DoD STTR Program Phase I Awards for FY97

Army Awards

Navy Awards

Air Force Awards

DARPA Awards

BMDO Awards


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ADVANCED MODULAR POWER SYSTEMS
4667 Freedom Drive
Ann Arbor, MI 48108
(313) 677-4260

PI: Robert C. Svedberg
(313) 677-3027
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0006
UNIV. OF MICHIGAN
2300 Hayward Ave
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
(313) 764-6203

ID#: 96AFOT002
Agency: AF
Topic#: 96-001
Title: Low Cost, YAG and Mullite Fibers by Continuous Extrusion and Pyrolysis of Metal Carboxylate Precursors
Abstract:   We propose to develop low-cost, creep-stable, polycrystalline yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) and mullite (3Al203.2Si02) fibers (10-20 m dia.) for evaluation as reinforcement for advanced ceramic composites. The fibers will be produced by spinning optimized alkoxide and carboxylate metalloorganic precursors. The critical issues that must be resolved fall into three categories: 1) control of fiber mechanical properties (tensile strength, creep resistance, etc.); 2) production of commercial quantities of fibers, and 3) development of low-cost processes. Phase I studies will focus on producing 10s of meters of single tows of fibers/h of both mullite and YAG fibers. Phase II will scale-up studies to 100s of meters of multiple tows of fibers/h. Efforts will be made to develop interfacial coatings that these tows can be used to fabricate oxide/oxide (e.g. YAG/YAG) ceramic matrix composites. Finally, examples of oxide/oxide composites will be fabricated.The potential success of the proposed program hinges on the need for inexpensive precursors and processing methods. Two low-cost routes to spinnable aluminum carboxylate and silicon alkoxide precursors were recently discovered. In one instance the precursor source is boehmite and the other, fused silica. These spinnable precursors offer direct access to YAG and mullite fibers and matrices.

ALPHATECH, INC.
50 Mall Rd
Burlington, MA 01803
(617) 273-3388

PI: Ronald D. Chaney
(617) 273-3388
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0071
MIT LINCOLN LAB.
244 Wood Street
Lexington, MA 02173
(617) 981-7094

ID#: 97AFO-045
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-004
Title: Situation Awareness Based on Fusion of Data from Multiple Sources: Machine Learning of Semi-Augomatic Decision Aids
Abstract:   The prodigious amount of information provided by surveillance systems and other information sources has created unprecedented opportunities for achieving situation awareness. The central challenge is to develop systematic, efficient methods to assimilate all available information regarding the battlespace into a self consistent representation that is accessible to all users. At the heart of this assimilation are two complementary activities; information fusion and knowledge-base construction. Information fusion provides and internally consistent method for dynamically updating the estimated state of the battlespace as new information becomes available; knowledge bases provide a convenient, hierarchical framework to represent the state estimate. A particular challenge is to manage this flood of heterogeneous information for analysts who must interpret it. Semi-automatic decision aids that incorporate machine learning techniques offer the promise of reducing the burden on analysts by managing and optimizing information flow, shielding the analyst from system complexity, providing methods to give abstract feedback to the system, and potentially performing high-level reasoning tasks. ALPHATECH and MIT Lincoln Laboratory propose to combine ALPHATECH's situation awareness methodology and Lincoln Laboratory's machine learning techniques to develop semi-automatic decision aids for situation awareness.

APPLIED PULSED POWER TECHNOLOGIES
614 1/2 Narcissus Avenue
Corona Del Mar, CA 92625
(714) 640-5738

PI: Eusebio Garate
(714) 640-5738
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0067
UNIV. OF TENNESSEE
415 Communications Bldg
Knoxville, TN 37996
(423) 974-3466

ID#: 97AFO-012
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-002
Title: A DC Atmospheric Corona Discharge System For Sterilization and Chemical Neutralization
Abstract:   Decontamination of military equipment and facilities that have been exposed to deadly biological and/or chemical warfare agents is of critical concern to U.S. Armed Forces. These agents include mustard, VX and sarin. Elimination of these agents is required on the battlefield, as well as in chemical agent production, storage and destruction sites. Conventional technologies used for decontamination and sterilization suffer from drawbacks that include toxic by-products, radiation hazards to personnel, and very long time scales for the decontamination process to be effective even over small areas. The objective of our effort is to develop a processing technology based on Dc atmospheric corona discharges that can sterilize biologically contaminated objects and that can neutralize various chemical warfare agents. In Phase I we will use a high density plasma, DC atmospheric corona discharge system to neutralize chemical warfare simulants and sterilize surfaces contaminated with bacteria like E-Coli. We will study the decomposition chemistry, by-product formation and electrical energy consumption of the system and correlate this information with the decomposition rate of the simulants. Standard characterization techniques for determining the composition of the processed gaseous and liquid effluents, like gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, will be used.

APR CONSULTANTS, INC.
27 OAKLAWN
MEDWAY, OH 45341
(937) 849-6795

PI: MR TONY GERARDI
(937) 849-6795
Contract #: F33615-97-C-3214
UNIV. OF DAYTON
300 COLLEGE PK
Dayton, OH 45469
(937) 229-4482

ID#: 97WFI-002
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-007
Title: A Practical Method for Aircraft Life Enhancement
Abstract:   Aircraft life enhancement is of prime importance in an era of reduced budgets. More and More emphasis is being placed on safely extending the life of existing aircraft and their subsystems. This proposal offers a concept to reduce the fatigu damage incurred on an aircraft by reducing the ground loads it is exposed to. Aircraft fatigue life is based in part on the number of ground-air-ground (GAG) cycles it is expected to endure during its life. Generally, the dynamic loads induced into the aircraft due to runway roughness are factored in as well. It is not uncommon for these dynamic loads to add another half a "g" to the ground part of the GAG cycle. Over time, this could accumulate significant fatigue damage to the aircraft's primary structure as well as subsystems such as the landing gear. Damage due to runway and taxiway roughness is amplified when the aircraft is heavy. These dynmamic loads can be significantly reduced by simply increasing the landing gear strut precharge pressure. The purpose of this effort is to investigate the feasibility of modifying strut precharge pressure for aircraft life enhancement.

CC TECHNOLOGIES LABORATORIES, INC.
6141 AVERY RD
DUBLIN, OH 43016
(614) 761-1214

PI: MR NEIL G THOMPSON
(614) 761-1214
Contract #: F33615-97-C-3215
OHIO STATE UNIV.
1960 KENNY RD
COLUMBUS, OH 43214
(614) 292-8671

ID#: 97WFI-009
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-007
Title: Development of a Mathematica Model to Predict Cracking in Corroded Aircraft Structures
Abstract:   A significant number of commercial and military aircraft has reached or exceeded their original design life, and fleet surveys have indicated that corrosion is a major problem and is increasing with the fleet's age. Of specific importance is the effect of preexisting corrosion on fatigue crack nucleation and growth. The proposed program is to develop a computer code module to predict the nucleation of fatigue cracks from preexisting corrosion films. The module will be made suitable for integration with existing deterministic and probablistic computer programs, as well as advanced life extension techniques. In Phase I of the program, a model will be built to predict the fatigue crack growth nucleation from pits in typical aircraft aluminum alloys. The model will be based on actual pit geometries and a novel hybrid finite element method developed at the Ohio State University (OSU). Using the model, the stress distribution around surface flaws and incipient cracks can be calculated and possible fatigue nucleation sites can be predicted. The accuracy of the numerical prediction of fatigue crack nucleation will be tested experimentally at the conclusion of the Phase I work, and a plan will be presented to expand the predictive model to other forms of corrosion and integrate the model into existing Air Force deterministic and probalistic computer codes.

CONTAINERLESS RESEARCH, INC.
906 University Place
Evanston, IL 60201
(847) 467-2678

PI: Richard Weber
(847) 467-2678
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0003
UNIV. OF ILLINOIS
Dept. of Materials Science 105 South Goo
Urbana, IL 61801
(217) 333-2186

ID#: 96AFOT003
Agency: AF
Topic#: 96-001
Title: Advanced Oxide Fibers and Coatings for High Temperature Composite Materials Applications
Abstract:   The project goal is to develop oxide composite systems for use in high temperature applications. The project team is CRI who are expert in oxide fiber synthesis and market development and Professor W.M. Kriven and scientists from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) who are expert in fiber coating, characterization and composites testing. Prior work by this team has shown that (i) strong oxide fibers can be economically made from various materials by drawing from undercooled molten oxides, (ii) interphase weakening coatings can be deposited on the fibers by pulsed excimer laser ablation (PELA), and (iii) the coated fibers exhibit low debonding shear strengths when imbedded in an oxide matrix. These results strongly indicate that tough oxidation resistant composite materials for high temperature service can be developed by applying the capabilities available at URUC and CRI. The proposed STM would apply these capabilities to further develop these technologies and create the science basis for transferring it to the marketplace. Phase I will be used to optimize fiber growth and coating processes, and to characterize the performance of coated fibers in oxide matrices. Phase II will emphasize R&D to establish new, tough, and oxidation resistant composite materials for very high temperature applications.

CORNERSTONE RESEARCH GROUP, INC.
102 Shelford Way
Beavercreek, OH 45440
(937) 320-1877

PI: Patrick J. Hood
(937) 320-1877
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0058
UNIV. OF ROCHESTER
Center for Optoelectronics & Imaging 240
Rochester, NY 14623-1212
(716) 275-0909

ID#: 97AFO-023
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-003
Title: Glass-Forming Liquid Crystals for Photonic Devices
Abstract:   Because of the spontaneous molecular self-assembly into various mesophases and the associated optical anisotropy, liquid crystals have found numerous optical and photonic applications. In addition to active devices, liquid crystal in solid films can be employed as passive devices for which no switching is required. In applications involving solid films, liquid crystals that can be vitrified with an elevated glass transition temperature Tg, offer long-term mesomorphic stability and environmental durability.The objective of this research effort is to demonstrate the feasibility of active and passive photonic devices based on glass-forming liquid crystalline materials. This relatively new class of materials has several unique properties, of which the ability to "freeze" in a specific optical activity and large birefringence enable some unique device design opportunities. The specific objectives of this program include:1) the preparation of nematic glass-forming liquid crystals materials and thin films 2) the experimental determination of the kinetics of defect formation and annihilation; 3) the identification of photonic devices which can utilize this class of materials; 4) the fabrication of transmissive and reflective liquid crystal cells in various configurations; and 5) the investigation of electronic drive mechanisms for heating and switching glass-forming liquid crystals in situ.

CORONA CATALYSIS CORP.
3200 George Washington Way
Richland, WA 99352
(509) 375-3365

PI: Joseph Birmingham
(509) 375-3365
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0057
BATTELLE COLUMBUS OPERATIONS
505 King Avenue
Columbus, OH 43201
(614) 424-7068

ID#: 97AFO-016
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-002
Title: Corona Discharge Plasma Reactor for Decontamination
Abstract:   The objective of this Phase I project is to demonstrate the use of the low temperature, ambient pressure, Corona Discharge Plasma Reactor (CDPR), which generates photons, electrons, ionized molecules and other active species, to decontaminate materials exposed to toxic chemical and biological contaminants. The proposal is focused on proving the feasibility of using the CDPR to provide rapid sterilization of contaminated materials without damaging the materials or producing hazardous by-products.In laboratory tests, the CDPR technology has already been used to demonstrate 1) the decomposition of chemicals, i.e. phosgene, cyanogen chloride, nerve agent, and benzene; and 2) the deactivation and decomposition of biological aerosol/particulate challenges, i.e. Bacillus globigii spores (a heat resistant simulant for biological warfare and pathogenic waste incinerators) and T-2 mycotoxin.We will assess the feasibility of two different system configurations--a plasma chamber in which materials can be placed for decontamination, and a hand held plasma flare which can be used to "spray" the ionized plasma gases for decontamination of larger materials. Our devices will be designed for low power consumption and field portability as well as high destruction rates and efficiency. We will fabricate and test a prototype device using targeted chemical and biological simulants. The treated material will then be analyzed to determine the system's destruction efficiency thus establishing the feasibility of the CDPR for military applications. A model of the plasma processes will be further developed as a result of this work.

CSA ENGINEERING, INC.
2850 W. Bayshore Road
Palo Alto, CA 94303
(415) 494-7351

PI: Brad Allen
(415) 494-7351
Contract #: F33615-97-C-2777
UNIV. OF DAYTON RESEARCH INSTITUTE
300 College Park
Dayton, OH 45469
(937) 229-2919

ID#: 97WPO-009
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-009
Title: Centrifugally Loaded Particle Damping
Abstract:    CSA Engineering with the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI), propose to develop and validate a design method for implementing particle damping in gas turbine engine blades. The overall program objective is to develop a robust design method to apply particle damping for mitigation of high-cycle fatigue failures of engine blades. The objectives of the Phase I effort are to determine: 1) if particle dampers will function in high centrifugal load environments, and 2) determine if a design method can be developed to predict blade damping effectiveness. The CSA/UDRI team proposes to leverage off an existing SBIR program which is developing a particle damping design methd for non-rotating, high temperature applications. A particle damper parameter characterization test procedure will be developed to investigate the influence of compaction on particles. Also, an analytical procedure which utilizes this parameter characterization test data will be performed on an undamped and damped blade-like structure. Results from this spin pit testing will provide guidance for defining th appropriate Phase II program to complete the overall program objectives. To ensure relevance to the engine community, our team has support from both Pratt & Whitney and AlliedSignal. Benefits: Particle damping is an attractive damping approach centrifugally loaded, high temperature applicatons because it is completely passive, self-contained, will funtion in high temperatures, and will not degrade over time. With a design method developed for particle damper implementation in centrifugal environments, this technology will likely prove to be very useful in reducing high-cycle fatigue failures of gas turbine eingine blades. Other extreme environment applications have been identified, including electric power turbines and the Reusable Launch Vehicle.

EIC LABORATORIES, INC.
111 Downey Street
Norwood, MA 02062
(617) 769-9450

PI: Kevin M. Spencer
(617) 769-9450
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0055
CARNEGIE MELLON UNIV.
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 268-8746

ID#: 97AFO-040
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-003
Title: Regioregular Nonlinear Optical Polymers
Abstract:   Photonic materials with alight intensity dependent refractive index have numerous applications within military systems, including optical limiting, all-optical switching and laser frequency conversion. Materials which show this property have a high value of the third order nonlinear optical coefficient or x(3). Hyperconjugated organic polymers have shown considerable promise in this regard. It is the goal of this program to produce improved x(3) polymers by controlling self-assembly of conjugated polymers. This will be achieved by employing synthetic methods recently developed at Carnegie Mellon leading to regioregular polymers that self assemble into extended planar domains. This approach improves both intramolecular and intermolecular conjugation. Processing of these materials will be addressed by employing new star structure geometries for conjugated chains under development at EIC. Preliminary results show that conjugated polymers of superior optical quality may be prepared from these star polymers in thicknesses sufficient for waveguide fabrication. Phase I will entail synthesis of regioregular versions of two "standard" x(3) polymers in both linear and star structures and their evaluation by third harmonic generation. A Phase I goal is >20% improvement in x(3) over nonregioregular analogs.

ENVIRONMENTAL ELEMENTS CORP.
3700 Koppers Street
Baltimore, MD 21227
(410) 368-7239

PI: Dennis J. Helfritch
(410) 368-7275
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0069
UNIV. OF TENNESSEE
404 Andy Holt Tower
Knoxville, TN 37996
(423) 974-3466

ID#: 97AFO-009
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-002
Title: Decontamination and Sterilization of Surfaces by Means of a One Atmosphere Uniform Glow discharge Plasma
Abstract:   Decontamination of surfaces that have been exposed to biological or chemical agents must be accomplished quickly under battlefield conditions. Extensive time periods for biological and chemical decontamination can result in long periods of equipment inaccessibility which negatively affects quick response forces. A simple fast-acting, and safe method for equipment decontamination would minimize equipment downtime and minimize the number of personnel needed. It has been demonstrated that exposure of chemicals and microorganisms to gas discharge plasmas leads to their destruction. In particular, the One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP) has been shown to completely destroy microbial agents in a time frame of tens of seconds. It has similarly been shown to remove surface films, such as photoresist and machine oil, from solid surfaces.The objective of this proposed work will be to demonstrate that the OAUGDP can be an effective portable unit capable of battlefield chemical and biological decontamination. Simulants of chemical and biological agents coating surfaces mimicing military equipment will be exposed to the OAUGDP under various operating parameters. Power levels and exposure times will be the principal variables. The operating conditions needed for complete agent destruction will then be determined and used for the design of a commercial unit.

F&S, INC.
P.O. Box 11704
Blacksburg, VA 24062-1704
(540) 953-4274

PI: Michael Miller
(540) 953-4267
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0047
VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INST. & STATE UNIV.
301 Burruss Hall
Blacksburg, VA 24062-1704
(540) 231-5281

ID#: 97AFO-027
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-003
Title: Ioni Self Assembled Monolayer (ISAM) Nonlinear Optical Thin Films and Devices
Abstract:   Revolutionary ISAM methods of creating multifunctional thin-films monolayer by monolayer have been proven to yield self-assembled, noncentrosymmetric structures that possess remarkable large x(2) second order nonlinear optical response. Exciting recent work at Virginia Tech has shown that the ionic nature of the deposition process results in a polar ordering of organic second order nonlinear chromophores that exhibits inherent long-term stability, in contrast to nonlinear optical pled polymers. ISAM nonlinear optical thin-films offer additional major advantages of excellent homogeneity for low scattering loss, high thermal and chemical stability, simplicity and low-cost. ISAM films greater than 10 um thick can be produced with excellent uniformity which can be patterned to yield channel waveguides and other device structures. This novel approach to the development of second order nonlinear optical materials avoids the cost and difficulties of inorganic crystal growth (e.g. LiNb03) as well as the large electric fields and subsequent decay of x(2) inherent in poled polymers. F&S has licensed the enabling Virginia Tech patent for ISAM materials processing, and would work with Virginia Tech ISAM and nonlinear optical materials researchers to rapidly transition recent laboratory results to prototype device products.

FAST MATHEMATICAL ALGORITHMS & HARDWARE
1020 Sherman Avenue
Hamden, CT 06514
(203) 248-8212

PI: Paolo Barbano
(203) 248-8212
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0052
YALE UNIV.
12 Prospect Place
New Haven, CT 65113-5160
(203) 432-2460

ID#: 97AFO-001
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-001
Title: High Frequency Electromagnetic Propagation/Scattering Codes
Abstract:   During the last several years, two new classes of methods have been developed for the solution of scattering problems, the Fast Multipole Method and the Localized cosine Transform. In their current forms, both approaches can be viewed as analytical techniques for the design of numerical methods for the solution of the Helmholtz equation; to our knowledge they have not been used as an asymptotic tool. On the other hand, the examination of the formulae for the translation operators for the Helmholtz equation indicates that their high-frequency expansions in this environment, in the form of numerical corrections. We propose to construct efficient numerical techniques for the solution of large-scale scattering problems based on such asysptotic analysis, and to apply these techniques to the modeling low-observable bodies and with Automatic Target Recognition. Unlike the existing Fast Multipole Methods, these techniques are not convergent schemes, but rather asymptotic ones, not unlike the GTD; on the other hand, we expect them to be much more efficient than the FMM and related methods, especially for large-scale problems.

GASL, INC.
77 RAYNOR AVE
RONKONKOMA, NY 11779
(516) 737-9862

PI: MR THOMAS R LEPORE
(516) 737-9862
Contract #: F33615-97-C-3006
UNIV. OF DAYTON
300 COLLEGE PARK
DAYTON, OH 45469-0101
(937) 229-2919

ID#: 97WFI-011
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-007
Title: Advanced Hypersonic Cruise Missile Concept
Abstract:   Feasibility of an advanced cruis missile concept will be evaluated. The proposed concept is based on integration of a storable fuel, dual-mode, ram-scramjet entine with a parasol-winged airframe designed for a Mach 8 cruise mission. The parasl wing is a form of wave rider which retains the conventional ogival-cylinder configuration of the missile body. Increases in lift-drag ration of 25% have been previously demonstrated experimentally (by this contractor) for this type configurtion in the Mach 3 to 5 range, as compared to conventional wing performance. The ogival-cylinder body configuration is highly advantageous for packing avionics, fuel and payload, as compared to other wave rider concepts which have highly blended wing-body configurations. On-going work on development of storable fuel, dual mode, ram-scramject engines with Mach 8 capability enables integration of realistic, non-circular engine flowpath configurations with the parasol wing in a manner which avoids the prior use of pylon mounts. CFD methods also permit evaluation of nonlinear flow interference and engine-airframe interaction effects not previously considered. The proposed Phase I effort will include development of a preliminary design, including engine-airframe integration, evaluation of aerodynamic and aerothermal loads at cruise and at selected off-design conditions and preliminary evaluation of mission performance.

GENERAL THERMAL, INC.
2555 Cannon Ave
Chattanooga, TN 37404
(423) 698-0948

PI: Mounir Laroussi
(423) 974-5866
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0074
THE UNIV. OF TENNESSEE
404 Andy Holt Tower
Knoxville, TN 37996
(423) 974-3466

ID#: 97AFO-007
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-002
Title: Sterilization and Decontamination of Matter with a One Atmospheric Glow Discharge
Abstract:   The sterilization and decontamination of matter plays a very important, and sometimes vital, role in various industrial processes, and health-related applications. In many civilian and military situations, the capability to sterilize tools, liquids, foods, etc., in a rapid and effective way, could make the difference between life and death. In this context, we propose to design, build, and test a sterilization/decontamination device which out performs existing methods, in terms of effectiveness, speed, and safety. Our method is based on the generation of a uniform glow discharge at atmospheric pressure. This discharge plasma is generated by low frequency R.F. power, applied between two insulated plate electrodes. This plasma is a source of active free-radicals, charged particles, and U.V. radiation. These agents interact with microorganisms at the atomic and molecular levels, and induce lethal chemical changes in the cells. Total sterilization can be achieved in few seconds to few minutes. Since the plasma power density is relatively low, no damage occurs to the supporting medium where the unwanted microorganisms live.

