DoD STTR Program Phase I Selections for FY04

Army Selections

Navy Selections

Air Force Selections

DARPA Selections

MDA Selections


---------- AF ----------

3TEX, INC.
109 MacKenan Drive
Cary, NC 27511
(919) 481-2500

PI: Dr. Alexander Bogdanovich
(919) 481-2500
Contract #:
University of Texas at Dallas
2601 N. Floyd Rd.
Richardson, TX 75080
(972) 883-6534

ID#: F045-020-0253
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-020       Selected for Award
Title: 3 Dimensional Nano-Scale Reinforcement Architecture for Advanced Composite Structures
Abstract:   Three-dimensional woven and braided fiber architectures provide important advantages to composites, including suppression of delamination, high damage tolerance, improved through-the-thickness properties, simplicity and cost-effectiveness of manufacturing complex composite structural components. However, in order to diversify applications and reach high volumes of utilization of these materials in high-performance composite structures, such problems as relatively low (compared to tape laminates) fiber volume fraction, reduced in-plane stiffness and strength characteristics have to be resolved. A novel approach to designing and manufacturing 3-D woven and 3-D braided preforms for advanced polymeric and high temperature composites proposed here. The approach is based on the use of very small diameter, ultra-strong and ultra-tough continuous carbon nanotube fibers (developed and produced by the Research Institution of this proposal) as part of the multidirectional reinforcement architecture. Specifically, this kind of fibers will be used as Z-reinforcement in 3-D woven preforms to maximize volume fraction of warp and fill fibers, and as braided tows in special 3-D braided architectures to maximize volume fraction of axial fiber. Finally, it is proposed that carbon nanotube fibers will be selectively integrated into regular, `host' tows to increase local strength, fracture toughness in the zones of anticipated high stress concentration.

ALPHATECH, INC.
6 New England Executive Park
Burlington, MA 01803-5012
(781) 273-3388

PI: Ms. Kathleen Misovec
(781) 273-3388
Contract #:
MIT
77 Massachusetts Avenue, Building E19-750
Cambridge, MA 02139-4307
(617) 253-3906

ID#: F045-011-0268
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-011       Selected for Award
Title: Cooperative Search, Acquisition and Tracking by UAV Teams
Abstract:   ALPHATECH and MIT propose to extend existing real-time mission manager, path planning, and video tracking technologies developed under DARPA, AFOSR, and AFRL programs to solve the Cooperative Search Acquisition and Track (CSAT) problem for multiple moving targets. This CSAT mission presents difficult challenges combining different types of tasking: area search, periodic track maintenance, focused viewing for classification and continuous critical track monitoring. MIT's multi-UAV flight testbed, sponsored by AFOSR DURIP, will be used for the Phase I proof-of-concept simulations and the Phase II flight demonstrations. Algorithm extensions will focus on balancing multiple mission objectives, incorporating uncertainty due to moving targets, and complex sensor viewing constraints. Our CSAT controller will integrate ALPHATECH's unique multi-platform video tracking algorithms with MIT's and ALPHATECH's mission and cooperative path planning technologies. The video tracking algorithms perform sensor stabilization, data association and tracking in a common coordinate frame, allowing the use of low-cost sensor hardware options. The Phase I objectives are to extend and tailor the planning and control algorithms to CSAT, integrate these algorithms with the video tracking technologies, and demonstrate them using simulated environments. The Phase I proof-of-concept will be expanded into flight demonstrations in Phase II using MIT's multi-UAV testbed.

ALTAIR CENTER, LLC.
1 Chartwell Circle
Shrewsbury, MA 01545-4819
(508) 845-5349

PI: Dr. Valery Rupasov
(508) 845-5349
Contract #:
University of Rochester
515 Hylan Building, RC Box 270140
Rochester, NY 14627
(585) 275-8036

ID#: F045-013-0102
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-013       Selected for Award
Title: Active Silicon Nanophotonics based on Photonic Crystal with Quantum Dots
Abstract:   ALTAIR Center in cooperation with University of Rochester proposes to develop a new class of active nanophotonic devices based on quantum dots embedded into photonic crystal microstructures fabricated in silicon-on-insulator waveguides. Due to extremely strong nonlinear optical and electro-optical properties and extremely short switching times, the silicon-based photonic crystal microstructures with quantum dots can be used as key elements for design of various all-optical and electro-optical components enabling their on-chip integration with silicon microelectronics. In Phase I we will prove feasibility of the proposed concept by analytical and numerical studies, fabricate the proposed devices, perform the simplest proof-of-concept experiments, and will characterize basic optical properties of the proposed key elements of active silicon nanophotonics. We will also develop conceptual designs of all-optical switches, modulators, transistors, amplifiers and lasers based on the proposed concept. In Phase II, we will study electro-optical properties of the proposed elements. The technology will be completely optimized and applied to fabrication of the prototype nanophotonic devices enabling on-chip integration with silicon microelectronics.

AMERICAN SUPERCONDUCTOR
Two Technology Drive
Westborough, MA 01581
(508) 621-4265

PI: Dr. C. L. H. Thieme
(508) 621-4264
Contract #:
Florida State University
1800 E. Paul Dirac Drive
Tallahassee, FL 32310-3706
(580) 644-3347

ID#: F045-002-0177
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-002       Selected for Award
Title: Coil Simulators for AC Conductors
Abstract:   This STTR Project addresses stability issues in Second Generation High Temperature Superconductor (2G HTS) wire and will test novel components for increased stability and measurement techniques to evaluate stability at a wide range of conditions, in particular for demanding military AC HTS applications. Wire fabrication at AMSC and testing experiments at FSU will focus on AC stability and quench protection issues for AC magnet applications. Specific experiments will focus on determining safe operational limits for YBCO coated conductors and how these limits are affected by AC transport current. In the Phase II of this Project a so-called "coil simulator test facility" will be built, to be designed in the Phase I. The coil simulator will be able to test short lengths of wire as if positioned in a coil, under a variety of DC+AC fields, AC currents up to 400 Hz, and temperatures from 27 to 77K. The facility will be able to test a wide variety of wire designs (filament size, substrate and stabilizer components, wire width etc.). This type of testing will be very cost-effective with a fast feed-back to researchers concerned with wire architecture and magnet and system design engineers. Optimal quench strategies will be explored in a larger coil using novel stabilizers developed in the Phase I.

APTIMA, INC.
12 Gill Street, Suite 1400
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 496-2415

PI: Dr. Jared Freeman
(202) 842-1548
Contract #:
Wright State University
Office of Research & Programs, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway
Dayton, OH 45435
(937) 775-2664

ID#: F045-014-0218
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-014       Selected for Award
Title: Model-based Optimal System for Training (MOST)
Abstract:   The objective of the proposed work is to integrate a normative engineering model into an intelligent tutoring system. This system will allow continuous performance monitoring and adaptation of training based on performance assessment. To accomplish these goals a model will be developed that will allow us to define and conceptualize how novices and experts process information. The novice/expert distinction will enable an intelligent coaching agent to assess trainees' performance needs based on skill and ability differences, and provide feedback for optimal performance. Thus, training interventions for various trainee skill levels will be evaluated and embedded in the agent to allow for adaptive training based on individual differences.

ARETE ASSOC.
P.O. Box 6024
Sherman Oaks, CA 91413
(520) 571-8660

PI: Dr. Gregory J Fetzer
(520) 571-8660
Contract #:
National Heart lung & Blood Institu
Building 31, Room 5A52, 31 Center Drive MSC 2486
Bethesda, MD 20892
(301) 594-9529

ID#: F045-017-0081
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-017       Selected for Award
Title: Instrumentation for Monitoring Breath Biomarkers for Diagnosis of Health, Condition, Toxic Exposure, and Disease
Abstract:   Arete Associates and National Jewish Medical and Research Center propose to develop an instrument to measure the concentration of ethane in exhaled breath. The analyzer uses the combination of a proprietary hollow optical waveguide measurement cell, tunable semiconductor laser, and wavelength modulation spectroscopy to provide sensitive and reliable measurements of ethane. The sensor will exhibit rapid response time (<1s), low minimum detection limits (100's of parts per trillion) and will be physically compact relative to other sensors with similar sensitivity. The proposed project leverages our experience developing a mid infrared laser absorption spectrometer (MIRLAS) to monitor NO in exhaled breath. In Phase I, a benchtop measurement system will be constructed and tested. This system will be challenged with a variety of laboratory air mixtures. Phase II will consist of the development and optimization of a prototype instrument that will be used to monitor both NO and ethane in research trials with human subjects at NJMRC. Ethane and NO measurements will be verified using gas chromatographic and chemiluminescence techniques respectively.

ARTANN LABORATORIES, INC.
1457 Lower Ferry Road
Trenton, NJ 08618
(609) 883-0100

PI: Dr. Charles R. Farrar
(505) 663-5330
Contract #:
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Weapon Response Group (ESA-WR), PO Box 1663, MS T006
Los Alamos, NM 87545
(505) 663-5330

ID#: F045-016-0181
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-016       Selected for Award
Title: Vibration Based Structural Health Monitoring using Time Reversal Acoustics
Abstract:   Vibration based structural health monitoring using Time Reversal Acoustics (TRA)represents a new approach to in-situ nondestructive evaluation of airspace structures. The proposed noncontact technique is based on TRA focusing of high frequency vibrations in tested structures produced by single or several external sources and surface vibration measurements by a scanning laser vibrometer. The application of TRA principles will significantly improve the vibration based NDE system's ability to detect the presence of structural faults and localize damage due to targeted focusing of the acousto-elastic waves. In contrast to conventional acoustic methods of NDE where the dispersion of elastic waves is viewed as an unfavorable phenomena, the TRA methodology takes advantage of this previously undesirable process. Scanning of the TRA focused signal over examined surface provides information necessary for tomographic mapping of damage and degradation. During Phase I, the principles of the TRA system with external sources and a laser vibrometer for damage detection will be developed and feasibility tests will be conducted on composite and metal parts with increasing level of damage including cracks, delamination, fiber breakage, corrosion, and battle damage. The developed TRA software and hardware will form a basis for the prototype that will be built in Phase II.

ATC - NY
33 Thornwood Drive, Suite 500
Ithaca, NY 14850-1250
(607) 257-1975

PI: Dr. David Guaspari
(607) 257-1975
Contract #:
Cornell University
Office of Sponsored Programs, 120 Day Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853
(607) 255-5337

ID#: F045-023-0029
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-023       Selected for Award
Title: SCorES, A Logical Programming Environment for Distributed Systems
Abstract:   Distributed systems, important to civilian and military infrastucture, have steadily become more complex and steadily more difficult to understand, implement, and maintain. Addressing these dangers, a collaboration between ATC-NY and Cornell University will build a mathematically based tool, SCorES, providing powerful automated support for specifying, developing, verifying, and synthesizing real-time distributed systems at a high level of abstraction. Mathematical techniques for modeling and analyzing distributed systems are difficult to use because they are insufficiently abstract. SCorES supports abstract methods that are "declarative" (rather than operational) and "constructive". Declarative methods permit systems to be specified, analyzed, developed, and verified at a conceptual level congenial to human designers. Constructive methods permit automatic code synthesis. The key is to define a "logic" for this new domain, so all development steps become logical inferences. Work by Cornell and ATC-NY has already defined a logic appropriate for the class of distributed systems that can be specified and modeled without reference to quantitative real time. This logic has specified and derived demonstrably correct nontrivial distributed algorithms (e.g., consensus protocols). We will extend our methods to hybrid systems, including variables that evolve in continuous time and implement SCorES by encoding these methods within the NuPRL logical environment.

BARRON ASSOC., INC.
1410 Sachem Place, Suite 202
Charlottesville, VA 22901-2496
(434) 973-1215

PI: Mr. Jason O. Burkholder
(434) 973-1215
Contract #: FA9550-04-C-0065
University of Virginia
PO Box 400195, Office of Sponsored Programs
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4195
(434) 924-4270

ID#: F045-027-0182
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-027       Awarded: 05AUG04
Title: Nonlinear Adaptive Actuation of Synthetic Jet Arrays for Aerodynamic Flow Control
Abstract:   Active flow control using synthetic jet actuators has been the subject of significant research in recent years due to its immense potential to expand the operating regimes of traditional aircraft and enable unconventional designs driven by nonaerodynamic operational considerations. Barron Associates, Inc. has teamed with researchers at the University of Virginia and the University of Wyoming to propose a research program which, if successful, will significantly advance the current state-of-the-art in active flow control and move this technology towards an ultimate objective of practical flight control via "virtual" control surfaces. Three primary investigations are proposed: (1) a novel concept that has been developed for the arrangement of synthetic jet arrays to facilitate virtual shaping of an airfoil during normal flight conditions will be modeled and analyzed; (2) a practical, implementable adaptive control algorithm based on adaptive inverse techniques that have been proven effective in many previous applications in systems with unknown actuator nonlinearities will be developed and tested; and (3) an adaptive actuator failure compensation scheme will be developed that will optimize the performance of the control system in the presence of unknown actuator failures. A nonlinear tailless aircraft model will serve as the Phase I test platform.

BIO-BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS SYSTEMS, LLC
7472 Woodlawn Colonial Lane
St. Louis, MO 63119
(314) 494-1108

PI: Dr. John A. Stern
(314) 961-6321
Contract #: FA9550-04-C-0082
Department of Psychiatry
Washington Univ School of Med, CB 8134, 660 S Euclid Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63110-1093
(314) 286-1369

ID#: F045-007-0055
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-007       Awarded: 23AUG04
Title: Real-Time Detector of Human Fatigue
Abstract:   We have selected three technologies for the unobtrusive monitoring of bio-behavioral events. Camera-based measures of gaze, including eye and head movements, pupil diameter, vergence, and blink parameters; Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) based measures of cardiovascular and muscle activity; and behavioral measures including movements of body parts as well as keyboard operations will be utilized. Our collaborator, J.W. Rohrbaugh, has been instrumental in the development of the application of LDV technology for these measurements. We, as well as others, have demonstrated the utility of gaze control measures for indexing aspects of loss of alertness and performance lapses. There is a reasonable literature attesting to the utility of cardiovascular and muscle activity in this regard. We propose to continue our development of software to reliably abstract relevant measures. Procedures for developing software appropriate for the on-line monitoring of specific measures will be developed for implementation in the phase II effort. A study to validate a subset of proposed measures is included in the phase I effort.

BUSEK CO., INC.
11 Tech Circle
Natick, MA 01760-1023
(508) 655-5565

PI: Dr. Manuel Martinez-Sanchez
(617) 253-5613
Contract #:
Massachusetts Institute of Tech.
77 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-3906

ID#: F045-005-0186
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-005       Selected for Award
Title: Two-Dimensional Micro-Colloid Thruster Fabrication
Abstract:   The proposed research for this project is to perform preliminary required research in order to pursue microfabricated colloid thruster arrays. The project is comprised of the following tasks: i. propellant selection studies to determine appropriate propellant for microfabricated configurations and desired thrust regimes, ii. study of capillary feed physics for transport of propellant to electrospray tips, iii. investigation of extractor electrode designs suitable for high-density arrays of electrospray sources, iv. Characterization of electrochemical corrosion effects upon silicon, the preferred material for microfabrication, v. development of improved models of the electrospray phenomena, and vi. test of a novel bipolar colloid thruster that may promote extended thruster operation in the ionic regime.

CALABAZAS CREEK RESEARCH, INC.
20937 Comer Drive
Saratoga, CA 95070-3753
(650) 595-2168

PI: Mr. Thuc Bui
(650) 948-5361
Contract #: FA9550-04-C-0069
Univ. of California at Berkeley
Dept. of Electrical Engineerin, University of California
Berkeley, CA 94720-1770
(510) 642-3477

ID#: F045-006-0086
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-006       Awarded: 19AUG04
Title: User-Safe "Virtual Laboratory" Environment for High-Voltage Radiation Source Experiments
Abstract:   The Computational Virtual Laboratory for High Voltage Radiation Experiments (VLAB) will be a computer-based laboratory for carrying out experiments with high-voltage, high-current electron-driven sources of electromagnetic radiation. Applications for the VLAB include studies of fundamental physics in the high-voltage, high-current environment; high power microwave sources for directed energy weapons; nuclear effects simulation; and novel imaging capabilities for medical or materials industries. This proposed development will leverage existing computer algorithms and computational tools to create a user-friendly environment for determining the impact of various geometries and configurations for high power electron and ion devices.

CALABAZAS CREEK RESEARCH, INC.
20937 Comer Drive
Saratoga, CA 95070-3753
(650) 595-2168

PI: Dr. Robert Jackson
(404) 518-0200
Contract #: FA9550-04-C-0070
Old Dominion University
Electrical &Computer Eng
Norfolk, VA 23529-0246
(757) 683-4827

ID#: F045-006-0068
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-006       Awarded: 19AUG04
Title: Field Marshal Simulation Environment
Abstract:   The Field Marshal Electromagnetic Simulation Environment (EM-SE) will provide a "virtual laboratory" for high-voltage radiation source research and design. The environment will be based on a modern scriptable programming language (Python) for usability and flexibility, finite difference techniques for extensibility and ease of maintenance, and multigrid techniques to enhance speed and power. Reduced development costs result from use of free, open-source software and internet-based distributed development tools. The Field Marshal EM-SE will support the key physical processes necessary for design and simulation of high-voltage sources including: (1) electron emission from moving cathode plasma surfaces, (2) scattering of energetic electrons from metals and insulating materials, (3) high-voltage electrical breakdown on insulator surfaces, (4) intense heat fluxes, (5) x-ray generation and effects, and (6) detailed structural visualization. Two key benefits of the Field Marshal approach will be more "intuitive" user interactions with high-power microwave (HPM) simulation tools and lower tool costs. Rather than produce expensive generic tools which researchers must adapt (or adapt to), developers can deliver affordable applications tuned to the specific needs of the HPM community.

CARBON SOLUTIONS, INC.
5094 Victoria Hill Drive
Riverside, CA 92506
(909) 234-2738

PI: Dr. Junbo Gao
(909) 234-2738
Contract #:
UCLA
Mechanical and Aerospace, Engineering Department
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597
(310) 794-9117

ID#: F045-020-0116
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-020       Selected for Award
Title: 3 Dimensional Nano-Scale Reinforcement Architecture for Advanced Composite Structures
Abstract:   This STTR Phase I project will focus on fabricating 3-D multi-scale macro/nanocomposites with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) integrated in carbon fiber preforms. The incorporation of nanoscale CNTs and conventional micro-scale carbon fibers into the polymer matrix will lead to a hierarchy of the reinforcement scales, ranging from a single fiber surrounded by a nanocomposite sheath to a bundle of fibers with inter-fiber nanoscale reinforcement, and a laminated or textile fibrous composite with nanoscale reinforcement bridging into the matrix-rich regions. The microstructure and performance of the composites will be characterized and analyzed. Process-structure-property relations for the composites will be established and feedback to improve the CNT deposition processes and also to understand the relation between the 3-D nano-structure and composite properties.

CERAMPHYSICS, INC.
921 Eastwind Dr., Suite 110
Westerville, OH 43081
(614) 882-2231

PI: Dr. William N. Lawless
(614) 882-2231
Contract #: FA9550-04-C-0073
University of Pittsburgh
648 Benedum Hall, 3700 O'Hara Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15261
(412) 624-9783

ID#: F045-002-0035
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-002       Awarded: 13AUG04
Title: Quench-Protection Strategies for HTS Conductors
Abstract:   An assessment will be made of two quench-protection strategies for HTS conductors, one based on dielectric insulations with enhanced thermal properties and the other on a cryovaristor technology. Three insulations are considered: ceramic powders in Formvar, sputtered ceramics, and diamond films. Both strategies make use of established databases at CeramPhysics (except for diamond films). Additional thermal measurements will be made on Formvar/powder composites, and a sputtered ceramic film on an HTS conductor will be demonstrated. Three-dimensional, transient, heat transfer modeling for the insulations will be performed by Prof. M. K. Chyu of the University of Pittsburgh. The electrical/thermal properties of a cryovaristor film will be modeled. The most favorable strategy will be identified.

CLEAR SCIENCE CORP.
PO Box 233, 663 Owego Hill Road
Harford, NY 13784-0233
(607) 844-9171

PI: Dr. Henry A. Carlson
(607) 844-9171
Contract #:
University of Minnesota
450 McNamara Alumni Center, 200 Oak Street SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455-2070
(612) 624-5066

ID#: F045-009-0201
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-009       Selected for Award
Title: Automated Design Optimization for Hypersonic Plasma-Aerodynamics
Abstract:   Clear Science Corp. and the University of Minnesota propose to evaluate and develop design optimization methods that exploit flow ionization associated with hypersonic, trans-atmospheric flight vehicles. Using magnetic fields from on-board devices, power may be extracted from ionized gas generated in the high-energy flow and electromagnetic forces can control heating and aerodynamic loading on the vehicle surface by altering the structure of the shock and boundary layers. Two challenges exist in meeting the objective of design optimization. First, all of the relevant physical properties of the flow must be appropriately modeled. These include compressibility, viscous effects, thermo-chemical non-equilibrium, Hall and ion-slip effects, and an accurate representation of the coupling between the plasma and the applied magnetic field. The resulting system of equations is complex, and the second challenge consists of deriving a compatible optimization algorithm that is efficient, versatile, and scalable. During Phase I, we will evaluate adjoint (backward) formulations, sensitivity (forward) methods, and algorithms that combine optimization with reduced-order modeling. Evaluations will be based on tests involving two-dimensional blunt-body flow in the low magnetic Reynolds number regime. Figures of merit will include scalability to three-dimensional flows and to problems with two-way coupling between the plasma and the magnetic field. The down-selected optimization algorithm will be developed in Phase I, and a Phase II work plan will be formulated for demonstration testing.

COLORADO ENGINEERING, INC.
3272 Silver Pine Trail
Colorado Springs, CO 80920-1495
(719) 388-8582

PI: Dr. Tim Chamillard
(719) 262-3150
Contract #:
University of Colorado
1420 Austin Bluffs Pkwy.
Colorado Springs, CO 80933-7150
(719) 262-3150

ID#: F045-008-0013
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-008       Selected for Award
Title: Automated Detection of Steganographic Content
Abstract:   Colorado Engineering, Inc., a small woman owned business, and the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs are teaming to develop a Stegi@work architecture for an extensible, distributed application that can be utilized to detect steganographic content in media files, alert the user, and either mitigate (destroy) the content if possible or quarantine the files as appropriate. The key distinguishing characteristics of the architecture will be distribution of the steganographic detection tasks to a set of subscribed PCs on a network (including the Internet or a Local Area Network) and the use of a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) to facilitate inclusion of new and improved steganalysis algorithms. This proposal will demonstrate and evaluate the feasibility of the proposed architecture through development of a prototype implementation of the architecture. Feasibility analysis will focus on the effectiveness of the proposed architecture, the ease with which new and improved algorithms can be included in the steganalysis activities, and support for the required user configuration options. Proposed Phase I objectives include: user subscription process development, high-level and detailed design of architecture components, prototype application development, feasibility analysis, and Phase II plan development. The proposed architecture will support effective distributed steganalysis activities using easily-extended steganalysis algorithms.

