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7 Phase I Selections from the 10.3 Solicitation

(In Topic Number Order)
Aerodyn Engineering Inc.
1919 S Girls School Rd
Indianapolis, IN 46241
Phone:
PI:
Topic#:
(317) 334-1523
Tom Lawrence
DLA10-001      Awarded: 4/25/2011
Title:Scale up of HVD parylene HT deposition process for economic continuous production of magnet wire
Abstract:The highest available operating temperature for magnet wire is 240°C. As electromagnetic performance is directly related to the density of winding turns times the operating current, the maximum operating temperature of magnet wire is the largest single constraint to advancements in high performance and high temperature electronics. It constrains advancements in aeronautics, automotive, turbines, power generation, down hole oil and gas electronics. In previous work an ideal super thin, gas impervious, pliable, high dielectric strength coating was found that is ideal for increasing the maximum operating temperature of magnet wire to 350°C. Unfortunately, its deposition process is not easily adapted for coating r continuous coating of long lengths of wire. Aerodyn formulated an innovative process and did a pilot run that demonstrated that it was possible to get 350°C magnet wire at about $1.50 a foot. This process is scalable to reduce the cost to about $0.015 a foot. Aerodyn has formulated additional innovational improvements which if successful could bring down the cost to approximately $0.01 per foot. This program seeks to take this process from its current TRL 4 level to a TRL 7 level in Phase I and to a TRL 9 level in phase II.

Coventry Associates, Inc.
1 Lynwood Lane
West Boylston, MA 01583
Phone:
PI:
Topic#:
(508) 835-9209
Craig Gardner
DLA10-001      Awarded: 4/20/2011
Title:Method for Improving Precision Grinding Quality and Productivity
Abstract:The objective of this proposal is to develop a self calibrating, low cost adaptive precision grinding system which provides real time workpiece taper and Scientific Measurement and Adaptive Response Techniques (SMART) control. This system incorporates the knowledge gained during the previous 20 plus years of research to make grinding a science rather than an art. Our approach utilizes a unique rotary table design which enables measurement of both the wheel angle and normal grinding force without the use of an instrumented grinding spindle.

Creare Incorported
16 Great Hollow Road
Hanover, NH 03755
Phone:
PI:
Topic#:
(603) 643-3800
Jay C. Rozzi, PhD
DLA10-001      Awarded: 6/1/2011
Title:Laser-Assisted Maching for PAC-3 Missle Radomes
Abstract:Structural ceramics are desirable for high-performance missile radomes due to their excellent strength-to-weight ratio and their ability to withstand high temperatures. Currently, the only way to machine silicon nitride to the tolerances and quality required involves a time- consuming and expensive diamond grinding process that can induce subsurface damage (SSD) into the part, requiring post-grinding destructive inspections. Our innovation is a novel Laser-Assisted Machining (LAM) system for the high-performance machining of radomes made from structural ceramics. Our novel processing technique uses a laser to preheat a thin layer of the ceramic material prior to its removal using conventional machine tools. Using the laser assist, the cutting forces during machining are reduced, which enables the production of high-quality, defect-free parts at processing speeds that are two orders of magnitude higher than high-speed grinding. During the Phase I project, we will assemble the LAM system, complete machining tests on relevant ceramic parts, and design the system for integration with our transition partner’s machine tool. During Phase II, we will complete the system design, integration, and testing to be followed by technology transition and commercialization.

Dynamet Technology, Inc.
Eight A Street
Burlington, MA 01803
Phone:
PI:
Topic#:
781) 272-5967
Harvey Fisher
DLA10-001      Awarded: 4/25/2011
Title:Affordable Titanium Alloy Fittings and Other Discrete Parts by Powder Metal Manufacturing technology
Abstract:The Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) procures significant quantities of Ti-6Al-4V hydraulic fittings in a wide range of types and sizes in maintaining legacy aircraft. These fittings are machined from forged preforms or, in the case of low volume procurement, are machined from wrought plate stock. The proposed technology is a radical departure from the current practice that can significantly lower unit costs of Ti-6Al-4V hydraulic fittings in low and high volume production thus helping DLA meet the challenge of reducing discrete-parts procurement costs while maintaining the readiness of fielded weapons systems. Dynamet Technology’s advanced powder metallurgical CHIP process involves cold isostatic pressing of blended powders, vacuum sintering and hot isostatic pressing to produce fully-dense, near-net shape titanium Ti-6Al-4V components, eliminating the need for forging. The Phase I program is aimed at demonstrating the potential to produce low-cost Ti-6Al-4V near net shape components for hydraulic fittings that meet product performance requirements for both existing and next generation systems and to quantify the potential cost savings to DLA. Phase I results will guide the development to be conducted in the Phase I Option, Phase II and will lay the groundwork for prototype manufacture of completed fittings and testing in a simulated environment.