INNOVATIVE SCIENTIFIC SOLUTIONS, INC.
3845 WOODHURST COURT
BEAVERCREEK, OH 45430
(937) 252-2706

PI: DR LARRY P GOSS
(937) 252-2706
Contract #: F33615-97-C-3005
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECH.
77 Massachusetts Ave.
CAMBRIDGE, MA 02139
(617) 253-5537

ID#: 97WFI-014
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-007
Title: Development and Application of an Advanced Optical Based Pressure Instrument for Low-Speed Flows
Abstract:   The proposed STTR program targets the development and application of advanced optical-based pressure instrumentation for low-speed (M less than 0.2) flows. The program is carefully designed for reakization of significant improvements in current pressure-paint technology. Improvements in both the pressure paints and the instrumentation for recording surface-pressure distributions will be investigated. In particular, pressure paints designed specifically for low subsonic applications will be developed. This requires an increase in paint high-pressure sensitivity (at 1 atm.), and a reduction in paint temperature sensitivity (at 1 atm.), and a reduction in paint temperature sensitivity. Instrumentation improvements will be focused on problems associated with model movement, paint uniformity, and photo-degradation. The data obtained from this instrumentation will eliminate the need for costly pressure transducers and provide continous surface-pressure measurement of models under the low-speed flows of interest.

INTEGRATED COMPOSTIES, INC.
741 Neeson Road
Marina, CA 93933
(408) 883-3360

PI: Joe R. Johnson
(408) 883-3360
Contract #: F33615-97-C-5142
CALIFORNIA POLYTECHNIC STATE UNIV.

San Luis Obispo, CA 93407
(805) 756-1334

ID#: 97WMT-028
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-008
Title: Affordable Tooling for Composite Structures
Abstract:   The processing of advanced composite components requires tooling that will perform during high temperature and pressure cycles. During these cycles, the tooling must exhibit little or no dimensional movement, retain vacuum, and be of low enough density so as not to become a source of excessive thermal gradients. Typically, a nickel alloy such as INVAR is used and will meet many of these requirements. However, its cost and delivery can be a source of concern, especially where low production numbers are anticipated. By developing a new tooling system based on existing reinforced polymer technology and new ceramic/polymer mass cast monlithic structures, all of the above desireable characteristics can be provided with far lower cost and delivery. Additionally, this type of system would offer uniform construction methods, unique business practices, and the potential for a new industrial base for advanced composite tooling systems. These systems could free the prime airframe manufacturers from the design, fabrication, maintenance, and ultimate storage of such tools.

INTEGRATED MICRO INSTRUMENTS
35617 Pond Drive
Fremont, CA 94536
(510) 792-9249

PI: Mark A. Lemkin
(510) 792-9249
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0075
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY
336 Sproul Hall #5940
Berkeley, CA 94720-5940
(510) 642-8120

ID#: 97AFO-047
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-005
Title: Micro-IMU for Navigation and Optical Pointing
Abstract:    The Air Force has an unfulfilled need for a high performance, miniature inertial measurement unit (IMU) which facilitates optical pointing and navigation. Macroscopic technology fails to deliver miniature size, while present micromachining technology fails to deliver adequate drift and noise performance. Integrated Micro Instruments proposed to manufacture a micro-IMU by micromaching novel sensors providing both miniaturization and performance. Integrated Micro Instruments was formed from the core DARPA-sponsored Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center (BSAC) design team which produced some of the first integrated microaccelerometers and gyroscopes. This work has resulted in a medium performance micro-IMU with signal processing on a thumb nail sized silicon chip. These proven sensor architectures will be combined with a deep trench micromachining technology developed at BSAC for high performance. The extremely thick structures will dramatically increase sensitivity and hence improve cancellation. Integrating circuits with these sensors will allow drift cancellation, exceptional miniaturization, and digital output. The goal of Phase I is to prove that micromaching can produce a micro-IMU 2 inches on a side which improves optical platform pointing accuracy. Full mechanical sensor and electrical circuit design plus mechanical structure prototypes will verify feasibility and allow fully functional versions to be rapidly fabricated in Phase II.

INTERNATIONAL ECOSCIENCE, INC.
201 E. Sandpointe Ave Ste 400
Santa Ana, CA 92707
(714) 434-7335

PI: Vladimir Oliker
(714) 434-7335
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0062
UNIV. OF TENNESSEE
404 Andy Holt Tower
Knoxville, TN 37996
(423) 974-2465

ID#: 97AFO-006
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-002
Title: Utilizing a One-Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma for Biological/Chemical Agent Sterilization/Decontamination
Abstract:   An innovative approach to the decontamination of biological and/or chemical warfare agents is proposed. This recently developed technology involved utilizing a one atmosphere uniform glow discharge plasma (OAUGDP) as the sterilant/decontaminant. Initial laboratory results indicate a greater than six log kill of bacteria in under one minute. In addition, the highly ionizing nature of the plasma discharge is expected to quickly degrade chemical agents through energetic bond breaking mechanisms. International EcoScience, Inc. (IES), supported by the University of Tennessee, proposed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the OAUGDP technique on a selected number of stimulants for the biological/chemical agents on selected porous and non-porous surfaces. Concurrently, a comprehensive plan will be prepared detailing how to (1) make the system field compatible, (2) test the effectiveness of the system against a full spectrum of military significant chemical and biological agents, and (3) optimize the system for battlefield use. The benefits for military and commercial applications are significant; they include decontamination of military devices, both USA and allies, hospital use to control virulent organisms, and sterilization of surgical instruments.

LOS GATOS RESEARCH
1685 Plymouth St., Suite 100
Mountain View, CA 94043
(415) 965-7772

PI: Pajo Vujkovic-Cvijin
(415) 965-7772
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0059
WASHINGTON STATE UNIV.
Department of Physics
Pullman, WA 99164-3140
(509) 335-9661

ID#: 97AFO-035
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-003
Title: Nonlinear Optical Polymer Thin Film for the Inspection of Sub-Micrometer Electronic Circuits
Abstract:   A novel diagnostic instrument for reliability studies and failure analysis of microelectronic integrated circuits is proposed. The instrument combines recent advances in nonlinear optics of thin-film polymers with those of near-field optical microscopy. The capability of the technique to measure the electric field generated by a sub-micrometer size integrated electronic circuit will be demonstrated. Spatial resolution of the order of tens of nanometers, and temporal resolution of the order of hundred femtoseconds is feasible. The technique allows circuit testing in a completely noninvasive mode, making it possible to diagnose an operational integrated circuit with virtually no external disturbance.

MATERIALS & ELECTROCHEMICAL RESEARCH
7960 S. Kolb Rd.
Tucson, AZ 85706
(520) 574-1980

PI: Dr. W. Kowbel
(520) 574-1980
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0005
BOSTON UNIVERSITY
25 Buick Street
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 353-4365

ID#: 96AFOT004
Agency: AF
Topic#: 96-001
Title: Low Cost CVD Mullite Fibers
Abstract:   Oxide fibers offer a potential to overcome the limitations of SiC fibers. The incorporation of oxide fibers into oxide matrices is expected to result in environmentally stable oxide-oxide composites. In addition, a possible use of oxide interfacial coatings facilitates oxidation resistant pure oxide composite systems.Poor creep resistance and high cost of currently available oxide fibers greatly hinders con-Lmercial applications of oxide-oxide composites. This proposal offers a unique way of producing low cost, creep resisant mullite fibers. It builds on the accomplishments of MER on the CVR SiC fibers and in-situ fiber spreading as well as Boston University's experience with CVD mullite. It proposes to use low cost, small diameter CVR SiC fibers as a core followed up by the in-situ spreading and CVD mullite deposition. The resulting mullite fibers are expected to exhibit tensile strength of about 3 GPa combined with good creep resistance up to 1500C. The projected cost of this new mullite fiber is in the 36 to $150 range.

MATIS, INC.
1565 Adelia Place
Atlanta, GA 30329
(404) 248-9926

PI: Vladimir Oliker
(404) 248-9926
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0070
UCLA
10945 Le Conte Ave #1401 Peter Ueberroth
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1406
(310) 825-0697

ID#: 97AFO-002
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-001
Title: High Frequency Electromagnetic Propagation/Scattering Codes
Abstract:   The purpose of this work is to develop further our new geometric and numerical techniques for high frequency electromagnetic propagation/scattering calculations. These techniques are based on novel approaches to ray tracing via direct geometric methods and nonlinear partial differential equations. The new computational schemes will be used for calculation of the required geometric data, for calculation of scattering in the shadow region and elsewhere, for determination of multivalued solutions accounting for ray crossing, etc. The new techniques will be implemented into a prototype code capable of performing the calculations on fully realistic aircraft models.

MAXUS STRATEGIC SYSTEMS, INC.
610 River St
Hoboken, NJ 07030
(201) 963-3554

PI: Paul Marshall
(201) 963-3554
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0004
ADVANCED TELECOM INST/SIT
Castle Point on Hudson
Hoboken, NJ 07030
(201) 216-8014

ID#: 97AFO-042
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-004
Title: A Situation Awareness Visualization System
Abstract:   Knowledge is today's most valuable resource. The Information Age has unleashed strategic imperatives for knowledge tools capable of managing information overload-too much information arriving too fast for the brain to absorb unassisted. Unless presented effectively, a deluge of data will obscure the vantage point which topsight-a central understanding of the 'big picture'-requires.METAPHOR MIXER, the Principal Investigator's patent-pending information fusion and visualization technology, renders information into knowledge and understanding by taking advantage of people's visual smarts: resulting in better decision making and situation awareness. As Clausewitz observed, "Knowledge must be so absorbed into the mind that it almost ceases to exist in a separate, objective way." METAPHORE MIXER excels at visualizing large, multivariate databases. It graphically depicts vast amounts of real-time information as data terrains: dynamic, visual icons populating a spatially structured three dimensional space. The resulting visual grammar communicates visual, auditory and interactive cues through an immersive user interface. METAPHOR MIXER implementations allow users to configure real time information from many sources and enables decision makers to identify and select data items, navigate the data terrain and spot emerging patterns and anomalies.As part of this effort, the Advanced Telecommunications Institute of Stevens Institute of Technology will develop semi-automated reasoning tools, including information fusion, filtering and verification tools as well as intelligent agents, for advanced cueing of threat and target detection. These cognitive enhancement components will provide an intelligent push-pull of command and control data.

METROLASER, INC.
18006 Skypark Circle, Ste. 108
Irvine, CA 92614
(714) 553-0688

PI: Jeffery Segall, Phd
(714) 553-0688
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0051
UNIV. OF ARIZONA
1630 E University
Tucson, AZ 85721-0094
(520) 621-3513

ID#: 97AFO-034
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-003
Title: Novel Organic Polymer Films for Real-Time Holographic Signal Processing
Abstract:   This proposal is to develop and commercialize new technologies based on state of the art photorefractive organic polymer films recently developed at the U. of Arizona. These novel polymer films make it possible to build an optical device that can perform fast, high resolution, whole field (imaged), profile measurements of three-dimensional (3D) objects. The quantitative 3D measurement system has numerous commercial applications in the aerospace, manufacturing and medical industries. The phase I study will fabricate custom polymer materials, demonstrate feasibility of the measurement system, and solidify a commercialization plan. Phase II research will optimize the polymer materials for this application and build a prototype measurement system. The proposed measurement system has many commercially viable applications including: non-destructive inspection of wear on critical machinery, automated 3-D manufacturing inspection, integrated with CAD/CAM for automated reproduction of complex shapes, and measurement of physical feature for medical applications.

MONTEC ASSOC., INC.
P.O. Box 4182; 1850 Four Mile Vue Road
Butte, MT 59702
(406) 494-5555

PI: Lawrence C. Farrar
(406) 494-5555
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0076
TEXAS TECH UNIV.
Office of Research Services, 203 Holden
Lubbock, TX 79409-1035
(806) 742-3884

ID#: 97AFO-008
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-002
Title: Plasma Destruction of Battlefield Chermical and Biological Warfare Agents
Abstract:   The innovative application of plasma is proposed for the destruction of deadly chemical and biological warfare agents. The technology approach consists of employing an electric arc to establish a plasma forming gas to efficiently heat a plume used to kill the harmful agents. The proposed approach will result in t heir rapid destruction, e.g., within a few seconds. The Phase I objective is to demonstrate that the technology can effectively destroy surrogate chemical and biological warfare agents. In Phase I will evaluate three different plasmas for their effectiveness to destroy harmful agents and establish durability of the plasma arcjet technology for this application. The approaches to be evaluated are a nitrogen plasma, an air plasma and a novel water plasma arcjet. The Phase II project will result in a prototype system suitable for field application of the proposed technology. Anticipated benefits include the development of an effective system that will allow rapid and effective decontamination of surfaces that have been contaminated with chemical and biological warfare agents. No harmful byproducts will be produced.

OPTIVISION, INC.
3450 Hilview Avenue
Palo Alto, CA 94304
(415) 855-0220

PI: Richard a. Hill
(415) 855-0225
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0060
NORTHEASTERN UNIV.
423 Lake Hall/360 Huntington Ave
boston, MA 02115
(617) 373-4587

ID#: 97AFO-036
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-003
Title: Development of Highly Active Electro-Optic Polymers for In-Line Fiber Photonic Devices
Abstract:   Polymeric in-line fiber (PILF) devices open up a new region of parameter space for electro-optic (EO) polymer materials development. The PILF device structure incorporates a short, controllable interaction length with the EO polymer which makes it possible to tolerate absorption losses as high as 100 dB/cm and take advantage of resonant enhancement to greatly boost the achievable EO response. Optivision and Northeastern University, with the University of California, Davis as a key collaborator, propose to develop novel high-temperature-stable, highly active EO polymer materials with properties optimized for PILF device applications. The effort will take advantage of established Optivision expertise in PILF device design and testing, Northeastern University expertise in the synthesis of EO chromophores and polymers, and University of California, Davis expertise in EO polymer processing and characterization. In the proposed effort, we will investigate: (1) processing and characterization methodologies for the subject EO chromophores and polymers; (2) device level testing of the developed EO polymers using PILF structures; (3) highly active nonlinear optical chromophores; (4) synthetic strategies for production of novel high-temperature-stable, highly active EO polymers during Phase II; and (5) high level design of a particular PILF device to be built during Phase II.

PACIFIC WAVE INDUSTRIES, INC.
10911 Weyburn Avenue Ste 222
Los Angeles, CA 90024
(310) 209-0777

PI: Boris Tsap
(310) 209-0777
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0064
UNIV. OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
Dept of Contracts/Grants; University Par
Los Angeles, CA 90089-1147
(213) 740-7762

ID#: 97AFO-031
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-003
Title: New Directions in Nonlinear Materials for Electro-optic Devices
Abstract:   The University of Southern California (USC) and Pacific Wave Industries propose a systematic attempt at integration of chromophores with large first hyperpolarizabilities into optical quality thin films characterized by optimized electro-optic coefficients. This will be accomplished by the design and synthesis of optic activity due to centric ordering under the influence of London forces. Initial derivatization of chromophores should also improve compatibility with conventional spin casting solvents so that high optical quality films can be achieved by spin casting. Modification of both chromophores and crosslinking reagents will reduce chromophore migration and phase separation under electric field poling and thus should lead to reduced poling-induced optical loss. In this highly interactive program these new materials will be extensively measured for their nonlinearities, optical losses, and thermal properties. The goal will be to define new directions for the next generation of commercial ultrahigh frequency devices.

PD-LD, INC.
243 Wall Street
Princeton, NJ 08540
(609) 924-7979

PI: Vladimir S. Ban
(609) 924-7979
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0066
PRINCETON UNIV.
Engineering Quadrangle
Princeton, NJ 08540
(609) 258-3090

ID#: 97AFO-028
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-003
Title: Self Assembly of Highly Non-Linear Organic Films Grown by a New Method: Organic Chemical Beam Deposition
Abstract:   In this proposal, we describe a newly invented growth method for depositing thin films of highly nonlinear organic films such as DAST. The new method called Organic Chemical Beam Deposition (OCBD) had numerous advantages, among them: i. independent regulation of input paressures of reactants; ii. growth at reduced pressures, fro better tckness and uniformity control iii. sharper interfaces between subsequent layers led doping of films We also discuss the use of specially treated substrates, which promote self-assembly of grown films. The ultimate goal is to produce optical quality NLO organic films suitable for the production of high performance fiber optic modulators, which our company intends to manufacture. The team in this effort will be lead by Professor Stephen R. Forrest, Director, ATC/POEM, Professor Jeffrey Schwartz, Chemistry Department, Princeton University and Dr. Vladimir S. Ban, President,PD-LD Inc., Princeton, New Jersey.

PLASMION CORP.
50 Harrison Street
Hoboken, NJ 07030
(201) 963-5450

PI: Steven I. Kim
(201) 963-5450
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0073
STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECH.
Castle Point Station
Hoboken, NJ 07030
(201) 216-5229

ID#: 97AFO-014
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-002
Title: A DC Steady Current Atmospheric Pressure Discharge for Battlefield Chem/Bio Decontamination
Abstract:   Recently several researchers demonstrated the feasibility of high (atmospheric) pressure glow discharge (HPG) for various practical applications. However, most of them is utilizing high voltage pulse (>5kV rms), which is not desirable in practical applications for many reasons. Kunhardt et al at Stevens Institute of Technology has invented a novel mechanism to generate a stable HPG discharge. The basis of this approach is the suppression of the glow-to-arc transition instability by creating a self-stabilizing cathode fall and thereby preventing the formation of a cathode spot. This is achieved simply by placing a perforated thin dielectric on the cathode surface. Due to the unique current limiting mechanism of a micro-channel, one can actually maintain the discharge in a DC steady current mode. Thus, the reactive radicals and ions would be much more power effective for decontamination. In the is Phase I, we will investigate the application of mechanically perforated dielectric disk or film stabilizing DC discharges. The bacterium Bacillus subtilis will be used as an indicator of the efficacy of the plasma. Mobile powered supply electronics will be designed for field-portability. In Phase II, prototype field-portable atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma decontamination system will be fabricated and demonstrate the full capability of decontamination against realistic bio/chemical warfare agent.

PRODUCTION PRODUCTS MANUFACUTRING & SALE
1285 Dunn Road
St. Louis, MO 63138
(314) 868-3500

PI: Kelli Corona-Bittick
(314) 868-3500
Contract #: F33615-97-C-5144
SOUTHERN RESEARCH INST.
757 Tom Martin Drive
Birmingham, AL 35211
(205) 581-2977

ID#: 97WMT-022
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-008
Title: Affordable Tooling for Composite Structures
Abstract:    Production Products and Soutern Research Institute will develop composite processing tools and tooling approaches that offer lower cost and shorter fabrication lead times with adequate durability and thermal performance characteristics. We will focus on a novel localized resistive heating concept which applies heat only to the part being processed and does not heat the tool except at the tooling surface. Tooling costs have been identified as a high cost area expecially in the prototype environment and as production rates continue to drop. Our composite tooling approach will produce dimensionally accurate parts, (match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the composite part), be affordable to demonstrate the tooling approach in a prototype environment, and be durable enough to meet the requirements of production use. We will develop composite processing tools that are low cost, highly durable, have compatible thermal performance characteristics, and short fabrication lead times. The new tooling technology and methodology will address the cost of fabricating both the tool face and substructure. It will provide all the capabilities of internal tooling point, scribe lines, and vacuum ports as available on current INVAR cure tools. In Phase I, we will develop and evaluate tooling system concepts and designs that provide hgih performance cure tools. Phase I will provide a description of the tooling approach, preliminary designs of the tooling system, thermal analysis of predicted thermal performance, and cost anlaysis of anticipated tooling fabrication costs. In Phase II: We will develop and demonstrate the new composite processing tool system on a significantly complex tool and verify the Phase I thermal and cost analysis predictions and demonstrate the tooling performance.

SENTEL TECHNOLOGIES LLC
NE 1615 Eastgate Blvd
Pullman, WA 99163
(509) 334-5190

PI: David Walker
(509) 334-5190
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0063
WASHINGTON STATE UNIV.
Office of Grant R&D
Pullman, WA 99164
(509) 335-9661

ID#: 97AFO-018
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-003
Title: Electro-Optic Fiber
Abstract:   Electro-optic modulators and switches are an integral part of many photonic systems. This project will develop an electro-optic fiber that will be used as a basic building block for in-line electro-optic devices. Electro-optic fibers will overcome many of the drawbacks associated with conventional planar designs. They will have lower overall optical loses for the final packaged device and greatly reducing end unit cost. Pigtailing will be reduced to fiber splicing (a well-known, routine commercial operation costing well under $1 per splice compared to $100's for pigtailing chips). Completion of Phase I research will set the foundation to develop fiber optic in-line sagnac modulators and other devices in Phase II research. Using electro-optic fibers, devices may be fabricated directly in the fiber, integrated by fusing fibers or using multiple cores, or used in hybrid technologies such as combining electro-optic fibers with other active fiber devices such as Erbium Doped Fiber Amplifiers.