CONNECTICUT ANALYTICAL CORP.
696 Amity Road
Bethany, CT 06524
(203) 393-9666

PI: Joseph J. Bango
(203) 393-9666
Contract #: FA9550-04-C-0064
Yale University
9 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06520-8286
(203) 432-4347

ID#: F045-005-0131
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-005       Awarded: 03AUG04
Title: Two-Dimensional Micro-Colloid Thruster Fabrication
Abstract:   In the field of electric space propulsion, specifically colloidal propulsion, there has been significant improvements of recent date in the development of small micro-fabricated arrays operating in the single Taylor Cone per emitter regime. To increase thrust, the density of 2-D arrays must be increased. The state-of-the-art employs silicon based MEMS fabrication techniques to effect suitable multiplexed 2-D emitter arrays. Although very efficient, MEMS emitters can be very difficult to get "just right" to achieve the desired performance. An alternative to silicon MEMS colloidal thruster design is to employ novel bundles of stretched fused silica glass fibers that comprise a plurality of capillary pores. Connecticut Analytical Corp. has devloped a patent-pending process utilizing these stretched fused fibers as a means to provide propellant delivery devoid of a hydrostatic source and at the same time yield a large 2-D electrospray array suitable for propulsion applications. The inherent capillarity of the structure maintains propellant fluid feed in perfect equilibrium to all spray demands.

COVALENT ASSOC., INC.
10 State Street
Woburn, MA 01801-6820
(781) 938-1140

PI: Victor R. Koch, Ph.D.
(781) 938-1140
Contract #:
University of Dayton
Research Institute, 300 College Park
Dayton, OH 45469-0168
(937) 255-9002

ID#: F045-018-0021
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-018       Selected for Award
Title: Ionic Liquid Lubrication
Abstract:   The U.S. Air Force requires advanced lubricants (oils and greases) that can perform at elevated temperatures and under a high vacuum for military and aerospace applications. Additionally, the rapidly growing field of microelectromechanical systems requires advanced lubricants for moving parts incorporated into microscopic actuators. Based on preliminary data collected by us, we believe that Covalent's hydrophobic ionic liquid technology is well suited for these particular applications. During Phase I a series of new ionic liquid materials will be prepared and purified by us. Our STTR partner will then evaluate the new materials in respect to their thermal properties under vacuum and their tribological properties under load.

DANIEL H. WAGNER, ASSOC., INC.
40 Lloyd Avenue, Suite 200
Malvern, PA 19355-3091
(610) 644-3400

PI: Dr. M. Karlovitz/Dr. D. Stephe
(610) 644-3400
Contract #: FA9550-04-C-0077
Stevens Institute of Technology
Department of ECE
Hoboken, NJ 07030
(201) 216-5480

ID#: F045-008-0259
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-008       Awarded: 23AUG04
Title: An Open Software Framework for Steganalysis
Abstract:   We propose to develop a platform-independent Rapid Steganographic Detection Suite (RSDS). The RSDS will be capable of applying a diverse collection of steganalysis detection methods to all relevant files on a PC or other hardware system. The software will have a publicly available API for steganalysis methods and will thus allow new methods to be incorporated by any user who has the RSDS and the necessary programming skills. The RSDS will be able to apply these detection methods to a set of user-specified folders and to user-specified file types. Further, the RSDS can be used to scan incoming email as well as images and other media files that are downloaded from the Internet. The RSDS main driver will be written in Java. It will be able to interface with steganalysis methods that are written in various languages, including Java, C or C++, and MATLAB. As part of our Phase I work, we will implement in the RSDS a change-point detection method of steganalysis developed by our expert collaborator, Professor R. Chandramouli of the Stevens Institute of Technology.

DESANTAGE CORP.
16 Forest Glen Drive
Pittsburgh, PA 15228
(412) 726-5444

PI: Dr. Jay McCormack
(412) 445-1822
Contract #:
Carnegie Mellon University
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 268-3713

ID#: F045-019-0006
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-019       Selected for Award
Title: A Decomposition Based Approach to Optimal Layout of Complex Systems such as UAV's and Satellites
Abstract:   This STTR proposes to solve the problem of automated component placement (also known as intelligent packaging) for UAV's and other products by building on our unique state-of-the-art, patented technology platform. The goal of this work is to enable the automated layout of an entire complex product, such as a UAV, featuring a multitude of systems and subsystems with 3D components. This will be accomplished by developing a method for computationally decomposing a system into subsystems, solving the subsystem layout problem in sub-defined spaces with our "Extended Pattern Search" (EPS) technology, and re-integrating the subsystems together. In developing the necessary methods this project will create a tool for use on UAV's, satellites, missiles, and other military and non-military products such as printed circuit boards (PCB) and automobiles. This technology is critical for the successful evolution of UAV's for two reasons: first, time to market affects both cost and deployment of new UAV's to meet Air Force needs, and second, faster design time allows for more extensive analysis and verification of performance and quality, improving the effectiveness of the UAV program.

ECLECTIC COMPUTING CONCEPTS, INC.
1650 W. Virginia, Suite 200
McKinney, TX 75069-7703
(972) 547-4090

PI: Dr. Robert Bechtel
(972) 547-4090
Contract #:
University of Wisconsin - Plattevil
1 University Plaza
Platteville, WI 53818-3099
(608) 342-1456

ID#: F045-008-0285
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-008       Selected for Award
Title: StegKit: Automated Steganalysis Tool
Abstract:   Surreptitious communication through steganography has application in many settings. There are many different techniques for hiding steganographic content and in theory, any file type can serve as a carrier. Most studies in steganalysis have focused on single file types and a few steganographic methods on those file types, representing a limited sample of the population of transmitted data. We propose to develop of a general-purpose steganalysis system that will handle many file types, many steganographic methods, while being easy to configure and use. Such a system can be deployed widely enough to adequately sample a statistically significant portion of transmitted data. A distinguishing feature of our approach is the use of machine learning techniques to create a file type classifier that can be used to select among available steganalysis modules. The resulting system will be modeled on modern antivirus software, capable of background monitoring of files, email, and visited web pages.

EIC LABORATORIES, INC.
111 Downey Street
Norwood, MA 02062-2612
(781) 769-9450

PI: Dr. Fei Wang
(781) 769-9450
Contract #: FA955-04-C-0091
University of Florida
Department of Chemistry, PO Box 117200
Gainesville, FL 32611-7200
(352) 392-1582

ID#: F045-010-0223
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-010       Awarded: 23AUG04
Title: High Mobility Stable Crosslinked Conductive Polymers
Abstract:   In this STTR program, EIC Laboratories is teaming with the University of Florida (Prof. John Reynolds group) to design a new class of charge-transporting electronic polymers that exhibit a high degree of organization, leading to high charge mobilities. Furthermore, the structures will be highly crosslinked, which will make them tough and less prone to destruction by chemicals or in the space environment. The general approach is adaptable to a wide range of p-type and n-type charge transporting systems, and therefore is applicable to light emitting displays, photovoltaics and transistors. Phase I will entail synthesizing several examples of these crosslinked systems and characterizing their molecular structures. Carrier mobilities of selected materials will be evaluated in microfabricated thin film transistor test structures. In addition, time of flight mobilities will be measured to evaluate carrier transport through thethickness of the new materials. A goal for Phase I is to achieve mobilities similar to regioregular poly-3-hexylthiophene in the new crosslinked materials.

EMT, INC.
600 Blvd. South, Suite 104
Huntsville, AL 35802
(256) 705-3502

PI: Dr. Ruby Lathon
(505) 550-7829
Contract #:
California State University,Hayward
25800 Carlos Bee Blvd
Hayward, CA 94542
(510) 885-2205

ID#: F045-014-0247
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-014       Selected for Award
Title: Optimal Training System
Abstract:   The ability to train novice operators on a variety of tasks through automated training systems provides a cost effective and timely solution for a number of applications. The training regimen required for military personnel lends itself to automated training systems. In order to overcome some of the challenges and shortfalls of the traditional intelligent training systems, a strong normative or expert model must be developed. Such a model provides a foundation by which comparison, monitoring and feedback can take place. EMT, Inc. and California State University, Hayward propose to develop a methodology that brings together both the normative model and the student model in a approach that enables individualized training based on the trainee's individual skills. This objective will be achieved by using machine learning techniques used to develop and maintain an expert learning transition contained in the student model module via two steps. First, machine learning techniques will be used to develop and maintain an expert learning transition in the student model. Second, methods for externalizing the student model will be used to provide for student-system interaction that can be compared against the normative model.

EPIR TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
590 Territorial Drive, Suite B
Bolingbrook, IL 60440-4881
(630) 771-0201

PI: Dr. Silviu Velicu
(630) 771-0206
Contract #:
University of Illinois at Chicago
College of Engineering , 1020 SEO, 851 S. Morgan St.
Chicago, IL 60607-7053
(312) 996-3423

ID#: F045-021-0160
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-021       Selected for Award
Title: Thermoelectrically Cooled MWIR Avalanche Photodiodes on Silicon Substrates
Abstract:   Modern Air Force weapon systems need to detect, recognize and track a variety of targets under a wide spectrum of atmospheric conditions. Recent technology developments are paving the way toward imaging optical radars with wavelengths in MWIR range for these applications. The best suited detectors for optical radars are the avalanche photodiodes (APDs) due to their high gain-bandwidth characteristics. Robust silicon-APDs are limited to visible and near infrared region, while InGaAs works well up to wavelengths of about 1.5 microns. Longer wavelength source-detector systems are required to overcome the practical and seasonal conditions of the atmosphere. The semiconductor alloy HgCdTe, with its wavelength tunability over a broad spectral range, high quantum efficiency, low dielectric constant permitting high speed operation, and low noise performance in APDs (due to the resonant enhancement of the ionization coefficient), is an attractive material for MWIR APDs. We propose to use our extensive experience in HgCdTe growth by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and device processing to fabricate thermoelectrically cooled MWIR avalanche photodiodes on silicon substrates as single elements and focal plane arrays. The proposing team EPIR Technology- University of Illinois at Chicago integrates the technical strength and extensive knowledge of reputed and accomplished scientists in MBE HgCdTe growth, devices and APD technology.

ERC, INC.
555 Sparkman Drive, Executive Plaza, Suite 1622
Huntsville, AL 35816
(256) 430-3080

PI: Dr. Karl O. Christe
(661) 275-5194
Contract #:
University of Southern California
Loker Research Institute, University Park
Los Angeles, CA 90089-1661
(213) 740-8957

ID#: F045-003-0018
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-003       Selected for Award
Title: All-Nitrogen or High-Nitrogen Compounds as High Energy Density Materials
Abstract:   During Phase I of the proposed program, ERC-Incorporated proposes to identify novel promising polynitrogen candidates by means of theoretical calculations. Furthermore, preliminary tests will be carried out to explore the feasibility of synthesizing the most promising candidates. High-nitrogen compounds constitute a second area of significant interest. It is well known that the insertion of one hetero atom, such as carbon or oxygen, can greatly enhance the stability of a polynitrogen compound. Therefore, these compounds might exhibit better stability, while retaining much of the endothermicity. Furthermore, numerous polyazido compounds are known which combine high nitrogen content with reasonable stability. The proposed work would be divided equally between ERC-Incorporated, the small business partner, and the Loker Research Institute of the University of California. Prof. Karl Christe, the Principal Investigator and Responsible Scientist for this program, has active research groups at each location and is splitting his time between the two efforts, guaranteeing maximum collaboration and synergy. ERC-Incorporated is an on-site contractor at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Edwards AFB, CA, and has full access to all the testing facilities and computational capabilities at AFRL. The synthesis and characterization efforts would be divided between USC and ERC, because both groups have excellent capabilities in this area.

FLUOROCHEM, INC.
680 S. Ayon Ave.
Azusa, CA 91702-5122
(626) 334-6714

PI: Dr. Kurt Baum
(626) 334-6714
Contract #:
SRI International
333 Ravenswood Avenue
Menlo Park, CA 94025-3493
(650) 859-3083

ID#: F045-003-0170
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-003       Selected for Award
Title: All-Nitrogen or High-Nitrogen Compounds as High Energy Density Materials
Abstract:   All-nitrogen compounds, also known as polynitrogen compounds, or nitrogen-rich compounds, such as polyazides, store large amounts of energy that can be released when these materials decompose to molecular nitrogen. The synthesis of these materials is very challenging because the reactants, intermediates, and desired products have high endothermicities. These high endothermicities make many of these compounds shock sensitive and extremely difficult to handle. The goal of exploiting the potential of polynitrogen compounds for HEDM applications requires research to identify new target molecules that possess sufficient energy and kinetic stability to warrant attempts at their synthesis, to develop new methodology for their preparation, and to prepare amounts sufficient for the determination of their structures and properties.

FOSTER-MILLER, INC.
350 Second Ave.
Waltham, MA 02451-1196
(781) 684-4242

PI: Ms. Judith Gertler
(781) 684-4270
Contract #:
Johns Hopkins University
Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Rd.
Laurel, MD 20723-6099
(240) 228-5629

ID#: F045-007-0118
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-007       Selected for Award
Title: Control Center Fatigue Monitoring System
Abstract:   Abstract: The nature of military operations requires around-the-clock operation. Consequently military personnel responsible for overseeing routine as well as battlefield activity must work at times outside the weekday, daytime hours common in many other occupations. Given the serious consequences for US defense strategy and the safety of US servicemen and women, it is imperative that control center personnel maintain their alertness and cognitive functioning, even when working at times that run counter to human physiology. Effective fatigue management requires both personal planning and ergonomically designed work schedules. The control center environment provides the opportunity to introduce technology to provide real time monitoring and feedback to a fatigued operator. Foster-Miller and Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory propose development of the Control Center Fatigue Monitoring System to provide both a personal planning and predictive component, and real time feedback from a monitoring system. Our proposed system has a biological sensor component that will monitor multiple physiological indicators as well as an adaptive model that uses personal behavioral data along with real time sensor data to predict alertness levels for both active and passive tasks. Phase I will produce both the system architecture and plans for a validation study in Phase II. (P-040333)

FOSTER-MILLER, INC.
350 Second Ave.
Waltham, MA 02451-1196
(781) 684-4242

PI: Dr. Robert Kovar
(781) 684-4115
Contract #:
University of Notre Dame
511 Main Building
Notre Dame, ID 46556
(574) 631-4670

ID#: F045-018-0175
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-018       Selected for Award
Title: High Temperature Ionic Liquid Lubricant for Advanced Aircraft Turbine Engines
Abstract:   The turbine engines and vertical lift systems of advanced military aircraft will require lubricants that function reliably between -40,aF to +625 ,aF for >4000 hrs. Current aircraft lubricants can only be used to +300 ,aF. The Foster-Miller STTR team proposes to develop a high temperature ionic liquid lubricant (HTILL) that provides exceptional lubrication and wear performance between -40,aF to +625 ,aF for prolonged periods without degradation. During operation at elevated temperatures, the HTILL forms thin, adherent, durable and stable surface boundary layers that maintain low friction and wear, even at +625,aF and in vacuum environments. The HTILL is a non-flammable, low vapor pressure, thermal-oxidatively stable liquid that maintains viscosity and resists degradation between -40,aF and +625 ,aF. The HTILL enables facile movement of the engines and lift system over their entire operating temperature range. In Phase I, we will apply modeling to identify the most promising HTILL molecular structures, synthesize selected candidates and evaluate HTILL candidates with respect to volatility, thermal-oxidative stability, lubrication and wear properties against steel at ambient and +625,aF. Our team includes experts in modeling, ionic liquids, chemical synthesis, tribology, high temperature lubricants, and aircraft and engine manufacturers. (P-040321)

FREMONT ASSOC., LLC
306 Kings Chase
Camden, SC 29020-2160
(803) 432-8272

PI: Dr. Duncan Clarke
(803) 432-8272
Contract #:
University of Pennsylvania
Computer and Info Science, 3330 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6389
(215) 898-4448

ID#: F045-023-0249
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-023       Selected for Award
Title: Modeling Languages and Analysis Tools for Complex Distributed
Abstract:   The Architecture Analysis and Design Language (AADL) is an emerging SAE standard language for describing the software and hardware architecture of performance-critical real-time systems. In addition, the AADL standard allows the definition of annexes, i.e., formal extensions to the standard language to enhance the design specifications of hardware or software components. We propose to leverage the AADL language and tool development efforts to create a new toolset that incorporates simulation and analysis technologies for embedded real-time systems developed within the Charon and ACSR/VERSA projects at the University of Pennsylvania. Our integration of AADL with Charon and VERSA will extend the capabilities of AADL to allow analysis and simulation at the architecture level, detailed analysis at the module level, and support for implementation.

GLOBAL NANOSYSTEMS, INC.
10327 MISSOURI AVENUE, #202
LOS ANGELES, CA 90025-6902
(310) 277-3691

PI: Ms. Liping Ren
(310) 277-3691
Contract #:
UCLA MICROLAB
420 WESTWOOD PLAZA
LOS ANGELES, CA 90095-1594
(310) 825-4593

ID#: F045-013-0244
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-013       Selected for Award
Title: NOVEL DESIGNS OF HIGH EFFICIENCY SILICON LIGHT EMITTING DIODES FOR SILICON NANOPHOTONICS
Abstract:   The primary objective of this proposal is to design and fabricate novel structures of silicon light-emitting diodes (Si-LEDs) that are capable of producing ever-high electro-optical efficiency for all optics Si nanophotonics. Our strategies are based on Si-based photonic crystals. The success of the project will accomplish four tasks: (1) Novel design and fabrication of high efficient Si-LEDs based on {113} defect engineering and Er-implanted nanocrystals, etc; (2) Novel design and simulation of Si-based photonic crystal structures in terms of photonic waveguides, switches, wavelength division multiplexers (WDM), bends, losses and their feasibility of integration and fabrication for nanophotonics; (3) Super integration of the Si-LEDs and SiGe photodiodes inside the total reflective Si-based photonic crystals for ever-high electro-optical and opto-electrical efficiency; (4) Finally, a simple monolithic nanophotonic system will be designed and fabricated based on photonic crystals, which consists of Si-LEDs arrays, photodiode arrays and coupling optics composed of waveguides, bends, switches and WDM, etc. Based on the proposed approaches, we strongly believe that more sophisticated nanophotonic systems can be designed and fabricated monolithically in independent nanophotonic integrated circuits and/or together with nanoelectronics. Such systems will be proposed through a Phase II project and/or an STTR fast track approach.

GUIDED SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
P.O. Box 1453
McDonough, GA 30253-1453
(770) 898-9100

PI: Dr. J. Eric Corban
(770) 898-9100
Contract #:
Georgia Institute of Technology
Office of Sponsored Programs, Industry Contracting Office
Atlanta, GA 30332-0420
(404) 894-6932

ID#: F045-027-0312
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-027       Selected for Award
Title: Neural-Network-Based Adaptive Flow Control for Maneuvering Vehicles
Abstract:   Conventional flow control methods employ actuation frequencies that are the same order as the characteristic frequency of the flow. Georgia Tech has demonstrated novel high-frequency synthetic jet actuation to modify the apparent aerodynamic shape of aerosurfaces and achieve quasi-steady flow reattachment over an otherwise separated airfoil. Practical application of this technology in dynamic maneuvers, however, will require closed-loop flow control that does not depend on an exact model of, or detailed measurement of, local flow phenomenon. In the USAF RESTORE program, GST, Georgia Tech and Boeing flight demonstrated neural-network adaptive control algorithms that can accommodate gross errors in the aerodynamic models used for design. Georgia Tech researchers have since extended this adaptive method to the case of output feedback. This program will demonstrate adaptive output feedback for control of synthetic jets to produce desired control moments without requiring detailed models of local flow phenomenon. In phase I, GST and Georgia Tech will produce a dynamic model of a 2-D airfoil equipped with synthetic jet actuators, and demonstrate in simulation adaptive closed-loop control of airfoil attitude. Phase II will provide a real-time wind-tunnel demonstration of this adaptive closed-loop flow control technology for a 3-D aerodynamic configuration that both rotates and translates at various low-speed conditions.

HALEAKALA RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT, INC.
7 Martin Road
Brookfield, MA 01506-1762
(508) 764-6199

PI: Dr. Theodore R. Anderson
(508) 867-3918
Contract #:
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
110 8th Street, Building J
Troy, NY 12180-3590
(518) 276-8979

ID#: F045-015-0049
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-015       Selected for Award
Title: Smart Reconfigurable Plasma Antennas for Seamless Sensor Network Communications
Abstract:   *Haleakala R&D Inc. and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will develop novel approaches for space-time coding of sensor networks to convert spatially distributed sensor nodes into efficient, robust and secure wireless networks. Contemporary and future sensor network applications are expected to utilize anywhere from 10 to 1000 or more individual sensors in potentially hostile and militarily sensitive environments. Each sensor is likely to be required to support secure data-intensive collection and dissemination in a robust and oftentimes covert fashion. We propose a space-time diversity scheme for multi-transmit systems with specific applications to CDMA sensor networks. This research proposes a scheme which groups transmission and reception network nodes into cooperative clusters of simple nodes A few examples of wireless multi-hop networks that would benefit from the proposed research are: 1. A set of rovers with sensors used for unmanned exploration. 2. A collection of interconnected sensors 3. monitoring the different parts of a plant for maintenance purposes. 4. Communications units, used by a maintenance team in a plant, that link to each other as well as to a sensor network in the plant and a parts' inventory database..5. A network of rovers with sensors deployed over a dangerous terrain.

HYPER TECH RESEARCH, INC.
110 E. Canal St.
Troy, OH 45373-3581
(937) 332-0348

PI: Mr. Michael Tomsic
(937) 332-0348
Contract #:
Massachusetts Institute of Technolo
77 Massachusetts Avenue, Bldg E19-750
Cambridge, MA 02139-4301
(617) 253-7086

ID#: F045-002-0057
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-002       Selected for Award
Title: Stability and Quench Protection for HTS Superconducting Magnets
Abstract:   The Air Force is currently pursuing the development of high temperature superconducting airborne generators, and air core transformers. Coated YBCO superconductors can enable these applications. More needs to be known about the stability of these YBCO coated superconductors when wound into coils, so that the best approaches for quench protection can be determined. Our STTR Phase I will investigate the stability of small YBCO coils with different amounts of stabilization and with different types of insulation. Our intent is to perform stability tests on small coils so that we can model larger coils and recommend methods of quench protection that can be evaluated and tested on larger YBCO coils in a Phase II effort. This technology will be applicable to rotor coils for a superconducting generator.