Integran Technologies USA Inc.
2541 Appletree Dr
Pittsburgh, PA 15241
Phone:
PI:
Topic#:
(954) 328-3880
Edward Yokley
DLA10-001      Awarded: 4/8/2011
Title:NANOMETAL-POLYMER HYBRIDS FOR COMPLEX HIGH TEMPERATURE AEROSPACE COMPONENTS
Abstract:Integran USA (Pittsburgh, PA) is pleased to provide this proposal in response to the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Request for Proposal (RFP) DLA10-001) “Advanced Technologies for Discrete-Parts Manufacturing” to develop a manufacturing process for allowing the further use of polymers in high temperature aerospace components. The proposed solution consists of a hybrid material that combines injection molding of temperature resistant polymers such as PEEK, high temperature Nylons (HTN) and LCP with nanostructured metal (nanometal). The polymer offers the ability to mold complex shapes economically in volume to replace highly machined Aluminum parts while the nanometal provides additional strength, stiffness, temperature and surface properties. The proposed program seeks to evaluate the feasibility of using Nanometal reinforcement on PEEK, HTN and LCP polymers to fabricate complex, high temperature structural parts. Integran is a world leader in developing nanocrystalline materials with some of the first patents on nanometals from 1992. Integran has also developed expertise on combining its coatings with nylon based polymers to further replace metals. Integran USA has had many recent inquiries from the aerospace industry about using this technology with higher temperature polymers for metal replacement in demanding aerospace applications such as cascade thrust reversers, turbine stators and even fasteners. The successful execution of this Phase I initiative will provide initial mechanical property data, cost estimates and process limitations for the proposed solution. Comparisons will be made against incumbent technologies for comparable parts or against the performance of the polymer alone as the case dictates. Several lead applications will be discussed with customers to assess the impact of the improved benefits. A case study on the applicability of the concept to complex parts will be conducted with one of our support partners a Phase I option program.

Materials & Electrochemical Research (MER) Corp.
7960 S. Kolb Rd.
Tucson, AZ 85756
Phone:
PI:
Topic#:
(520) 574-1980
Roger Storm
DLA10-001      Awarded: 4/25/2011
Title:Rapid Additive Manufacturing of Very Low Cost 3-Dimensional Titanium Alloy Components
Abstract:The designers, manufacturers, and end users of metal components are finding limitations in the performance that can be achieved with conventional steel and super alloys. As a result, they are increasingly turning to titanium (Ti) alloys, which can provide a substantial increase in performance. However, for most applications the cost of Ti components is prohibitively high to be implemented. In the past few years, the cost of Ti alloy components has increased by ~2-3X. While the cost of Ti sponge powder has risen in recent years, it is still a small portion (e.g. <5%) of the final component cost. The predominant cause of the high cost of Ti components is the down stream processing costs to make a net shape component. This proposal will accomplish a dramatic reduction in the cost of finished Ti alloy components by demonstrating a new innovative low cost rapid manufacturing process that uses very low cost Ti sponge powder as the feedstock. The goal of this program is the demonstration of a single melt direct manufacturing process for near net shape 3-dimensional Ti-6-4 components resulting in a selling price under $10/lb. This process would be scaled up in a joint venture which is in review with a large US titanium manufacturer.

Nevada Composites, Inc.
Po Box 2174
Dayton, NV 89403
Phone:
PI:
Topic#:
(775) 246-5999
John Crowley
DLA10-001      Awarded: 4/25/2011
Title:Low-Cost Tooling as Enabling Technology for Drastic Cost Reductions of DLA Parts
Abstract:The ultimate objective of the work outlined in this proposal is to develop, demonstrate and commercialize a new technology for accurate, rapid, low-cost tooling for discreet parts manufacturing of high-performance composite components. This tooling results from a new tool-production process and is suitable for prototyping, repair, replacement and manufacturing of short-run but high unit-cost composite components. Applications include rotary and fixed-wing aircraft, ground vehicle systems, weapons and missiles. The tooling to be developed for and applied to discrete parts manufacture for DLA parts, as outlined in this proposal, will permit manufacture, repair and replacement of composite components at a very significant savings in both cost and time. Known as Green-Aero(SM) tooling, it is produced using a unique tool-forming approach that is not being used or developed by any other company. While not as yet developed for discrete parts manufacture, the tooling has been used successfully in several demonstration projects. The overall technical objective of Phase I is to examine the surface coatings, large-area tooling and integration with existing composites manufacturing, and to determine the opportunities that provide the greatest likelihood of improvements in cost reduction and rapid commercialization for development during the Phase II effort.