SURFACES RESEARCH
8330 Melrose Drive
Lenexa, KS 66214
(913) 541-1221

PI: Paul Sutor
(913) 541-1221
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0077
AUBURN UNIV.
307 Samford Hall
Auburn, AL 36849
(334) 844-4438

ID#: 97AFO-056
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-006
Title: Development of High Temperature Solid Lubricant Coatings
Abstract:   The US Air Force requires solid lubricant coatings with friction coefficients at or below 9.1 from 25C to 815C. Surfaces Research has developed the first bonded coating to meet this goal. Other Surface Research coatings are close to meeting this goal.The first objective of this program is to develop the parameters for sputter deposition of the best coating. Sputter-deposited coatings will have better coating-substrate adhesion, thus better wear life.The second objective is to systematically study related solid lubricant coatings, to elucidate the mechanisms by which low friction at 25C is produced by certain high-temperature lubricants. Chemical composition, crystal structure and melting point/hardness will be evaluated for their relative contributions to this behavior.Insights into these mechanisms are expected to open the door to further breakthroughs in wide temperature range low friction coatings.

TDA RESEARCH, INC.
12345 West 52nd Avenue
Wheat Ridge, CO 80033
(303) 930-2301

PI: Jack D. Sibold
(303) 930-2319
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0004
LEHIGH UNIVERSITY
Office of Research & Sponsored Programs
Bethlehem, PA 18015
(610) 758-3021

ID#: 96AFOT001
Agency: AF
Topic#: 96-001
Title: Low Cost Creep Resistant Alumina Fibers for High Temperature CMC Applications
Abstract:   To meet the demanding advanced aerospace engine conditions (extended time near 1500C) , materials are needed that possess high strength, toughness, chemical stability in oxidizing environments, and stable thermomechanical properties at high temperatures. Ceramic oxides are the most promising materials for these demanding conditions. Unfortunately, monolithic ceramics are too brittle and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) are too expensive.TDA Research has identified a low cost precursor route to ceramic fibers, interfacial coatings, and matrix materials for CMC's. The precursor utilizes low cost raw materials ($2/lb). Lehigh University has developed creep resistant Y and La doped polycrystalline alumina compositions that can be readily made by TDA's precursor technology. In Phase I we will utilize this precursor technology to make low cost creep resistant doped alumina fibers. The fibers will be creep tested by Lehigh using bend stress relaxation testing, and NASA Lewis will perform limited tensile creep testing on the best composition. Lehigh will also model the dopant segregation to grain boundaries by computer simulation to relate microstructure to thermomechanical properties.

TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT & TRANSFER, INC.
133 Defense Highway, Ste 212
Annapolis, MD 21401
(301) 261-8373

PI: Frank Kustas
(301) 261-8373
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0056
SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INST.
6220 Culebra Road
San Antonio, TX 78228
(210) 522-2235

ID#: 97AFO-054
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-006
Title: Ion Beam Deposited Metal Oxide and Fluoride Composite Coatings for High Temperature Tribological Applications
Abstract:   Development of advanced solid lulbricant coatings for future-generation gas-turbine engine components represents an enabling technology. The reliability and performance of moving mechanical hardware for gas turbine engines in constrained by the method(s) of lubrication. Increased operational requirements (higher temperatures and pressures) place stringent demands on coating performance. Consequently, a new generation of adaptive lubricant coatingns with multiple-cycle lifetime, needs to be developed. Durable high-temperature capable coatings for bearings and turbine blade/root disk areas of tas turbine engines and for back-up bearings for magnetic suspension systems, are desperately needed. Technology Assessment & Transfer and Southwest Research Institute propsoe to develop innovative ion-beam assisted deposition (IBAD) of multilayer coatings that will form adaptive lubricants at elevated temperatures and dispersed high-temperature-capable solid-lubricant islands in a lower-temperature-caple matrix. Performance comparisions between IBAD and magnetron-sputtered coatings will be performed in Phase I. Coating characterization will include thermal cycling, scratch-adhesion, elevated-temperature wear tests, and coating surface analysis. The best-performing adaptive solid lubricant or dispersed solid-lubricant coating will be applied to hardware components to demonstrate component processing.

TECHNOSOFT, INC.
4434 CARVER WOODS DR
CINCINNATI, OH 45242
(513) 985-9877

PI: MR TERRENCE A WEISSHAAR
(765) 494-5975
Contract #: F33615-97-C-3216
PURDUE RESEARCH FOUNDATION
1021 HOVDE HALL RM 324
W LAFAYETTE, IN 47907
(765) 494-6200

ID#: 97WFI-023
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-007
Title: Air Vehicle Technology -- Modeling and Simulation
Abstract:   The aircraft design process is complex, highly iterative, and time-consuming and contributes significantly tothe overall engineering cost. Aircraft specifications including performance, weight, cost, and other aspects must be addressed to create an effective design. The multidisciplinary nature of the engineering process, which includes design, analysis, and manufacturing, follows a regimented path that is initiated by a conceptual design, evolves into a preliminary design, and is followed by a detailed design for production. Many critical design decisions are made at the conceptual level where the least amount of information is available to assist in the design evaluation and tradeoffs. The proposed objective is the development of a comprehensive design environment for modeling and simulating aircraft systems, seamlessly integrating different engineering processes. The proposed system architecture will support a single underlying object-oriented architecture with demand-driven computation and dependency tracking that allows information to feed forward and backward among the various engineering processes as the design evolves. In Phase I, the system architecture will be completed including: 1) modeling aspects of the conceptual and preliminary phases in an aircraft design, and 2) demonstrating the feasibility of such a system with a focus on the application of composite materials to wing structures.

TPL, INC.
3921 Academy Pkwy, North NE
Albuquerque, NM 87109-4416
(505) 342-4421

PI: Douglas J. Taylor
(505) 342-4428
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0065
SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INST.
6220 Culebra
San Antonio, TX 78228
(210) 522-2238

ID#: 97AFO-049
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-006
Title: Sol-Gel Derived,Nanostructured Oxide Lubricant Coatings
Abstract:   The reduction of friction and wear is essential to the proper operation of all modern machines. Gas turbine engines are approaching operating temperatures and speeds that exceed the capacity of current lubricant materials. Solid coatings that can provide lubrication from sub-ambient to 850C would allow exploitation of recent performance gains.TPL proposes innovative, multi-component solid lubricant coatings made via inexpensive sol-gel routes to solve the problem of high temperature wear. This wet chemical approach uses synthesis on the molecular level, which allows the ability to tailor the nanostructure of the coatings. Preliminary research on the compositions to provide wear resistance was performed at the Southwest Research Institute and will be incorporated into this program.TPL will demonstrate the feasibility of depositing coatings to reduce friction and wear by sol-gel methods. The compositions previously discovered for this application will be the starting point for composition/property optimization. The coefficient of friction, wear resistance and microstructure will be characterized to prove the proposed concept.TPL has extensive experience and resources in sol-gel technology, and is capable of performing the proposed research. The P.I. is a pioneering researcher in multi-component sol-gel processing, firing techniques and characterization.

UES, INC.
4401 Dayton-Xenia Rd.
Dayton, OH 45432-1894
(937) 426-6900

PI: Rabi Bhattacharya
(216) 687-3501
Contract #: F49620-97-C-0054
CLEVELAND STATE UNIV.
E. 24th Street, Stillwell Hall 455
Cleveland, OH 44115
(216) 687-3501

ID#: 97AFO-048
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-006
Title: Developmente of High Temperature Solid Lubricant Coatings
Abstract:   Solid lubricant coatings are of interest for applications where components are exposed to both low and high temperatures, vacuum, oxidizing environment and radiations. Most common solid lubricant coatings are useful for only a narrow range of temperatures. Known solid lubricants for high temperature applications (>500C) exhibit a high friction coefficient, >0.2; and, they are usually abrasive at low temperature. There is a great need, therefore, to develop solid lubricant coatings that possess low friction properties over a wide range of temperature. UES proposes to develop solid lubricant coatings for applications over a wide range of temperature by using an adaptive composite approach where a common solid lubricant such as WS2 will be mixed with an oxide such as cesium tungstate (Cs2WO4). WS2 will provide lubrication in air up to about 450C while the reaction product of cesium tungstate and WS2, i.e., cesium oxythiotungstate (Cs2WO3), will provide higher temperature lubrication. Bias sputtering will be used to deposit dense composite coatings. Coatings will be characterized for composition, chemistry, friction and wear.

WAUKESHA FOUNDRY, INC.
1300 Lincoln Ave.
Waukesha, WI 53186
(414) 542-0741

PI: Bill Norris
(414) 542-0741
Contract #: F33615-97-C-5143
MILWAUKEE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
1025 N. Broadway
Milwaukee, WI 53202-3109
(414) 277-7416

ID#: 97WMT-037
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-008
Title: Advanced Casting Technology for Low Cost Composites
Abstract:   For INVAR lay-up tools of complex geometry, casting the tool face near net shape and machining the tools surface has proven to be the low cost manufacturing method. Cast face sheets offer consistent finsished thickness, resulting in uniform heat transfer during the composite cure cycle, allowing short cure cycle times.There will be three main areas of investigation.1. Primary emphasis will be directed toward patternless molding as a method to significantly reduce costs and lead times of INVAR lay-up tool casting by eliminating hard pattern equipment.2. The production of thinner cast face sheets will also be investigated as a method to reduce casting cost and machining cost and lead time.3. Integrally cast stiffeners will be investigated as a method to reduce cost and lead-time of tool sub-structures and to improve the heat transfer properties of the tools.A test article will be designed and produced to test the validity of computer based simulations. The probability of success is high as these goals can be accomplished by the novel application of existing technologies

WRIGHT MATERIALS RESEARCH CO.
3591 Apple Grove Dr.
Beavercreek, OH 45430
(937) 643-0007

PI: S.C. Tan
(937) 643-0007
Contract #: F33615-97-C-5152
UNIV. OF DAYTON RESEARCH INSTITUTE
300 College Park
Dayton, OH 45469
(937) 229-2919

ID#: 97WMT-025
Agency: AF
Topic#: 97-008
Title: Developing of a Flexible Mandrel and Semi-Flexible Tooling for the Fabrication of Integrated Composite Strucutres
Abstract:   Affordability has become one of the most important issues in composites utilization for aircraft and aerospace industry. Cost analyses show that tooling and assembling are the major drivers. Conventional tooling for composite fabrication has a fixed geometry and are expensive due to low volume production. We (WMR and UDRI) propose to develop a flexible mandrel and a semi-flexible tooling for the fabrication of integrated composite structures. The proposed flexible mandrel and the semi-flexible tooling are reusable to process composite structures with different shapes without time-consuming machining. Resin transfer molding or tape laying technique will be used with this flexible tooling to fabricate example integrated hat-shape structures. The capability of processing integrated composite structures will have the advantage of reducing part counts, thereby saving assembling costs. The tooling cost, processing cycle and lead time will all be dramatically reduced (up to orders of magnitude) using the proposed flexible mandrel and semi-flexible tooling technique. In this Phase I project a prototype flexible mandrel and semi-flexible tooling system will be constructed and composite parts will be fabricated as a feasibility study. NDE, physical and mechanical tests will be performed to evaluate the quality of the parts fabricated.

---------- ARMY ----------

BIOELASTICS RESEARCH, LTD.
1075 South 13th St
Birmingham, AL 35205
(205) 934-9512

PI: Dr. Jie Xu
(205) 934-9513
Contract #: DAAG55-97-C0049
AUBURN UNIV.
101 Life Sciences Building
Auburn University, AL 36849
(334) 844-4784

ID#: 37440
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 97-005
Title: Production of Biodegradable Plastic Protein-based Polymers in Plants
Abstract:   Contemporary petroleum-based plastics derive from a non-renewable resource and present environmental problems both in their production and disposal. Desirable would be plastics obtainable from renewable resources and of benignproduction and disposal. Protein-based polymers, polymers of repeating peptide sequences, have been produced using recombinant DNA technology and expressed in both E. coli and tobacco plants. With the correct sequence and composition, the protein-based polymers can be regular and inverse thermoplastic. The latter provides the potential for programmed biodegradation with half-lives ranging from days to decades, and the former allows that the polymers can be processed as melts (e.g. for injection molding and fiber extrusion). Thus, the broad objective of this proposal is for plant reproduction of programmable, biodegradable plastics. The technical objectives are: 1) to use recombinant DNA technology for achieving high level expression in E. coli of suitably designed plastic protein-based polymers, 2) to utilize the purified protein-based polymers for physical characterization of melting points, decomposition points, tensile strengths, half-livesetc., 3) to produce monoclonal antibodies to the chosen E. coli-produced protein-based polymers in order to follow expression in the tobacco plant, and 4) To develop producion in tobacco plants of the preferred plastic protein-based polymers that had demonstrated both the desired physical properties and high level expression by E. coli fermentation. Environmental problems require the development of biodegradable plastics which can be produced from renewable resources without use of toxic and hazardous chemicals and which will help to solve the increasing global disposal burden. The extent of this need is expressed in the Maritime Pollution (MARPOL) treaty preventing disposal of plastics at sea as of 1995, and in the Plastic, Pollution Research and Control Act of 1987 (Public Law 100-220). It is quite apparent that biodegradable plastics would gracefully become a source of food rather than a cause of death for marine life. Furthermore, the demand for an agricultural product of the scale of a range of biodegradable plastics couldContemporary petroleum-based plastics derive from a non-renewable resource and present environmental problems both in their production and disposal. Desirable would be plastics obtainable from renewable resources and of benignproduction and disposal. Protein-based polymers, polymers of repeating peptide sequences, have been produced using recombinant DNA technology and expressed in both E. coli and tobacco plants. With the correct sequence and composition, the protein-based polymers can be regular and inverse thermoplastic. The latter provides the potential for programmed biodegradation with half-lives ranging from days to decades, and the former allows that the polymers can be processed as melts (e.g. for injection molding and fiber extrusion). Thus, the broad objective of this proposal is for plant reproduction of programmable, biodegradable plastics. The technical objectives are: 1) to use recombinant DNA technology for achieving high level expression in E. coli of suitably designed plastic protein-based polymers, 2) to utilize the purified protein-based polymers for physical characterization of melting points, decomposition points, tensile strengths, half-livesetc., 3) to produce monoclonal antibodies to the chosen E. coli-produced protein-based polymers in order to follow expression in the tobacco plant, and 4) To develop producion in tobacco plants of the preferred plastic protein-based polymers that had demonstrated both the desired physical properties and high level expression by E. coli fermentation. Environmental problems require the development of biodegradable plastics which can be produced from renewable resources without use of toxic and hazardous chemicals and which will help to solve the increasing global disposal burden. The extent of this need is expressed in the Maritime Pollution (MARPOL) treaty preventing disposal of plastics at sea as of 1995, and in the Plastic, Pollution Research and Control Act of 1987 (Public Law 100-220). It is quite apparent that biodegradable plastics would gracefully become a source of food rather than a cause of death for marine life. Furthermore, the demand for an agricultural product of the scale of a range of biodegradable plastics could

CFD RESEARCH CORP.
3325 Triana Blvd
Huntsville, AL 35805
(205) 536-6576

PI: Dr. Anantha Krishnan
(205) 536-6576
Contract #: DAAG55-97-C0047
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECH.
77 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-3884

ID#: 37471
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 97-004
Title: Chemical Process Models for Supercritical Water Oxidation of Toxic Organic Materials
Abstract:   The proposed work will develop and integrated, experimentally tested process model for Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) of toxic organic waste, The model will include (i) advanced thermodynamic models for local fluid properties, (ii) advanced kinetic models for waste hydrolysis and oxidation in SCW, (iii) models for salt formation and deposition on surfaces, and (iv) a general purpose commercial Computational fluid Dynamics (CFD) code capable of simulating fluid transport, heat/mass transfer, gas/surface chemistry and particle transport/deposition in the reactor. In addition, the above models will be interfaced to a process simulator to generate equipment design parameters for major items upstream and downstream of the reactor and to perform an economic analysis consisting of capital and operating costs. The work will be performed by CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC), OLI Systems, Inc. (OLI) and the MIT Energy Laboratory (MIT). Phase I will demonstrate proof-of-concept coupling of OLI thermodynamic models and MIT kinetic and salt formation/deposition models into CFDRC's general purpose commercial code, CFD-ACE. The coupled code will be tested against simulant waste destruction observed in an MIT bench-top reactor. A preliminary interfacing with a process simulator, ASPEN PLUS will also be accomplished during Phase I. The Phase II work will focus on further refinements to the physical models, detailed validation studies and demonstration of the software on a production SCWO systems. The proposed development of a chemical process model will be an enabling technology to facilitate the commercialization and broader application of SCWO processes for the destruction of chemically complex wastes. This will have military applications (for the cleanup of toxic chemical warfare agents as well as civilian applicaitons (fir the disposal of organic wastes from chemical industries , municipal sewage, etc.). The proposed work will develop and integrated, experimentally tested process model for Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) of toxic organic waste, The model will include (i) advanced thermodynamic models for local fluid properties, (ii) advanced kinetic models for waste hydrolysis and oxidation in SCW, (iii) models for salt formation and deposition on surfaces, and (iv) a general purpose commercial Computational fluid Dynamics (CFD) code capable of simulating fluid transport, heat/mass transfer, gas/surface chemistry and particle transport/deposition in the reactor. In addition, the above models will be interfaced to a process simulator to generate equipment design parameters for major items upstream and downstream of the reactor and to perform an economic analysis consisting of capital and operating costs. The work will be performed by CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC), OLI Systems, Inc. (OLI) and the MIT Energy Laboratory (MIT). Phase I will demonstrate proof-of-concept coupling of OLI thermodynamic models and MIT kinetic and salt formation/deposition models into CFDRC's general purpose commercial code, CFD-ACE. The coupled code will be tested against simulant waste destruction observed in an MIT bench-top reactor. A preliminary interfacing with a process simulator, ASPEN PLUS will also be accomplished during Phase I. The Phase II work will focus on further refinements to the physical models, detailed validation studies and demonstration of the software on a production SCWO systems. The proposed development of a chemical process model will be an enabling technology to facilitate the commercialization and broader application of SCWO processes for the destruction of chemically complex wastes. This will have military applications (for the cleanup of toxic chemical warfare agents as well as civilian applicaitons (fir the disposal of organic wastes from chemical industries , municipal sewage, etc.).

LUMIN, INC.
PO Box 11704
Blacksburg, VA 24062-1704
(540) 953-4274

PI: Mark Jones
(540) 953-4268
Contract #: DAAG55-97-C0048
VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INST. & STATE UNIV.
301 Burress Hall
Blacksburg, VA 24062-1704
(540) 231-5281

ID#: 37424
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 97-001
Title: Fiber Optic Vapor-Phase Sensor Arrays Processed by Neural Networks for Mine Detection
Abstract:   A novel optical limiting device is proposed for the protection of optical sensors against laser threat. The new device has a compact pre-fabricated diffraction grating which is index-matched by a nonlinear liquid and hence made invisible to weak light. Strong light rapidly causes index mismatch, revives the grating, diffracts light away, and provides effective and immediate protection to the sensor. Advantages of the new device include simple and compact structure, broadband response, infrared cutoff, fast protection, high damage dynamic range, and high linear transmission. The break-through technology has significant potential applications. Companies from California, Mississippi, and Florida have shown interests of offering their resources to support Phase II and III work. The business market estimation and profit expectations are impressive. Preliminary feasiblity of the concept are supported by theoretical analyses and experimental evidence. Proposed tasks of Phase I have been described in detail. the proposed Principal Investigator, Dr. Hua-Kuang Liu, a fellow of both the OSA and SPIE, is a prolific inventor in optics and has authored over 200 papers. The research team has world renowned scientists from top national laboratories. The cooperative academic, industrial, and business effort poses good probability of success of technology transfer for enhancement of US competitiveness in the world economy. The new optical limiting devices using less expensive nonlinear materials may be used for civilian applications such as CCD camera protection and laser processing safety for human operators. With proper ultra-sensitive non-linear liquid, the device may also be used for head beam glare reduction for night automobile driving and sun light diversion for building windows. Private industry including the Science Applications International Corporation, Standard Packaging, Inc., and the Gulf Coast Alliance for Technology Transfer have shown interests in using their resources to support the Phase II and Phase III efforts of the innovation. A novel optical limiting device is proposed for the protection of optical sensors against laser threat. The new device has a compact pre-fabricated diffraction grating which is index-matched by a nonlinear liquid and hence made invisible to weak light. Strong light rapidly causes index mismatch, revives the grating, diffracts light away, and provides effective and immediate protection to the sensor. Advantages of the new device include simple and compact structure, broadband response, infrared cutoff, fast protection, high damage dynamic range, and high linear transmission. The break-through technology has significant potential applications. Companies from California, Mississippi, and Florida have shown interests of offering their resources to support Phase II and III work. The business market estimation and profit expectations are impressive. Preliminary feasiblity of the concept are supported by theoretical analyses and experimental evidence. Proposed tasks of Phase I have been described in detail. the proposed Principal Investigator, Dr. Hua-Kuang Liu, a fellow of both the OSA and SPIE, is a prolific inventor in optics and has authored over 200 papers. The research team has world renowned scientists from top national laboratories. The cooperative academic, industrial, and business effort poses good probability of success of technology transfer for enhancement of US competitiveness in the world economy. The new optical limiting devices using less expensive nonlinear materials may be used for civilian applications such as CCD camera protection and laser processing safety for human operators. With proper ultra-sensitive non-linear liquid, the device may also be used for head beam glare reduction for night automobile driving and sun light diversion for building windows. Private industry including the Science Applications International Corporation, Standard Packaging, Inc., and the Gulf Coast Alliance for Technology Transfer have shown interests in using their resources to support the Phase II and Phase III efforts of the innovation.