HYPERCOMP, INC.
31255 Cedar Valley Drive, Suite 327
Westlake Village, CA 91362
(818) 865-3713

PI: Dr. Ramakanth Munipalli
(818) 865-3718
Contract #:
University of Texas at Arlington
Box 19018, 500 W. First St., 211 Woolf Hl
Arlington, TX 76019-0018
(817) 272-2072

ID#: F045-009-0128
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-009       Selected for Award
Title: Automated Design Optimization for Hypersonic Plasma-Aerodynamics
Abstract:   Recent years have witnessed a resurgence of interest in MHD and plasma augmentation of hypersonic flows, for applications in active flow control, power generation and flow acceleration. HyPerComp Inc. has been at the forefront of comprehensive physical modeling efforts pertaining to MHD flow simulations. Here, we propose a teaming arrangement with the University of Texas at Arlington, and the NASA-Ames Research Center to study design optimization techniques in the context of hypersonic MHD. In Phase-I, a master set of adjoint equations will be formulated for the class of MHD problems with low magnetic Reynolds number. Sample internal flow (on-board MHD power generator) and external flow (inlet flow control) problems will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of these techniques in 2-D. In Phase-II, techniques developed in phase-I will be interfaced with the parallel unstructured mesh MHD codes developed under prior AFOSR contracts, with automatic mesh movement and graphical user interfaces to assist with code execution. Provisions for arbitrary magnetic Reynolds number will make the technique more generally applicable. There are lucrative alternative markets to which this development can be applied.

IDZAP LLC
P.O.Box 2586
Sunnyvale, CA 94087-0586
(408) 621-1470

PI: Dr. Ping WAh Wong
(408) 621-1470
Contract #:
Polytechnic University
6 MetroTech Center
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 260-3339

ID#: F045-008-0044
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-008       Selected for Award
Title: Automated Detection of Steganographic Content
Abstract:   Given the ubiquitous nature of the Intenet and the pervasiveness of multimedia content on the network, a typical user downloads an enormous number of media files daily and routinely via many mechanisms including web browsing, email, file sharing, and so on. The easy availability of high quality steganography software, both public domain and commercial, media files can be easily used to deliver malicious payloads to unsuspecting users or to carry prohibited content across firewalls and proxy gateways. As a result, the threat of steganography has become a very real and increasing concern among government, business, and personal users. We propose in this project to develop an anti-steganography application that can automatically detect the presence of hidden information in media files. The anti-steganography software system consists of a client application and a server application. The client application is installed on client computers, and it will intercept and examine media files that go into the machine. For each media file, the client application executes steganography detection algorithms, and takes appropriate action is hidden messages are detected. The server portion of the system is provided to allow the user to automatically upgrade the client application as new steganography detection algorithms are developed. The client application is designed to be extendable so that the steganography detection capability can continuously be enhanced and updated. Specifically, an external Application Program Interface (API) is defined so that as long as any steganography detection module conforms to the API, then the application will be able to integrate and make use of the capability in the external module. In this Phase I project, we will develop a comprehensive API for the anti-steganography application. Prototype client and server applications will be built and tested.

INNOVATIVE SCIENTIFIC SOLUTIONS, INC.
2766 Indian Ripple Rd
Dayton, OH 45440-3638
(937) 429-4980

PI: Dr. Larry Goss
(937) 429-4980
Contract #:
University of Washington
Box 351700
Seattle, WA 98195
(206) 685-8665

ID#: F045-001-0292
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-001       Selected for Award
Title: Improved Pressure- and Temperature-Sensitive Paint
Abstract:   The phase I technical objectives are to use existing lifetime based PSP technology and identify a combination of existing probes and a binder that will provide a temperature-insensitive PSP measurement. These will be accomplished by extending the current lifetime-based systems that employ two-gate detection and by adding a second probe and a third or fourth gate. The proposed system will be constructed using the PtTFPP probe, FIB binder, and 470-nm LED excitation that are commonly employed in lifetime systems. A second probe that is compatible with this system and effectively eliminates temperature sensitivity will be identified and incorporated into the system. The final product will include a paint formulation and a set of camera gates that provide a pressure measurement that is insensitive to temperature.

INSITU GROUP, INC.
118 E. Columbia River Way
Bingen, WA 98605
(509) 493-8600

PI: Dr. David Rathbun
(509) 493-8600
Contract #:
Univ. of Washington
Grant and Contract Services, 3935 University Way N.E.
Seattle, WA 98195-6613
(206) 543-4043

ID#: F045-011-0033
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-011       Selected for Award
Title: Cooperative Tracking of Moving Targets by Teams of Autonomous Unmanned Air Vehicles
Abstract:   The goal of the proposed work is to rapidly evaluate, and demonstrate in flight, algorithms for cooperative tracking of moving targets using multiple UAVs. The building block algorithms have been maturing through sponsorship elsewhere, and the timing is crucial to now pull them together for demonstration and commercialization. Phase I will involve simulation and flight demonstration of the building blocks. Phase II will involve an end-to-end Hardware-in-the-Loop (HiL) simulation and a set of comprehensive flight experiments of the integrated system. The Insitu ScanEagle/Seascan is the smallest fixed-wing UAV that can be used for target tracking as it is the smallest UAV that has an inertially stabilized and gimbaled turret. ScanEagle has demonstrated in-flight the ability to autonomously track moving targets for short periods of time. The goal of this research is to combine the latest methods being developed at the University of Washington, Cornell, and Insitu into the current framework. The project goal is to enable a swarm of UAVs to track a moving, evading target for up to 30 minutes without human intervention.

INTEGRATED SMART STRUCTURES, INC.
2601 Twin Creeks Drive
Copley, OH 44321-1770
(330) 664-0982

PI: Dr. Wahyu Lestari
(330) 664-0982
Contract #: FA9550-04-C-0078
The University of Akron
244 Sumner Street
Akron, OH 44325-3905
(330) 972-5226

ID#: F045-016-0125
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-016       Awarded: 12AUG04
Title: Rapid and Robust Dynamics-Based Nondestructive Method for Aerospace Structural Health Monitoring
Abstract:   A dynamics-based damage identification technique with aid of smart piezoelectric materials and scanning laser vibrometer is proposed for health monitoring of aerospace structures. The identification technique is developed with closely considerations of implementation of a portable dynamics-based system for on-site use and potential for real-time automated monitoring. Therefore, the smart piezoelectric materials will be used as sensors and actuators, which provide great prospect for development of on-board smart structural health monitoring (SHM) system; while development of identification technique using scanning laser vibrometer will lead to portable on-site system. The objective of Phase I project is to develop a robust dynamics-based damage identification technique with capability of determining the location and extent of damage in aerospace structures made of both metallic and composite materials. The curvature mode shape and anti-resonance methods will be used simultaneously to locate and quantify the damage, and a combined static and dynamic technique will be employed to perform detection experiment demonstration. A combined experimental and analytical/numerical approach will be adopted, and the novel numerical simulation of damage structures will be used as a guide and validation tool for experimental study.

INTELLIGENT AERODYNAMICS INTERNATIONAL
845 Sharon Park Drive
Menlo Park, CA 94025-6739
(650) 854-6710

PI: Dr. Luigi Martinelli
(609) 258-6652
Contract #:
Princeton University
Princeton University
Princeton, NJ 08544
(609) 258-3090

ID#: F045-009-0240
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-009       Selected for Award
Title: Automated Design Optimization for Hypersonic Plasma-Aerodynamics
Abstract:   The research goal of this project is to develop adjoint based methods for design optimization of hypersonic aerospace vehicles and system components. Specifically, we will build on our expertise in the area of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Design optimization to extend existing numerical algorithms for non-equilibrium hypersonic flows. The long term goal is the development and use of these computational capabilities to characterize the performance of hypersonic flight vehicles systems over the flight envelope, and to optimize MHD flow control in hypersonic vehicles. Combined with the use of high performance computing algorithms and a fully automated software architecture we hope to provide a robust and accurate computational tool for designers that can be eventually imbedded in the design process of future hyersonic vehicles.

INTELLIGENT AUTOMATION, INC.
7519 Standish Place, Suite 200
Rockville, MD 20855
(301) 294-5221

PI: Dr. Chiman Kwan
(301) 294-5238
Contract #:
University of Pennsylvania
3330 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6389
(215) 898-8560

ID#: F045-007-0085
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-007       Selected for Award
Title: A Novel Non-Intrusive Approach to Detect Human Fatigue in Real-time
Abstract:   Fatigue affects human performance. If we can capture the early signs of fatigue such as lack of concentration, yawning, changes in voice characteristics, etc., we will be able to evaluate individual job performance and plan optimal work schedules to optimize performance. Intelligent Automation, Incorporated (IAI) and its subcontractor, Prof. Jianbo Shi and Prof. David Dinges of the University of Pennsylvania, propose a novel non-intrusive approach to detecting human fatigue. Our approach combines the latest algorithms in video processing, audio processing, and fusion in a unified framework. The video signals contain not only camera signals but also eye safe low intensity laser scanner signals (3-D images) that can provide more facial information than 2-D images. Our video processing algorithms extract coarse (body behavior such as yawning) and fine (eye blink, facial expressions, etc.) features. The microphone signals contain voice characteristics that reflect fatigue behavior. Our audio algorithm is based on cepstral features and Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM), which have been proven to be extremely powerful in characterizing human speaker and bird voice characteristics. Our fusion algorithm combines video and audio fatigue features and yields an optimal decision on fatigue detection.

IPITEK
2330 Faraday Avenue
Carlsbad, CA 92008-5216
(760) 438-1010

PI: Dr. David Schaafsma
(760) 438-1010
Contract #:
University of Maryland
College Park
College Park, MD 20742
(301) 405-4976

ID#: F045-025-0164
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-025       Selected for Award
Title: Miniature, All Dielectric Wideband Electro-Optic Field Measurement System
Abstract:   IPITEK proposes to develop a wideband, all-dielectric, filed probe based on the novel electro-optic (E-O) polymer maters and devices developed by this company. Since these polymers have very high electro-optic responses, they have both good sensitivity to electric field when used as sensors and good response to applied voltage when used as modulators.

IRVINE SENSORS CORP.
3001 Redhill Avenue, Building #3-108
Costa Mesa, CA 92626-4532
(714) 444-8760

PI: Mr. John Leon
(714) 435-8920
Contract #:
University of Southern California
3740 McClintock Avenue, EEB-200C
Los Angeles, CA 90089-2562
(213) 740-4483

ID#: F045-015-0165
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-015       Selected for Award
Title: Seamless Sensor Network Communications
Abstract:   Irvine Sensors Corporation together with the University of Southern California propose to develop a novel noncoherent seamless sensor network called "SCOUT" (Figure 1) that involves space-time coding technique, capable of transmitting multiple radio frequencies. SCOUT reconfigures itself upon learning (detecting) its nearest SCOUT neighbor(s) thus becoming a coherent network. Traditionally, sensors have been limited by their processing power, amount of battery power, size of memory and data transmission capabilities. Much of the battery consumption occurs at the learning stage of noncoherent networks. Our approach involves the use of commercially available components that Irvine Sensors can miniaturize their size into a small, power efficient device, to maximize the sensing and data transmission rate of the sensor. The power consumption used within each device is controlled and optimized within the FPGA logic using novel power algorithms from the University of Southern California and a novel data sensor awareness technique.

ITN ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC.
8130 Shaffer Pkwy
Littleton, CO 80127-4107
(303) 285-5111

PI: Dr. Russell Hollingsworth
(303) 285-5154
Contract #:
Colorado School of Mines
1500 Illinois
Golden, CO 80401-1887
(303) 273-3240

ID#: F045-013-0114
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-013       Selected for Award
Title: Waveguide coupled high speed plasmon optical modulator
Abstract:   Silicon is the dominant material for electronic devices, but basic material properties have limited its use for optical devices. Passive components such as waveguides, splitters and multiplexers have been demonstrated on silicon wafers. Most active photonic devices have been made with materials such as gallium arsenide that cannot be grown directly on silicon electronics. The development of active optical elements on silicon will enable the large scale integration of optics and electronics directly on a single silicon chip. This can revolutionize many fields, including data communications, telecommunications, optical computing and sensing. This STTR phase I contract will develop novel CMOS compatible high speed optical modulators for communication band wavelengths based on long range plasmon waveguides as well as plasmon modulators coupled to conventional dielectric waveguides. The modulators will be a factor of ten smaller than competing technologies.

LUNA INNOVATIONS, INC.
2851 Commerce Street
Blacksburg, VA 24060-6657
(540) 953-4261

PI: Dr. Bryan Koene
(540) 558-1699
Contract #:
University of Akron
ORSSP, Polsky Bldg., Room 284, 225 S. Main Street
Akron, OH 44325-2102
(330) 972-6764

ID#: F045-010-0158
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-010       Selected for Award
Title: Carbon Nanotube Based Transistors and Opto-Electronic Devices
Abstract:   Luna Innovations addresses the US Air Force need to develop flexible transistors and electronic devices to enable fabrication of smart skins and conformal electronic structures. Electronically active organic and polymer materials have been studied extensively for their use in various electronic devices such as transistors, photovoltaics, and light emitting diodes. These devices have significant technological and manufacturing advantages over traditional solid state inorganic analogues such as low cost and ease of manufacture, as well as flexibility. Despite these benefits, poor charge carrier mobility of organic materials is one of the obstacles that has hindered their widespread use in these advanced electronic and opto-electronic device applications. Luna, teamed with the University of Akron, are developing conductive polymer - carbon nanotube thin film electronic materials that can overcome this barrier. The use of highly aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) in the active layer of these devices will increase the carrier mobility to the point that flexible thin film electronics will be competitive with conventional semiconducting devices.

METROLASER, INC.
2572 White Road
Irvine, CA 92614-6236
(949) 553-0688

PI: Dr. Ben Buckner
(949) 553-0688
Contract #:
Purdue University
Mechanical Engineering, 585 Purdue Mall
West Lafayette, IN 47907-2088
(765) 494-6900

ID#: F045-024-0209
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-024       Selected for Award
Title: High-Resolution Evanescent PIV for Near-Wall Microfluidics
Abstract:   This project aims to develop and test a system concept for high-resolution evanescent wave PIV, capable of near-wall flow measurements with 100 nm resolution in-plane and better, along the surface normal direction. We will construct a simple microfluidics test apparatus and identify the most appropriate type of velocity tracer from among fluorescent particles, enhanced scattering particles, or fluorescent volume tracers. Then we will design and construct an evanescent illumination system using plasmon-resonant coatings to enhance the tracer signal, the weakness of which can be a major impediment with the small tracer sizes required. We will also perform experiments using Purdue's advanced PIV data processing techniques with these apparatus to determine system performance and characterize resolution parameters. Based on the knowledge acquired from the analysis of the data, we will determine the best system design to propose for further development in Phase II and eventual commercialization. We have identified numerous promising techniques that could be applied to advance this nascent field of near-wall velocimetry, and we will investigate the use of these both to meet our current objectives and to determine the optimal strategies for the subsequent development of the system.

MICRO ANALYSIS & DESIGN, INC.
4949 Pearl East Circle, Suite 300
Boulder, CO 80301-2477
(303) 442-6947

PI: Mr. Brad Best
(303) 442-6947
Contract #:
Carnegie Mellon University
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890
(412) 268-1161

ID#: F045-014-0076
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-014       Selected for Award
Title: Optimal Training System
Abstract:   Successful training in complex environments is normally accomplished through the interaction of a trainee and a skilled expert, but due resource constraints, experts' use in training can be problematic. Developing expert models for training is one solution, but constructing expert models is costly and time-consuming, and they tend to be difficult to validate, test, and debug. Alternatively, using an optimal model of task performance may be more efficient since optimal models are simpler to validate, test, and debug. Using a simulated task environment (STE) permits the necessary close model-trainee interaction. The simplifying assumptions of STEs often enable construction of optimal performance models, allowing them to perform the same task as the trainee using the same interface while closely observing and guiding trainee performance. We propose to develop the concept of using a normatively correct model of task performance as the core engine of an automated tutor with an initial application to a national missile defense (NMD) task STE. The NMD STE is a complex task requiring skilled operators to allocate assets under time constraints to minimize expected losses, yet is amenable to construction of an optimal model, and therefore has potential for exploring a normative modeling-based tutoring approach.

MILLENNIUM DYNAMICS CORP.
5860 Bridgemont Place
Acworth, GA 30101-4397
(770) 241-5045

PI: Mr. Vin Sharma
(770) 241-5045
Contract #:
School of Aerospace Engineering
Georgia Inst.of Technology, 270 Ferst Drive
Atlanta, GA 30331-0150
(404) 894-3078

ID#: F045-016-0148
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-016       Selected for Award
Title: Rapid and Robust Dynamics-based Nondestructive Method to Monitor Structural Health
Abstract:   The objective of this proposal is to demonstrate the feasibility of detecting damage in structures using Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) and further lead to the development of a robust aerospace structural health monitoring system. The proposed concept is based on use of LDV to measure velocities and displacements associated with high frequency operational deflection shapes as well as lamb waves. Anomalies and changes in the measured displacement maps are then identified through intelligent data processing techniques that can be used to locate and characterize the extent of the associated damage. The underlying principle of the proposed damage detection methodology relies on the evaluation of changes in displacement amplitudes, curvatures and energy distributions associated with high frequency vibrations and wave propagation phenomena. The proposed research is supported by preliminary theoretical and experimental work which clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed techniques and the potential of their integration. The ideal scenario for the ultimate usage of the LDV based damage detection technique would be the injection of small amounts of energy into the structure and then determining the damage status of the structure in a brief time span. The proposed techniques will provide the necessary building blocks for such a scenario.

MLB CO.
2551 Casey Ave, Suite B
Mountain View, CA 94043
(650) 966-1022

PI: Dr. Henry Jones
(650) 966-1022
Contract #:
University of California - Berkeley
C3 Unmanned Vehicles, 115 McLaughlin Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720-1712
(510) 642-9540

ID#: F045-011-0095
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-011       Selected for Award
Title: Cooperative Tracking of Moving Targets by Teams of Autonomous Unmanned Air Vehicles
Abstract:   Teams of low cost unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) with autonomous behaviors will be capable of performing inexpensive, persistent distributed sensing functions. One application of interest is the use of UAV teams to perform Cooperative Search, Acquisition and Tracking (CSAT) of moving ground targets in a stealthy manner. Current state-of-the-art for autonomous control of UAV teams enables the collaborative tracking of friendly ground vehicles, for example in the context of a convoy protection scenario. The focus of this work is to demonstrate the joint capability of the MLB Company's small autonomous UAVs and UC Berkeley's self-directed collaborative control architecture to perform CSAT of multiple moving ground or sea-based targets, drawing heavily on field experience by both groups in the areas of UAV operations, ground vehicle tracking, vision-based road following, and collaborative team control. The extension of collaborative tracking of friendly vehicles to CSAT of adversarial targets will be achieved by addressing two major technical challenges. First, stand-off line of sight trajectory following will be integrated with the current collaborative tracking methodology. Second, a data fusion center will be developed that integrates measurements from all team members in order to estimate ground target tracks in a shared global reference frame.

MTECH LABORATORIES LLC
831 Rte. 67, Bldg. 45C, P.O. Box 227
Ballston Spa, NY 12020-0227
(518) 885-6436

PI: Dr. Michael J. Hennessy
(518) 885-6436
Contract #:
NHMFL
A233 NHMFL FSU, 1800 E. Paul Dirac Dr.
Tallahassee, FL 32310-3706
(850) 644-0996

ID#: F045-002-0212
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-002       Selected for Award
Title: HTS Magnet Quench Protection
Abstract:   A program is proposed which will lead to the development of novel quench protection technologies in high-temperature superconductive magnets operating at temperatures above 30K. These magnets are intended for use in compact, energy-dense magnet systems for the Air Force. In Phase I, innovative approaches will be explored. The designs will be based on many years of experience with both passive and active superconductive magnet protection systems. A magnet system will be fabricated and tested in Phase II. The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) at Florida State University will assist MTECH in the quench propagation analysis in Phase I. In Phase II, NHMFL will assist MTECH in the design and fabrication of the HTS magnet and associated test hardware.

NANEX
832 Dolores Drive
Santa Barbara, CA 93109-1612
(805) 895-9726

PI: Mr. Carl Meinhart
(805) 893-4563
Contract #:
Univ California Santa Barbara
Dept. Mech. & Envir Eng, UC Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106
(805) 893-4856

ID#: F045-024-0153
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-024       Selected for Award
Title: High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Velocimetry Measurements for Microfluidic Devices
Abstract:   The overall goal of the proposed research is to develop a commercially-viable micro/nano-PIV instrument that can measure fluid motion in microchannels with 100 nanometer out-of-plane spatial resolution, 1 micron in-plane spatial resolution, and 1 microsecond temporal resolution. The instrument will also be capable of measuring bulk fluid motion in 100 nanometer channels.The 100 nanometer out-of-plane resolution will be achieved by using an evanescent field to illuminate flow-tracing particles near a waveguide surface. The PIV instrument will be well-suited for investigating near-wall slip flow, boundary layer regions, and electro-osmotic flow in microfluidic devices. Although this form of micro-PIV has been reported by several researchers, it has not yet been commercialized. We will use low-cost laser diodes, and well-designed optical coupling strategies, to improve the evanescent illumination and to develop a low-cost commercial instrument.In order to take full advantage of evanescent wave illumination and to measure flows in 100 nanometer channels, the size of the flow-tracing particles must be reduced to order 20 - 50 nm. These particles must be small enough to flow within a ~100 nanometer channel or within an evanescent field, while being large enough to sufficiently dampen Brownian motion, and emit sufficient fluorescent light. We will investigate the use of single quantum dots (QDs) or clusters of QDs. QDs are well known for their broad excitation curves, and bright emission signals. Several research groups have suggested using quantum dots as seed particles but to date there has been no report in the the literature that this has been done.

NANOLAB, INC.
55 Chapel St
Newton, MA 02458
(617) 581-6747

PI: Mr. David L. Carnahan
(617) 581-6747
Contract #:
University of Delaware
126D Spencer Laboratory
Newark, DE 19716
(302) 831-2423

ID#: F045-020-0227
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-020       Selected for Award
Title: Advanced Composites with Nanoscale Reinforcement
Abstract:   Advanced fiber composites are fabricated by automated 3D weaving and braiding processes. These weaving processes use tows of micron diameter fibers, to create preforms for resin infiltration. The interaction between the resin matrix and the fibers can be potentially increased by creating nanoscale features on the carbon fibers. NanoLab is expert in the synthesis of carbon nanotubes and their applications in composites. In the proposed work, we plan to develop a process where nanotubes can be grown on 3-D woven or 3-D braided performs, as well as individual fibers and cloths. We will then infiltrate sample composites, and perform representative mechanical tests, in order to validate the possibility of achieving improved mechanical performance, particularly higher penetration resistance under foreign object impact.