PAUL HOLLAND & ASSOC., INC.
5123 Virginia Way, Ste C-21
Brentwood, TN 37027
(615) 221-9047

PI: Dr. Robert Tryon
(615) 221-9047
Contract #: DAAG55-97-C0053
VANDERBILT UNIV.
512 Kirkland Hall
Nashville, TN 37240
(615) 322-2631

ID#: 37448
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 97-009
Title: Reliability-Based Modeling and Analysis of Advanced Composites
Abstract:   The proposed research will develop a probabilistic analysis framework incorporating current aerostructure industry composite laminate design methodologies to predict the reliability of composite structures. The research will consider the reliability ased composite design methodology as being divided into two distinct but closely coupled modeling techniques. The first is the structural model which uses finite element analysis to determine the global and ply level response of the structure. The second modeling technique is the failure models which are closely coupled with the structural model. The failure models which address both initial and progressive damage, may be in the form of maximum stress/strain, interactive criteria, or more specific models which have been developed by the aerostructure manufacturers. Using an iteractive process, the damage states will be incorporated into the structural models to determine the distribution of stiffness reduction and delamination buckling loads. System reliability methods such as branch and bound technique and efficient Monte Carlo simulation will be used with probabilistic finite element methos\ds to determine progressive damage states and residual strength. The research will link state-of-th-art laminate design techniques with failure models. This effort has the potential for applicaiton to the engineering tasks required for the development of new rotorcraft using modern composite materials and technologies, and is especially relevant to the areas of damage tolerance and crashwothiness. The proposed research will yield a methodology and software that would greatly improve both our physical understanding and analytical capability in this area. The proposed research will develop a probabilistic analysis framework incorporating current aerostructure industry composite laminate design methodologies to predict the reliability of composite structures. The research will consider the reliability ased composite design methodology as being divided into two distinct but closely coupled modeling techniques. The first is the structural model which uses finite element analysis to determine the global and ply level response of the structure. The second modeling technique is the failure models which are closely coupled with the structural model. The failure models which address both initial and progressive damage, may be in the form of maximum stress/strain, interactive criteria, or more specific models which have been developed by the aerostructure manufacturers. Using an iteractive process, the damage states will be incorporated into the structural models to determine the distribution of stiffness reduction and delamination buckling loads. System reliability methods such as branch and bound technique and efficient Monte Carlo simulation will be used with probabilistic finite element methos\ds to determine progressive damage states and residual strength. The research will link state-of-th-art laminate design techniques with failure models. This effort has the potential for applicaiton to the engineering tasks required for the development of new rotorcraft using modern composite materials and technologies, and is especially relevant to the areas of damage tolerance and crashwothiness. The proposed research will yield a methodology and software that would greatly improve both our physical understanding and analytical capability in this area.

PHYSICAL OPTICS CORP.
20600 Gramercy Pl, Bldg 100
Torrance, CA 90501
(310) 320-3088

PI: Dr. Lothar U. Kempen
(310) 320-3088
Contract #: DAAG55-97-C0056
REGENTS OF THE UNIV. OF NEW MEXICO
c/o Research Srvcs Scholes Hall, Rm 102
Albuquerque, NM 87131
(505) 277-7575

ID#: 37467
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 97-001
Title: Reversible Fiber Optic Biosensor for Detection of Explosives
Abstract:   A fiber optic immunosensor system for the detection of minute amounts of explosives is proposed, based on an olfactory receptor mechanism. The system incorporates a novel concept for the realization of a fully reversible immunosensor, in which an analog, a competing agent for binding to the antibody, is fluorescently labeled and bound to the surface together with the immunochemistry. this method eliminates the need for constant replenishment of fluids, and makes the system intrinsically reversible. The substances interact optically with the light in a D-shaped, single-mode fiber, as part of a fiber optic system incorporating fiber Bragg-gratings for spectral source filtering, signal enhancement, and suppression of excitation light. Implementation of the complete system in fiber optics drastically reduces the size and weight of the system, leading to a highly sensitive, highly selective, compact explosives detection system. Besides the intended use for mine sweeping, the system will immediately have great potential for explosive detection in airports and other potential targets for terrorism. The fiber optic design also makes the system will suited for distributed sensing over large areas. Replacement of the antibody can adapt the sensor to a large number of target substances

PLASMA PROCESSING ENTERPRISES
PO Box 99088
Raleigh, NC 27624-9088
(919) 870-0006

PI: Dr. Louis J. Circeo
(404) 894-2070
Contract #: DACA39-97-M-1409
GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECH.
490 10th St, NW
Atlanta, GA 30318
(404) 894-2070

ID#: 37441
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 97-010
Title: In Situ Stabilization of Geologic Materials by Vitrification using Plasma Arc Technology
Abstract:   The subterranean application of plasma arc technology would result in the in situ transformation of virtually any geologic material into a vitrified rock-like mass (similar to obsidian), that is durable, strong, and highly resistant to leaching. Conceptually, a plasma arc torch would be lowered into a borehole to any depth and operated at progressively higher levels to thermally convert a mass of soil into a vertical column of vitrified and stabilized material up to 10 feet in diameter. This process of plasma stabilization of geologic materials is expected to be rapid, efficient, cost-effective, and simple. By applying this technique over a systematic grid pattern, the process would become a viable means of stabilizing weak foundation materials and unstable slopes, creating pile structures or coalescing the columns into a large contiguous monolith. The objectives of the Phase I program would be to conduct laboratory-scale experiments in selected rock and weathered rock materials at the 100kW and 200kW plasma torch power levels. the improvement in the engineering properties of the vitrified and adjacent heat-treated rock materials will be determined. In addition, the mechanical interrelationship between the vitrified mass and the surrounding undisturbed materials will be evaluated. Based on these data and the estimated unit costs to stabilize the geologic materials, the commercialization potential of the various ground improvement applications will be assessed. In situ plasma stabilization technology offers the potential to rapidly and cost-effectively improve any geologic foundation materials tha cannot be economically stabilized with current technologies. Poor foundation conditions which may be especially well suited to rapid liquefaction from earthquakes; man-made waste deposits (landfills, sludge beds, dredged materials, mine-tailings); unstable slopes and landslides; and structures undergoing excessive settlement. If this technology is brought to its full technological potential, fundamental improvements in the field of foundation engineering would be possible. foundation conditions would no longer be a limiting factor in construction operations.

QUALTECH SYSTEMS, INC.
66 Davis Rd
Storrs, CT 06268
(860) 423-2099

PI: Dr. Somnath Deb
(860) 423-2099
Contract #: DAAG55-97-C0050
UNIV. OF CONNECTICUT
U-6, Research Foundation
Storrs, CT 06269
(860) 486-3337

ID#: 37461
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 97-012
Title: A Distributed Lattice Architecture for Real-Time Diagnosis and Recovery
Abstract:   The goal of the proposed research is to develop a diagnostics and recovery system that meets the real-time supervision requirements of reactive systems. in an earlier effort, we had developed and demonstrated TEAMS-RT, a software tool that can diagnose multiple faults in a system with up to 1000 sensors and aspects in just about 0.1 second. This tool uses fast and powerful algorithms based on multi-signal fault models of comples hierarchical systems. Armed with this capability, our main objectives will be two-fold. First, we will develop a distributed architecture for a real-time diagnostics system. Second, we will develop a preprocessing module for sensor measurements to minimize erroneous test results. towards the first task, we will develop a lattice architecture of decentralized but cooperative TEAMS-RT units to ensure quick response to local failures, while partitioning large systems into manageable subsystems. Local TEAMS-RT units embedded in individual subsystems will cooperate with neighboring TEAMS-RTs and report subsystem health status to a supervisor TEAMS-RT. The supervisor will perform global reasoning to isolate failures having system-wide ramifications. The developement of the preprocessing module will yield a signal processing library for generating test results. Phase II of the effort will address the development of reconfiguration modules to the reasoning engine, as well as accounting for unreliable test results. 1. Quality control and process control of manufacturing systems. 2. On-board spacecraft maintenance. 3. Commercial airlines. 4. Automotive diagnosis 5. Patient health monitoring in emergency room and intensive care units.

RATON TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH, INC.
848 Clayton Highway
Raton, NM 87740
(505) 445-3607

PI: Dr. Larry G. Stolarczyk
(505) 445-3607
Contract #: DAAG55-97-C0057
LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LAB.
PO Box 1663: MS D434
Los Alamos, NM 87545
(505) 667-2470

ID#: 37478
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 97-006
Title: Multi Sensor Detection Imaging and Explosive Confirmation of Mines
Abstract:   This Phase I program combines three non-chemical bandmine detection technologies into an integrated sensor suite that will detect and interrogate anomalous objects for shape, size, geometrical detail, and explosive content. Lateral migration (X-Ray) radiography (LMR) is the primary imaging element, with the resonant microstrip patch antenna (RMPA) providing a "quick look" capability, and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as an explosive element indicator. LMR methods are capable of locating and imaging antipersonnel (AP) and antitank (AT) mines to 10 cm depths. Mine obscuring features such as soil surface variations can be quickly removed by wavelet image analysis. RMPA can detect and image shallow-buried nonmetallic and metallic objects. RMPA with its 1 inch resolution will limit the search area and allow LMR to be realized with lower power source. NQR methods of explosive detection typically rely on the observation of radio-frequency signals from 14N nuclei present in explosive material. This method provides a positive identification of and quantity estimate of explosive material. This sensor conbination will provide the humanitarian de-mining community with a unique means to unambiguously detect and image shallow-burried metallic and non-metallic landmines. The proposed technology is designed to be used primarily in humanitarian de-mining applications. However, there are untested possibilities for application to a variety of Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) and environmental remediation problems. Resonant microstrip patch antennas are also currently under development for measurement of uncut coal thickness left by coal excavation machine that will reduce ash, sulfur and heavy metals in run of mine coal.

SARCOS RESEARCH CORP.
360 Wakara Way
Salt lake City, UT 84108
(801) 581-0155

PI: Dr. David L. Wells
(801) 585-7905
Contract #: DAAG55-97-C0051
UNIV. OF UTAH
1471 Federal Way
Salt Lake City, UT 84112
(801) 581-3008

ID#: 37503
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 97-007
Title: Tactile Stimulators for Haptic Interfaces
Abstract:   A number of situations exist in which a person's ability to effectively interact with his environment (by sensing or manipulation) is compromised by a lack of sufficient high resolution feedback from the environment ( a real environment or a virtual environment). a novel haptic interface could be used for information transfer to augment perception and understanding of the operator's environment. However, transducers and small, two-dimensional actuator arrays with the appropriate bandwidth and resolution to effectively convey surface topology (sufficient for edge detection) to aid in perception/cognition do not exist at this time. The packing density of tactile display actuators and the level of integration required to form an array with the necessary control interconnects require new approaches for fabricaiton of small electro-mechanical devices SRC proposes to use its innovative nonplanar microfabrication techniques to create actuation systems for haptic interfaces. Our approach uses microfabricated, cylindrically-shaped, active fibers arranged to form reliable, conformable subsytems which can be networked to provide data on surface characteristics via physical action, enabling the development of small, light weight tactile displays. Phase I will proceed from design specifications to concept feasibility verification, design recommendations and fabrication of a preliminary prototype tactile stimulator. A successful haptic interface system would be a significant contribution in several areas. It would improve operator perception in virtual reality systems for entertainment, training, etc. It would improve information transfer and dexterity in telerobotic systems. It would provide improved information transfer, perception, and cognition for the hearing and visually impaired. Also, such interfaces could also provide valuable feedback during microsurgery and microelectronic fabrication.

SCIENTIFIC SYSTEMS COMPANY, INC.
500 West Cummings Park, Ste 3000
Woburn, MA 01801
(617) 933-5355

PI: Dr. Greve/Dr. Perloff
(617) 933-5355
Contract #: DAAG55-97-C0052
THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE UNIV. OF IL
109 Coble Hall MC-325, 801 S. Wright St
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-2187

ID#: 37472
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 97-008
Title: WINES: WIreless NEtwork Simulator
Abstract:   Networks of the future will be incredibly complex as they move to provide any time/anywhere indiviual communication of voice, video, and data traffic. Such networks will exist in both commercial and military environments. Their complexity will follow from several factors: 1)-Network Size, 2)-Wireless/Heterogeneous Networks, 3)-Mobility 4)-Multimedia 5)- Military Environment. All of these factors conspire to make theoretical evaluation of wireless, mobile, multimedia communication networks interactable. This necessitates simulation of networks in order to evaluate algorithms and protocols for managing such networks. We propose a simulation CAD tool for efficient design of mobile, wireless, multimedia communication networks. The effort will consist of speeding up the simulations using packet-level approximations of error conditions in wireless networks as well as variance reduction techniques such as importance sampling of rare events. the tool user will be able to graphically enter the network node topology as well as select attributes of the nodes, environment, and performance measures. The University of Illinois will provide experience in mobile wireless networks, and Scientific Systems will provide experience in the implementation of network algorithms. The phase I objectives will be achieved through completion of the following tasks: Task 1: Identification of Simulation Requirements for: Subtask 1.1: Packet-Level Error Approximations. Subtask 1.2: Wireless physical layer features (eg, FH-CDMA). Subtask 1.3: Traffic source Models (eg, MMPP and ARMA). Subtask 1.4: routing. Subtask 1.5: Transmission Scheduling Subtask 1.6: Performance Measures. Task 2: Simulation Platform Development. Task 3: Proof-of-Concept Demonstration. Task 4: Final Report and Phase II recommendations. Wireless technology is rapidly becoming a part of the mainstream technology for personal communication systems, nomadic computing and industrial applications where the use of wirelines is either too expensive or infeasible. Wireless ATM standards are being developed rapidly by the ATM forum for multimedia wireless communication. Scientific Systems is a member of the ATM Forum and has developed strategic relat

TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT & TRANSFER, INC.
133 Defense Highway, Ste 212
Annapolis, MD 21401
(301) 261-8373

PI: Dr. Frank Kustas
(301) 261-8373
Contract #: DAAG55-97-C0054
AMES LABORATORY
311 TASF, Iowa State University
Ames, IA 50011-3020
(515) 294-6486

ID#: 37508
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 97-003
Title: New Sputtered Quasicrystalline Coatings for Advanced Propulsion Systems
Abstract:   Future combat-ready forces will require revolutionary advances in propulsion system capabilities to satisfy the Army's aggressive goals of significantly increased power-to-thrust and horsepower-to-volume ratios. To achieve these performance enhancements, the temperature capabilities of both structural components and lubrication systems need to be expanded. To date, no single approach has met combined performance and life goals. Technology Assessment and Transfer, along with Ames Laboratory, propose to advance the state-of-the-art in wide-temperature-range solid lubrication by sputtering new quasicrystalline system (QS) coatings, which offer unique tribological properties. Al-Cu-Fe (& Cr) quasicrystalline materials exhibit a desirable combination of high hardness, high modulus, low friction, and thermal insulating properties that is unique among metallic systems. The desirable tribological properties are due to the low surface energy characteristics of the quasicrystalline atomic arrangement. TA&T proposes to deposit thin-film QS materials by closed field unbalanced magnetron sputtering (CFUMS), which will produce coatings with superior properties compared to plasma-sprayed or normally-sputtered coatings. This represents the first known application of CFUMS for the deposition of QS materials. Thin-film coatings will be characterized for composition, structure, hardness, toughness, and elevated-temperature wear behavior. The combination of QS materials and CFUMS offers an innovation with a high probability of success for tribocontact mechanisms in advanced diesel and turbine engines. Demonstration of new thin-film QS materials for propulsion system components will probide an entirely new class of wide-temperature-range solid lubricants. QS coatings will be produced which have smooth surfaces, low porosity, and exhibit low-friction and low wear rates over a wide temperature range. Potential applications include military propulsion systems for ground and airborne vehicles, engine components for commercial transportation systems, bearings for x-ray systems, and coatings for tools used in the dry machining of materials

---------- BMDO ----------

ACCUWAVE CORP.
1651 19th Street
Santa Monica, CA 90404
(310) 449-5540

PI: Mr. Koichi Sayano
(310) 449-5540
Contract #: F30602-97-C-0330
UNIV. OF CENTRAL FLORIDA
4000 Central Florida Blvd, Adm. 243
Orlando, FL 32816-0150
(407) 823-5278

ID#: 97BMDO37T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-002
Title: Holographic Grating Filters in Optical Glasses for CI WDM Networks
Abstract:   Accuwave Corporation and CREOL will develop high efficiency, narrow bandwidth filters for WDM multiplexer and demulti-plexer applications using volume holographic gratings in new volume recording materials. Gratings fabricated in these materials will be used in multiplexing/demultiplexing filters in a similar approach that has been used with LiNbO3 holographic filters. Filter parameters will be tested based on industry standards. A preliminary design of multiplexing filters as well as other telecommunications applications of these gratings will be developed. Potential commercial applications include filters for WDM networks, instrumentation and remote sensing, and wavelength calibration sources. WDM network applications include multiplexers and demultiplexers for long distance, local area, and metropolitan networks. Holographic grating filters in these materials can also be incorporated into Accuwave's current wavelength locker and network monitor products.

AMERICAN XTAL TECHNOLOGY
4311 Solar Way
Fremont, CA 94538
(510) 683-5900

PI: Heikki Helava
(510) 683-5900
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0355
KANSAS STATE UNIV.
2 Fairchild Hall
Manhattan, KS 66506-1103
(913) 532-6804

ID#: 97BMDO16T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-002
Title: A Comprehensive AIN Source Material, Single Crystal and Substrate Development Program
Abstract:   Aluminum Nitride (AlN) substrates are attractive for III-nitride epitaxial growth due to their high thermal conductivity, close lattice and thermal expansion match to III-nitride compositions used for opto-electronic and electronic devices and their relative ease of growth when compared to Gallium Nitride (GaN). A comprehensive program which integrates the manufacturing of starting material feedstock, single crystal growth and wafering process development. The overall program objective is to develop a process for synthesizing high purity, consistent AlN powder for use a feedstock for the sublimation growth of single crystals. Seeded AlN single crystal growth using a unique vertical furnace provided through DURIP will be used to study the impact of crucible material and design on crystal growth and quality. Crystal slicing and polishing processes will be developed to prepare the substrates for epitaxial growth. Initial studies will be carried out in Phase I which will establish the basis for the Phase II crystal growth technology transfer from Kansas State University to American Xtal Technology. In Phase III AXT will fully commercialize AlN substrate technology. We have proposed a unique program which integrates all aspects of technology which are required to achieve a commercially viable AlN substrate manufacturing process. Successful development of a large-area, high-quality AlN substrate will have significant impact on the development and availability of blue and green III nitride lasers and nitride-based high temperature, high power electronics. Conservative estimates of the potential market for these devices is in the billions of dollars within the next 5-10 years. The devices are important for many military and commercial applications such as high density data storage, solar-blind detectors, high resolution printing, underwater communications, etc.

APPLIED SCIENCES, INC.
141 West Xenia Ave, PO Box 579
Cedarville, OH 45314
(513) 766-2020

PI: Robert L. Alig
(937) 766-2020
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0374
WEST VIRGINIA UNIV.
617 Spruce Street, P.O. Box 6845
Morgantown, WV 26506
(304) 293-3998

ID#: 97BMDO51T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-003
Title: High Strength Carbon Foam
Abstract:   New technologies for production of structural carbons offers promise to create a new generation of structural materials with useful mechanical properties, yet with production costs which will eliminate the barrier to wider use in transportation and communications. These new technologies include the derivation of low-cost carbon precursors from coal, and the use of such precursors in the production of lightweight structural carbon foams. The objective for this proposal is to show that high strength structural carbon foams can be produced by combining the West Virginia University method for producing carbon foam with the Applied Sciences carbon fiber technology, to act as a high strength reinforcement. Benefits which could accrue are increased performance and payload, and lower operating costs of aerospace and terrestrial vehicles, durable bridges, the reduced use of fuel in transportation (currently 67% of U.S. oil consumption), and consequent improvement in air quality. Potential applications include aerospace structures, terrestrial structural applications as well, impact resistance materials, armor shock absorption, and filters for removal of metal ions from liquid waste.

ASTARTE FIBER NETWORKS, INC.
2555 55th St., Suite 100
Boulder, CO 80301
(303) 443-8778

PI: John Wittenberger
(303) 443-8778
Contract #: DASG60-97-M-0209
UNIV. OF COLORADO - BOULDER

Boulder, CO 80303
(303) 492-2698

ID#: 97BMDO60T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-002
Title: Integrated Optoelectronic Switching Technology for Fiber-optic Communications Networks
Abstract:   Astarte Fiber Networks, Inc., the world's leading manufacturer of fiber optics network switching devices, is teaming with the Opto-electronic Computing System Center, an NSF Engineering Research Center at the University of Colorado, to develop the technology for the next generation of optical network switches. Based on passive polymeric waveguides, high-speed semiconductor optical amplifiers, and a modular, scaleable architecture, the technology will provide six orders of magnitude improvement in network reconfiguration time. A performance improvement of this magnitude will move reconfigurable network switches into new application areas that will drive product volumes higher and prices lower. The product cost of the switch is kept low by using self-aligning optoelectronic packaging technology, while switch scalability is achieved by using highly integrated, polymer waveguide structures in conjunction with semiconductor amplifiers. These technologies have been developed largely by Federal funding, and are now poised to enter the commercial marketplace. The main goal of the proposed Phase I effort is to demonstrate the functionality of the optical switching module technology, focusing on a 2X2 test vehicle. A secondary goal is to determine the switching architecture compatible with these new modules. Fiber-optic switching systems based on this technology are expected to provide important benefits over the state-of-the-art. Benefits include: improved switching times, lower insertion loss, the ability to adjust optical throughout to accommodate transmission losses, increased switch size flexibly, and manufacturing efficiencies leading to lower cost products. These benefits are important to a multi-tude of markets and applications that need relatively inexpensive, fully-optical, high-speed switching capabilities for their high band-width, fiber-optic communications networks. Beneficiaries include military/defense installations, government agencies, telecommunica-tions companies, and companies with large data communications networks.