NANOSONIC, INC.
P.O. Box 618
Christiansburg, VA 24068
(540) 953-1785

PI: Dr. Rochael Swavey
(937) 748-0761
Contract #:
University of Dayton
300 College Park
Dayton, OH 45469
(937) 229-3145

ID#: F045-001-0113
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-001       Selected for Award
Title: Temperature-Compensated Pressure-Sensitive Paint Containing a Bichromophoric Luminophore
Abstract:   Temperature-sensitive paints (TSP) and pressure-sensitive paints (PSP) are a reliable way to map surface response to change in pressure and temperature. Luminescent probes are incorporated into a surface treatment and the change in luminescent intensity or the change in the lifetime of the luminescence is monitored with change in temperature and pressure. The TSP and PSP are used in the aeronautics and astronautics industry to understand temperature and pressure gradients to maximize material integrity and design geometry of vehicles. The purpose of this Phase I STTR program is to design a new pressure- and temperature-sensitive paint for use with the developing lifetime-based fluorescence response measurements. The luminophores selected for this paint can be photoexcited at a single wavelength and emit a single fluorescence band for ease of excitation and collection of data. In addition, the two luminophores will be combined into a single bichromophoric complex to ensure equal distribution of the luminophores in the binder matrix. NanoSonic, Inc will partner with the Chemistry Department at the University of Dayton to synthesize the proposed complex and to measure its response to temperature and pressure. The University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) will aide in paint dispersion and spray application as well as measure gloss, film adhesion and monitor photo-degradation of the paint in Xenon-arc artificial weathering chambers.

NANOTECHLABS, INC.
501 Deacon Blvd. Suite 200
Winston-Salem, NC 27105
(336) 403-7762

PI: Mr. Richard Czerw
(336) 403-7762
Contract #:
Wake Forest University
Research & Sponsored Programs
Winston-Salem, NC 27109-7528
(336) 758-4910

ID#: F045-018-0278
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-018       Selected for Award
Title: Ionic Lubricants incorporating nanomaterials.
Abstract:   Ionic liquids could be an important component in green engineering. They are salts that are liquid at ambient temperature, and they possess attractive features as green lubricants such as very low vapor pressure and non-flammability. In contrast to many conventional solvents, ionic liquids produce virtually no hazardous or flammable vapors. NanoTechLabs Inc. and Wake Forest University will synthesize and evaluate ionic liquid / carbon nanotube based lubricants using unique cations based on chiral imidazoliums as a basis for the lubricant. The presence of chiral centers in the alkyl substituents in combination with chiral anions in a salt will provide a mixture of diastereomers depressing the melting point of the salt further and preventing crystallization. Single wall nanotubes will be incorporated into the ionic lubricants to impart lower friction coefficients and enhanced thermal stability. It is anticipated that carbon nanotubes will affect the molecular ordering of the lubricant, and the amount of induced long-range orientation will be characterized as a function of the nanotube length and dispersion.

NUMEREX
2309 Renard Place SE, Suite 220
Albuquerque, NM 87106-4259
(505) 842-0074

PI: Dr. John Luginsland
(607) 277-4272
Contract #:
The University of New Mexico
EECE Department, The University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
(505) 277-4011

ID#: F045-006-0295
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-006       Selected for Award
Title: User-Safe "Virtual Laboratory" Environment for High-Voltage Radiation Source Experiments
Abstract:   The advent of advanced scientific computation capabilities has enabled high fidelity simulations that can predict the performance of experimental tests over a wide variety of physical problems. This ability to virtually test and prototype can open new avenues of scientific inquiry by providing the means to study complex physical phenomena at institutions without the resources to field experimental programs and deal with the resulting safety hazards. We propose to develop a computational tool that will allow the construction of a "virtual laboratory" to investigate the physics of electromagnetic radiation sources. Building on mature software efforts such as Particle-in-Cell, Magneto-Hydrodynamics, and x-ray transport codes, we propose designing an object-orientated environment that can combine these codes into a large-scale system of interconnected systems. Leveraging The University of New Mexico's experience with the Rational Unified Process and Universal Modeling Language against NumerEx's experience with physics algorithm development, we will lay the ground work for a tool that combines existing physics packages in such a way as to allow continued independent development of the physics software, while ensuring that the combined capabilities of the software can be brought to bear with sufficient accuracy for the first principles simulation of novel radiation sources.

OMEGA OPTICS, INC.
10435 Burnet Road,, Suite 108
Austin, TX 78758-4450
(512) 996-8833

PI: Dr. Kevin Wu
(512) 996-8833
Contract #:
University of Texas at Austin-PRC
10100 Burnet Rd., Bldg. 160, Mail Code R9900
Austin, TX 78758
(512) 471-7035

ID#: F045-013-0245
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-013       Selected for Award
Title: Ultra-compact Optical Modulator Based on Silicon Photonic Crystal Waveguide
Abstract:   Nanophotonics promises to have a revolutionary impact on the landscape of photonics technology. Due to the maturity of sub-micron silicon CMOS technology, nanophotonics on silicon is anticipated to play a critical role in future nano-system integration. In this program, we propose an innovative approach to building ultra-compact silicon Mach-Zehnder(MZ) modulators. The proposed structure consists of carefully designed photonic crystal waveguides(PCW) in conjunction with a metal-oxide-semiconductor(MOS) "capacitor," which utilizes plasma dispersion effect to achieve high-speed modulation. Incorporating the PCW nanostructure provides an unprecedented opportunity to enhance the modulation efficiency of silicon based MZ modulators, and a reduction of electrode length by 100 times is expected. The ultra-short electrode length associated with the highly dispersive PCW nanostructure brings such exclusive advantages as low power consumption, high bandwidth, and potential for high-density integration of modulator arrays, which promises to outperform existing silicon guided-wave devices by at least one order of magnitude. To prove the feasibility of the proposed idea, photonic crystal waveguide based silicon MZ modulators will be designed, fabricated, and characterized in Phase I. The dispersion of the photonic crystal waveguides and the modulation characteristics of the MOS structure will be carefully investigated.

OPTEOS, INC.
1340 Eisenhower place
Ann Arbor, MI 48108-3282
(734) 973-6600

PI: Dr. Kyoung Yang
(734) 973-6600
Contract #: FA9550-04-C-0079
University of Michigan
CUOS (IST Bldg), 2200 Bonisteel Blvd., Rm. 1006
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099
(734) 763-1324

ID#: F045-025-0282
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-025       Awarded: 20AUG04
Title: MINIATURIZED ELECTRO/MAGNETO-OPTIC SENSORS FOR THE DETECTION AND MEASUREMENT OF BROADBAND RF PULSES
Abstract:   An innovative electromagnetic wave detection and measurement system based on broadband, non-intrusive, miniaturized electro-optic (EO) and magneto-optic (MO) sensors will be developed in order to evaluate the effects caused by short duration burst or pulsed EM waves incident on electronic circuits. Due to the compact size and non-metallic construction, the EO and MO sensors can be placed within close proximity to the circuit under observation, and their measurement bandwidth and spatial resolution can be greater 100 GHz and less than 10 microns, respectively. The EO and MO sensors will be designed and fabricated during the Phase I of STTR project, and entire system hardware and software development will be completed during the Phase II. Upon its successful realization through the effort of this STTR project, the EO/MO sensor system is expected to provide an unprecedented capability for EM monitoring of complex electronics in a broad range of applications, particularly when the electronics are exposed to externally generated time-varying EM waves. The information from the EO/MO sensor system will reveal the actual EM transients created by incident RF pulses, where such signals may lead to temporary malfunction or permanent damage of sophisticated electronic systems.

ORGANICID, INC.
495 Vanderbilt Court
Colorado Springs, CO 80906-7242
(310) 777-5917

PI: Mr. Klaus Dimmler
(719) 540-0440
Contract #: FA9550-04-C-0080
Northwestern University
c/o Tobin Marks, Department of Chemistry
Evanston, IL 60208-3113
(847) 491-5658

ID#: F045-010-0208
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-010       Awarded: 12AUG04
Title: Organic Based Flexible Transistors and Electronic Devices
Abstract:   The work outlined in this proposal is directed toward the development of materials and fabrication processes for organic-based complementary circuits. New and improved n-channel (electron transporting) semiconductors will be synthesized and characterized at Northwestern University. These materials will possess a mobility of about 1 cm2/V-s and will be combined with p-channel FET materials such as pentacene (mobility ~ 1 cm2/V-s) to realize an organic complementary circuit technology. The speed of complementary circuits with materials possessing a mobility of 1 cm2/V-s will be equivalent to p-channel FET circuits with a mobility of 10 cm2/V-s, underscoring the importance of developing complementary technology. The fabrication of the transistors will be performed by OrganicID and will include detailed investigations of the best insulator-semiconductor combinations for both top-gate and bottom gate devices. The channel lengths of these devices will extend to below 5 micrometers. The analysis and improvement of injecting contacts will be subcontracted to the University of Texas. The development of a practical organic complementary technology is vital to the business goals of OrganicID which is engaged in building low-cost radio frequency identification tags and other circuitry. Complementary circuits will result in lower power requirements, greater range, and faster speed.

PERFORMANCE POLYMER SOLUTIONS, INC.
91 Westpark Road
Centerville, OH 45459
(937) 298-3713

PI: Dr. David B. Curliss
(937) 298-3713
Contract #:
The Ohio State University
Engineering Experiment Station, 156 Hitchcock Hall
Columbus, OH 43210-1278
(614) 292-6081

ID#: F045-020-0267
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-020       Selected for Award
Title: High Performance 3D Composite Preforms Manufactured Via Novel In Situ Vapor Grown Carbon Fiber Infusion
Abstract:   The objective of this proposal is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility and payoff of novel in situ vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) reinforcement of 3D woven or braided composite preforms for advanced composite aerospace structural or thermal-structural applications. In this approach the carbon nanofibers are grown within the composite perform in a controllable and tailorable manner to yield the desired reinforcement size, morphology, and spatial distribution for the chosen advanced composite application. The approach holds tremendous promise to increase the strength, stiffness, and damage tolerance of advanced composites while preserving the inherent affordability of near-net-shape woven or braided preforms for component manufacturing. The technology is generally applicable with any composite preforming technology including carbon, graphite, glass, quartz, ceramic, or metal fiber woven, braided, or constructed performs. The resulting VGCF reinforced preforms can be tailored for optimal thermal and structural performance.

PHYSICAL SCIENCES, INC.
20 New England Business Center
Andover, MA 01810
(978) 689-0003

PI: Dr. David Rosen
(978) 689-0003
Contract #:
Johns Hopkins Univeristy
615 N. Wolfe Street
Baltimore, MD 21205
(410) 955-3258

ID#: F045-017-0162
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-017       Selected for Award
Title: Instrumentation for Monitoring Breath Biomarkers for Diagnosis of Health, Condition, Toxic Exposure, and Disease
Abstract:   Detecting the presence and levels of endogenously produced molecules in expired breath is a promising technology with potential for non-invasive monitoring of warfighter health, physiologic condition, and toxin/radiation exposure. Until now, exploiting this potential has been limited by the lack of a suitable platform technology for easy, rapid, reliable and versatile breath analysis measurements. To address this need, Physical Sciences Inc. in collaboration with our academic research partner, Johns Hopkins University, proposes to develop a compact, portable, and high sensitivity system for non-invasive, real-time monitoring of normal and abnormal human physiology via human breath analysis. The breath analysis system we propose to develop will employ photonic biosensor platform technology based on the marriage of the very latest in tunable, mid-wave IR semiconductor laser technology and cavity-enhanced spectroscopy for ultra-sensitive absorption measurements. The proposed instrument will enable rapid, reliable and real-time measurements of trace levels of selected biomarker gases in exhaled breath. The Phase I goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of developing a compact, transportable, dual-laser module capable of real-time monitoring of breath ethane and carbon monoxide. Breath ethane is a key biomarker of oxidative stress status (OSS) and breath carbon monoxide a biomarker of OS response.

PHYSICAL SCIENCES, INC.
20 New England Business Center
Andover, MA 01810-1077
(978) 689-0003

PI: Dr. R. Daniel Ferguson
(978) 689-0003
Contract #:
Massachusetts General Hospital
Wellman Center for Photomedici, 50 Blossom Street
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 724-2202

ID#: F045-022-0194
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-022       Selected for Award
Title: Field-Deployable Imaging System to Assess Potential Retinal Injuries
Abstract:   Advanced imaging technologies now exist to detect the tissue changes that occur due to retinal laser injuries that may not be visible with fundus photography. Very recent developments at Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) and the Wellman Center for Photomedicine have made it possible to combine these technologies into a single, affordable field-deployable device. The Line-Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (LSLO) is a compact, low-cost, quasi-confocal SLO imaging system. High quality, high resolution and high contrast wide-field en face retinal SLO images are obtained non-mydriatically with <600ŸYW of NIR source power at up to 30 frames/sec. Images are captured, processed and displayed with integrated FPGA and LCD technology. Simultaneously, revolutionary advances have been made in the field of optical coherence tomography (OCT), pioneered by researchers at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine. New implementations of spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT) have produced more efficient and compact OCT designs with few moving parts and a thousand-fold multiplex advantage over conventional OCT. Full SD-OCT images are obtained non-mydriatically, with <600ŸYW of broadband illumination at up to 30 frames/sec. The architecture that PSI has already developed for hand-held LSLO applications, is ideally suited to the incorporation of SD-OCT. In Phase I, a hybrid LSLO/SD-OCT system will be demonstrated, that offers superior retinal imaging in a compact, portable package.

PHYSICAL SCIENCES, INC.
20 New England Business Center
Andover, MA 01810
(978) 689-0000

PI: Dr. Shawn Wehe
(978) 689-0000
Contract #: FA9550-04-C-0094
Brown University
Box 1929, Brown University
Providence, RI 02912-1929
(401) 863-1805

ID#: F045-024-0191
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-024       Awarded: 23AUG04
Title: High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Velocimetry Measurements for Microfluidic Devices
Abstract:   Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) and Brown University propose to develop and demonstrate a system for the measurement of fluid velocities in close proximity fo solid surfaces in microfluidic and micropropulsion devices. The instrument couples the Total Internal Reflection Fluorescent Microscopy (TIRFM) technique with Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) algorithms and integrates waveguide optical coupling for depth-tailored excitation at the sub-micron scale range, high efficiency quantum dot fluorescence probes for ~ nm spatial resolution, and compact, low-cost photonic excitation sources such as pulsed LEDs. The Phase I research effort will optimize each element of the excitation and collection system, and demonstrate the integral system in a microfluidic channel with improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to existing techniques. The results of the Phase I will be packaged in a set of microfluidic diagnostic systems in Phase II for wall velocity measurements in micro- and nano- scale devices. Extensive testing during the Phase II program will fully validate the sensor's performance, accuracy, and spatial resolution.

PRINCETON LIGHTWAVE, INC.
2555 Route 130 South
Cranbury, NJ 08512
(609) 495-2551

PI: Dr. Mark Itzler
(609) 495-2551
Contract #:
University of Texas
UT/PRC/MER #R9950, 10100 Burnet Road; Building 16
Austin, TX 78758
(512) 471-9669

ID#: F045-021-0231
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-021       Selected for Award
Title: Low-Noise Avalanche Photodiodes for Midwave Infrared (2 to 5 um) Applications
Abstract:   In this program, we will develop room-temperature avalanche photodiodes (APDs) for midwave infrared (MWIR) applications. The internal gain of APDs results in significant improvements in optical receiver sensitivity, and APDs have been widely used for telecommunications receivers with In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As absorption regions lattice-matched to InP substrates. However, In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As is transparent to wavelengths longer than 1.65 um, and to date, APDs have not been available for the MWIR because materials that exhibit strong MWIR absorption also generate high dark currents at fields required for impact ionization. We propose a novel MWIR APD design that will maintain low noise, good responsivity, and high gain-bandwidth product. The device will employ the separate absorption, charge, and multiplication (SACM) structure widely used for telecommunications receivers coupled with several critical new design features: (1) an ultra-low-noise impact ionization engineered (I2E) multiplication region and (2) an undepleted absorber structure that will facilitate the incorporation of (3) an absorption region optimized for MWIR detection. For the absorption region, we will study Sb-based bulk materials such as InGaAsSb and InAsPSb as well as Sb-based strain-compensated quantum well structures. For the multiplication region, we will use compositions compatible with the GaSb-based absorption regions, such as AlGaAsSb, and apply these materials in the design of an I2E multiplication region.

RAINBOW COMMUNICATIONS, INC.
2362 Qume Drive, Suite F
San Jose, CA 95131
(408) 577-0109

PI: Dr. Sean Zhang
(408) 577-0109
Contract #:
Beckman Laser Institute
300 University of Tower, Sponsored Projects Admini.
Irvine, CA 92697-7600
(949) 824-4781

ID#: F045-022-0075
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-022       Selected for Award
Title: MicroElectro Mechanical System (MEMS) and Optical Frequency-Domain Reflectometry (OFDR) Based Field-Deployable Imaging System to Assess Potential Retinal Injuries
Abstract:   Rainbow Communications, together with the Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic of University of California at Irvine, proposes to investigate MicroElectro Mechanical System (MEMS) and Optical Frequency-Domain Reflectometry (OFDR) based field-deployable imaging system to assess potential retinal injuries. Rainbow­_s proposed portable Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Fundus camera integrated imaging system will provide the following unique features: (1) Rapidly and precisely detect retinal lesions by combining OCT and fundus camera into a rugged and small package with fast sampling characteristics; (2) Field-portable with a handheld probe by using OFDR and MEMS two-axis scanning mirror to eliminate the application of bulky spectrometer and scanning mirrors; (3) High sampling rate (30 frame per 1 second) and very small size by using high stiffness PZT as piezoelectric actuator for Fiber Fabry-Perot Tunable Filter (FFP-TF); (4) Multi-functional imaging (Conventional OCT and Doppler OCT) capability to provide more detailed information; (5) Low cost and high anti-interference by using optic fiber and MEMS components. Phase I will develop, model, and simulate the MEMS and OFDR based field-portable imaging system concept, and demonstrate the feasibility. In Phase II, a practical portable imaging system will be developed and tested for animal and human models.

RESPIRATORY RESEARCH, INC.
1167 Raintree Drive
Charlottesville, VA 22901
(434) 825-7627

PI: Dr. John Hunt
(434) 243-9916
Contract #:
University of Virginia
Box 800386, Division of Peds Resp Med
Charlottesville, VA 22908
(434) 243-9929

ID#: F045-017-0207
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-017       Selected for Award
Title: Instrumentation for Monitoring Breath Biomarkers for Diagnosis of Health, Condition, Toxic Exposure, and Disease
Abstract:   The exhaled breath condensate (EBC) sampling procedure is as simple and safe as blowing through a straw, yet provides substrate (EBC) for assays that have proven remarkably useful in identifying lung inflammation and oxidative stress. Most validated is the measurement of EBC pH, which is profoundly low (acidic) in many lung diseases and reflects underlying airway acidification. This proposal seeks funding for development of a continuous exhaled breath pH monitoring system and tests its utility by applying EBC pH measurement to the Intensive Care Unit environment. This novel system to measure minute-by-minute EBC pH will be employed to determine if EBC acidification will predict development of, or worsening of, severe lung diseases including ventilator-associated pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome with or without trauma. Identifying such progression early may allow more successful therapeutic intervention. Additionally examined will be the ability of single EBC pH assays to predict the need for hospitalization in patients presenting to the emergency room with respiratory complaints. These readily available clinical model systems will help determine the utility of EBC pH to provide useful information regarding war-fighters' health.

SOUTHWEST SCIENCES, INC.
1570 Pacheco Street, Suite E-11
Santa Fe, NM 87505-3993
(505) 984-1322

PI: Dr. Shin-Juh Chen
(505) 984-1322
Contract #:
The University of Michigan
Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, 1320 Beal Avenue
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2140
(734) 763-3193

ID#: F045-012-0054
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-012       Selected for Award
Title: Diode Laser-Based Flight Test Instrumentation for Scramjets
Abstract:   The optimization of scramjet engine performance parameters such as combustion efficiency, thrust maximization, reduction in pollutants, minimization of exhaust signatures (for stealth) are essential. Measurements of chemical species and temperature in the scramjet engine during test flight are critical for evaluating engine performance. For a diode laser-based sensor system to be a viable option for measuring chemical species and temperature, a simple, lightweight and compact sensor system is required. This will require substantial reduction in the physical size of the system, reduction in the number of lasers and detectors, innovative optics, and implementation of compact and rugged electronics. In partnership with the University of Michigan under this STTR, Southwest Sciences proposes to develop an in situ, non-intrusive, multi-species capable, lightweight, compact, and rugged sensor system based on diode laser spectroscopy to monitor the exhaust gases of a scramjet. The proposed sensor system incorporates several key technologies which will permit the development of a multi-gas sensor capable of meeting both detection and severe operational constraints. These key technologies include state-of-the-art lasers, wavelength modulation spectroscopy, modulation frequency multiplexing, time-division multiplexing, a two-color photodiode detector, absorption-based thermometry, digital signal processing, an unique supersonic combustion tunnel.

SPIRE CORP.
One Patriots Park
Bedford, MA 01730-2396
(781) 275-6000

PI: Dr. Steven Wojtczuk
(603) 595-8900
Contract #:
Boston University
8 Saint Mary's Street
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 353-5067

ID#: F045-021-0235
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-021       Selected for Award
Title: InAsSb Strain-Balanced Avalanche Photodiodes with 4-5 micron Cutoff Wavelength
Abstract:   Spire Corporation, through its Bandwidth Semiconductor subsidiary and in collaboration with colleagues in the Electrical Engineering Department at Boston University, proposes the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) epigrowth of indium arsenide antimonide (InAsSb) avalanche photodiodes (APDs) ~2mm in diameter that should prove useful in laser radar and free-space communications. One particular composition (InAs90%Sb10%) is lattice-matched to GaSb wafers and would be used as a separate absorption region in this uncooled APD with a cutoff wavelength of about 4.4microns. The avalanche region would be in a homojunction in the higher bandgap GaSb. A thin two-compositional-step grading layer of InGaAsSb will help photogenerated carriers in the InAsSb absorption region reach the GaSb multiplication region by presenting smaller energy band transitions. This simpler lattice-matched separate absorption, grading, and multiplication region (SAGM) APD structure with a useful 4.4micron cutoff will serve as the experimental control to compare its performance with that of a strain-balanced APD using alternately tensile and compressive InAsSb layers with the goal of extending the cutoff wavelength from 4.4 to 5microns.

STREAMLINE AUTOMATION, LLC
1109 Chesterfield Road
Huntsville, AL 35803
(256) 694-5063

PI: Mr. Alton J. Reich
(256) 694-5063
Contract #:
Argonne National Laboratory
9700 S. Cass Avenue
Argonne, IL 60439
(630) 252-6258

ID#: F045-017-0004
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-017       Selected for Award
Title: Development of a Portable Breath Analysis System Based on a Novel Electronic Nose Microsensor
Abstract:   Significant recent research has shown that breath biomarkers are excellent indicators of oxidative stress caused by conditions ranging from radiation exposure to COPD. Current techniques for collection, concentration, and analysis of exhaled breath do not support real-time analysis, or require complex and bulky equipment. Streamline Automation, LLC will develop a portable Breath BioDetector in partnership with Argonne National Laboratory. The core technology is ANL's Electronic Nose Microsensor, a robust sensor, about the size of a postage stamp, that is capable of simultaneously detecting gases at low concentrations. The small size, and multi-gas capability of the sensor enables integration into a compact, light weight, portable system. Streamline Automation's system design and integration experience will be augmented with the clinical experience of Dr. Keary Cope, USDA, and Dr. Bruce Freeman, UAB. They will assist in developing the requirements for the prototype Breath BioDetector and the protocol for its use. During Phase 2, Dr. Freeman will test prototype units in conjunction with a 5-year NIH grant to study NO as a breath biomarker for COPD. This testing will provide valuable clinical experience that would not otherwise be possible during a Phase 2 project.

STRUCTURED MATERIALS INDUSTRIES
Suite 102/103, 201 Circle Drive North
Piscataway, NJ 08854
(732) 302-9274

PI: Dr. Brent Hoerman
(732) 302-9274
Contract #:
Cornell University
Office of Sponsored Programs, 102 Day Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853-2801
(607) 255-5014

ID#: F045-013-0141
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-013       Selected for Award
Title: CMOS Compatible Active Silicon Nanophotonic Devices and Systems
Abstract:   In this STTR effort, Structured Materials Industries, Inc. (SMI), in collaboration with our academic and industrial partners will design, develop, and demonstrate a more efficient and compact, silicon-based electro-optic modulator based on nanoscale photonic structures that is completely compatible with standard CMOS processing. The structures developed will form the building blocks for a family of devices based on active silicon nanophotonics which will open the door to a new technology free from conventional microelectronics limitations, providing low power, high bandwidth, high speed and ultra-small optoelectronic components. Moreover, the active silicon nanophotonic devices to be developed will benefit from the inherent infrastructure and cost benefits of the existing CMOS manufacturing infrastructure. In Phase I of this project, we propose to expand preliminary results on specific electro-optic devices to address a more general class of devices and their integration on a silicon chip within a commercially manufacturable infrastructure. To this end, we will design, develop, and demonstrate devices for analysis and feasibility studies. In Phase II we will complete development of the devices and finalize a route for integrating passive and active components into complex, electro-optical systems on a single silicon chip within a commercial CMOS foundry.

SURFACES RESEARCH & APPLICATIONS, INC.
8330 Melrose Drive
Lenexa, KS 66214-1630
(913) 541-1221

PI: Dr. Barbara J. Kinzig
(913) 541-1221
Contract #:
University of Florida
Dept. of Mech. & Aerospace Eng, Bldg. 183, Room 002
Gainesville, FL 32611
(352) 392-8488

ID#: F045-018-0169
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-018       Selected for Award
Title: Ionic Liquids: Novel Lubrication for Air and Space
Abstract:   The team of Surfaces Research and the University of Florida proposes to study novel ionic liquids as lubricants for space mechanisms, MEMS devices, and electrical contacts. Ionic liquids offer unique properties of great interest to the U.S. Air Force, including ultra-low vapor pressures, extremely low friction, and electrical conductivity. We propose fundamental materials interaction, surface chemical and microtribological studies for assessment of these novel substances. Because they have numerous chemical structures, careful assessment and selections in the present program will be performed to optimize them for maximum tribological utilization

SVT ASSOC., INC.
7620 Executive Drive
Eden Prairie, MN 55344-3677
(952) 934-2100

PI: Dr. Aaron Moy
(952) 934-2100
Contract #:
Columbia University
1312 Mudd, MC 4712, 500 W. 120th St.
New York, NY 10027
(212) 854-1748

ID#: F045-021-0180
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-021       Selected for Award
Title: Low-Noise Avalanche Photodiodes for Mid-IR Applications
Abstract:   Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are the detector of choice for low noise, high speed, high sensitivity photodetectors. Applications in the mid-IR (3-5 micron) include optical trace gas detection, LADAR, quantum cryptography and targeting countermeasures. Currently there are no commercially available APDs operating in this wavelength range. To address this need, this Phase I program will investigate using the III-V ternary alloy InAsSb for APD applications. This compound semiconductor alloy has a low bandgap energy suitable for absorbing mid-IR photons. The InAsSb material will be combined with a p-i-n avalanche multiplication structure in a unique manner to create a low noise 3-5 micron wavelength APDs.

SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, INC.
13766 S. Hawthorne Blvd.
Hawthorne, CA 90250-7083
(310) 679-2281

PI: Mr. R. Wade Allen
(310) 679-2281
Contract #:
Brigham and Womens Hospital
Harvard Medical School, 221 Longwood Ave., Room 481
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 732-5500

ID#: F045-007-0288
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-007       Selected for Award
Title: Real-Time Detector of Human Fatigue
Abstract:   The goal is to develop and validate an automated, real-time, fatigue detection system for operators seated at workstations. The system can be used for alerting the operator, self-assessment, supervision, and scheduling. The operational environments of interest include stationary and airborne command centers. The proposed system will combine (1) a well-validated mathematical model of circadian rhythm and performance, (2) wrist mounted actigraph and lux sensors used to initialize the circadian rhythm model, (3) a non-intrusive (and non-invasive to the primary task) visual face and eye monitoring system that will measure eye point angle, blink rate, percentage eye closure, and other physiological metrics, and (4) signal processing methods such as the extended Kalman filter that will optimally combine the model's fatigue prediction with the real time physiological measurements. The hypothesis is that this combined system will result in improved detection of operator fatigue. A Phase I experimental pilot study will demonstrate the system and test the hypothesis using a small subject population. A set of cognitive and psychomotor tasks will be used to provide an objective performance measure. A larger experimental study will be conducted in Phase II using multiple consoles in a simulated operation center.

TDA RESEARCH, INC.
12345 W. 52nd Ave.
Wheat Ridge, CO 80033-1916
(303) 940-2300

PI: Mr. James Nabity
(303) 940-2313
Contract #:
University of Colorado at Boulder
Dept. of Mech. Engineering, 427 UCB
Boulder, CO 80309-0427
(303) 492-7110

ID#: F045-005-0236
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-005       Selected for Award
Title: MEMS Colloid Thruster Array
Abstract:   Colloid thruster technology continues to be attractive for spacecraft propulsion, since its specific impulse can be many times greater than even the best bi-propellant chemical rocket. However, the technology was abandoned in the 1970s due to low charge-to-mass ratios, which lead to excessively high voltages and large inert mass fractions. The recent advent of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology and improved propellants has created renewed interest. Colloid thruster arrays may produce large thrust levels, while maintaining the ability to deliver a small impulse bit from a single emitter, making them well suited to micro- and nano-satellites. However, a number of technological barriers have prevented full development at the micro-scale. In particular, simple fabrication strategies are needed to create dense two-dimensional thruster arrays. Therefore, TDA Research, Inc., teamed with the University of Colorado at Boulder, proposes a fundamentally sound MEMS-based colloid thruster array concept that we have the facilities and experience to build. In Phase I we will design and fabricate 2D colloid thruster arrays, determine their susceptibility to voltage breakdown and balance the flow through individual thrusters. In Phase II we will integrate these technologies to demonstrate thrust modulation from individually addressable 2D colloid thruster arrays.

TECHNOSOFT, INC.
11180 Reed Hartman Highway
Cincinnati, OH 45242-1829
(513) 985-9877

PI: Mr. Adel Chemaly
(513) 985-9877
Contract #:
Georgia Institute of Technology
School of Aerospace Engng, 270 Ferst Drive
Atlanta, GA 30332-0150
(404) 894-3000

ID#: F045-019-0100
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-019       Selected for Award
Title: Knowledge-based Software Framework for 3D Component Layout
Abstract:   Component layout plays an important role in the design of air vehicles, satellites, and many products in the defense industry. Automated synthesis of product layout has the potential of substantially reducing design cycle time while allowing for better design. The search for optimal layout typically requires a huge number of iterations and tight integration between the layout design and the optimization methods. The multi-dimensionality of the problem, time dependent position, and the complexity of the geometry and constraints, require generative modeling and computing methods to allow for the abstraction of the problem and the representation of physical and non physical characteristics of the components. Proposed herein is a generative object-oriented framework, integrating layout modeling and optimization, applicable to wide a spectrum of applications. Detailed studies are fully automated reducing engineering time and cost while expanding the exploration of multidimensional (position, time, velocity, etc.) space and shape configuration. The framework provides multi-objective stochastic optimization capabilities, integrated with distributed computing, and coupling geometrical modeling and reasoning for complex parts connecting shapes parameterization, and layout optimization. During Phase I, a prototype environment employing adapted optimization algorithms, will be developed, deployed, and exercised in the layout design and configuration of a UAV. It will facilitate thorough investigation of alternative vehicle system layout and configurations to provide a population of optimal and effective designs. The team headed by TechnoSoft brings innovation and unparalleled strength to this effort with proven experience in product design and the development of tools and software as deployed in the defense industry.

TOYON RESEARCH CORP.
Suite A, 75 Aero Camino
Goleta, CA 93117-3139
(805) 968-6787

PI: Dr. Mark R. Meloon
(805) 968-6787
Contract #: FA9550-04-C-0071
Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
Dept. of Electrical & Computer, University of California
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9560
(805) 893-7042

ID#: F045-011-0286
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-011       Awarded: 11AUG04
Title: Cooperative Control of UAVs for Tracking Moving Targets Through Information Gain
Abstract:   Toyon Research Corporation and the University of California at Santa Barbara propose to develop algorithms for the dynamic management of sensors onboard small, autonomous Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) to execute Cooperative Search, Acquisition, and Tracking (CSAT) of multiple moving ground targets. In our approach, UAV flight paths and sensor operations are dynamically selected in order to minimize the information-theoretic entropy of a common fusion and tracking database subject to line-of-sight, communications, standoff-range, and sensor usage constraints. Cooperative management of a heterogeneous mix of sensors will provide the data necessary for a data fusion and target tracking system to perform CSAT operations even in the presence of obscuration. Routing of the UAVs is performed using cooperative control theory while management of the sensors onboard is accomplished through Toyon's existing optimization techniques. We will demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm using our software testbed SLAMEMT on an example problem. In Phase II, we would work to refine our algorithm, perform a physical demonstration of the system, and expand our focus to include the CSAT of sea-based targets in a littoral environment.

TOYON RESEARCH CORP.
Suite A, 75 Aero Camino
Goleta, CA 93117-3139
(805) 968-6787

PI: Dr. Richard E. Cagley
(805) 968-6787
Contract #: FA9550-04-C-0074
UC, Santa Barbara
Dept. of ECE, Eng. I, University of California
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9560
(805) 893-4166

ID#: F045-015-0228
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-015       Awarded: 18AUG04
Title: Seamless Sensor Network Communications
Abstract:   Toyon/UCSB proposes to research and design architectures for sensor networks to efficiently communicate to antenna array enabled collectors. Communication will take place in a coordinated fashion such that space-time coding can be employed. This technique can be exploited for a variety of purposes ranging from distribution of signal transmission, for even dispersion of communication load each sensor must handle, to environmental consideration such as low probability of interception (LPI)/detection (LPD) or anti-jam requirements. While multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) and space-time coding has been heavily researched for systems employing antenna arrays, on both transmit and receive portions of a communications link, its application to sensor networks presents a unique set of challenges. Some of these include the appropriate partitioning of information among the sensors and associated coding to be employed. Furthermore, resource management must be employed to efficiently coordinate sensor activity. Such management will involve gathering information on network connectivity and channel states, through techniques such as sounding, as well as determining transmission parameters for individual sensors. Due to a well rounded combination of experience and academic background, our Toyon/UCSB team is well positioned to analyze and provide practical solutions to the proposed problem.

TRITON SYSTEMS, INC.
200 TURNPIKE ROAD
Chelmsford, MA 01824
(978) 250-4200

PI: Dr. Bijan Radmard
(978) 250-4200
Contract #:
University of California
405 Hilgard Avenue, Dept. of Mat'l Sci & Eng.
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1595
(301) 825-4052

ID#: F045-010-0074
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-010       Selected for Award
Title: Organic-based Flexible Transistors (1000-497)
Abstract:   Triton Systems, Inc. responds to Air Force need to develop polymeric based transistors and electronic devices on flexible substrate for integration with other complex functionalities such as flexible memory, flexible waveguides and flexible photovoltaics to form conformal smart skins and multifunctional structures with built in signal processing and functional control circuitry for air and space applications. During proposed Phase I, Triton will evaluate approaches to improve charge mobility, and charge-balancing issues in organic and polymeric phases. Simple device structure will be fabricated to give indication of device performance. The improvement of the performance of the mobility of these materials will enable high external efficiency Light Emitting Diodes with 10-20% external efficiency and pro-longed service life, thin film transistors with expanded bandwidth and performance level suitable for logic and memory applications.

VANU, INC.
One Porter Square, Suite 18
Cambridge, MA 02140
(617) 864-1711

PI: Dr. John Chapin
(617) 864-1711
Contract #:
Harvard University
Div. of Engineering & AS, 33 Oxford Street Room MD-347
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 384-5026

ID#: F045-015-0098
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-015       Selected for Award
Title: Seamless Sensor Network Communications
Abstract:   This proposal focuses on multi-node collaboration in communication systems involving channels using space-time coding (STC) such that groups of antenna transmitters and receivers collaborate across nodes to produce and enhance spatial diversity patterns. This approach, called collaborative STC, not only exploits the spatial and temporal diversities but also explores the potential of collective cooperation in networks of nodes and represents a major improvement over previous work in collaborative communications. Specifically, multiple nodes in clusters will be able to collaborate using distributed space-time coding achieving significantly higher bandwidth efficiencies by employing the collaborative transmission strategies disclosed in this proposal. While extremely powerful, the collaborative STC paradigm is largely unexplored, presenting a host of new challenges in the integration of data, models, communications, analysis, and control systems. From a coding perspective, the challenge is to design distributed space-time coding techniques maximizing the diversity benefits while minimizing the redundancy of information exchanged between nodes. From a system perspective, the challenge is to realize the performance gain resulting from collaborative STC in real-world wireless networks. The proposed research goal is to design and develop the first collaborative STC communications system using a software radio platform. Although this will be demonstrated for two transmitting collaborators and one receiver unit, many of the above implementation challenges will be overcome and addressed.

VEROMODO, INC.
11 Osborne Road
Brookline, MA 02446
(860) 486-2672

PI: Dr. Nancy Lynch
(617) 253-7225
Contract #:
NORTHEASTERN U/MIT/UCONN
MIT CSAIL, The Stata Center, Building 32 - 32 Vassar Street
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-7225

ID#: F045-023-0117
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-023       Selected for Award
Title: A Framework for Modeling and Analyzing Complex Distributed Systems
Abstract:   Summary and intellectual merit. This Small Business Technology Transfer Phase I project will develop a modeling language and computational support tools for specifying, analyzing, and verifying complex distributed system designs. The overall modeling and analysis framework will provide an integrated suite of tools and methods ultimately leading to qualitative improvements in the design of dependable distributed systems. In more detail, building on the existing expertise this project will develop: (a) a formal modeling language, called TIOA (Timed Input/Output Automata), for specifying timed, asynchronous, and interacting systems components, (b) the front-end processor for TIOA, incorporating syntax and type checking, and providing interfaces to computer-aided design tools, (c) a simulation tool allowing simulation of specifications and paired simulations of a specification and an abstract implementation, and (d) a theorem-proving link through an interface to PVS. To demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, this project will produce complete examples of specification and analysis of distributed algorithms using this framework. This project will set the stage for extending the language and its front end in Phase II, for integration with model-checking tools, and eventually for development of tools enabling computer-aided generation of code from TIOA specifications.

VIOSENSE CORP.
36 South Chester Avenue
Pasadena, CA 91106-3105
(626) 432-9950

PI: Dr. Dominique Fourguette
(626) 432-9950
Contract #:
Georgia Institute of Technology
Office of Sponsored Programs, 505 10th Street
Atlanta, GA 30332-0420
(404) 385-2542

ID#: F045-024-0135
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-024       Selected for Award
Title: A High Resolution Evanescent Wave Velocity Sensor for Liquid and Gas Flow in Microfluidics
Abstract:   This project proposes to design and build an advanced evanescent velocity sensor for near wall velocity measurements in microfluidic devices. Optical MEMS technology will be utilized to create a compact sensor design. The sensor will measure velocities within 100 nm of the channel wall, which is five times closer than the best current technique. The sensor will have a spatial resolution of 100 nm, which is twenty times better than the best current technique. The sensor will use evanescent wave illumination to perform Nano Particle Image Velocimetry (nPIV). During Phase I, an evanescent wave sensor prototype will be designed and fabricated using optical MEMS technology. The prototype will be tested in a liquid microchannel flow. In addition, feasibility studies will be conducted on both optimizing nPIV and extending the sensor's capabilities into: three-dimensional nPIV, gas phase velocimetry and, sensing spatially and temporally resolved fluid temperatures. Initial testing will use liquid flows; subsequent testing will be in gas flow regimes. During Phase II, a sensor commercially viable for a variety of applications, including three-dimensional nPIV, thermometry, and gas phase applications will be fabricated.

ZOLO TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
4946 N. 63rd Street
Boulder, CO 80301
(303) 604-5849

PI: Dr. Andrew D. Sappey
(303) 604-5804
Contract #:
Stanford University
ME Department
Stanford, CA 94305-3032
(650) 723-5854

ID#: F045-012-0101
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-012       Selected for Award
Title: Dense Wavelength-Multiplexed Sensors for Tomography in Hypersonic Flows Using Diode-Laser Technology
Abstract:   Zolo Technologies and Stanford University propose to develop and demonstrate an innovative combustion sensor technology that employs tunable diode laser spectroscopy implemented in a novel way to diagnose the SCRAMJET flow field for ground test evaluation. The sensor will enable the end-user to detect and quantify non-uniformities in the spatial distribution of temperature and species concentrations in order to optimize combustion efficiency. The ability to observe non-uniformities directly is deemed critical since complete combustion requires that some turbulent-induced mixing occur in the flow field that will produce local non-uniformities.

ZONA TECHNOLOGY, INC.
7430 E. Stetson Drive , Suite 205
Scottsdale, AZ 85251
(480) 945-9988

PI: Dr. Lei Tang
(480) 945-9988
Contract #:
Stanford University
Durand Building, Room 365, Dept.of Aero & Astronautics
Stanford, CA 94305
(650) 723-9954

ID#: F045-009-0078
Agency: AF
Topic#: 04-009       Selected for Award
Title: An Automated Design Optimization Tool for Electromagnetic Control of Hypersonic Flow
Abstract:   This STTR Phase I project proposes to develop an automated design optimization tool for electromagnetic flow control based on the gas-kinetic BGK scheme and the adjoint optimization method. A non-equilibrium BGK solver will be generalized to explicitly take into account the acceleration and deceleration of the charged particles and the effects of electromagnetic forces. A comparison between the continuous and discrete adjoint optimization methods will also be made to investigate which one is better suited for hypersonic flows. Furthermore, an exploratory computation will be performed for shape optimization to maximize the electrical conductivity for external flow control applications.

---------- Army ----------

21ST CENTURY SYSTEMS, INC.
12152 Windsor Hall Way
Herndon, VA 20170-2359
(571) 323-0080

PI: Mr. Jeffrey Hicks
(402) 212-7474
Contract #: W74V8H-04-P-0487
University of Missouri - Rolla
215 ME Annex, University of Missouri-Rolla
Rolla, MO 65409
(573) 341-6129

ID#: A045-001-0093
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-001       Awarded: 09AUG04
Title: Fielded Agent-based Geo-Analysis Network (FAGAN)
Abstract:   Traditional military command & control (C2) usually evokes images of operators in command posts centers. But what about the mounted or dismounted soldier trying to get from A to B without getting blown up? It's C2 as well, just a different scale. The digital battlefield provides an explosion of information to gain a tactical advantage over the adversary but it's challenging. That challenge is to sift through this information and identify critical information to help plan or re-plan the mission. The team of 21st Century Systems, Inc. and University of Missouri - Rolla proposes to develop agent-based decision-aiding system and technologies to train and assist the soldier through that challenge. Research will examine interactive terrain analysis and planning incorporating spatial and temporal terrain details and dynamically changing intelligence information, via battlefield networks. When given mission intent, the system will be able to provide dynamic guidance for interactive terrain analysis and mission planning. Our system will be for the soldier of the future trained in virtual, scenario-based simulation environments. Rather than developing specialized training environments, the emphasis of our system is embedded training of the soldier so that the training interface is created around the soldier's actual combat vehicle and systems.

ACTIVITY RESEARCH SERVICES
2608 Santa Maria Court
Chula Vista, CA 91914
(619) 216-7037

PI: Dr. Timothy F. Elsmore
(619) 216-7037
Contract #: W81XWH04-C-0136
University of Oklahoma
Office of Research Services, 731 Elm Avenue Room 134
Norman, OK 73019
(405) 325-4757

ID#: A045-025-0075
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-025       Awarded: 06AUG04
Title: Automated Behavioral Health Triage
Abstract:   The overall objective of this project is to develop an automatic adaptive testing system that rapidly identifies specific cognitive deficits to aid in medical and operational decision making. This system will greatly increase the usability of test systems developed under Army sponsorship during the last 20 years, resulting in a product with broad application in both military and civilian environments. Existing computerized neuropsychological testing systems will be evaluated for their ability to detect changes in attention, perception, memory, and psychomotor skills and abilities. A number of tests will be selected to serve as a cognitive survey test battery, which will be the first step in the triage process. To home in on problematic areas detected in the cognitive survey a logic tree for reconfiguring the test battery on the fly will be developed. This process will employ demographically-stratified normative values for key variables on the survey portion of the test to select appropriate tests and test parameters for subsequent testing.

ADVENSYS, LLC
11481 E. Bella Vista Dr.
Scottsdale, AZ 85259
(480) 634-6644

PI: Dr. Ranu Jung
(480) 634-6644
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0071
Arizona State University
Res & Spons. Proj. Admin, P.O. Box 3503
Tempe, AZ 85287-3503
(480) 965-0835

ID#: A045-009-0121
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-009       Awarded: 28JUL04
Title: Neuromorphic Control System for Powered Limb Splints
Abstract:   AdveNsys, Inc. will join with Arizona State University to develop a neuromorphic analog system to control an actuated, lightweight, powered ankle-foot orthosis. The neuromorphically actuated orthosis will provide mobility in the battlefield for soldiers with lower-leg wounds or fractures to enable them to be evacuated with minimal medical support. This effort builds upon our expertise in modeling and design of neuromorphic controllers, design of analog hardware, design of robotic variable compliant actuators, and assessment of locomotor function and assistive devices in human subjects. The biologically-inspired controller is based upon our published pattern generating analog circuit design that reproduces physiological behavior by automatically entraining orthosis actuation to the locomotor rhythm and by resetting the controller rhythm in response to external perturbations. A variable compliant actuator to power the orthosis mimics the properties of muscles by cyclically storing/releasing energy and actively modulating compliance through the gait cycle. Human subjects testing will be performed in our rehabilitation motor control laboratory to assess the functioning of the neuromorphic control system and the actuated ankle foot orthosis. The successful demonstration of neuromorphic control of an actuated ankle-foot orthosis will form the foundation for future development of powered orthoses for civilian and military applications.