BEND RESEARCH, INC.
64550 Research Road
Bend, OR 97701-8599
(541) 382-4100

PI: Daniel T. Smithey
(541) 382-4100
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0368
UNIV. OF OREGON
c/o Office of Research Services 5219
Eugene, OR 97403-5219
(541) 346-5131

ID#: 97BMDO10T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-002
Title: Organometallic Polymers for Nonlinear Optical Applications
Abstract:   This Phase I. STTR proposal is directed at the development of a new class of polymeric nonlinear-optical (NLO) materials. As envisioned, these new NLO materials will 1) be thermally stable at temperatures above 350 C, 2) have large second-order optical nonlinearities, 3) have facile synthesis procedures, and 4) allow simple processing for a variety of thin-film devices with excellent optical and mechanical characteristics. In addition, these new materials will be easily modifiable so that they may be optimized for a wide range of operating wavelengths. Bend Research, Inc., and personnel at the University of Oregon will combine their expertise in this area to meet the program goals for BMDO. The Phase I approach is to design and prepare organometallic polymeric materials with specific structural characteristics that simultaneously impart extraordinarily high optical nonlinearity and thermal stability. If successful, these new NLO materials will be enabling for a broad range of applications, such as electro-optic components, second-harmonic generation materials, and photorefractive polymers. The successful completion of the proposed work would result in a new class of highly nonlinear-optical materials with excellent optical and thermal properties. These materials would be easily processable and inexpensive. Such materials could be used for an important range of BMDO and civilian applications, including the following: electro-optic sampling, Gbit/sec switching networks, optical-computing applications such as optical interconnects and optical storage, and laser radar and frequency doubling.

CRYSTAL IS, INC.
25 Cord Street
Latham, NY 12110
(518) 783-7521

PI: Dr. Glen Slack
(518) 276-4015
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0362
RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC INST.
110 8th Street
Troy, NY 12180
(518) 276-6283

ID#: 97BMDO56T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-002
Title: Innovative Crucible Design for Commercial Growth of Aluminum Nitride
Abstract:   The rapid development of III-nitride epitaxial techniques has caused a concurrent development of significant new device concepts which utilize these wide-bandgap, high temperature semiconductors. Unfortunately, current substrates for nitride epitaxy significantly degrade the performance of many types of desired devices including blue/ W laser and high power semiconductor applications. Here we & pose to develop AlN substrates for III-nitride epitaxy which will be superior to all substrates currently available. In particular, the AlN substrates have significantly superior chemical compatibility, lattice/crystal structure match, thermal expansion match, and thermal conductivity when compared to the sapphire substrates that are currently being extensively used for epitaxial growth. Our technique for growing AlN boules is based on the sublimation-recondensation techniques developed for this material by Slack and McNelly. Commercial application of this technique, however, will depend crucially on the development of new crucible designs with significantly longer lifetimes while maintaining chemical purity of the growing AlN crystal. In addition, the new crucible designs will have to maintain the good nucleation characteristics of the W crucibles used in the original work. The development of these new crucibles is the point of this Phase I STTR and will play a crucial role in bringing AlN substrates to the market. Substrates of AlN will allow growth of higher quality epitaxial nitrides and will also exhibit better characteristics in high temperature and high power applications. Commercial applications of the improved epitaxial nitrides includes the development of long lifetime, efficient blue/UV solid state lasers for display and data storage applications. Other applications include the development of very high power solid state switching devices for power utilities.

DISPLAYTECH, INC.
2602 Clover Basin Drive
Longmont, CO 80503
(303) 772-2191

PI: Dr. Michael J. O'Callagha
(303) 772-2191
Contract #: DASG60-97-M-0207
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECH.
77 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-3864

ID#: 97BMDO61T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-002
Title: Read/Write Head for Room Temperature Holographic Memory
Abstract:   Growing demand for high capacity, compact, low cost, data storage for consumer products (e.g. video), for desk top computers, and for large data base systems is surpassing the capabilities of-present day magnetic disk drive and optical CD-ROM technologies. Due to advances in volume holographic storage media a number of university and industrial research laboratories are pursuing the development and commercialization of high capacity holographic data storage systems. In order to effectively exploit this potential, new types of optical input/output devices are needed. In this STTR Displaytech, working in collaboration with MIT, proposes to develop a-compact optical read/write head for use in MIT's room temperature holographic memory program. The optical read/write head will be an important component for the eventual production of commercial holographic memory systems. This new electro optic device should enable the largest demonstration of single page data transfer ever reported (l,000 x 1,000 pixels), enabling storage of more than 100 Gbytes of information in the holographic memory. The electro-optic read/write head, in conjunction with the room temperature holographic material, will enable the first system integration of a very high capacity holographic memory and has high commercial payoff. Successful completion of the proposed work will result in a prototype optical |read/write head which will raise the performance and commercial feasibility of optical holographic memory systems. It will be of immediate use in MIT's room temperature holographic memory program, and will be a key building block for the commercialization of holographic memory technology.

ELECTRON POWER SYSTEMS, INC.
42 Washington Drive
Acton, MA 01720
(508) 263-3871

PI: Clint Seward
(508) 263-3871
Contract #: DSWA01-97-M-0537
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECH.
167 Albany Street, NW 16-186
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-5528

ID#: 97BMDO68T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-003
Title: The Electron Spiral Toroid (EST) for Energy Storage
Abstract:   A newly discovered stable configuration of an electron beam is being investigated for application to energy storage. This presents an extraordinary opportunity to obtain a breakthrough in capabilities for missile defense systems. Energy is stored in an electron spiral toroid (EST) which requires no cryogenics or external magnetic fields for containment. Total energy stored is projected as exceeding 100 megajoules (MJ). Energy can be removed as needed or all at once in a pulsed form. Projected applications include: Energy Storage: an EST system will have specific energy density of about 100 MJ/kg, compared to 1.5 MJ/ kg for future chemical batteries. The "fuel" of an EST is the electron beam itself which has a specific energy content of order 1015 J/kg, a remarkably high value and many orders of magnitude higher than chemical systems. Directed Energy: Pulses of > 100 megajoules in one microsecond. Proof of concept experiments were completed at Electron Power Systems, Inc. (EPS). An independent confirmation of the technology is in progress by two consulting physicists from the MIT Plasma Fusion Center. This proposal requests funds to evaluate the feasibility of this technology for missile defense systems. In particular, test results to date will be extended to design a full demonstration model. T. his research will be conducted jointly with EPS, and with the consultants at MIT. Research funding will be on a shared basis with private investors. Potential commercial applications of an EST based power supply are great. The EST could provide the battery to make a practical electric vehicle (EV). The EV program is limited by the chemical batteries which weigh several hundred pounds. The EST based battery will weigh three pounds and power an EV for 600 miles. Potentially, every car in the world will be EST powered, which means 48 million new vehicles per year. Several major auto companies are evaluating the technology.

EPITAXIAL TECHNOLOGIES, LLC
1450 South Rolling Road
Baltimore, MD 21227
(410) 740-0505

PI: Dr. Olaleye Aina
(410) 740-0505
Contract #: DSWA01-97-M-0551
UNIV. OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE
1000 Hilltop Circle/(208 N. Wright Stree
Baltimore, MD 21250
(410) 455-6779

ID#: 97BMDO40T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-002
Title: Bandgap Engineered Low Noise InAs Channel FETs for Phase Array Radar
Abstract:   Epitaxial Technologies, LLC. proposes to develop novel bandgap engineered materials for the fabrication of W-band low noise amplifiers which can be deployed in phased array radar and missile seekers. To do this, we will implement new approaches to growing material structures with the most suitable properties for W-band electronics. Specifically, we will investigate the bandgap engineering growth optimization of InAs based heterostructures and demonstrate the high performance device potential that has been predicted for this material system. The main goal of this proposed Phase I effort is to demonstrate the feasibility of high performance W-band low noise amplifiers by developing the enabling material technologies for producing these important components and demonstrating through materials growth and characterization and through device fabrication the high performance, cost reduction and millimeter wave system design simplification that can be expected from ultra low noise W-band circuits. In Phase II of the proposed project, we will further optimize the growth processes, material structures and device fabrication processes developed in Phase I and fabricate ultra low noise W-band amplifier MMICs (in collaboration with a manufacturer of W-band MMICs). This effort will result in two products: ultra-low noise W-band amplifier integrated circuits (MMICs) and the epitaxial wafers for producing them. The proposed InAs FET wafer products and W-band MMICs will be applicable in military applications such as phased array radars and missile seekers. Civilian applications with great commercial potential include components for intelligent transport systems, collision avoidance and millimeter wave imaging.

HYPRES, INC.
175 Clearbrook Road
Elmsford, NY 10523
(914) 592-1190

PI: Oleg Mukhanov, PhD
(914) 592-1190
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0343
RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF SUNY
Office of Research Services
Stony Brook, NY 11794
(516) 632-9024

ID#: 97BMDO30T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-002
Title: All-Digital Autocorrelator for Signal Recognition
Abstract:   HYPRES, Inc. and the State University of New York at Stony Brook (SUNY) propose to design an ultra-fast low-power digital autocorrelator based on Rapid Single-Flux-Quantum (RSFQ) superconductor technology. This joint effort will combine an extensive library of elementary RSFQ cells and advanced computer-aided design (CAD) software packages developed at SUNY with the advanced fabrication facilities and testing of HYPRES, Inc. In Phase I of the project, we will design, fabricate and test a single-bit 16-channel autocorrelator with 4-GHz input signal bandwidth, and less than 0.1 mW power dissipation. In Phase II of the project, the work will be extended to multichip, multi-bit digital autocorrelators using ultra-wideband multichip modules. The proposed autocorrelator has extensive applications in advanced EW, surveillance, communications, and image processing systems currently limited by the speed of digital processing. Major commercial applications, including CDMA communications, advanced instrumentation for ground-based and space-based spectroscopy and signal analysis are further enabled by the combination of the proposed autocorrelator with recent advances in the manufacturing of affordable cryocoolers.

INTELLIGENT AUTOMATION, INC.
2 Research Placa, Suite 202
Rockville, MD 20850
(301) 590-3155

PI: Jianhong Cai
(860) 486-2666
Contract #: DSWA01-97-M-0586
UNIV. OF CONNECTICUT
260 Glenbrook Road
Storrs, CN 06209
(860) 486-2666

ID#: 97BMDO03T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-002
Title: A New CCD QWIP Combination for Infra-Red Focal Plane Arrays
Abstract:   A new technology approach for a two-dimensional infrared irnager is proposed comprised of a Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) array monolithically integrated with a new GaAs based CCD and HGET device structure. High resolution Infra-Red focal Plane Arrays (IRFPA's) in the MEWIR and LWIR regions are of growing commercial and military importance for many applications including passive-IR detection and night vision, IR countermeasures, IR spectroscopy for chemical sensing and pollution monitoring, laser surgery and future ultra low loss fiber transmission. The QWIP device was introduced as an attractive alternative to the HgCdTe array in large part because of potential GaAs Integrated circuits (GASIC's) compatibility. Thus far, the readout of a QWIP array has been performed with a bump bonded Si integrated circuit which has substantially limited its use. Concurrently a new approach has been reported for optoelectronic GASICs described as the Inversion Channel Technology (ICT). In this approach, an inversion channel is produced at a modulation doped interface which forms an almost perfect replica of the MOS inversion interface. This technology produces a high performance HFET device very similar to the PHEMT device. The ICT has produced VCSELs (2 mA threshold), vertical cavity resonant detectors (0.6 A/W responsivity), and high performance HFETs (ft > 40 GHz). A dramatic advantage of this structure is that it enables a surface or buried channel CCD through unique resistive gate transfer mechanism. In this program, the QWIP will be incorporated into the collector of the CCD to produce a single chip IRFPA with high density, high resolution and very high speed read-out due to the high speed GASIC. Such single chip QEIPs will provide over an order of magnitude improvement in IRFPA technology cost/performance, allow penetration for new market segments and it will also open up the possibility of combing the QWIP array with a monolithic optical read-out capability to enable much simpler and higher speed interfacing with the cryogenic environment. Successful deployment of this technology will provide high performance IRFPA arrays which can be used in communication systems, missile seekers, space imagers and large area display technology. The immediate applications are as sensors for night vision systems. The GASIC capability with O/E devices will also enable interconnect technology required for many commercial applications including multi-gigabit networks, distributed computing

JET PROCESS CORP.
24 Science Park
New Haven, CT 06511
(203) 777-6000

PI: Guang-Ji Cui, PhD
(203) 777-6000
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0372
YALE UNIV.
P.O. Box 208284
New Haven, CT 06520
(203) 432-4211

ID#: 97BMDO39T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-002
Title: A New JVD System for Synthesizing Gate Dielectrics on SiC and GaN
Abstract:   A number of wide bandgap semiconductors such as SiC, GaN, and diamond are being considered as the basis for the next generation of high-power and high-temperature electronics. SiC is the most promising materials for near term applications, since it shares many common features with Si processing, and the recent advances in the growth of both bulk SiC crystals and epitaxial layers have made high quality materials available for in-depth studies of their electrical properties. Many military and commercial systems today are requiring high temperature electronics to run smaller system size at high performance level. The Jet Process Corporation (JPC) has recently cooperated with Yale University on successful demonstration of high quality MNS capacitors, in which the silicon nitride layer is produced by the Jet Vapor Deposition Process (tm) (JVD(tm)) on silicon carbide substrates. Our MNS (Metal-SiN-SiC) capacitors show that the JVD nitride can form a high quality inversion layer on the SiC surface with low density of fix charge, low current density and high breakdown voltage. More recently, we are able to deposit high quality oxide dielectric layer at room temperature, which can reduce all the problems of high temperature thermal oxide. JVD(tm) is a patented, low cost, pollution free, and scaleable process. In Phase I, we will develop a JVD system which is suitable for depositing thin gate JVD oxide layer appropriate for MOS capacitors and MOSFETs on SiC. The new JVD system design will be experimentally demonstrated by making high quality MOS devices and integrated circuits with high reproducibility, reliability, and testability. In Phase II, we will work with government and industry labs to design and fabricate a prototype JVD system for MOSFETs on SiC wafers to demonstrate the feasibility. JPC will provide the JVD systems to the users to meet the need of the market for high temperature, high power electronics. Jet Vapor Deposition can produce high quality, high reliability gate dielectric layer deposition system for MOSFETs devices that are of great importance for applications in high-power high-temperature electronics for military and commercial applications.

LASERGENICS CORP.
6830 Via Del Oro, Suite 103
San Jose, CA 95119
(408) 363-9791

PI: Dr. Hana Hoffman
(408) 363-9791
Contract #: DASG60-97-M-0206
UNIV. OF CENTRAL FLORIDA
4000 Central Florida Blvd
Orlando, FL 32816
(407) 823-5278

ID#: 97BMDO04T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-001
Title: Multi-wavelength, Efficient Mid-Infrared Laser System
Abstract:   A potentially efficient and highly compact multi-wavelength mid-infrareds solid state laser is proposed capable of emitting radiation at several wavelengths in the 1-4 um range under resonant pumping with near-IR radiation sources compatible with diodelaser arrays. The laser system takes advantage of cascade processes in holmium-doped fluorides. Room temperature operation can potentially be achieved by exploiting the fortuitous coincidence of round state and excited state absorption thus overcoming long terminal state lifetimes. In addition, single crystal fibers of the same holmium-doped fluorides will be grown and tested. With these guided wave configurations even lower gain transitions can be utilized while mitigating against high thresholds typical of quasi-three-level systems. A mid-IR laser source scalable to high repetition rates and average powers will find wide applications, both government and commercial. Two key areas that would benefit from the proposed laser are fiber telecommunications and medical lasers for microsurgery and diagnostics where lasers operating at selected IR wavelengths where either superior transmission or maximum tissue absorption are required. Other applications include coherent laser radar, remote sensing and any other areas requiring eye-safe lasers. Countermeasure applications are a particular beneficiary of the proposed project .

MICROWAVE TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
5716 Edgewater Oak Ct.
Burke, VA 22015
(703) 250-1440

PI: Jose E. Velazco
(703) 250-1440
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0353
GEORGE MASON UNIV.
4400 University Drive
Fairfax, VA 22030
(703) 993-2295

ID#: 97BMDO07T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-001
Title: Miniature Cold-Cathode Electron Gun
Abstract:   We propose the development of a miniature cold-cathode electron gun (MCEG) which should be suitable for applications such as sensor systems for ballistic missile defense. The MCEG employs a Pierce geometry and uses a microscopic silicon cathode for the generation of a high-quality high-current density electron beam. Our studies indicate that the MCEG should be perfectly suited for applications where simplicity, compactness, light weight and reliability are desired. Of special interest is the development of these sources as electron sources for microwave devices such as TWTs, klystrons and other electron-based devices. When compared to conventional thermionic electron guns, the MCEG offers a reduction of about 10 times in size and weight and avoids the use of heating elements. If successfully developed, the MCEG could be the basis for a new generation of microscopic electron guns which have smaller angular distribution, reduced operating power requirements and improved reliability. Detailed analysis of this concept is proposed in order to address key issues such as maximum current attainable, gun optics, and cathode assembly. We anticipate that this miniature electron source will be able to provide high-quality, high current density, electron beams for applications such as the next generation of microwave tubes. Other commercial applications of the MCEG include electron microscopes, high definition television, spectrometers and flat panel displays. The proposed electron gun should be much smaller, more affordable, and lighter in weight than conventional electron sources.

NANOPOWDER ENTERPRISES, INC.
120 Centennial Ave.
Piscataway, NJ 08854
(908) 885-5909

PI: Ganesh Skandan
(908) 885-5909
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0342
VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INST. & STATE UNIV.
301 Burruss Hall
Blacksburg, VA 24061
(540) 231-5283

ID#: 97BMDO25T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-003
Title: Low Temperature Processing of Ferroelectric Thick Films
Abstract:   Low temperature processing of ferroelectric thick films is of paramount importance in reducing the device cost and optimizing the performance at the same time, e.g. in multilayer capacitors. The best dielectric properties are achieved when the grain size is small, typically 0.7 to 1.0 um. This requires low temperature sintering. Furthermore, at a processing temperature less than 1000 C, noble metal electrodes can be replaced with base metals. Until now, it has remained a challenge to process at low temperatures without the addition of sintering aids, and thus compromising on the purity of the material. In this program, we propose a radically new approach of processing thick-film based devices at less than 0.45 Tm by starting from nanoparticles of multicomponent materials such as BaTiO3, PZT, PLZT, BST and others. Our patented process, called Combustion Flame - Chemical Vapor Condensation (CF-CVC), involves pyrolysis of chemical precursors and condensation in the gas phase to form nanoparticles. Presently, in the CF-CVC process, a bubbler system has been used to transport vapors of precursor species to the burner. Our STTR partners at Virginia Tech. have developed a Flash Evaporation (FE) process to deliver difficult to handle precursors of Ba, Pb and La, which has the unique capability to deliver precursors at high rates. In Phase I, we will demonstrate production of nanoparticles of multicomponent oxides using the combined FE and CF-CVC technologies. If successful, this will be the first time that a chemical vapor phase method is used to produce complex multicomponent nanoparticles. In Phase II, apart from economically producing different compositions that are of technological significance, we will also use our high rate in situ deposition technique to directly sinter clusters/nanoparticles on the substrate. The device characteristics will be evaluated both in-house, and in partnership with end-user companies. There exists a huge market for high quality thick film devices for applications in MLCCs, and other device applications. The combined Flash Evaporation - Chemical Vapor Condensation technique will be a unique powder and film processing capability with the potential to deliver a high quality product in the marketplace, and hence this Phase I STTR.

NEW SPAN OPTO-TECHNOLOGY, INC.
9710 SW 72nd Court
Miami, FL 33156
(305) 284-4041

PI: Xu Gang Huang
(305) 284-4041
Contract #: F04611-97-C-0079
UNIV. OF MIAMI
1507 Levant Avenue
Coral Gables, FL 33146
(305) 284-2665

ID#: 97BMDO43T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-002
Title: Novel Programmable Optical Interconnects for Optoelectronic Packaging
Abstract:   Optical interconnects are required for high speed opto-electronic packaged computing systems for fast image data processing for missile interception and fast target identification. However, low cost polymer waveguide optical interconnects and other waveguide interconnects suffer from the packaging difficulty of waveguide interconnect lines with opto-electronic transmitters and receivers It is difficult to perform optical alignment during the packaging since the transmitters and receivers have not yet been turned on electrically to monitor their optical alignments with the interconnection waveguides. After the packaging, the optical alignment errors can not be easily corrected, New Span Opto-Technology Inc. and University of Miami propose a novel programmable optical interconnect concept. It facilitates dynamic optical alignment of the packaged opto-electronic chips and waveguides by laser writing of waveguides that connect the existing waveguides to the laser transmitters and photodetector receivers, This completes the dynamic optical alignment without physically moving packaged chips and waveguide components. The proposed concept also facilitates the formation of a programmable optical interconnect chip to be used for interconnect line reconfiguration. The dynamic optical alignment is comparable to conventional wire bonding in terms of packaging flexibility, The programmable optical interconnect chip is comparable to programmable logic array in terms of reconfiguration flexibility. The successful development of the programmable optical interconnects will allow us to design and demonstrate a laser direct-write system for dynamic optical alignment without moving packaged opto-electronic components. Furthermore, a programmable optical interconnect chip for optical bus line reconfiguration will be demonstrated, Applications include fast image data processing for military and commercial applications.

NORTH COAST CRYSTALS, INC.
P.O. Box 18188
Cleveland Heights, OH 44118
(216) 321-3277

PI: Christopher S. Kovach
(216) 321-3277
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0399
CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIV.
10900 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, OH 44106
(216) 368-2009

ID#: 97BMDO62T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-002
Title: Commercial Scale Production of Bulk, Polycrystalline Group III Nitrides
Abstract:   The proposed research will demonstrate the feasibility of a direct plasma-liquid process for bulk synthesis of polycrystalline Group III nitrides. In comparison with thermal chemical reactors, plasma assisted deposition systems have the advantages of cleaner reaction environments, and higher product purity. Recent developments at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) have shown that the Group III nitrides can be grown by direct reaction using a microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source. The innovation proposed is to use a microwave plasma at higher operating pressures and higher nitrogen throughput. These conditions will allow us to overcome transport limitations of the ECR system and convert a larger percentage of the liquid metal substrate. The system will also allow for higher thermal energy transfer to the substrate and, therefore, greater efficiency. Our technical objectives are to grow GaN and Al of high crystalline quality and purity. Various process modifications will be made to enhance the transport of reactive nitrogen to the unreacted metal. We will identify the best conditions for nitride growth. Once growth of the nitrides is demonstrated (Phase I), a commercial scale system will be designed that will make the process semi-continuous. This design will minimize capital costs while maxi zing conversion and energy efficiency. In Phase II the commercial scale system will be built and tested. With these modifications, we will develop a cost effective method for growing high quality group III nitrides. The high quality bulk, polycrystalline Group III nitrides grown will be used as source materials for single crystal growth and as device materials. GaN and its alloys could be sublimed (or ablated) to form thin film light emitting diodes, field effect transistors and diode laser structures. High quality polycrystalline GaN can be used for W detectors, inexpensive LED's and as seed material for single crystal growth. There is also great demand for high purity A N powder for the fabrication of high thermal conductivity electronic substrates. In markets such as telecommunications and radar, the highest crystalline quality, lowest impurity level substrates for thermal management are required.

OPTICAL SEMICONDUCTORS, INC.
8 John Walsh Boulevard
Peekskill, NY 10566-0000
(914) 739-0048

PI: Brian J. Fitzpatrick
(914) 739-0048
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0367
RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF CITY COLLEGE NY
138th Street and Convent Avenue
New York, NY 10031
(212) 650-5418

ID#: 97BMDO01T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-002
Title: Hexagonal II-VI structures by Substrate Bandgap Engineering
Abstract:   Quantum well structures in cubic materials show benefits from intentional strain, due to splitting of the valence band. In hexagonal materials, the valence band shows similar splitting, but without the strain. We believe that, by doing Substrate Bandgap Engineering, hexagonal heterostructures can be made, with strong potential benefits for blue-green light emission. ZnMgSSe is used in all blue-green laser diodes that have attained RT CW operation. We invented and patented this composition, and grew it first in bulk form. This material is hexagonal at high Mg/Zn ratios. Hexagonal II-VI materials have. generally better crystalline structure than cubic materials, because they have no high temperature phase transitions and no twins. Thus, these materials are better substrates for epitaxial growth. Epilayers grown by MBE should be hexagonal on non-basal planes. Hexagonal II-VI materials show lower electron-beam laser thresholds than cubic ones; this correlates with efficient excitonic luminescence. Dislocation motion should be slower in hexagonal materials, thus reducing degradation. Optical storage, film marking, printing, photochemical fabrication, cell sorting in medical diagnostics, DNA fluorescence excitation (at the cellular level), COM (computer output to microfilm), pumping small dye lasers and specialized displays are some of the applications for these devices.

PLASTRONIC, INC.
35 Mary-Bill Dr.
Troy, OH 45373
(937) 335-0656

PI: Michael Tomsic
(937) 335-0656
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0348
LOCKHEED MARTIN ENERGY RESEARCH CORP.
P.O. Box 2008, Bethel Valley Road
Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6248
(423) 574-9920

ID#: 97BMDO75T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-003
Title: Improved Processing of Textured Metal Substrates for Long Length YBCO High Temperature Superconductors
Abstract:   For BMDO requirements for small and efficient cryopower, generators and power cables. YBCO on textured substrates high temperature superconductors offers a great potential for high efficiency and low weight for these applications. Current densities up to 1,000,000 amps/cm2 have been demonstrated on short samples. To obtain these current densities on long length conductors requires excellent textured metal substrates over long lengths. This proposal will investigate several thermo-mechanical processes and techniques for improving the texture and increase the number of low angle grain boundaries in these metal substrates . We will also investigate texturable alloys that have better AC properties than nickel substrates. The results will enable the YBCO on textured substrate approach to be improved because of improved texture over long lengths and characteristics that will make the superconductor better for long length AC applications such as cryocooled power sources, generators, and power cables for BMDO, Army, and Air Force applications. The results of this work will accelerate the development and commercialization of AC- high temperature superconductor that operate at 77 K at high fields of 1-4 tesla. These conductors will accelerate the development of high temperature superconductors for commercial transformers, fault current limiters, energy storage systems, motors, generators, and AC transmission lines.

RADIANT RESEARCH LAB
3925 W. Braker Lane, Suite 420
Austin, TX 78759
(512) 305-0295

PI: Dr. Suning Tang
(512) 305-0297
Contract #: F04611-97-C-0080
UNIV. OF TEXAS - AUSTIN
Microelectronics Research Center Dept. o
Austin, TX 78712-1084
(512) 471-7035

ID#: 97BMDO76T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-001
Title: A Novel Micro/Electro/Mechanical/Optoelectronic (MEMO) Tunable Filter for Wideband In-site Optic Fiber Sensor Arrays
Abstract:   Optoelectronic instruments would be miniaturized to an unprecedented extent by use of components fabricated by innovative surface micro-machining techniques. In contrast to any existing approaches, Radiant Research, Inc. (RRI) proposes a novel micro/electro/mechanical/-optoelectronic (MEMO) band-pass tunable filter for a wavelength-division-multiplexed optical fiber sensor system. The proposed tunable MEMO filter will be constructed by integrating thin film multiplexed volume holograms, an micro electrostatic deflector and a Si photodetector array in silicon substrate. The micro electrostatic deflection employed, providing fast and repeatable adjustments, greatly enhances the dynamic range of the filter. The application of multiplexed volume hologram in conjunction with a photodetector array allows the filter to operate at many wavelength windows, including 670 nm, 850 nm, 980 nm, 1300 nm and 1550 nm. The choice of semiconductor such as silicon, GaAs, and InP as the substrate material allows the incorporation of a photodetector array and a drive electronics on the same chip. The proposed MEMO band-pass tunable filter will offer significant advantages over existing devices including dynamic tuning range, size reduction, low cost, high reliability and fast data acquisition. Because of these advantages, a myriad of applications for optical measurement techniques can be anticipated in the future. The surface integration of optical multiplexed holograms, micro electrostatic deflectors and photodetectors proposed herein represents an innovative concept and a novel technology for realizing a new generation of optoelectronic instruments that can be miniaturized to an unprecedented extent with an unprecedented performance. We will demonstrate a working module in Phase I with the promised claims addressed in this proposal. The proposed MEMO band-pass filter represents a new device concept based on a novel surface machining technique. The success of the proposed research will lay a solid foundation for fabricating a new generation of miniaturized optoelectronic instruments. The proposed MEMO band-pass tunable filter will offer significant advantages over existing devices including dynamic tuning range, size reduction, low cost, high reliability and fast data acquisition. Because of these advantages, a myriad of applications can be anticipated in the future in the area of optic fiber transmissions, optical sensors and optoelectronic switching networks.

ROTORDYNAMICS-SEAL RESEARCH
3628 Madison Avenue, Suite 20
North Highlands, CA 95660
(916) 344-9500

PI: Robert I. Hibbs
(916) 344-9500
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0375
JOHN HOPKINS UNIV.
3400 North Charles St.
Baltimore, MD 21218
(410) 516-8668

ID#: 97BMDO74T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-003
Title: High Strength Ceramics Bearings
Abstract:   High Strength Ceramic Bearings will be fabricated using a new low cost process that promises high strength. The bearings will enable elimination of temperature limiting metallics from high performance turbomachinery. The new ceramic process will enable order of magnitude cost reductions in ceramic components in most industrial and consumer applications. This effort will consist of development of a ceramic bearing design, fabrication, and testing of the bearing in an existing test rig. High strength, low cost bearings, low cost ceramic composite materials.

SCIENTIFIC MATERIALS CORP.
310 Icepond Road
Bozeman, MT 59715
(406) 585-3772

PI: Randy W. Equall
(406) 585-3372
Contract #: F49620-98-C-0005
MONTANA STATE UNIV.
244 Wood Street
Bozeman, MT 59717
(406) 994-2891

ID#: 97BMDO33T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-002
Title: Improved Optical Memories
Abstract:   Current computing and data acquisition systems exceed the capabilities of existing data storage systems. Optical storage and processing based on persistent spectral holeburning (PSHB) is one of the few technologies capable of meeting these demands with the potential to scale and meet future demands. These devices currently employ rare earth doped crystals as the storage or processing media and have the potential for data bandwidths of lOO's of gigahertz to terahertz combined with demonstrated storage densities exceeding a gigabit/cm2 and raw bit error rates of < 10^-6. This technology is sufficiently mature that it is possible to construct first generation devices that meet or exceed the capabilities of current technologies. However, the performance of these devices is limited by the materials upon which they are based. In some cases this is due to material quality, while in others the materials lack the necessary performance capabilities. Identical problems also exist in other optical memory techniques. It is the purpose of this Phase I project to advance the quality and capabilities of materials for use in optical memory applications. Solutions to material quality problems and the development of improved performance materials will enable the development of PSHB optical memory and signal processing devices for both military and private sector applications. This will also provide a commercial source for the production of high quality crystals that allow the full potential of the material to be utilized and generate a source for new materials for photon-gated holeburning studies at a reasonable cost.

SDL, INC.
80 Rose Orchard Way
San Jose, CA 95134
(408) 943-9411

PI: Marc Verdiell
(408) 943-9411
Contract #: F49620-96-C-0024
NASA JET PROPULSION LAB.
4800 Oak Grove Drive
Pasadena, CA 91109
(818) 354-2800

ID#: 95-070T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 95-002
Title: Monolithically Integrated WDM Transmitter for All Optical Fiber Communications
Abstract:   Spectra Diode Laboratories (SDL), in collaboration with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), will develop a monolithically integrated Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) transmitter for all-optical, high-data rate telecommunications. The integrated devices will incorporate on a single chip e-beam written, multi element DFB lasers emitting at equally spaced wavelengths, and an integrated combiner. In Phase I, SDL will demonstrate the integrated passive combiner, the essential element of the monolithic WDM source, and JPL will demonstrate direct-write e-beam lighography with 1 A absolute pitch control, and essential point for high device yield. Phase II will result in the development of a packaged transmitter, capable of WDM transmission at the rate of 2.5 Gb/s per channel, single-mode fiber pigtailed, with driver electronics, thermoelectric cooling and optical isolator included in the package. WDM transmitters are one of the key components missing for the practical implementation of all-optical networks. The current solution consists in screening discrete DFB devices, using an external coupler and a fiber amplifier to recover from the coupler losses. This results in bulky, expensive transmitters. The monolithic integration will remedy this situation and provide a low-cost, compact, high output power solution for WDM network sources.

SPACE ELECTRONICS, INC.
4031 Sorrento Valley Blvd.
San Diego, CA 92121
(619) 452-4167

PI: D. Czajkowski
(619) 452-4167
Contract #: DSWA01-97-M-0552
UNIV. OF ALABAMA - HUNTSVILLE
College of Engineering, EE Dept.
Huntsville, AL 35899
(205) 890-6642

ID#: 97BMDO14T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-002
Title: Technique and Development of Radiation Hardened digital Signal Processor Using COTS Technologies
Abstract:   Space Electronics, Inc. proposes to develop a low cost technique of utilizing commercially available application specific integrated 4 circuit (ASIC) foundries and commercial design tools to develop an advanced radiation hardened Digital Signal Processor (DSP). Such a technique could be used to develop other advanced IC functions at substantially lower costs than traditional radiation hardened IC f development programs. The technique consists of developing and capturing the IC design in a high level descriptive language (HDL) and performing functional and timing design simulation. The design will then be programmed into-a COTS Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) for design verification with commercially available software and hardware development tools and a hardware mod e . After verifi-cation, the design will be optimized and synthesized and then ported to a commercial CMOS epitaxial or silicon-on-insulator foundry because of their known high level of radiation tolerance. The high level design will be wafer foundry independent. Single Event Latchup (SEL) and Total Ionizing Dose (TID) radiation hardening will be accomplished through foundry/process/selection and IC design techniques. The selected design and process verification candidate is a 32-bit floating point digital signal processor, hardware and software compatible with Texas Instruments' TMS320C30 family. Successful demonstration of a low cost method for designing and fabricating complex digital radiation hardened ICs should greatly increase the availability of presently unavailable functions, such as 32-bit DSPs, 32- and 64-bit microprocessors, GPS receiver chip sets, etc. The availability of these functions will greatly enhance the technical capabilities of both military (GPS, SMTS, SBIRs, etc.) and commercial satellites systems.

STRUCTURED MATERIALS INDUSTRIES, INC.
120 Centennial Ave
Piscataway, NJ 08854
(908) 885-5909

PI: Dr. Bei-Shen Sywe
(908) 885-5909
Contract #: F19628-96-C-0024
MASS. INST. OF TECH. LINCOLN LAB.
244 Wood Street
Lexington, MA 02173
(617) 981-7094

ID#: 95-086T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 95-002
Title: Laser Writing of Quantum Crystal Structures
Abstract:   The demonstration of photoluminescent (PL) and electroluminescent (EL) from nanometer scale Si and Ge crystals has been regarded as an important step toward the realization of Si-based photonic and optoelectronic devices. From the material aspect, the successful development of such devices relies heavily on the ability to control the formation of the nanocrystals in size and distribution since quantum effects play the major role in the observed PL and EL phenomena. The device processing, structure, and packaging are also important features. Structured Materials Industries, Inc. (SMI), developed a technology to fabricate Si/Ge nanocrystals in an amorphous SiOx matrix and demonstrated a white-light EL device from this material. SMI will team with MIT Lincoln Laboratory to implement a laser beam processing technology to control the formation of Si nanocrystals in the amorphous SiOx matrix. The laser technology has been developed by MIT Lincoln Laboratory and successfully applied to produce device quality polysilicon. The goal of implementing the MIT Lincoln Laboratory laser annealing approach is to facilitate multicolor pixel arrays from a single composition film, thus, maximizing the "color" output efficiency per pixel and minimizing cost through eliminating multilayer processes. This program will build upon SMI's current nanotechnology success and add in the advanced processing technology from MIT Lincoln Laboratory that will be needed for advanced device manufacturing. It will facilitate the development of nanocrystal-based photonic devices.

SYMYX TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
420 Oakmead Parkway
Sunnyvale, CA 94086
(408) 328-3104

PI: W. Henry Weinberg
(408) 328-3106
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0347
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA - BERKELEY
Dept. of Chemistry, Latimer Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720
(510) 643-1944

ID#: 97BMDO47T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-002
Title: Combinatorial Solid-State Laser Material Discovery
Abstract:   Lasers are one of the fundamental components of modern optical and optoelectronic technology. The search for efficient lasing media at a variety of wavelengths is ongoing. This proposal details the application of combinatorial methodology to the preparation and evaluation of solid-state laser materials. This approach involves the parallel synthesis of multi-element libraries of materials and subsequent rapid assessment of their physical properties. The combinatorial approach offers the capacity to rapidly assess enormous numbers of potentially interesting materials and represents a revolutionary development in the process of basic materials discovery. Initial Phase I studies will focus on the well established lasing materials Cr3+:AI2O3, Ti3+:Al203 and Nd3+:YAG with future extension to a wide variety of solid-state materials as potential novel laser media. Phase I goals include: i) feasibility studies of parallel synthesis of laser materials in thin-film library format, ii) development of serial spectroscopic analyses of laser materials libraries, iii) evaluation of direct laser gain measurements in thin-film micro-laser libraries. Anticipated benefits from Phase I work include the establishment of combinatorial methodology as a tool in the search for novel solid-state laser materials. Application of this methodology should allow rapid and efficient discovery and optimization of lasing media which have wide commercial applicability in a variety of emerging technologies.

TRS CERAMICS, INC.
2820 East College Avenue, Suite J
State College, PA 16801
(814) 238-7485

PI: Dr. Wesley Hackenberger
(814) 238-7485
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0344
PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.
Materials Research Laboratory
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 865-1372

ID#: 97BMDO73T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-003
Title: Lead Free Piezoelectric Transducers and Sensors
Abstract:   This Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Phase I program will address the synthesis and processing of lead-free piezoelectric ceramics for high performance transducers and sensors. In collaboration with The Pennsylvania State University, the piezoelectric activity of Na,KNbO3-based materials will be enhanced through the use of dopant strategies that include A-site and B-site modifications. The ability to enhance the extrinsic polarizibility will allow piezoelectric activity comparable to current DOD Type I and III piezoelectric materials based on lead zirconate titantate (PZTs). In addition to being environmentally and manufacturing friendly, these non-lead perovskite piezoelectrics offer significant reduction in weight, an essential requirement for aerospace applications. The Phase I research will provide a basis for further piezoelectric formulation and processing optimization in Phase II, that includes the manufacturing of monolithic and multilayer actuators for various electronic systems. Rapid commercialization is projected with the environmental concerns of a lead-free environment. Non-lead piezoelectric ceramics with comparable properties and performance of present day PZTs will find established markets in actuators, hydrophone sensors, sonar and new markets in smart materials for aerospace and DOD-related industries.

WITECH
827 State Street, Suite #12
Santa Barbara, CA 93101
(818) 879-0686

PI: Brian Thibeault
(805) 963-9338
Contract #: DSWA01-97-C-0343
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA - SANTA BARBARA
3227 Cheadle Hall
Santa Barbara, CA 93106
(805) 893-3890

ID#: 97BMDO15T
Agency: BMDO
Topic#: 97-002
Title: GaN-based Solid-State Power-Combining Modules
Abstract:   WideGap Technology (WiTech) and the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) propose to develop CW X-band solid-state power module technology that has the potential of revolutionizing the microwave power electronics industry. Recently UCSB has demonstrated a spatial power combining technique that enables large numbers of power amplifier circuits to be efficiently combined in a compact, thermally attractive enclosure. UCSB and WiTech propose a marriage of this technology and high power GaN MODFET technology under development at WiTech. Under Phase I, WiTech will develop the large gate width GaN MODFET based device designs necessary to support up to 20W X-band devices. Thermal management will be a main thrust of the device design work. UCSB will develop the power combiner package design to meet electrical and thermal requirements in a manufacturable package. Through a joint effort, Hybrid amplifier cards will be designed to provide the means of merging the two technologies. In phase II, the technologies will be merged to provide the compact, reliable, highly efficient, linear power modules, which have the potential of providing 1 kW CW X-band power amplification desired for commercial and military radar and communications systems. Highly efficient, Linear, Light weight Power Modules for microwave radar, and military and commercial satellite communication applications at C-Band and higher frequencies.

---------- DARPA ----------

ADVANCED MATERIALS CORP.
700 Technology Drive P.O. Box 2950
Pittsburgh, PA 15230
(412) 268-5649

PI: Satoru Simizu
(412) 268-5650
Contract #: DAAH0197CR227
CARNEGIE MELLON UNIV.
700 Technology Drive
Pittsburgh, PA 15230
(412) 268-3190

ID#: 97ST10019
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 97-010
Title: Spectro-Polarimetric Video Image Processing System
Abstract:   Technology exists today for the simultaneous measurement of the spatial, spectrosccopic and polarimetric (spectro-polarimetric) features of remote objects at video frame rates. Advanced Materials Corporation has recently demonstrated an evolutionary enhanced target identification system by combining a high performance CCD array with an agile acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). By adding a variable phase retarder, full polarimetric analysis is also possible at video frame rates. We propose to develop an intelligent imaging system capable of real time image discrimination based on spatial, spectral, polarimetric and temporal input. This approach permits highly selective discrimination among objects or targets of nearly identical spatial and spectral signatures. This will be achieved by a combination of employing a state-of-the-art imaging hardware and an innovative approach to the software for image data analysis and scene display. By taking advantage of the full spectral and polarimetric features, system capabilities will be enhanced many-folds.

BEND RESEARCH, INC.
64550 Research Road
Bend, OR 97701-8599
(541) 382-4100

PI: Daniel T. Smithey
(541) 382-4100
Contract #: DAAH0197CR228
UNIV. OF OREGON
c/o Office of Research Services 5219
Eugene, OR 97403
(541) 346-5131

ID#: 97ST10058
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 97-002
Title: A Reconfigurable, High-Storage-Density Holographic Memory Based on Bacteriorhodopsin
Abstract:   This Phase I STTR is directed toward developing a novel, analog holographic optical-storage system with high capacity and fast access time. This system is based on bacteriorhodopsin (BR), an optical-recording medium of biological origin. If successfully developed, the proposed system will ultimately be able to store approximately 100,000 high-resolution holograms in a single storage material and will have the capability to read out all of these holograms in less than 1 second. Additionally, the system will be completely reconfigurable, thus allowing the optical memory to be updated with new information without physically replacing the storage medium. Our approach will be collaborate with the University of Oregon to genetically engineer the BR material itself to meet the demands of analog memory, such as lifetime, read-without-erase capability, thickness, and sensitivity. This will enable a robust holographic data-storage system with sensitivity. This will enable a robust holographic data-storage system with high storage density, fast access time, high resolution, permanent information-storage capability, read-without-erase capability, high sensitivity photo-chemical and thermal stability, and optical-erase capability. These features are extremely difficult to achieve with other materials such as photochromics, photopolymers, or photorefractive crystals.