AGAVE BIOSYSTEMS, INC.
P.O. Box 80010
Austin, TX 78708-0010
(512) 671-1369

PI: Dr. Theresa Curtis
(607) 272-0002
Contract #: W81XWH04-C-0140
Cornell University
Office of Sponsored Projects, 123 Day Hall
Ithaca, NY 14854
(607) 255-7123

ID#: A045-028-0194
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-028       Awarded: 10AUG04
Title: Portable Cell Maintenance System
Abstract:   Cultured cell-based biosensors offer insight into the physiological action of the agent of interest, which is an advantage over other types of sensors. The development of cell-based biosensors that are field-portable would increase their utility in toxicology and environmental monitoring. One of the most significant issues hampering the development of field portable cell-based biosensors is the maintenance of optimal cultured cell environment under field conditions. A key technology to overcoming this issue is the use of microfluidic systems. A microfluidic based systems would allow assaying small quantities of sample while optimizing storage and transport conditions by minimizing the overall systems size and fluid monitoring requirements. In this Phase I, Agave BioSystems and Cornell University propose to develop a cell maintenance system (CMS) with integrated pH, osmilarity, CO2 and temperature sensors to support multiple vertebrate cells and cell types under field conditions. In addition, a microfluidic cell cartridge suitable for use in hand-held devices and fabricated from biocompatible materials will be developed that is inexpensive and disposable. The proposed CMS would maintain vertebrate cell viability and sterility through transport, storage, and testing and be compatible with interfaces for acquisition and analysis of cell signaling data relevant to toxicity identification.

ALDER BIOPHARMACEUTICALS, INC.
21823 30th Dr SE
Botthell, WA 98021-3907
(425) 527-2703

PI: Dr. John Latham
(425) 527-2703
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0093
Keck Graduatate Institute
535 Watson Dr.
Claremont, CA 91711-4817
(909) 607-0398

ID#: A045-006-0246
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-006       Awarded: 02AUG04
Title: Development of New Production Technologies for Humanized Antibodies
Abstract:   Humanized antibodies currently are produced through mammalian cell culture methods that require extensive resources, in particular, choosing the manufacturing cell line and the need for highly specialized cell growth facilities. These limitations have highlighted the need for new and more innovative ways for antibody production. Yeast heterologous protein expression systems have long been viewed as efficient and high yielding alternatives for mammalian cell line production. Yeast is able to deal with important folding and export issues that are unique to proteins found in higher eukaryotes, makes use of inexpensive media, has much greater routine commercialization, and enables significant reduction in cost and time for production. Antibody expression in this host provides an excellent solution for more efficient and expanded application of this class of therapeutics. In the case of antibodies, correct glycosylation was viewed a required feature. However, recent studies have questioned this requirement. Aglycosylated antibodies have been described to have comparable half-lives and retain function when the post-translational modification is eliminated. It is in this light that our proposal focuses on the use of Pichia pastoris as a new host for full-length antibody expression building on the extensive success this system has had for the production of therapeutic proteins.

ALTAIR CENTER, LLC.
1 Chartwell Circle
Shrewsbury, MA 01545-4819
(508) 845-5349

PI: Dr. Valery Rupasov
(508) 845-5349
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0089
University of Texas
2601 N. Floyd Rd.
Richardson, TX 75080
(972) 883-4316

ID#: A045-015-0211
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-015       Awarded: 30JUL04
Title: Tunable Terahertz-Frequency Lasers Based on Semiconductor Nanocrystals
Abstract:   ALTAIR Center proposes to develop a new class of tunable terahertz laser sources based on an active laser material fabricated from spherical semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots) incorporated into an optical medium transparent in terahertz-frequency range. Due to the strong Stark effect, recently discovered in semiconductor nanocrystals, the transition frequencies can be shifted by an applied low electric voltage that allows developing THz lasers tunable in a wide frequency range. In the proposed implementation, the nanocrystal composites will be incorporated into silicon waveguide structure working as an optical resonator for nanocrystal emitters. That enables on-chip integration of the THz laser sources and terahertz photonics with silicon microelectronics. All key components of the proposed device are either commercially available or routinely fabricated in many laboratories. In Phase I, we will prove feasibility of the proposed concept, evaluate optimum parameters of the required optical elements, and identify cost-effective technology for fabrication of the THz laser. In Phase II, the technology will be completely optimized and applied to fabrication of the prototype THz lasers tunable in a wide range of terahertz frequencies.

ANP TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
824 Interchange Boulevard
Newark, DE 19711
(302) 283-1730

PI: Dr. Robert Daniel
(302) 283-1730
Contract #: W911SR-04-P-0082
UMBC
1000 Hilltop Circle
Baltimore, MD 21250
(410) 455-3502

ID#: A045-022-0070
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-022       Awarded: 31AUG04
Title: Multiple Bio-Agent Detection with Low-cost Nanomaterial-based Devices
Abstract:   This goal is to construct a low-cost, polymeric, nanomaterial-based assay for the detection of multiple biological agents in a single device using our nanomanipulation technology to meet or exceed the sensitivity of the current two-line assays used in DoD applications. The nanodevice will exhibit no background streaking, cross bleeding, or other flow problems often associated with laminar flow devices. We expect to demonstate a multiplex device capable of detecting between 5 and 8 biothreat agents.

ANTEK
54 Wyman Street
Waban, MA 02468
(781) 461-1654

PI: Mr. Anthony Terrinoni
(781) 801-0023
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0095
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
140 Mechanical Eng MC-244, 1206 West Green Street
Urbana, IL 61801
(217) 333-3415

ID#: A045-013-0280
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-013       Awarded: 03AUG04
Title: Biologically Inspired Acoustic Direction Finding for Soldiers
Abstract:   We are proposing a helmet-mounted sound localization system that incorporates two subsystems, one that restores and enhances the soldier's natural hearing, and another that makes decisions on the acoustic scene and displays the information to the soldier. The system will integrate auditory processing models from a variety of biological sources to aid in detection and analysis.

APPLIED SPECTRA
123 Crosby Ct. #3
Walnut Creek, CA 94598
(925) 330-1431

PI: Dr. Jong Yoo
(408) 945-7753
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0070
University of California Berkeley
Sponsored Projects Office, 336 Sproul Hall MS 5940
Berkeley, CA 94720-5940
(510) 642-0120

ID#: A045-011-0100
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-011       Awarded: 19JUL04
Title: Nanoscale Chemical Analysis using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (nano-LIBS)
Abstract:   As nanotechnology fabrication develops internationally, the availability of tools for ensuring that materials and systems abide by their chemical design characteristics becomes essential. In order for nanotechnology to mature, diagnostic instruments must be developed to detect and analyze physical and chemical properties with spatial resolution much less than the dimensions of the nanostructures (materials and devices). The basis of this proposal is to address this need by expanding the capabilities of LIBS (laser induced breakdown spectroscopy) to the nanoscale. LIBS-based diagnostic systems have been developed for military and industrial applications because of the advantages of sensitive real-time analysis and in-situ measurement capabilities. The Phase I effort will demonstrate the feasibility of performing nanometer spatially resolved chemical analysis based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (nano-LIBS). The nano-LIBS system (to be prototyped in Phase II) will provide the capability for imaging the morphology of the sample, with selection of individual nanoparticles and nanostructures for chemical analysis . The proposed system will utilize NSOM (Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy) ablation capability with nanosecond and femtosecond pulsed laser excitation, and intensified optical detection, to chemically analyze individual nanoparticles on surfaces (as opposed to particles in an aerosol stream) and nanostructures.

ASPEN SYSTEMS, INC.
184 Cedar Hill Street
Marlborough, MA 01752-3017
(508) 481-5058

PI: Dr. Jae Ryu
(508) 481-5058
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0063
Clemson University
300 Brackett Hall
Clemson, SC 29634-5702
(864) 656-6444

ID#: A045-007-0047
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-007       Awarded: 10JUL04
Title: Nanocomposites with Independently Controlled Properties of the Thermoelectric Material for High Figure of Merit
Abstract:   Aspen Systems proposes to develop advanced nanocomposite materials to achieve high thermoelectric figure of merit by incorporating nanoparticles with high Seebeck coefficients within a high surface area semiconducting matrix with extremely low thermal conductivity and high electrical conductivity. In the proposed nanocomposite structure, we will achieve the high hot charge carrier generation efficiency by selecting the high Seebeck coefficient particles. High electric charge collection efficiency and low thermal conductivity will be achieved by fabricating highly doped semiconducting matrix by employing the reactive pyrolysis of high surface area matrix. By decoupling constituents of the thermoelectric Figure of Merit, we can independently control the materials properties without affecting others and consequently achieve the high thermoelectric figure of merit. In Phase I, we will experimentally demonstrate the proposed concept of high thermoelectric Figure of Merit by fabricating and testing nanocomposites of thermoelectric nanoparticles embedded within high surface area boron-silicon-carbon based matrix. By modifying compositional stoichiometry, we can control electrical conductivity and charge transport mechanism in the matrix. Based on these experimental results, we will also elucidate the charge transport mechanism operating in nanocomposite structures. In Phase II, we will fabricate and test the high efficiency thermoelectric modules for intended applications.

AUSIM, INC.
241 Polaris Avenue
Mountain View, CA 94043-4514
(650) 322-8746

PI: Ms. Agnieszka Jost
(831) 430-9443
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0072
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Research & Sponsored Programs, 750 University Avenue
Madison, WI 53706-1490
(608) 262-0252

ID#: A045-013-0064
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-013       Awarded: 22JUL04
Title: Biologically Inspired Acoustic Source Localization System
Abstract:   Situational awareness is a critical factor for the soldier in the field. An acoustic source localization system can greatly benefit the soldier by detecting threat and displaying its location. The goal of this proposal is to study a promising algorithm based on a biologically inspired technology and verify its ability to perform in various environments and with multiple sources. The proposed source localization technology involves a two-stage localization procedure to detect, classify and localize sources. A Constant False Alarm Rate sound detection algorithm is used to detect the presence of an acoustic event, classify it as noise or signal and determine its coarse location. A second-stage time-delay algorithm is used to locate sound sources with greater precision. Results of the localization algorithm will be presented using 3D auditory displays and a visual representation. The full system will be evaluated in a multi-source dynamic environment with selected acoustic source material that spans a representative range of potential sounds under a variety of noise conditions. The expected result is a functional system that will automatically detect and localize acoustic source material as well as, or better than, the human auditory system.

AUTOMATIC RECOGNITION & CONTROL, INC.
24 Widewaters Lane
Pittsford, NY 14534
(585) 244-0680

PI: Dr. Conger W. Gabel
(585) 244-0680
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0079
Rochester Institute of Technology
77 Lomb Memorial Drive
Rochester, NY 14623-5604
(585) 475-2295

ID#: A045-005-0129
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-005       Awarded: 21JUL04
Title: Imaging Infrared System with Extended Depth of Field Focusing
Abstract:   The objective of this proposal is to demonstrate an innovative optical detection and imaging system that will allow battlefield imaging through smoke, dust and fog obscurants in the 10 micron wavelength range. The Phase I effort will deliver a feasibility concept design and a prototype instrument. The system employs a multi-mode, diffraction-limited, infrared telescope that can operate either in a passive mode or in an active mode using 10.6 micron laser illumination. This is the first system of its kind, including the following innovative capabilities: 10 times improvement in the depth of field as compared to standard optical systems, uncooled microbolometer array for ease of operation, elimination of cat's eye reflection, use of narrow band filter in the active mode of operation to improve signal to noise performance, and computer controls for automated operation. The proposed, final system will be small, portable and designed for battlefield environments. The primary optics is 10 inches in diameter. Low cost is achieved through small size and use of state-of-the-art, commercially available components. The system is designed to operate in the range from 500 feet to 10 miles with a minimum of focus adjustment required because of the extended depth of field capability.

BC INTERNATIONAL, CORP.
980 Washington Street
Dedham, MA 02026-6704
(781) 461-5700

PI: Dr. Gregory Luli
(386) 418-4050
Contract #: W911SR-04-P-0078
University of Florida
Department of Microbiology, Bldg. 981, Museum Road
Gainesville, FL 32611
(352) 392-8176

ID#: A045-019-0243
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-019       Awarded: 13AUG04
Title: Tactical Biorefinery for Forward Fuel Production
Abstract:   This proposal is directed to the development of a process that utilizes this advanced ethanol-producing technology synergistically coupled to a low severity biomass pretreatment and a novel method of ethanol recovery and purification that will be capable of utilizing a wide variety of waste materials on a small scale of operation. Combining these technologies for ethanol production/recovery with new advances in combustion of biomass residues and plastics in biomass boilers will enable the development of bio-refineries that have several advantages over existing technology, including: 1) reduced chemical and energy requirements for biomass pretreatment, 2) reduced enzyme requirements for cellulose conversion, 3) replacement of traditional distillation recovery processes with an advanced membrane separations technology, and 4) incorporation of waste plastics into a biomass boiler for energy production. If successful, this approach would be a significant step toward the development of small, skid-mounted, mobile facilities would product liquid fuel, steam and electricity and meet the Department of Defense needs for a Tactical Bio-refinery.

BIOPHOTONIC SOLUTIONS, INC.
3590 Breezy Point Dr.
Okemos, MI 48864
(517) 351-4400

PI: Dr. Marcos Dantus
(517) 355-9715
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0094
Michigan State University
Contract & Grant Administratio, 301 Administration Bldg.
East Lansing, MI 48824
(517) 355-5040

ID#: A045-008-0256
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-008       Awarded: 03AUG04
Title: Fast Laser Pulse Shaping for Molecular Control and CB Detection
Abstract:   Monitoring the air for potential chemical and biological agents (from terrorist threats or from industrial contamination) has become a necessity. Our proposal objective is to develop device capable of fast (1 second), accurate (even in a chemically complex environment), robust (stand alone, closed-loop, and portable), and reproducible sensing. Operationally, the device interfaces with a commercially available femtosecond pulsed laser and mass spectrometry module. The device operates on the principle of molecular control based on shaped laser fields. Using genetic-algorithm (GA) search methods, a series of laser fields are determined to unequivocally identify each chemical or biological agent of interest. The stand-alone unit monitors for suspected chemical agents. Multiple electromagnetic fields increase the accuracy of chemical identification a million-fold compared to available sensor methods. Upon positive identification, the unit contacts a command center. The goal, for phase I will be to demonstrate that differently shaped laser fields produce uniquely different fragmentation mass spectra, and that such fields can be determined for each chemical or biological sample. Phase II of the project will concentrate on the development of a field-ready stand-alone module capable of detection of contaminants at part per billion levels even in the presence of a chemically complex environment.

CBL TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
1095 Eden Bower Lane
Redwood City, CA 94061
(650) 725-6910

PI: Dr. Glenn Solomon
(650) 725-6910
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0066
Stanford University
CISX 328
Stanford, CA 94305-4075
(650) 723-9775

ID#: A045-015-0169
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-015       Awarded: 15JUL04
Title: Quantum Dot Microcavity Terahertz Laser
Abstract:   CBL Technologies and Stanford University propose to develop and characterize a unique quantum dot microdisk source for high-power laser operation in the low terahertz frequency regime. The source will be used in military applications such as chemical and biological sensing, imaging and communications, as well as emerging commercial applications in medicine and biology. The source contains two components: a gain component and a cavity component. The gain region is composed of self-assembled InAs quantum dots, where lasing occurs via an intersubband transition. Cavity structures are difficult in the terahertz regime, often either lossy or requiring excessively thick epitaxial layers. Our cavity is a high quality microdisk that can have quality factors in excess of 10000. For terahertz emission, the cavity diameter is large and easily fabricated. Since optical modes are present at the perimeter region of the large disks, a unique regrowth process is employed, selectively positioning quantum dots in the cavity mode region. Cavity and lasing simulations in the far infrared are completed, and Stanford has demonstrated early results. In this Phase 1, we will fabricate microdisk laser structures, characterize them in the near-infrared spectral region and extrapolate our results to the terahertz regime.

CHARLES RIVER ANALYTICS, INC.
625 Mount Auburn Street
Cambridge, MA 02138-4555
(617) 491-3474

PI: Dr. Jonathan D. Pfautz
(617) 491-3474
Contract #: W74V8H-04-P-0434
University at Buffalo
413 Bell Hall, Industrial Engineering Dept.
Buffalo, NY 14260
(716) 645-2357

ID#: A045-002-0105
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-002       Awarded: 09AUG04
Title: Meta-Information Visualization to Enhance the Common Operational Picture (MIVEC)
Abstract:   Decision-making in 21st century warfare environments is characterized by large amounts of complex information from a variety of individual and networked sensor systems that must be rapidly processed by the commander. Part of this complexity is due to meta-information, or, characteristics of information such as uncertainty, staleness, etc. that increase the decision-making burden. Knowledge regarding this meta-information, along with cognitively and perceptually based visualization methods, can be used to relieve the decision-maker's workload and encourage more battlespace-aware decisions. We therefore propose a process for developing Meta-Information Visualizations to Enhance the Common Operation Picture (MIVEC). This process consists of three steps. First, we will perform a cognitive task analysis across a set of case studies to develop a principled categorization of types and sources of information and meta-information, to identify meta-informational requirements, and to identify display elements in existing DoD systems. Second, we will design and prototype a software toolkit for augmenting incoming data with identified meta-information types and for rapidly creating new meta-information visualization methods and interfaces. Third, we will develop an evaluation methodology, including metrics of the effectiveness of each meta-information visualization technique in supporting performance and training. We will demonstrate feasibility of our approach for Phase II development.

CHI SYSTEMS, INC.
1035 Virginia Drive, Suite 300
Fort Washington, PA 19034-3107
(215) 542-1400

PI: Dr. Dawn Riddle
(408) 277-9288
Contract #: W74V8H-04-P-0482
University of South Florida
Computer Science & Engineering, 4202 East Fowler Ave ENB342
Tampa, FL 33602
(813) 974-3652

ID#: A045-001-0144
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-001       Awarded: 09AUG04
Title: Terrain Analysis for Human-Robot Interaction (TAH-RI)
Abstract:   Military decision-making for ground forces is driven by tactical constraints and opportunities based on terrain. Future Force Warrior (FFW)and Future Combat Systems (FCS) are developing advanced functional capabilities, but soldiers still have to take and hold tactically significant terrain. Adding robotic vehicles, sensors, and weapons systems creates a planning and coordination challenge for the human commander. Results must be in a form useful for efficient storage and processing for `understanding' by robots as well as humans. Coordinating all these assets is not easy, even at the FCS Cell level. Terrain Analysis for Human-Robot Interaction (TAH-RI) is intended to ensure that any human or robot who needs to understand the integrated tactical importance of terrain, intelligence, and CROP can understand it, along with the commander's intent. The proposed effort builds on experience of the team in all these areas, including fielded terrain analysis in USMC C2PC and robots that worked the WTC site.

CORTEC CORP.
4119 White Bear Parkway
St. Paul, MN 55110
(651) 429-1100

PI: Ms. Margarita Kharshan
(651) 429-1100
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0085
University of California of Irvine
Chem Eng & Matls Science , School of Engineering
Irvine, CA 92697-2575
(949) 824-2800

ID#: A045-003-0155
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-003       Awarded: 28JUL04
Title: Corrosion Protection of Aluminum Aerospace Alloys by Biofilm Appliques
Abstract:   Fabrication procedures have been proposed to develop biofilm-containing appliques capable of mitigating the corrosion of aluminum aerospace alloys (e.g. AA2024-T3). The proposed methods are expected to produce surface protective flexible polymer coatings that containing bacterial biofilms capable of providing corrosion protection to the metal surfaces of aircraft and other military equipment to which they are applied.

DEFENSE LIFE SCIENCES, LLC
6832 Old Dominion Drive, Suite 206
McLean, VA 22101
(703) 448-0440

PI: Mr. Jerry B. Warner
(703) 862-2744
Contract #: W911SR-04-P-0076
Purdue University
LORRE , 1295 Potter Center
West Lafayette, IN 47907-1295
(765) 494-7022

ID#: A045-019-0065
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-019       Awarded: 13AUG04
Title: Tactical Biorefinery for Forward Fuel Production
Abstract:   The objective of this proposal is to research the feasibility of converting military waste into liquid and gaseous fuel in the forward battle-space. The fuel produced would be used to power contiguous stationary devices such as mess burners, generators, etc. This opportunity is presented as a product of recent advances in biotechnology, in particular our ability to engineer organisms and molecules to specific tasks, as well as improvements from research activities in biomass refinement, such as pyrolysis and gasification technologies. Equally important, is the recent advent of a commercially viable small biorefinery market that might be expanded to military applications. During Phase I, field military context will be evaluated to determine where the optimal conditions exist for employing military biorefineries. Based on this information, we will identify the optimal candidate bioprocessing technologies. Next, models and simulations of candidate biorefinery versions will be developed and used to evaluate candidate processes. Upon identification and down-selection of the best, or best set of feasible versions, conceptual diagrams will be produced at a level of detail to allow reviewers to evaluate these versions for phase II prototyping. During Phase II, recursive optimization of bioprocessing technologies will be conducted and working prototype tactical biorefinery created.

DENDRITECH, INC.
3110 Schuette Drive
Midland, MI 48642
(989) 496-1152

PI: Dr. Steven Kaganove
(989) 496-1144
Contract #: W81XWH04-C-0132
University of Michigan
303 South State Street, First Floor, Room 1070
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1274
(734) 764-7250

ID#: A045-024-0089
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-024       Awarded: 12AUG04
Title: Highly Robust, Temperature-Stable, Nano-structured Fluoropolymers for Battlefield Resuscitation Applications
Abstract:   The aim of this research program is to evaluate highly fluorinated yet water soluble, nano-scaled polymers for use in battlefield resuscitation applications where highly efficient oxygen transport is required. These polymers will represent a quantum leap over current artificial oxygen transport technology, which includes modified hemoglobin (e.g., crosslinked human, animal and recombinant hemoglobin) and fluorocarbon emulsions. Their advantages will include biocompatibility, non-toxicity and non-irritability, high long-term stability at ambient and elevated temperatures, high structural precision, monodisperse nanoscopic size, ability to reach places in the body inaccessible to more massive red blood cells, high solubility in water, blood plasma or cell culture media, low-to-medium molecular density, high oxygen solubility, efficient rate of oxygen transfer into an aqueous phase, and potential for cost-effective manufacture on a large scale. The proposed Phase I program will include: (a) synthesis and characterization of prototype nano-scaled polymers using proven chemistries and procedures; and (b) preliminary evaluation for efficacy and toxicity using instrumental methods and a rabbit animal model. It is expected that the results obtained will constitute the proof-of-concept data that will provide sound foundation for the optimization and development effort in Phase II.