CCVD, INC.
430 Tenth Street, N.W. Suite N-108
Atlanta, GA 30318
(404) 249-7001

PI: Andrew T. Hunt
(404) 249-7001
Contract #: DAAH0197CR230
RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC INST.
110 8th Street
Troy, NY 12180
(518) 276-6283

ID#: 97ST10039
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 97-003
Title: Embedded Capacitors for Electronic Circuits Based on Flexible Laminate Multichip Module/Printed Circuit Boards
Abstract:   This proposal will develop high-dielectric-constant thin film coatings for high-frequency multichip module (MCMs) embedded capacitance. Embedded capacitance has been identified as essential for high operating frequency MCMs. It eliminates discrete capacitors, reducing size and weight while minimizing the effects of simultaneous gate switching noise at high frequencies, all of which are essential to the development of smaller, lighter, more automous and less expensive compact information devices. The objective of this proposal is to demonstrate a low-cost process, Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition (CCVDsm), and materials for embedding capacitance in MCMs. The CCVD process, invented by MicroCoating Technologies' founder, is the only viable open-atmosphere CVD technique for depositing thin films of ceramicand metals. This inexpensive technology has the ability to quickly apply dense, continous, adherent thin films. It can be used for the low-cost production of high-dielectric-constant thin-film coatings on metal foils and ceramic substrates. The CCVD process does not require a reaction chamber or furnace, yet the thin films produced are of electronic quality, allowing easy depositions over large surfaces-required for embedded capacitance. Using the CCVD technology, the company has deposited high quality films of over fifty materials, including Ba1-x SrxTiO3, onto numerous substrates. To effectively minimize particle and pinhole defects, a ULPA fume hood was recently completed to eliminate airborne particulates. These coatings can provide up to a 90% savings and provide revolutionary performance as described in this proposal.

EDAPTIVE COMPUTING, INC.
2161 Blanton Drive
Miamisburg, OH 45342
(937) 433-0477

PI: Praveen Chawla
(937) 433-0477
Contract #: DAAH0197CR229
UNIV. OF CINCINNATI
Office of Sponsored Programs ML #627
Cincinnati, OH 45221
(513) 556-2870

ID#: 97ST10057
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 97-004
Title: Systems on a Chip Created Using Extended Requirements Language
Abstract:   This research, to be conducted by EDAptive Computing Inc. and the University of Cincinnati will develop a unique and commercially viable solution to the problem of specifying the requirements and intended function of mixed-technology systems-on-chip (SOC) for synthesis. Our Systems On a Chip Created using Extended Requirements language (SOCCER) program will apply DARPA and AF-sponsored language developments in VSPEC, SimSpec, and VHDL-AMS, synthesis techniques developed under a USAF-sponsored mixed-signal synthesis program, and analyzer developments performed under the USAF-sponsored SAVANT program, in a focused approach to establish feasibility in Phase I. Specific Phase I Objectives are to (1) Define requirements, (2) Identify and evaluate candidate languages, tools and technologies, (3) Develop languages and tools, (4) Demonstrate technical feasibility through preliminary design and prototyping, and (5) Establish commercial product feasibility and potential. The Phase II result will be an ESDA tool suite which will, given a declarative mixed-technology system specification in extended VSPEC, translate input specifications into a functional, synthesizable VHDL-AMS description. This will not only be technical solution to the problem of specifying the requirements and intended fuction of mixed-technology SOC for synthesis but a basis for immediate transition into a commercial product.

IMAGE MEDICAL COMMUNICATIONS
1010 Gallows Road 10th Floor
Vienna, VA 22182
(703) 848-2700

PI: Howard R. Champion
(410) 626-0322
Contract #: DAAH0197CR226
UNIV. OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE
511 W. Lombard Street 5th Floor
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 706-3559

ID#: 97ST10030
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 97-007
Title: Haptics Interface for Combat Trauma Training
Abstract:   The project proposes to develop a haptic interface fro virtual reality simulator that can be used fro the training of medics, surgeons and other health personnel in trauma procedures. The challenge will be to develop a single finger-based haptics display that can be used to convey tactile and proprioceptive sensation, allowing the trainee to feel the forces associated with actual trauma procedures. The major effort in Phase I will be to prepare requirements for the design of haptics interface devices, based on a task analysis of chest tube insertion, central venous line placement, and other manual manipulations associated with trauma surgery. It is anticipated that development of the haptics display will lead to a reduction in the number of animals used for trauma training, increase the readiness of military medical personnel and improve the performance of physicians, nurses and allied health personnel by providing a platform for practice and performance assessment.

INFORMATION SYSTEM LABORATORIES
6767 Old Madison Pike Suite 180
Huntsville, AL 35806
(205) 922-1475

PI: Peter S. Erbach
(205) 922-1475
Contract #: DAAH0197CR221
UNIV. OF ALABAMA - HUNTSVILLE
Huntsville Research Institute E-35
Huntsville, AL 35899
(205) 890-6000

ID#: 97ST10012
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 97-001
Title: Fractal/Wavelet-Based Region-of-Interest Classification
Abstract:   This Phase I STTR effort will establish the feasibility of employing wavelet transform techniques, fractal theory techniques, and standard multivariant filter techniques to determine target regions of interest (ROI) in tactical imagery. This effort will be accomplished through the application of wavelet transform techniques for edge and feature detection capabilities as well as generating reduced matched filters. The effort will also be accomplished by the generation of fractal filters for clutter characterization and the use of fractal dimensions for distinguishing man-made from natural objects for subsequent target and clutter ROI determination. The combinations of generalized filters with wavelet and fractal filtering methods will be explored to improve on the characterizing ability of single wavelet, fractal, or standard matched filtered. Information Systems Laboratories (ISL) proposes to define algorithms that successfully incorporate these concepts in standard and non-standard tactical image processing and classification techniques.

IS ROBOTICS, INC.
22 McGrath Highway, Suite 6
Somerville, MA 02143
(617) 629-0055

PI: Helen Greiner
(617) 629-0055
Contract #: DAAH0197CR222
SANDIA NATIONAL LABS.
1515 Eubank NE, Mail Stop 1176 P.O.5800
Albuquerque, NM 87185
(505) 844-2552

ID#: 97ST10023
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 97-009
Title: Micro Unattended Mobility System
Abstract:   The goal of this program is the development of Micro Unattended Mobility SYstem as a complement to existing unattended sensor packages. A typical unattended sensor strategy consists of air dropping sensor packages into a target terrain fro remote observation and intelligence gathering. Existing and planned unattached systems have no contrtol over their location after the drop is complete. We propose to augment the capability of these packages by giving them a degree of local mobility. The envisioned device is the Micro Unattended Mobility System or MUMS. The device will be small (3" in diameter) mobility system capable of carrying a suite of sensor devices such as a modular GPS antenna, communications antenna, seismic sensor, microphone, EM detector, and possibly chemical detection sensors. In the Phase I effort, we will define the operational requirements, identify the critical components, and produce conceptual layouts of the system. Phase II will fabricate, test, and evaluate this prototype.

J. & D. SCIENTIFIC, INC.
4300 N.W. 23rd Avenue Suite 11
Gainesville, FL 32614
(352) 336-2599

PI: Larry D. McCormick
(352) 336-2599
Contract #: DAAH0197CR246
UNIV. OF FLORIDA
219 Grinter
Gainesville, FL 32611
(352) 392-1582

ID#: 97ST10049
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 97-010
Title: Resonance Ionization Image Detectors
Abstract:   A novel imaging concept and method of viewing images in an ultra narrowband spectral range on the order of 1 MHz using atomic resonance ionization image detectors (RIID) is proposed. The RIID can have a spatial resolution, working area, and acceptance angle aperature on the order of 0.03mm, several meters square, and 2 pi sr., respectively. The limit of quantum detection is estimated to be on the order of 10 (-2) - 10 (-3) quanta/second per pixel. In preliminary experiments, we have demonstrated the detection of a single photoelectron using resonance ionization and the detection, via fluorescence, of resonance images formed by Hg atoms and that laser induced photoionization in Hg vapor can be detected by the optical emission of the buffer gas via energy transfer from ionized Hg atoms. A number of potential applications for RIID's are discussed, indicating a wide range of uses in many scientific fields. A prototype system will be constructed and tested during phase I.

JMAR TECHNOLOGY, CO.
3956 Sorrento Valley Blvd
San Diego, CA 92121
(619) 535-1706

PI: Harry Shields
(619) 535-1706
Contract #: DAAH0197CR224
LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LAB.
7000 East Avenue L-399
Livermore, CA 94550
(510) 422-5335

ID#: 97ST10036
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 97-005
Title: Demonstration of Laser Plasma X-Ray Source with Resonant Reflector Collimator
Abstract:   JMAR Technology Co. (JTC) is developing a laser-produced plasma x-ray point source, generating x-rays in a wavelength range around 11A. This source may be used in future lithography systems to manufacture semiconductors having 0.13 micron features. The efficiency of the source, and hence the throughput of semiconductor wafers, could be significantly enhanced by use of an x-ray collimater to effectively transform the spherical x-ray radiation pattern of the point source toa linear beam. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing x-ray collimators for point sources in this wavelength range, based on a conical reflecting surface, coated with multilayer x-ray mirror to achieve reflectivity. In Phase I, this STTR proposes to couple a prototype LLNL collomator to the JTC source, and carry out a series of measurements to characterize the system performance relative to the requirements for 0.13 micron lithography. This data will include beam divergence and collimator gain, and will be used in a preliminary design of a scanned-beam system which meets the exposure uniformity requirements for lithography. In Phase II, the scanned-beam system will be constructed and used to demonstrate lithographic transfer of features from a mask to a wafer.

MATERIALS RESEARCH GROUP, INC.
12441 W. 49th Avenue Suite 2
Wheat Ridge, CO 80033-1927
(303) 425-6688

PI: Russell Hollingsworth
(303) 425-6688
Contract #: DAAH0197CR225
COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES
1500 Illinois St.
Golden, CO 80401
(303) 273-3255

ID#: 97ST10008
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 97-006
Title: Near Field Scanning Optical Nanolithography Using a-Si:H Photoresists
Abstract:   Materials Research Group, Inc. in collaboration with the Colorado School of Mines, proposes and investigation of the potential of near field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) for generating 100 nanometer level patterns in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photoresists using optically enhanced oxidation. This research builds on MRS's expertise in -Si:H photoresists for in situ patterning of HgCdTe and CSM's expertise in the design and application of near field microscopy. The complete resists process will be examined: deposition, pattern generation, and hydrogen plasma development. Deposition parameters of a-Si:H will be optimized to minimize the required exposure dose. Hydrogen plasma etching parameters will be optimized to give high a-Si:H to oxide selectivity while maintaining high aspect ratios in the final pattern. Extensive work on NSOM patterning will determine the effects of scan speed, scan height, illumination energy, and dither amplitude on line width and oxide thickness. Methods of increasing the scan speed to allow 100x180 micron image regions to be scanned at 100 nm resolution on a one second time frame will be examined.

NONVOLATILE ELECTRONICS, INC.
11409 Valley View Road
Eden Prairie, MN 55344
(612) 996-1607

PI: Mark Tondra
(612) 996-1615
Contract #: DAAH0197CR238
UNIV. OF MINNESOTA
Magnetic Microscopy Ctr 116 Church St SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455
(612) 624-3506

ID#: 97ST10054
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 97-006
Title: Imaging of Active Nano-Scale Magnetoresistive Devices Using High Frequency Magnetic Force Microscopy
Abstract:   The objective of this Phase I project is to demonstrate the feasibility of using high frequency Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM) to magnetically image electrically active nano-scale magnetoresistive elements. To do so, an MFM (a type of AFM) would be fitted with special new tips capable of imaging 10nm features. Using a new technique, the operating frequency of the instrument would be pushed to the 25MHz range or higher. If successful, this technique would allow quasi-dynamic imaging of active elements. Concurrent with MFM development would be fabrication of 30nm magnetoresistive devices. These tiny magnetic sensors would act as a test case for the MFM development and help characterize MFM properties on the appropriate length scale. MFM data, in turn, would guide the construction of effective nano-scale magnetic devices. This combined effort would represent a major contribution to the understanding of the time-dependence of magnetic domain structures in rapidly switching nano-scale magnetoresistive elements. Consequently, the ability to design and fabricate these devices with feature sizes down 10nm would be greatly increased. Research of this type would be of enormous value in the development of increasingly dense Magnetic Random Access Memory (MRAM), read heads, and other magnetic sensing devices.

PHYSICAL OPTICS, INC.
2545 W. 237th St., Ste B, Appl Tech Div
Torrance, CA 90505
(310) 320-3088

PI: Kalin Spariosu
(310) 530-1416
Contract #: DAAH0197CR237
ALABAMA A&M UNIV.
4900 Meridian Street
Normal, AL 35762
(205) 851-5675

ID#: 97ST10016
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 97-009
Title: Ultra-High Sensitivity Seismic Sensor Network Based on a Novel Holographic Technique
Abstract:   In response to DARPA's requirements for novel, low-cost, unattended sensor systems for a variety of applications (seismic, geological, etc.), Physical Optics Corporation (POC) Applied Technology (AT) division, in conjunction with Alabama A&M University, proposes to develop an ultra-high sensitivity seismic sensor system based on a novel holographic technique. The basis for the proposed concept lies in novel technique for a laser interrogated holographic current sensor (LIHCS). The sensor system can be multiplexed (for simultaneous monitoring of multiple position-sites), is inherently rugged, yet sensitive, is low-cost, and is operable in a real-time unattended mode. POC's sensor sytem element is ideal for security net deployment where ultra-high sensitivity seismic disturbances can be readily detected. Through simple encoding and calibration, the system can be made fail-safe by eliminating unwanted noise and interference from ambient conditions.

PRESSURE PROFILE SYSTEMS, INC.
605 Sheldon St.
El Segundo, CA 90245
(310) 322-2464

PI: Jae S. Son
(310) 322-2464
Contract #: DAAH0197CR239
HARVARD UNIV.
Office of Sponsored Res. 1350 Mass Ave
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 495-5501

ID#: 97ST10003
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 97-007
Title: Conformable Tactile Sensor for Surgical Data Acquisition
Abstract:   Surgeons rely on the sense of touch, but surprising little is known about the nature of interactions that occur at the surgeon's fingertips. The proposed project will create a "Comformable Tactile Sensor" (CTS) that can be unobtrusively mounted on the fingers to measure pressure distributions during surgical procedures. Pressure Profile Systems, a producer a multielement pressure sensing systems, will develop a thin and flexible sensor, with good sensitivity to contact forces but minimal response to shear loads and bending. Harvard University will perform experiments to determine the tradeoff between sensor properties (e.g. thickness, stiffness) and human performance in manipulation and perception. This will allow design optimization, and provide insight into the tactile fidelity required for future haptic interfaces. Development of CTS technology is the first step in developing a Tactile Glove System (TGS) that can measure fingertips forces, finger joint angles, and hand position in 3D space. The TGS will enable the measurement of fingertip forces and motions in surgical procedures for the first time. The resulting information about interactions between the surgeon's hands and the patient's tissue is essential for improving realism in surgical simulation systems.

---------- NAVY ----------

ACTIVE SIGNAL TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
13025 Beaver Dam Rd.
Cockeysville, MD 21030
(202) 547-0293

PI: Dr. Keith Bridger
(202) 547-0293
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0298
NY STATE COLLEGE OF CERAMICS AT ALFRED U
2 Pine St., McMahon Engineering Bldg.
Alfred, NY 14802
(607) 871-2486

ID#: 107100956
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 97-003
Title: Frequency Agile High-Power-Density Transducers
Abstract:   Active Signal Technologies and the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University, propose to build a new type of highly capable transducer that will enable the development of broadband sonar projections within a practically deployable envelope for size, weight, and power conditioning equipment. The transducer will be developed by combining innovative mechanical amplifier designs and state-of-the-art performance models with material processing and formulation enhancements that overcome known property limitations with high performance sonar materials. In particular, processing, characterization and test of this class of electroactive ceramics at Alfred University has highlighted the importance of controlling grain boundary phases for both the physical and electromechanical properties of importance to the sonar system designer. The improved material will be coupled with transducer designs selected by the Active Signal the which has >50 years cumulative experience in the design, modeling, fabrication and testing of transducers utilizing all three conventional ceramic lead zirconate titanate; electrostrictive ceramic lead magnesium hiobate, and the magnetostrictive alloy Terfenol. This marriage of materials science and transducer capability is essential to achieving the variety of waveforms and wide range of frequency needed for shallow water ASW and MIW.

AERODYNE RESEARCH, INC.
45 Manning Rd.
Billerica, MA 01821
(508) 663-9500

PI: Dr. John T. Jayne
(508) 663-9500
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0301
CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECH.
1200 E. California Blvd. / MS 213-6
Pasadena, CA 91125
(818) 395-6073

ID#: 107100914
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 97-001
Title: An RPA Compatible Aerosol mass Spectrometer
Abstract:   Atmospheric aerosols in the marine boundary layer significantly affect the operation of navy vehicles and their associated electro-optical "smart weapons" and navigation sensors. Atmospheric aerosols in the free troposphere directly affect both atmospheric radiative transport, important for satellite and airborne remote sensing systems and climate change, and cloud nucleation, critical to both weather and remote sensing. The Navy's ongoing research into the formation processes and intrinsic properties and atmospheric affects of aerosols would be greatly aided by the development of a single instrument capable of measuring both in situ aerosol size distributions and their size dependent chemical composition; and the deployment of this instrument aboard suitable remotely protected aircraft (RPA) platforms. This Phase I proposal addresses the laboratory demonstration of a novel aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) capable of performing the required size distribution and chemical composition measurements. It also addresses design issues necessary to deploy this AMS aboard existing Navy RPA platforms. A phase II effort would involve the construction, deployment, testing and utilization of a dedicated RPA borne AMS instrument.

CENTER FOR REMOTE SENSING, INC.
11350 Random Hills Rd., Suite 710
Fairfax, VA 22030
(703) 848-0800

PI: Dr. Suman Ganguly
(703) 848-0800
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0311
UTAH STATE UNIV.
Center for Atmospheric & Space Sciences,
Logan, UT 84322-4405
(801) 797-1227

ID#: 107100932
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 97-004
Title: Development of Satellite Based Sensors for Improved Measurement and Validation of Ionospheric Parameters
Abstract:   We propose a small low powered satellite based instrument package consisting of a modern swept frequency type sounder, a two frequency beacon and explore the possibilities of using EUV based ionospheric reconstruction technique, through on-board EUV monitoring or through other concurrently available system. This package will provide primary standard measurements of electron density distributions in the topside ionosphere, where most of the ionization resides. Intercomparison and validation of the ionosphere profiles derived with different techniques (both satellite and ground based) and from model predictions are essential for both operation enhancement and development of new techniques. These will help validation of different techniques, development of ionospheric tomograph, understanding global morphology and other ionospheric processes. This will resolve uncertainties associated with ionospheric tomography, GPS calibration, plasmaspheric content, EUV derived ionospheric densities and so forth. This will enhance space weather activities and facilitate radion communication, scintillation, etc. During Phase I, we address the issues associated with the development of such a system and perform initial system design.

DATASONICS, INC.
P.O. Box 8
Cataumet, MA 02534
(508) 563-5511

PI: Dr. John Proakis
(617) 373-4429
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0289
NORTHEASTERN UNIV.
309 Dana Research Center
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 373-3252

ID#: 107100947
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 97-005
Title: Multiple access networking communication for use by oceanographic instruments, sensors, and underwater vehicles (AUV's).
Abstract:   The object of this project is to develop communications and mapping capabilities for a system of small robotic vehicles operating on detection/neutralization missions in a surf zone or a beach environment. The proposed system provides multiple access communication capability to a large group of vehicles (on the order of 100) in the local area of vehicle swarming motion (a radius on the order of 100 m). The communication is covert. Based on the collected information, a map of the local area containing potential threats is constructed. In addition, a long range link (up to 300 km) to the command post is considered, and the design of its acoustic part(s) is proposed which provides covertness. The desired multiple access capability and covertness will be achieved simultaneously by the use of code-division multiple access (CDMA) spread spectrum techniques. The system will be designed for the specific local area shallow water communication channel parameters. Both direct sequence and frequency hopping methods will be considered. Candidate systems will be evaluated through computer analysis with synthetic and/or real data, based on reliability, multiple access capability and covertness. Mapping algorithms will be designed and demonstrated; these will include data compression methods. A second system will be provided and evaluated for covert spread spectrum transmission of data over the long range underwater acoustic link. Software implementations of communications and mapping algorithms, suitable for phase II development, will be delivered.

ENGINEERING ACOUSTICS, INC.
1490 Gene St.
Winter Park, FL 32789
(407) 645-5444

PI: Thomas H. Ensign
(407) 645-5444
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0299
UNIV. OF MIAMI
Rosentstiel School of Marine & Atmospher
Miami, FL 33149
(305) 361-4000

ID#: 107100957
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 97-003
Title: Environmentally Adaptive Broadband Sonars for ASW and MIW
Abstract:   An innovative electroacoustic transducer is proposed for use in an expendable source that can transmit coherent broadband pulse compression coded signals. Once received, a signal processing gain of 30 to 40 dB is realized with replica correlation. Knowledge of the replica is necessary to achieve the gain so that an uniformed listener may not detect the presence of the transmission. A small device, four feet or less in length and under four inches in diameter is envisaged, that can be deployed through a submarine signal tube, form an AUV or even air dropped. The probe source would have preset programmable signal levels, frequency content, and transmission duration, selected to match the environment and tactical situation. This Phase I proposal covers the detailed design and analysis of the acoustic projector and the signal processing scheme, and will conclude with the construction of a prototype transducer/probe source and a real time processor receiver to be used in a proof of concept demonstration. Also included will be the analysis of the effectiveness of modification of the probe source to extend its function to include use as a bi-static expendable active source. Finally, model-based processing and inversions techniques will be presented to evaluate the environmental prediction by means of ocean and geo-acoustic inversion.

F&S, INC.
P.O. Box 11704
Blacksburg, VA 24062-1704
(540) 953-4274

PI: Scott A. Meller
(540) 953-4266
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0312
VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INST. & STATE UNIV.
301 Burruss Hall
Blacksburg, VA 24062-1704
(540) 231-5281

ID#: 107100930
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 97-004
Title: Detection of ocean mines using ultra-sensitive optical fiber magnetic field sensors
Abstract:   The object of the proposed program is to develop low-cost, portable, fiber optic gradiometers capable of sensitive magnetic field gradient detection for shallow water mine detection and classification. The proposed fiber optic gradiometer has advantages over existing gradiometer mine detection technology including wide operating temperature range, low power consumption, and small size/low weight. The small size/low weight and low power consumption of the device will allow remote mine detection via manned or unmanned remote control reconnaissance aircraft. F&S proposes to use an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer configuration with magnetostrictive elements and silicon micromachined substrates to create a temperature insensitive device to detect the magnetic field signatures of buried, tethered, and floating ferrous mines in the littoral area. The proposed device will complement existing acoustic and optical methods of mine detection and classification in shallow water environments where high acoustic or optical background clutter and attenuation limit operation of these devices. An experienced research team of F&S INC., Fiber and Electro-Optics Research Center of Virginia Tech, and Litton Poly-Scientific is assembled to successfully complete the Phase I project and continue towards product commercialization. F&S envisions large, near-term commercial product opportunities in military and industrial applications.

FALMOUTH SCIENTIFIC, INC.
1140 Rt. 28 A
Cataumet, MA 02534
(508) 564-7640

PI: Alan J. Fougere
(508) 564-7640
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0302
WOODS HOLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INST.
Woods Hole Road
Falmouth, MA 02543
(508) 457-2000

ID#: 107100923
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 97-001
Title: Development of a Low Cost, Stable CTD Measurement System for Autonomous Oceanographic Instruments
Abstract:   A need exists for very low cost temperature and salinity data to be collected from newly designed free-drifting oceanographic platforms. In particular, it is now recognized that a much expanded measurement program for the monitoring of oceanic salinity is required for the analysis and prediction of climate variations. While new autonomous vehicle systems make it feasible to deploy large numbers of monitoring platforms, we sill lack a system for making high quality salinity measurements with long term stability at a sufficiently low cost. The need is particularly acute for a Conductivity/Temperature/Depth (CTD) system capable of being mounted on expendable vehicle systems: examples are the Davis/Webb ALACE Float, RAFOS Floats, surface drifters, and gliding floats under development by groups at Scripps/WHOI/Webb and University of Washington. The high cost and power utilization of currently available commercial CTD systems combined with poor conductivity stability makes them unsuitable for the long term requirements of these new vehicles. Although each of the vehicle systems is unique they all have common CTD requirements: very low cost, low power consumption, high accuracy, long term stability, including immunity from biological fouling, easy low-speed flushing and digital data in a form suited to the expanding system of direct satellite data transmission. Falmouth Scientific Incorporated (FSI) in cooperation with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, (WHOI) propose to develop a compact, low cost, CTD system with stability in salinity measurement of better than 0.01 PSU/Year at a cost which is a fraction of existing technologies. The development will build on: 1. recent innovations precision CTD technology by N. Brown 2. integrated temperature and onductivity sensors to minimize lagg correction problems. 3. new low-cost approaches to fabrication and calibration developed through a program of value engineering, and 4. an anti-fouling protection system to assure long term stab.

FOSTER-MILLER, INC.
350 Second Ave.
Waltham, MA 02254
(617) 684-4379

PI: Mr. Arnis Mangolds
(617) 684-4379
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0285
AUTONOMOUS UNDERSEA SYSTEMS INST.
86 Old Concord Turnpike
Lee, NH 03824
(603) 868-3221

ID#: 107100946
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 97-005
Title: VLF Magneto Inductive Signaling and Navigation
Abstract:   A new approach to undersea and amphibious navigation and communication is proposed. The technology, referred to as Very Low Frequency (VLF) Magento Inductive Signaling (MIS) and navigation uses a simple coil antenna operating at a low (300 Hz to 30 kHz) frequency to set up a quasi-static magnetic field. A second coil is used as the receiver and using the math of Faraday's law, can be used to determine the presence of the magnetic field and its direction. The field is independent of the propagation medium and can therefore be transmitted or sensed in either air or water. The technology is the only method of achieving both navigation and communications with a single system in the geometrically complex and highly dynamic very shallow water (VSW) and surf zone (SZ) regimes. Foster-Miller has proven feasibility of using VLF-MIS for navigation and communication on other programs. Teamed with the Autonomous Undersea Systems Institute it will explore the limits of VLF-MIS technology in providing comprehensive guidance and communications.

IS ROBOTICS, INC.
22 McGrath Highway, Suite 6
Somerville, MA 02143
(617) 629-0055

PI: Colin Angle
(617) 629-0055
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0288
MIT SEA GRANT
77 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-3862

ID#: 107100950
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 97-005
Title: Ultra-Short Baseline (USBL) Positioning for Littoral Swarm Systems
Abstract:   This program's goal is the development of a positioning system for the littoral region. This system called DAMP (Distribution Acoustic Mobile Positioning) will be able to operate in varying conditions for the surf zone to open water, and will provide the cornerstone for a multi-element positioning network. The proposed work will be on the further development of Ultra-Short Baseline (USBL) positioning technology. The USBL system will be capable of determining azimuth and elevation to a source. This being the data that is common to all underwater applications involving position, we feel that by optimizing this type of system for size, cost, and power requirements we will be able to provide the foundations for a wealth of underwater positioning applications. Phase I of the effort will define the operational requirements, identify the critical components, and produce a preliminary design of the system. Phase II will fabricate, test, and evaluate this prototype. In Phase II, we will define an interface from the positioning system to swarming systems. We intend to use the Ariel Mine Countermeasures System as a testbed for the network. Ariel is a biomimetic crab-like system that is currently being developed at IS Robotics for littoral missions.

LOS GATOS RESEARCH
1685 Plymouth St., Suite 100
Mountain View, CA 94943
(415) 965-7772

PI: Dr. Anthony O'Keefe
(415) 965-7772
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0300
CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECH.
391 S. Holliston Ave., Mail Code 104-44
Pasadena, CA 91125
(818) 395-4100

ID#: 107100927
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 97-001
Title: Multi-Species Mid-Infrared Absorption Trace Analysis of Atmospheric Samples
Abstract:   Los Gatos Research proposes to develop a technology to make ultra-sensitive absorption measurements over a wide spectral range in the mid-infra red spectral region (3 to 14 microns wavelength) in a short time period. The band width of the measurement, as well as the time period over which the measurement is made can be controlled by the user. This technology will be used to probe the environment as an atmospheric sampling probe. In the proposed STTR effort Los Gatos Research will collaborate with a atmospheric science research group at California Institute of Technology which is active in the development of airborne instrumentation to ensure that our design will be consistent with the limitations imposed by flight requirements.

MANAGEMENT SCIENCES, INC.
6022 Constitution Ave., NE
Albuquerque, NM 87110
(505) 255-8611

PI: Kenneth g. Blemel
(505) 255-8611
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0314
UTAH STATE UNIV.
1770 North Research Park Way, Ste. 120
Logan, UT 84322-1415
(801) 753-9694

ID#: 107100939
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 97-002
Title: Miniature Distributed Systems Using Advanced Instrument Controllers
Abstract:   This STTR will investigate the use of exciting new miniature Advanced Instrumentation Controllers (AIC) in autonomous distribution systems. AIC are self-contained, full-featured computers with central processor, DAC/ADC converters, non-volatile memory and input/output ports. Low cost AIC technology makes it possible to process data form hundreds of sensors. These low-power devices can handle up to 32 analog and digital signals, simultaneously. The research of this project will lead to small, lightweight, low-cost, multi-purpose sensors and controllers that will provide control, data processing, perform multi-sensor data fusion, as well as simple tasks for mine detection, surveillance, and defense. We will us AIC to manufacture into miniaturized distributed units in diverse applications for surveillance, interdiction, communication, security, and countermeasures. Commercial applications include biomedical, home security, industrial control, test equipment, and hundreds of other users. The research team will investigate the use of AIC to create general purpose programmable modules to perform sampling, filtering and other complex functions. In Phase I, we will create a prototype to demonstrate the use of AIC in Navel distributed systems.

MASSA PRODUCTS CORP.
280 Lincoln St.
Hingham, MA 02043-1796
(617) 749-4800

PI: Joseph Ayers
(617) 581-7370
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0304
NORTHEASTERN UNIV.
360 Huntington Ave.
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 373-4597

ID#: 107100943
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 97-002
Title: Integration of an Ambulatory Robotic System with an Acoustic Lane Marking System for Littoral Zone Mine Counter-Measures
Abstract:   There has been considerable recent interest in biomimetic robots which implement biologically-based solutions to the control of locomotion and navigation. Animals have evolved to occupy every niche where one might wish to operate a robot, save outer space. In many cases animal performance transcends the efficiency and agility possible with current engineering solutions. We plan the development of an autonomous reactive underwater robotic system based on the lobster. Lobsters have inherent advantages for littoral zone maneuvers due to their proven abilities to negotiate a variety of terrain while preserving hydrodynamic stability in the face of current and surge. Moreover their ability to maneuver into complex environments allows them to place sensors with adequate proximity to sense and detect mine-like objects. We have already implemented a neuronal-network based controller and tested the proposed actuator system in an undulatory robot. In the present work we plan to develop an 8 legged walking system, develop sensors for balance, current and collision and integrate these peripherals with the controller. This robotic system has a profoundly simplified control architecture and a behavioral set based on the adaptive strategies of real lobsters. We will modify an existing acoustic telemetry system to provide basic two way communication with the robots. This communication system will be integrated into an acoustic lane marking and ranging system to mediate spatially-constrained random search procedures in the littoral zone.

METRATEK, INC.
12330 Pinecrest Rd.
Reston, VA 20191
(703) 620-9500

PI: Raymond L. Harris
(703) 620-9500
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0287
REGENTS OF THE UNIV. OF MICHIGAN
3003 S. State St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1274
(313) 764-7250

ID#: 107100933
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 97-004
Title: Advanced High-Frequency Surface Wave Radar for Ocean Monitoring and Surveillance
Abstract:   This effort combines the oceanographic and High-Frequency Surface-Wave (HFSWR) radar expertise of two major universities (Michigan and Miami), with a small business (METRATEK, Inc.) that builds advanced high performance radar systems. The objective is to provide over-the-horizon surveillance of surface and low altitude targets and cost-effective, autonomous remote monitoring of ocean characteristics. HFSWR is the only sensor that can measure temporal and spatial ocean properties simultaneously over thousands of square kilometers with resolutions less that 1 km. HFSWR is normally deployed as a pair of land stations with overlapping coverage, but can operate from ships or, with reduced capabilities, from a single land station. Oceanographic measurements include surface current, vertical current shear, directional wave height spectra, wind direction, detection of fronts and eddies, and measurement of bathymetry in the littoral zone. This R & D effort will refine the baseline multifrequency HFSWR developed at Stanford and Michigan Universities, add advanced oceanographic data processing algorithms developed at U. Miami and Michigan, and use METRATEK radar electronics technology, real-time processing software, and rugged packaging to produce a high-quality, cost-effective commercial product suitable for use by both sophisticated and unsophisticated users.

OCEAN POWER TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
1590 Reed Rd.
West Trenton, NJ 08628
(609) 730-0400

PI: Dr. George Taylor
(609) 730-0400
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0319
PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.
187 Materials Research Lab.
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 865-1154

ID#: 107100937
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 97-002
Title: Electric Power Generation from Electrostrictive Polymers for Autonomous Distributed Systems
Abstract:   Ocean Power Technologies, Inc. (OPT) is developing electrical power generation systems that use piezoelectric polymers to convert the mechanical energy in natural energy sources such as ocean waves into electricity. OPT is investigating two different generator configurations for Autonomous Distribution Systems for DoD. OPT and the Materials Research Laboratory of Penn State University propose to investigate the electrostrictive polymer Polyurethane, operated as an electric field induced piezoelectric, as an alternative to the piezoelectric PVDF for electrical power generation. Preliminary assessments indicate that Polyurethane has these advantages over PVDF: *Lower dielectric losses, lower Young's modulus (less applied force), and half the dielectric constant. *Converts 20 times more electric charge per unit strain. *The elastic limit is much greater and should permit a much greater power generating strain level. *Polyurethane should be less expensive to manufacture than PVDF since it is an inherently cheaper resin and no poling process is required. The above factors should result in a 2 to 3 fold improvement in generator efficiency over PVDF. The investigation will include measurements to assess its potential as a generator, e.g., power density, mechanical-electrical conversion efficiency, operational lifetime, and cost.

PICODYNE, INC.
801 University SE, Ste. 206
Albuquerque, NM 87106
(505) 272-7900

PI: Gary K. Maki
(505) 272-7040
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0331
THE UNIV. OF NEW MEXICO
Scholes Hall, Rm. 102
Albuquerque, NM 87131
(505) 277-7575

ID#: 107100938
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 97-002
Title: ULTRA Low Power Electronics
Abstract:   Power consumed in electronics is becoming a major issue for both Government and commercial systems. Commercial industry estimates that certain critical consumer electronic chips will consume 150 watts in the year 2000. Government users will find 100 watt/chip totally unacceptable for Autonomous Distributed Systems (ADS) or Spacecraft systems. The objective of both the commercial and Government designers is to greatly reduce power and to increase performance. The goal of the proposed work is to identify a path that promises to achieve ultra low power VLSI. A major ultra low power VLSI program is being undertaken by the RI (University of New Mexico) which has the promise to produce CMOS technology that operates at supply voltages near 0.25 volts. A 500 factor reduction would be realized in comparing a 5 and 0.25 process. Test circuits have been produces and a commercial foundry is becoming involved to which this technology can be transferred. The proposed STTR program will proceed in parallel with the RI program and consider ADS and commercial applications to the ultra low power research program.

QUADRANT ENGINEERING, INC.
107 Sunderland Rd.
Amherst, MA 01002
(413) 549-4402

PI: James B. Mead
(413) 549-4402
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0303
UNIV. OF MASSACHUSETTS
North Pleasant St.
Amherst, MA 01003
(413) 545-2514

ID#: 107100918
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 97-001
Title: Ultra Compoact Millimeter Wave Radar for Cloud and Precipitation Research from Remotely Piloted Aircraft
Abstract:   In recent years, airborne millimeter-wave radars have played an increasing role in remote sensing the distribution, dynamics and particle properties of clouds and precipitation. The ability of Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPAs) to make such measurements over long time periods (typically 24 hours) makes them attractive platforms for studying the evolution of weather systems. This proposal describes an effort to merge the latest developments in Millimeter-wave Monolithic Integrated Circuit (MMIC) technology with proven millimeter-wave radar techniques to design a lightweight, compact radar for cloud and precipitation research from an RPA. The University of Massachusetts Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory, a recognized leader in the area of millimeter-wave devices and techniques, is now actively developing MMIC's for a wide variety of millimeter-wave receiver applications. Recently developed MMIC low noise amplifiers operating at W-band (typically 95 Ghz) have sufficient performance to allow direct signal detection at W-band. This design requires less than half the components used in previous millimeter-wave cloud radars, a reduction that is critical for use on small, unmanned aircraft. Combined with a 35 W solid-state power amplifier and compact lens antenna, the proposed radar will target the rigorous packaging constraints necessary to allow use on virtually any RPA.

QUADRANT ENGINEERING, INC.
107 Sunderland Rd.
Amherst, MA 01002
(413) 549-4402

PI: Ivan Popstefanija
(413) 549-4402
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0286
UNIV. OF MASSACHUSETTS
North Pleasant St.
Amherst, MA 01003
(413) 545-2530

ID#: 107100929
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 97-004
Title: Remote Sensing, Algorithms, and Inexpensive Space Sensors
Abstract:   In this proposal Quadrant Engineering Inc. and its academic partner, the University of Massachusetts, seek STTR funding to develop an airborne Dual-Beam Interferometer for measurement and mapping of the ocean surface current vector in the littoral zone. The proposed instrument, initially targeted for small aircraft, will be capable of estimating the surface current vector with a single pass of the aircraft. The proposed technique uses a aft-squinted beam. The forward motion of the aircraft imparts different Doppler shifts to each beam, allowing them to be separated during signal processing. The two dual-beam antennas are separated in the along-track direction, allowing interferometric estimates of surface Doppler velocity along both the fore and aft beams. The two surface Doppler velocity estimates are combined to for a vector surface current estimate. The proposed technique will exploit limited synthetic aperture processing within the constraints dictated by the ocean surface coherence time. Simple "unfocused SAR" processing is sufficient to resolve the surface to a few tens of meters in the along-track direction from nominal flight altitudes.

VIASAT, INC.
2290 Cosmos Ct.
Carlsbad, CA 92009
(619) 438-8099

PI: Ken Gamanche
(508) 635-9933
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0290
MIT SEA GRANT
77 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-3862

ID#: 107100953
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 97-005
Title: Two-Way Satellite Datalink for Small Robotic Vehicles
Abstract:   This proposal describes a multi-phase effort to design, develop, implement, and demonstrate a two way satellite datalink, the Oceanographic Datalink (ODL), capable of remote data collection and position reporting from small robotic vehicles. Specifically, the ODL will be integrated and demonstrated on Odyssey, the MIT Sea Grant Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV). The datalink will support throughputs orders of magnitude greater than ARGOS, while providing a two way capability, and at a cost considerably less than currently charged by ARGOS. The ODL is comprised of a small transceiver and multi-element C-band patch antenna integrated into an Odyssey IIb AUV. The idea is to use a broadbeam, asymmetric antenna so that Odyssey simply has to surface and drive towards the equator to position the antenna. Several different antenna designs will be evaluated during Phase I. A candidate demonstration configuration and antenna will be selected in Phase I and a detailed system design completed. This design will be implemented and demonstrated in Phase II on Odyssey in an operational environment.

VIRTUAL TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
2175 Park Blvd
Palo Alto, CA 94306
(415) 321-4900

PI: James F. Kramer, Ph.D.
(415) 321-4900
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0112
BOARD OF TRUST LELAND STANFORD JR. UNIV
867 Serra St., Room 260
Stanford, CA 94305-4125
(415) 723-4740

ID#: 107100890
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 96-003
Title: A Grasp and Arm Force Feedback System
Abstract:   There are only a few existing force feedback systems which allow users of teleoperated robots or virtual reality systems to feel objects they are manipulating. Unfortunately, such feedback systems are typically limited in workspace, cumbersome, uncomfortable, expensive and few are available commercially. We propose to develop a compact, lightweight, comfortable and inexpensive system for providing grasp and arm force feedback. For phase I, we will assess the feasibility of our innovative approach for grasp-force feedback. The proposed innovation employs a network of tendons to transmit forces generated by desk-mounted actuators to force-applicator pads located at the user's fingertips. In addition, each force-applicator pad has a novel feature enabling it to simulate high-frequency force sensations associated with impacts with hard objects without requiring high bandwidth actuation. This device will thus provide a more intuitive interface for applications requiring users to feel virtual or telemanipulated objects. In phase I, our objective is to develop a working prototype for a thumb and a single finger, and to evaluate the concept's effectiveness. We will then enlist a team of manipulation experts at Stanford's Dextrous Manipulation Lab (DML) to provide input and evaluate the feasibility of the system in real-world telemanipulation applications. We are confident the system will provide high-fidelity perception of simulated forces. The Navy could apply this technology to virtual reality and telerobotic applications in areas such as: oceanographic exploration, hazardous waste removal, underwater cable inspection, and any area in need of an intuitive computer interface.

WEBB RESEARCH CORP.
82 Technology Park Dr.
East Falmouth, MA 02536
(508) 548-2077

PI: Douglas C. Webb
(508) 548-2088
Contract #: N00014-97-C-0322
MIT SEA GRANT
292 Main St., Bldg. E38-366
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-3862

ID#: 107100944
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 97-002
Title: An Autonomous Gliding Vehicle for the Distributed Observation of the Littoral Environment
Abstract:   Future observation of near shore environments will increasingly depend upon flexible, affordable, high performance devices operating as components of autonomous distributed systems. Mine detection, coastal monitoring and environmental measurement can be most effectively performed by numbers of autonomous devices operating in coordinated networks. The requested Phase I research proposes the design, specification and mission identification of a novel component of such a network: a small (35 kg) gliding vehicle capable of remotely commanded, steerable, sawtooth motion in the water column with a range of 120 km. The vehicle's motion is powered by changing its net buoyancy. This makes it inherently silent, able to carry sensitive acoustic or microstructure payloads and easily assume at-surface or on-bottom stations in addition to gliding. Phase II research anticipates the building and deployment of several gliders in a networked field exercise. The proposed collaboration with the partner research institution (MIT, Sea Grant AUV Laboratory) seeks to apply that group's recognized skills in underwater vehicle control and operations to the proven gliding vehicle concept. The result will be a significantly and boldly innovative autonomous observational system with many military and scientific applications.