ECHO TECHNICAL
PO Box 1238
Cedar Park, TX 78630-1238
(512) 632-6070

PI: Dr. Jeffrey A. Cook
(512) 632-6010
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0090
University of Texas at Austin
Office of Sponsored Projects, PO Box 7726
Austin, TX 78713-7726
(512) 471-6424

ID#: A045-010-0123
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-010       Awarded: 30JUL04
Title: Isothermally Amplified Proximity Ligation Assays for Biothreat Agents
Abstract:   Echo Technical and the Ellington Lab at the University of Texas at Austin have performed initial testing of a demonstration biosensor capable of using aptamer-based receptors (Biological Reconfigurable Interface Electronics For Classification and Analysis of Selected Elements, or BRIEFCASE). We propose to adapt a recently developed technology, proximity ligation assays, to a field-deployable device based on the BRIEFCASE to perform rapid, specific, hypersensitive detection and identification of the unique protein biosignatures of biothreat agents. To date, the proximity ligation assay has relied on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for signal amplification. While PCR has previously been adapted to fielded devices, these devices have tended to be relatively bulky, in part because of the hardware required for thermal cycling. In order to simplify reagent addition and ultimately the device itself, we will therefore instead utilize isothermal amplification reactions that are as sensitive as PCR, but that require only a single addition of reagents in order to amplify nascent signals. This new technique, isothermally amplified proximity ligation assay (IAPLA), and an IAPLA-based biosensor prototype will be demonstrated to support goals identified for sensitivity, miniaturization, and field deployability, with feasibility demonstrated by the end of Phase I.

EIC LABORATORIES, INC.
111 Downey Street
Norwood, MA 02062-2612
(781) 769-9450

PI: Dr. Jane F. Bertone
(781) 769-9450
Contract #: W911SR-04-P-0080
Johns Hopkins University
102 Maryland Hall, 3400 N. Charles St.
Baltimore, MD 21218
(410) 516-6077

ID#: A045-021-0049
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-021       Awarded: 12AUG04
Title: Nanoporous Metallic Structures for Concentrating Hazardous Vapors
Abstract:   Air toxins, whether industrial by products or terrorist releases, must be rapidly and accurately detected. The trace concentrations (generally ppb) that must be detected usually require sensitive analytical laboratory equipment. However, rapid and continuous field monitoring is preferable. To achieve this goal, a filter that rapidly concentrates the contaminants into a small sample volume and can be directly interrogated using a noninvasive, stand-alone device is desired. In this program, EIC Laboratories and Johns Hopkins University will develop novel nanoporous metallic substrates that can simultaneously concentrate the hazardous material into a small volume and then serve as the sample for optical evaluation. The techniques of Surface-Enhanced Raman (SERS) and Surface-Enhanced Infrared (SEIR) Spectroscopies can both provide ppb levels of detection for analytes adsorbed to roughened metal substrates. EIC has already demonstrate 5 ppb detection of explosive vapors on portable equipment in military field tests. In the current program, nanoporous gold will be produced through novel nanosynthetic and metallurgic procedures. The physical characteristics of the substrates, their adsorption coefficients for hazardous materials of interest, and SERS and SEIR spectra will be collected. The optimal substrates will be further developed and demonstrated in an air handling system that can emulate building flow rates.

ERALLO TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
20 Taylor Street
Littleton, MA 01460-1416
(978) 884-8199

PI: Dr. Steven Moulton
(617) 414-5131
Contract #: W81XWH04-C-0113
Boston University
Dowling 2419, One Boston Medical Center Pl.
Boston, MA 02118-2908
(617) 414-5131

ID#: A045-026-0062
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-026       Awarded: 13AUG04
Title: GPS-Based Tracking System for Trauma Patients
Abstract:   The objective of this proposal is to build a wireless, low-power, GPS-enabled sensor node prototype to capture patient location and time information. Development of the sensor node prototype will be based on emerging technologies in sensors, GPS and wireless communications. Integration of these technologies will facilitate the study of resuscitation and acute care strategies for combat and commercial medical use. Currently, detailed information regarding out-of-hospital resuscitation efforts is poorly captured and rarely integrated with the hospital record. There is no existing real-time, sensor system that can collect, integrate, locally store, and transmit this type of information ahead of the patient, so that trauma centers can better anticipate the arrival of extremely ill patients. This Phase I STTR proposal addresses these needs by: 1) developing a prototype GPS-enabled sensor node, 2) modifying an existing wireless transmitter to send GPS information over a cellular network to a receiving hospital, and 3) modifying an existing SQL database to process, display and store the patient location data generated by the GPS sensors. The Primary Investigator is a pediatric trauma surgeon with experience in micro-sensors, sensor networks, trauma management and resuscitation research. Co-investigators are experts in wireless location tracking, RF and database design.

FOSTER-MILLER, INC.
350 Second Ave.
Waltham, MA 02451-1196
(781) 684-4242

PI: Dr. Vladimir Gilman
(781) 684-4174
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0059
University of Connecticut
1084 Shennecossett Rd.
Groton, CT 06340
(860) 486-2483

ID#: A045-003-0088
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-003       Awarded: 09JUL04
Title: A Novel Bio-Applique for Corrosion Protection
Abstract:   Traditional coatings used by the military to camouflage and protect aluminum alloys contain organic solvents (VOCs) and toxic metal corrosion inhibitors (chromates). Gases emitted during application and wastes generated when stripping the metal for recoating create hazardous working conditions and pollute the environment. Appliqu‚s (thin film fluoropolymers with a pressure sensitive adhesive) provide an environmentally friendly and inexpensive alternative coating system that is easy to apply and maintain. Provided these impermeable coverings remain intact and properly bonded, they effectively prevent the substrate metal from corroding. However, if the appliqu‚ is damaged, moisture and oxygen can permeate to the metal and initiate corrosion. Providing additional protection with a chromate-containing primer or conversion layer would defeat the attractiveness of the appliqu‚ technology. Instead it is proposed to incorporate a biological system into the appliqu‚ that will protect exposed metal against all types of corrosion. In effect, the biological system will secrete corrosion inhibitors and antimicrobials in a manner designed to emulate the "inhibition-on-demand" characteristics of chromate inhibitors. The biological system will be safe and environmentally friendly. This proposal provides detailed information on the functioning of the biological system and describes an experimental program to demonstrate its effectiveness. (P-040410)

FOSTER-MILLER, INC.
350 Second Ave.
Waltham, MA 02451-1196
(781) 684-4242

PI: Dr. Harris Gold
(781) 684-4181
Contract #: W911SR-04-P-0077
Biomass Energy Foundation
1810 Smith Rd.
Golden, CO 80401
(303) 278-0558

ID#: A045-019-0199
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-019       Awarded: 16AUG04
Title: Advanced Thermal Conversion of Waste/Biomass for Forward Units Energy Production/Conversion
Abstract:   The dependency of United States military forward units on logistic fuels, such as JP-8, presents significant tactical and strategic disadvantages, as fuel shortages in times of heightened mission-criticality greatly burden operations. Reducing the logistic fuel dependency gap during these periods would result in marked tactical advantages for American forces. In this Phase I Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program, Foster-Miller and the Biomass Energy Foundation propose to address this issue through development of a novel burner system capable of converting logistic wastes and indigenous biomass, in addition to logistic fuels such as JP-8, into a viable energy source for use in non-combat systems such as field kitchens, generators, and other field-deployable systems. (P-040418)

FOSTER-MILLER, INC.
350 Second Ave.
Waltham, MA 02451-1196
(781) 684-4242

PI: Dr. Vladimir Gilman
(781) 684-4174
Contract #: W81XWH04-C-0117
University of Pittsburgh
McGowan Institute , University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
(412) 383-9458

ID#: A045-024-0154
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-024       Awarded: 16JUN04
Title: Improved Performance, Stable Artificial Oxygen Carrier for Battlefield Casualty Care
Abstract:   Abstract: Foster-Miller and the University of Pittsburgh propose to develop a new artificial oxygen carrier (OC) formulation with improved stability and tissue oxygenation performance for use in first echelon combat casualty care applications. In Phase I, they will demonstrate the feasibility of using structure-property relationships and computer-aided property prediction methods to develop improved perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions that are stable over extended periods of time (more than one year) under the widely varying storage conditions expected in battlefield use. In addition, they will demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining improved tissue oxygenation using the University of Pittsburgh's innovative drag reducing polymer (DRP) additive. The feasibility demonstration will include measurements of emulsion particle size and stability under a range of conditions (including freeze/thaw stability), oxygen carrying capability of the OC formulation, in vitro rheology measurements, and preliminary assessments of the effect of OC formulation on various blood parameters. (P-040435)

FRACTAL SYSTEMS, INC.
200 9th Avenue North, Suite 100
Safety Harbor, FL 34695-3504
(727) 723-3006

PI: Dr. Anastasia Bogomolova
(727) 723-3006
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0068
University of South Florida
4202 E. Fowler Avenue, FAO 126
Tampa, FL 33620
(813) 974-5555

ID#: A045-010-0186
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-010       Awarded: 16JUL04
Title: Direct Toxin-Specific Biowarfare Detector
Abstract:   There are several potent cytotoxins such as ricin, which can be lethal with very low dose of exposure. Currently used immunochemical detection methods for such toxins are long and expensive. Recent research resulted in the discovery of peptides which bind selectively to these lethal toxins, particularly ricin, and could replace the traditional monoclonal antibody used in immunochemical detection. Our innovative approach will use a peptide-modified conductive polymer with biorecognition and biomimetic properties for binding to ricin in Phase I. The binding of peptide to ricin will induce a change in the electrical properties of the conductive polymer. Electrochemical ac and dc techniques will register the changes in situ, corresponding to the active peptide-toxin recognition. We will synthesize and characterize the novel ricin-specific detection material and focus on sensitivity and speed of recognition using ultrathin films on interdigitated electrode arrays. In Phase II, other derivatives will be synthesized for specific recognition of other toxins towards creating multi-specific detector arrays in a credit card-like format. This work will be carried out in collaboration with the Center for Biological Defense at the University of South Florida (Tampa) properly equipped to carry out the necessary testing towards a Phase III implementation of the technology.

HYPERION BIOTECHNOLOGY, INC.
13302 Langtry Rd.
San Antonio, TX 78248
(210) 493-7452

PI: Dr. Robert J. Christy, PhD
(210) 536-4266
Contract #:
The University of Montana
Dept. of Helath and Human Perf, McGill Hall
Missoula, MT 59812
(406) 243-2117

ID#: A045-018-0142
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-018       Selected for Award
Title: Biomarker Based Matrix That Predicts Levels of Physical and Cognitive Performance
Abstract:   The objective of this proposal is to identify a matrix consisting of 4-20 protein and peptide biomarkers that predict near-term physical and cognitive performance capabilities in humans. The ultimate goal is a technology that can be used to predict near-term performance capability using the matrix. During phase I, a human study involving an 8-hour period of intense physical exercise will be used for demonstration of proof-of-concept. Biosamples (saliva, urine and blood) will be obtained and physical performance tests performed at various times during the study. SELDI and MALDI mass spectrometry will be used for analysis. Biomarkers will be identified using standard comparative methods. It is anticipated that many endogenous substances including enzymes and oxidant-modified proteins will increase during the exercise but may not be associated with performance decrement. In order to identify biomarkers that are related to physical performance, a double-blind, placebo controlled study using a nutritional intervention known to produce a significant improvement in physical performance during the last hours of the exercise regimen will be completed. Comparison of biomarker profiles from individuals that receive the intervention and show improvement and those that do not will identify biomarker candidates that are unequivocally associated with performance.

IC TECH, INC.
4295 Okemos Road, Suite 100
Okemos, MI 48864
(517) 349-9000

PI: Dr. Gail Erten
(517) 349-9000
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0065
Michigan State University
103 Amdin Bldg
East Lansing, MI 48824
(517) 355-5040

ID#: A045-013-0031
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-013       Awarded: 12JUL04
Title: Acoustic direction finding using biologically inspired techniques
Abstract:   The ability to determine the direction and characteristics of sounds they hear is one many birds and mammals are endowed with. This biological ability evolved over millions of years, and if one can understand the mechanisms, one expects, we can copy and mimic the capability to some extent in practical applications. Audio cues are also essential for situation awareness for soldiers. Ability to determine where a sound is coming from and respond in a fraction of a second is vital. Our company IC Tech has been engaged in developing biologically inspired technologies and solutions for audio and speech processing since 1997. Based on our previous experience, and given that oftentimes, in a battlefield environment sounds from multiple sources overlap in time and frequency, we see direction finding for soldiers as a two part problem: (1) separating the mixture of sounds into their individual components, and (2) determining the direction of each component. It may be possible to establish coupling between the modules that address these two problems, or solve both problems simultaneously. We are proposing, to combine our signal separation technology and know-how with the expertise of our collaborators to develop dependable acoustic direction finding for soldiers. Our Phase I investigation will involve selecting the best microphone front end, positioning, and arrangement, as well as the optimum algorithms for signal separation classification and switching, and for direction finding. Moreover, we will study the integration of position sensors to link sensor array referenced sound direction with actual physical direction. We will follow this by identification of the most effective rapid and intuitive delivery of the sound source direction information to the soldier. Finally, we will review how individual direction finding systems can be networked.

INTERNATIONAL BIOMETRIC GROUP
1 Battery Park PLaza
New York, NY 10004-1405
(212) 809-9491

PI: Mr. Mcken Mak
(212) 809-9491
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0087
Michigan State University
Computer Science & Engineering, 3115 Engineering Building
East Lansing, MI 48824-1226
(517) 355-9282

ID#: A045-017-0263
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-017       Awarded: 29JUL04
Title: High Confidence Multimodal Biometric System
Abstract:   Phase I consists of a detailed feasibility study examining the potential of multimodal biometric systems to provide more robust accuracy and throughput than single-modal biometric systems. An experimental system capable of utilizing previously acquired, correlated data - match scores, templates, and samples will be designed and built. This system utilizes combinations of two biometric modalities (selected from face, fingerprint and iris) for the purpose of experimentation with multiple data fusion models. Phase I outputs will include data indicative of the degree to which alternative fusion models improve identification and verification performance as well as strategies to extend the methodology to a tri-modal system for Phase II. Phase II extends the Phase I experimental system to encompass development of an end-to-end prototype multimodal system. This hardware and software system enables live acquisition of biometric data from subjects for use in online identification and verification modes. Phase II further builds on Phase I by enabling more than two biometric modalities at a time.

KAZAK COMPOSITES, INC.
32 Cummings Park
Woburn, MA 01801-2122
(781) 932-5667

PI: Dr. Pavel Bystricky
(781) 932-5667
Contract #: W9132T-04-C-0027
Georgia Institute of Technology
Department of Civil & Environm
Atlanta, GA 30332-0355
(404) 385-0826

ID#: A045-023-0127
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-023       Awarded: 29JUL04
Title: Large Shape Memory Alloy Composite Structures for Seismic Resistant Building Applications
Abstract:   KaZaK Composites and Professor DesRoches (Georgia Institute of Technology) propose to develop, build, and characterize large Nitinol Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) composite structures for applications in seismic-resistant framing connection elements. Recent earthquakes have highlighted the need for isolation and passive energy dissipation devices to enhance behavior of structures affected by seismic events. Current technologies have shortcomings that could potentially be overcome with passive composite SMA dampers and re-centering devices. SMAs have the ability to dissipate significant energy through repeated cycling without significant degradation or permanent deformation. There are no applications of SMA seismic dampers in the United States to date, however, largely due to the high cost of SMA materials and the fact SMAs have been available and fully characterized in fine wire form only. KCI will use its expertise in specialized pultrusion processing and other composite manufacturing methods to develop and demonstrate cost effective, high performance composite materials reinforced with standard continuous SMA wires, allowing devices of arbitrarily large size and shape to be cost effectively made with available SMA wire. The use of large diameter SMA composite dampers in seismic resistant design will be validated by characterizing mechanical properties, thermo-mechanical heat treatment, strain rate effects, and recovery properties.

KIONIX, INC.
36 Thornwood Dr.
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 257-1080

PI: Dr. Peng Zhou
(607) 257-1080
Contract #: W81XWH04-C-0137
Lawrence Livermore National Lab
7000 East Avenue, L-668
Livermore, CA 94550
(925) 422-3343

ID#: A045-028-0044
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-028       Awarded: 06AUG04
Title: Portable Cell Maintenance System for Rapid Toxicity Monitoring
Abstract:   The health and safety of civilians and deployed troops critically depends on the ability to detect a broad range of toxic contaminants in drinking water. There is also a generally perceived need for an accurate, reliable, and cost-effective measurement system for assuring the safety of drinking water, i.e., a simple test to determine "lack of contamination" in military, civilian, and industrial settings. This proposal addresses these important needs by demonstrating the feasibility of a system comprising a novel and innovative, low-cost, small-size, microfluidic chip-based cell maintenance cartridge (CMC), and a portable cell maintenance system (CMS) capable of housing multiple CMCs. The proposed CMC/CMS system will be capable of optimally maintaining multiple vertebrate cell types during transport, storage, and use while supporting both optical and electrical assay formats. Specifically, the proposed project will establish on-chip assays for cell viability, vitality, and function in order to assess the ability of the CMC to optimally maintain multiple cell types for a period of three days in Phase I and significantly longer in Phase II. Additionally, the CMC/CMS system will enable the development of powerful cellular assays based on both primary cells and next-generation engineered cells designed for sensing applications.

LIPOMICS TECHNOLOGIES
2545 Boatman Avenue
West Sacramento, CA 95691
(916) 371-7974

PI: Dr. Steven M. Watkins
(916) 371-7974
Contract #:
University of California
Office of VC/Research, 1 Shields Avenue
Davis, CA 95631
(530) 752-7076

ID#: A045-020-0042
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-020       Selected for Award
Title: Metabolomic Evaluation of Combat Personnel for Optimum Fitness and Performance
Abstract:   This Phase I proposal for evaluation of combat personnel for optimum fitness and performance will be based on measuring lipid and amino acid biomarkers prior to and during the performance of ultra-marathon participants. Plasma or serum samples will be collected before individuals participate in the marathon and at various times during the race. The specific aims are to analyze and profile structural changes in plasma metabolites that may indicate tissue or metabolic changes and to seek evidence of physiological stress during strenuous physical activity by measurement of eicosanoids, which are produced by macrophages and that can indicate possible compromise to the immune system. This study will be related to the research topic by developing analytical tools to identify biomarkers of physical readiness, and markers that will be predictive of potential stress damage and damage that occurs in individual soldiers during times of physical stress. Based on plasma metabolite profiles, Phase II research would seek nutritional means to optimize soldier physiological performance under stress in the field.

LYNNTECH, INC.
7607 Eastmark Drive, Suite 102
College Station, TX 77840
(979) 693-0017

PI: Dr. Bikas Vaidya
(979) 693-0017
Contract #: W911SR-04-P-0084
Northwestern University
Department of Chemistry, 2145 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL 60208-3113
(847) 491-3516

ID#: A045-021-0145
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-021       Awarded: 02SEP04
Title: Novel Material for Capture and Spectral Detection of Hazardous Vapors
Abstract:   Rapid detection and unambiguous identification of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and other hazardous substances at low concentrations is required to conclusively determine the level of a potential threat. Optical spectroscopic techniques such as infrared or Raman spectroscopy, providing spectral fingerprints of organic compounds, combined with pre-concentration of the analyte onto a solid support matrix present an attractive and extremely versatile method to unequivocally identify a wide range of airborne hazardous materials. We propose to develop a novel inorganic composite material that will be used as pre-concentration matrix for spectroscopic interrogation of contaminants. A mesoporous support that does not exhibit significant optical absorptions in the desired wavelength range will be combined with nanometer-sized noble metal structures to provide surface-enhanced infrared and Raman spectroscopic responses. Utilizing a `bottom-up' assembly technique, our proposed substrates can be fabricated in the form of a membrane or a fiber filter that can be directly employed as air filtration media. The proposed detection system will exhibit the desired high sensitivity and will complement the military's current CWA detection equipment.

MICROBIAL INSIGHTS, INC.
2340 Stock Creek Blvd
Rockford, TN 37853-3044
(865) 573-8188

PI: Dr. Edward A. Sobek
(865) 573-8188
Contract #:
University of Tennessee
10515 Research Drive, Suite 30
Knoxville, TN 37932-2575
(865) 974-8001

ID#: A045-018-0041
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-018       Selected for Award
Title: Rapid Assessment of Individual Soldier Operational Readiness
Abstract:   Human breath contains a treasure-trove of metabolic data, which has the potential to provide real time information representing an individual's baseline health status or rapidly categorize baseline deviations related to environmental stressors, including, biological or chemical agents, physical, heat and cold stress, sleep deprivation, pollutant or allergen exposure, and disease. The most prevalent and discriminating group of biomarkers in breath are the lipid regulatory molecules. We propose to quantitatively assess individual soldier operational readiness with a non-invasive, rapid, analysis of regulatory lipids in expired breath condensate. Proof-of-principal experiments, supported by DARPA, have demonstrated that regulatory lipid biomarkers (eicosanoids and platelet activation factors) are expressed in the breath condensate of mice, rats and piglets exposed to various toxins and pathogens. The biomarker data was reproducible and correlated to presymptomatic inductions of cytokines and host response proteins; both key indicators of immune system activation. Moreover, the data indicate that the pattern of lipid regulator molecules expressed were unique for each stressor. Phase I will test thirty subjects to demonstrate: 1) reproducibility of recovery, 2) individual and group baseline responses while at metabolic rest, physically stressed (aerobic exercise), and sleep deprived 3) profile discriminatory patterns representing the various stressed and unstressed states.

MP TECHNOLOGIES, LLC
1801 Maple Avenue
Evanston, IL 60201-3135
(847) 491-7208

PI: Dr. Steven Slivken
(847) 491-7208
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0069
Northwestern University
633 Clark Street, Room 2-502
Evanston, IL 60208-1110
(847) 491-1967

ID#: A045-012-0025
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-012       Awarded: 22JUL04
Title: Optimization of Strain-Balanced Heterostructures for High Power 4-5 Micron Quantum Cascade Lasers
Abstract:   In order to extract the full potential of quantum cascade laser technology, a heterostructure with a large conduction band offset is required in order to minimize thermal leakage associated with high average power operating conditions. Strain-balanced heterostructures, based on GaInAs/ AlInAs/ InP, exist which are predicted to allow efficient laser operation in the 3-5 micron wavelength region. Due to a large mismatch relative to InP, strict control over layer composition and thickness is required in order to accurately reproduce ideal quantum well heterostructures. In this project, the main effort will be to optimize quantum well shape using strain-balanced heterostructures. In addition, experimental data will be gathered in order to update band structure parameters, which will allow for more accurate laser design. By the end of the project, a laser source with >20 mW continuous wave power in the 3-5 micron wavelength will be demonstrated.

NANOLAB, INC.
55 Chapel St
Newton, MA 02458
(617) 581-6747

PI: Mr. David Carnahan
(617) 581-6747
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0080
MIT
Room 3-158, MIT, 77 Massachusetts Ave
Cambridge, MA 02139-4307
(617) 253-0006

ID#: A045-007-0208
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-007       Awarded: 21JUL04
Title: Nanostructured Thermoelectric Composites
Abstract:   Advances in thermoelectric materials are needed to broaden the application areas for these materials. Specifically, the figure of merit (ZT) for thermoelectrics must be increased. Some recent demonstrations show that nanoscale structures are the key to obtaining high ZT (>2). However, these superlattice structures are created one layer at a time, in expensive processes. In the Phase I effort, NanoLab proposes to develop a bulk analog of the superlattice structure, that retains the properties of the quantum dot superlattice structures. To accomplish this, NanoLab plans to synthesize nanoparticles of thermoelectric materials and incorporate them into a nanocomposite. We believe that we can create a large number of quantum confined structures (quantum dots) distributed within a semiconductor matrix will be a cost effective route to obtain high figure of merit (ZT). Even at today's costs, we can predict that the cost of a nanocomposite will be far less than a structure grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE).

NAVSYS CORP.
14960 Woodcarver Road
Colorado Springs, CO 80921
(719) 481-4877

PI: Dr. Alison Brown
(719) 481-4877
Contract #: W81XWH04-C-0135
Univ of Colo, Colorado Springs
1420 Austin Bluffs Parkway
Colorado Springs, CO 80918
(719) 262-3510

ID#: A045-026-0215
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-026       Awarded: 06AUG04
Title: GPS-Based Tracking System for Trauma Patients
Abstract:   This proposed effort develops a system that addresses two areas of concern in tracking the location and coordinating timing of events for trauma patients. Determining the timing of the treatment of trauma patients is an important aspect of increased survivability. Additionally, victims of mass trauma events may be sent to diverse locations for treatment. If the event involves a biological agent, it is desirable to be able to determine where the victims were sent to deal with the potential for possible contamination of others who come into contact with them. The effort proposed here will develop a prototype of a wearable software defined radio which can be attached to a trauma patient upon first contact by medical staff. The system will contain a software defined GPS radio as one of the waveforms, which will provide timing and location information to a central site via an ISM connection. This central asset will then make use of wideband communications (either with a cellular link, or other technical means) to send timing, location, and other patient information to a master site.

NEW SPAN OPTO-TECHNOLOGY, INC.
9380 SW 72nd Street, B-180
Miami, FL 33173-5460
(305) 275-6998

PI: Dr. Jame J. Yang
(305) 321-5288
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0086
University of Miami
Office of Research Adm., Rhodes House Building 37-A
Coral Gables, FL 33124-5215
(305) 284-4541

ID#: A045-005-0230
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-005       Awarded: 06AUG04
Title: Non-conventional Imaging Lens With Extended Depth of Focus
Abstract:   The Army is seeking to develop innovative optical detection and imaging systems that allow battlefield imaging through smoke, dust, and fog obscurants for applications of battlefield visualization, remote manipulation in hazardous environments, situational awareness, surveillance and monitoring. In commercial and industrial fields, the applications of such system include: automated inspection and robotic manipulations, airports and traffic control, autonomous vehicle guidance, monitoring and security, 3D object/scene modeling, visual art, movies production, and virtual environments. For realization of these tasks, the imaging system should possess two significant properties: (1) large depth of focus for simultaneously imaging objects locating at different altitudes or various distances, and (2) effectively operates through obscurants. Conventional auto focus technique is too slow and not capable of long depth of focus while small aperture system is not energy efficient and not capable for low light level imaging. New Span Opto-Technology Inc. proposes herein a new extended depth of focus lens with fast F# and large aperture for battlefield imaging application. The proposed Phase I research will evaluate and demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed concept. Phase II will optimize the design and fabrication to demonstrate a practical device prototype for military applications as well as for commercial applications.

NOMADICS, INC.
1024 S. Innovation Way
Stillwater, OK 74074-1508
(405) 372-9535

PI: Mr. David Goad
(405) 372-9535
Contract #: W81XWH04-C-0141
Oklahoma State University
College of Veterinary Medicine, 221 McElroy Hall
Stillwater, OK 74078
(405) 744-4467

ID#: A045-027-0237
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-027       Awarded: 12AUG04
Title: Ruminant B-Lymphocyte Yellow Fluorescent Protein Aggregation Bioassay for Elk Chronic Wasting Disease
Abstract:   The goal of the proposed research is to develop a cell culture model for elk chronic wasting disease (CWD) prion propagation that can be used as a bioassay for detecting CWD. Our goal will be accomplished by bioengineering a bovine B-lymphocyte cell (B-cell) line to surface express elk PrPc fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Interaction of these B-cells with infectious, mis-folded, protease resistant CWD prion (PrPcwd) will induce conversion of the dispersed YFP-PrPc to aggregated mis-folded YFP-PrPcwd that will be detected by confocal microscopy as aggregated YFP-PrPcwd on the B-cell surface. Once Phase I proof-of-concept has been demonstrated by elk PrPcwd conversion of YFP-PrPc on the B-cell line to YFP-PrPcwd, a stably transfected cell line will be developed and validated as a sensitive, specific, and reproducible bioassay for detecting PrPcwd infected elk and deer tissues and body fluids during Phase II.

OMEGA PIEZO TECHNOLOGIES
2591 Clyde Ave., Suite 3
State College, PA 16801-7560
(814) 861-4160

PI: Dr. John V. Badding
(814) 777-3054
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0073
Penn State University
152 Davey Lab
University Park, PA 16802-1413
(814) 777-3054

ID#: A045-007-0119
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-007       Awarded: 14JUL04
Title: Nanostructured Thermoelectric Composites
Abstract:   We propose to develop synthesis and processing approaches to high density semiconductor quantum dot/conducting polymer nanocomposites that exhibit improved efficiencies in thermoelectric devices. The best thermoelectric semiconductors currently have a dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT, of approximately 1. Doubling or tripling ZT will increase the range of application and market size of ther-moelectric devices by a factor much larger than 2 or 3. Nanocomposites of thermoelectric semiconductor quantum dots with conducting polymers are a promising means for realizing such high ZT in a low cost material. The proposed interdisciplinary effort utilizes the combined expertise of the PI's in materials modeling, polymer nanocomposite processing and chemistry, inorganic nanomaterials and heat transfer. Innovative aspects of our approach include 1) One step fabrication of polymer nanocomposites that have the semiconductor dots bonded directly to the polymer backbone, facilitating the electrical transport that is critical to improved performance, 2) Fabrication of stretched conducting polymer nanofiber/quantum dot nanocomposites that should exhibit improved transport behavior because of the orientation of the polymer chains, 3) Application of state of the art modeling techniques to understanding the thermoelectric properties of the nanocomposites and how to modify them for improved behavior.

OMNI SCIENCES, INC.
647 Spring Valley Drive
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
(734) 420-0190

PI: Dr. Michael J. Freeman
(734) 420-0190
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0078
University of Michigan
Elect. Eng. and Comp. Sci., 1301 Beal Avenue, 1110 EECS
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2122
(734) 647-9700

ID#: A045-012-0043
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-012       Awarded: 16JUL04
Title: Mid-infrared Laser Based on Cascaded Raman Wavelength Shifting in Fibers
Abstract:   Spectral fingerprinting for chemical agent detection or industrial process and analytic chemistry requires a compact, lightweight, tunable mid-infrared (mid-IR) laser. A room temperature, fiber-based mid-IR laser is proposed that starts with a pump laser in the near-IR, and then down-shifts the light based on cascaded Raman wavelength shifting in mid-IR fibers. The laser is widely tunable by simply tuning a seed semiconductor laser, and the power can be scaled up to watts by using larger core size fibers. The mid-IR laser leverages the mature technology base from telecommunications, where our team has considerable experience on Raman technology. We use simulation codes carefully tested in near-IR wavelengths to design the proposed mid-IR lasers, and we show that the Raman wavelength shifting process is extremely efficient. New technical challenges arise from using mid-IR fibers based on chalcogenides or fluorides, but these should be engineering challenges rather than fundamental limitations. The Phase I project has three main objectives. First, prove the accuracy of the simulations and better understand the properties of the mid-IR fibers. Second, demonstrate experimentally cascaded Raman wavelength shifting in the mid-IR fibers. Finally, generate light in the 3-5 micron wavelength range using off-the-shelf telecom technologies and mid-IR fibers.

OPERATIONAL TECHNOLOGIES CORP.
4100 N. W. Loop 410, Suite 230
San Antonio, TX 78229-4253
(210) 731-0015

PI: Dr. John G. Bruno
(210) 731-0015
Contract #:
Texas State University
601 University Drive
San Marcos, TX 78666-4616
(512) 245-2314

ID#: A045-022-0135
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-022       Selected for Award
Title: Multiplexed-Magnetically Assisted Test Strips (M-MATS)
Abstract:   Some biowarfare (BW) agents infect at extremely low doses and their detection is masked by debris-ridden water. Furthermore, a large variety of BW agents may be disbursed in a water supply, thus complicating detection. Therefore, ultrasensitive, multiplexed detection is required. To address this need, Operational Technologies (OpTech) has recently been awarded an EPA SBIR contract to couple highly specific DNA aptamers to ultrasensitive fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) and push sensitivity limits. However, OpTech's EPA project will demonstrate individual aptamer-NP assays in separate lanes of a Magnetically-Assisted Test Strip (MATS) using a prototype compact fluorescence reader. MATS is similar to an immunochromatographic test strip, but its flow is not limited by capillary action, because it uses magnetically guided aptamer-magnetic microbeads in microfluidic channels to purify targets from the sample. Under this STTR proposal, OpTech proposes to team with Texas State University and leverage its EPA project to accelerate and enhance the MATS-sensor development for both military and EPA use by developing a larger repertoire of multiplexed aptamer-NP and antibody-NP assays using different colored NPs in each microchannel of the MATS. In Phase II, OpTech and Texas State University will build a lifetime fluorometer attachment to the compact sensor for even greater sensitivity.

OPTEOS, INC.
1340 Eisenhower place
Ann Arbor, MI 48108-3282
(734) 973-6600

PI: Dr. Kyoung Yang
(734) 973-6600
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0075
University of Michigan
CUOS (IST Bldg.), 2200 Bonisteel Blvd., Rm. 1006
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099
(734) 763-1324

ID#: A045-014-0264
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-014       Awarded: 19JUL04
Title: Nonlinear-Optical-Based Vector Electric and Magnetic Near-Field Probing for Analysis of Electromagnetic Compatibility
Abstract:   The determination of the feasibility of utilizing optically-interrogated electro-optic and magneto-optic sensors as the front-end of a new, near-field characterization system for measuring time-varying, non-sinusoidal signals in microwave digital and mixed-signal circuits is proposed. The extraction of complex signals from the internal nodes of circuits or larger systems such as multi-chip modules will be crucial to the advancement of technologies needed to increase information capacity while decreasing system size and cost. Thus, impending requirements to access either very high time resolutions or the very high frequencies of harmonics in high-data-rate systems will be addressed by the proposed approach, with a bandwidth goal extending through the millimeter-wave regime to greater than 100 GHz. Emphasis will be placed on making high spatial resolution vector measurements with negligible invasiveness while in close proximity to the surface of circuits in order that near-field signal information can be used to determine the far-field radiation emitted by the circuit or a particular portion of the circuit. The feasibility of exploiting this unique knowledge of the local field for the determination of the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of devices and circuits will be explored.

PHYSICAL SCIENCES, INC.
20 New England Business Center
Andover, MA 01810
(978) 689-0003

PI: Dr. John D. Lennhoff
(978) 689-0003
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0083
University of Michigan
930 North University Ave.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055
(734) 615-2146

ID#: A045-004-0205
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-004       Awarded: 23JUL04
Title: Metal Organic Framework Adsorbents for Fuel-Cell Relevant Small Molecules
Abstract:   Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) proposes to utilize 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional Metal Organic Framework (MOF) structures for the selective adsorption of small contaminant molecules from a hydrogen feed stream. These contaminants include carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide, and ammonia. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEM-FC), which are typically fueled by hydrogen, can suffer catalyst poisoning from these contaminants. The variable pore size and the structural versatility of MOFs permit the tailoring of their chemistry to selectively absorb the small molecules of interest. PSI will utilize its library of MOFs, the library of MOFs synthesized by the Yaghi group at the University of Michigan, as well as design and synthesize new MOFs suited absorb each small molecule of interest. The Phase I effort will focus on specializing the transition metal MOF corners for CO adsorption. Transition metals with a range of electronic structures will be explored along with a range of organic segments. On a Phase II program, PSI will scale-up the MOF synthesis and provide an adsorption system to selectively remove multiple small molecule contaminants in hydrogen feedstocks powering a 20W PEM-FC for 72 hours.

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES GROUP
PO Box 4914, 4046 Quenita Drive
Winter Park, FL 32793-4914
(407) 628-2530

PI: Dr. Mark E. Koltko-Rivera

Contract #: W81XWH04-C-0133
University of Central Florida
Office of Research, 12443 Research Pkwy Ste 302
Orlando, FL 32826-3252
(407) 823-3778

ID#: A045-025-0283
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-025       Awarded: 12AUG04
Title: Automated Behavioral Health Triage
Abstract:   The ultimate STTR goal is to develop an automated behavioral health triage assessment system that: (a) contains tests sensitive to specific cognitive dysfunctions; (b) organizes test data into a logic-tree indicating where further testing is needed; (c) provides concurrent and transparent analysis of individual test results; (d) provides a tailored battery of relevant additional test modules when further testing is indicated; (e) interfaces with existing military cognitive testing systems. There does not yet exist a comprehensive assessment system suitable for military triage. In Phase I, we propose to: (1) survey the cognitive science and human factors literatures, to identify key areas of cognitive function underlying cognitive and behavioral performance; (2) survey the cognitive testing literature, to map each test against these key areas of function and performance; (3) based on these reviews, determine the feasibility of obtaining test data in each domain, adequate for triage; (4) devise a prototype set of screening tests that addresses the key domains outlined above; (5) develop a prototype logic tree that uses screening test data for "test further/do not test further" decisions; (6) identify instruments for use when further testing is indicated. The prototypes will be validated in Phase II.

PROTEUS OPTICS LLC
4 Locust Lane
Rose Valley, PA 19086
(610) 695-0081

PI: Dr. Robert J. Levis
(215) 204-5241
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0096
Temple University
Chemistry Department, 13th & Norris Streets
Philadelphia, PA 19122
(215) 204-7459

ID#: A045-008-0084
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-008       Awarded: 05AUG04
Title: Fast Laser Pulse Shaping for Molecular Control and CB Detection
Abstract:   We propose the development of a robust laser pulse shaping system (LPSS) for commercialization to the defense, industrial and academic communities for advanced laser processing applications. The LPSS will be used for closed-loop control of molecular reactions and dynamics by coherent electromagnetic fields. In Phase I we will design and assemble breadboard LPSS and demonstrate molecular reaction control by modifying the mass spectrum resulting from the decomposition of dimethylmethyl phosphonate, a simulant for the chemical nerve agent Sarin. We will cleave the methyl group or the methoxy upon demand using the system as a component in a strong field closed-loop photonic reactor consisting of a laser system, the proposed LPSS, TOF mass spectrum analyzer and a control system running adaptive feedback pattern recognition codes. We will identify aspects of the LPSS that require further engineering for mass production. In Phase II we will design and build a prototype commercial system that is compact, economical, and rugged with a standard I/O communication interface. The system will be compatible with portable laser systems and detectors suitable for use in the field. Our self-aligning system will include reliable means for calibration and be operable without maintenance for extended periods.

RADIATION MONITORING DEVICES, INC.
44 Hunt Street
Watertown, MA 02472-4699
(617) 668-6800

PI: Mr. Arieh M. Karger
(617) 668-6827
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0061
Harvard University
Pierce 225 , 29 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 496-8729

ID#: A045-011-0038
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-011       Awarded: 09JUL04
Title: Nanofiber LIBS for Nanoparticle Composition
Abstract:   The pervasiveness of nanoparticles and nanomaterials is rapidly expanding, and determination of their chemical composition can be achieved by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) excited through an optical fiber of nanometer dimensions. We propose to develop a LIBS system for nanomaterials based upon recently demonstrated nanometer silica wires [Nature, Dec 2003] for excitation and an ultrasensitive avalanche photodiode (APD) array for optical detection. Moreover, we propose to employ a near-field approach to excite LIBS using femtosecond laser pulses, which yield sharper LIBS spectra and minimize damage to the nanofiber. The Phase-I goal is to demonstrate nanometer spatial resolution of compositional analysis of nanoparticles on surfaces. The ultimate goal is a system that will achieve single-pulse compositional analyses of nanostructure in various configurations, including for surface microscopy and in-situ monitoring of size and composition of nanoparticles in flowing reactant streams.

RULES-BASED MEDICINE
3300 Duval Rd, Suite 110
Austin, TX 78759
(512) 846-8026

PI: Dr. James Mapes
(512) 846-8026
Contract #:
Lawrence Livermore National Labator
7000 East Ave.,
Livermore, CA 94550
(925) 422-5616

ID#: A045-018-0156
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-018       Selected for Award
Title: Rapid Assessment of Individual Soldier Operational Readiness
Abstract:   It is important to develop a hierarchical series of molecular biomarkers for the rapid assessment of a soldier's physiological and operational readiness. Stress factors play an important role in combat related illnesses among troops. Studies of Gulf War Syndrome and other combat related disorders provide evidence that a wide range of stressors can degrade performance (e.g. fatigue, nutrition, sustained physical activity, fear, sustained attention, vaccinations, environmental chemicals, and unusual pathogens). Clearly, no single molecular marker, or small group of markers, will be able to accurately report the status of this wide variety of stress mechanisms. Rules-Based Medicine (RBM) has developed fluorescent microsphere array approach to perform Multi-Analyte Profiles (x-MAP) in blood. This technology is well suited for screening large numbers of markers in parallel to identify stress profiles. The research work on stress profiles facilitates comparison between stress responses and disease mechanisms. This should also increase the understanding and robustness of readiness profiles. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has a number of ongoing collaborations with RBM to develop and apply multiplex immunoassays to the study of infectious diseases. Thus, RBM and LLNL are uniquely qualified to perform high-throughput analyses of genomic, proteomic and other biomarkers, and to facilitate application of these approaches by those responsible for assessing troop training and readiness.

RURAL TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
1008 32nd Ave
Brookings, SD 57006
(605) 688-5652

PI: Dr. Kris Fairbanks
(605) 692-6953
Contract #: W81XWH04-C-0138
National Animal Disease Center
USDA-ARS-Midwest Area, 2300 Dayton Ave.; PO Box 70
Ames, IA 50010
(309) 681-6602

ID#: A045-027-0018
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-027       Awarded: 13AUG04
Title: Development of Bioassays for Prion Infectivity Using Human, Deer, or Elk Cells
Abstract:   Originally believed to be due to a unique viral infection, it is now believed that prion diseases or Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs) are the result of a new, infectious protein (PrPSc). Definitive antemortem tests for TSEs are lacking, primarily due to an inability to expand the small amounts of infective prion protein found in the blood of asymptomatic individuals. To date, only rodent cell lines have been used to expand murine-adapted scrapie protein. Unfortunately, cell lines from other susceptible species (including deer and elk) are lacking. The two major cell types which appear to concentrate PrPSc during infection are nerve cells and follicular dendritic cells (FDCs). FDCs have the unique ability to concentrate foreign proteins due to a specific interaction with complement components. We have successfully used a magnetic-bead separation based methodology to isolate and culture FDCs from sheep, and have confirmed the utility of these reagents against deer and elk cells. We will establish FDC lines from susceptible deer and elk, and to adapt existing techniques for PrPSc proliferation to propogate Chronic Wasting Disease prion protein (PrPCWD). Phase II efforts would be directed towards development of more sensitive dioagnostic assays for prion infection than are currently available.

SCHAFER CORP.
321 Billerica Road
Chelmsford, MA 01824
(978) 256-2070

PI: Mr. Michael Sherry
(256) 721-9572
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0060
University of South Carolina, IMI
USC, Industrial Math Institute
Columbia, SC 29208
(803) 777-2632

ID#: A045-016-0046
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-016       Awarded: 08JUL04
Title: Smooth, Piecewise-Polynomial Terrain Representation Using Nontraditional Metrics
Abstract:   Current methods for representing terrain data utilize standard metrics (least squares or maximum deviation) to generate an approximation of terrain surfaces. These methods typically represent the data through a piecewise linear (polygonal) surface which fails to capture the smoothness of the data and thereby creates undesirable artifacts. The result is a poor representation of the actual surface while still requiring high processing and large amounts of memory. By incorporating non-traditional metrics matched to the specific environments (e.g., dense urban, suburban, and rural mountainous) and by utilizing smoother surface representations, it is believed that better surface representation requiring less processing and memory will ensue. This technology has broad military application, such as the real-time visualization of remotely sensed data for unmanned vehicles & operational planning, battlefield simulation, and data feeds to the warfighter on the ground. The Schafer / University of South Carolina Team is proposing an initial study to identify the optimal metrics for various environments followed by a software prototype development effort that implements the surface generation techniques for specific military applications. This effort will leverage Schafer's extensive military understanding and software development experience, along with USC's existing terrain generation algorithms to provide a thorough analysis of nontraditional metrics.

SDS INTERNATIONAL, INC.
One Crystal Park, 2011 Crystal Drive, Suite 100
Arlington, VA 22202
(703) 553-7526

PI: Dr. Dutch Guckenberger
(407) 282-4432
Contract #: W74V8H-04-P-0436
Tuskegee University
Tuskegee University
Tuskegee, AL 36088
(334) 727-8853

ID#: A045-002-0213
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-002       Awarded: 09AUG04
Title: Joint Visualization Module (JVM) for Enhanced Human-Computer Capabilities (Human-Computer Visualization)
Abstract:   The Joint-Visualization-Module(JVM) enhances the ability of computers to augment and complement human perception and cognition, including training, rehearsal and operational support of human visualization and conceptualization skills. SDS' current JVM prototype features already directly supports simultaneous 3D augmentation of USA/USMC C2PC Common-Operational-Picture(COP); semi-transparent 3D "probability-spheres" representing JSTARS Moving-Target-Indicator objects; advanced simulation, virtual and augmented reality symbology and interfaces; as well as HLA/DIS/Internet interfaces for realistic battlespace research/training/rehearsal/operational utilization. JVM's add-on Modular design enables add-on augmentation of existing systems such as GCCS, C2PC, AWACS, JSTARS, Synthetic-Vision/Augmented-Reality for Unmanned Vehicles, Land Warrior and FCS. This STTR represents a JVM perception and cognition evolution focused on the Army's "See First" requirements inclusive of sensor-driven computer depictions of the COP to empower battle command visualization. The SDS/Tuskegee University(TU) team plans to design and develop JVM system features to recognize and correlate human and computer representations of battlefield patterns and situations including specification of encoding and decoding processes for perception, cognition and digital visualization technologies. Specifically, SDS/TU plans to exploit past research successes associated with human visual-perception/cognition including: plasticity of human sensor phenomena; spatial/temporal-perception/cognition (multiple-visual-maps); and extensive human-factors and display research. Beyond JVM military applications, security, business, manufacturing, marketing, and education versions are envisioned.

SEISMIC ISOLATION ENGINEERING, INC.
P.O. Box 11243
Oakland, CA 94611-0243
(510) 595-7498

PI: Dr. Ian Aiken
(510) 595-7498
Contract #: W9132T-04-C-0029
Georgia Institute of Technology
School of Civil & Envir. Engrg, 790 Atlantic Drive
Atlanta, GA 30332-0355
(404) 385-0826

ID#: A045-023-0166
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-023       Awarded: 02AUG04
Title: Development of Innovative Shape Memory Alloy Connections and Dampers for Frame Structures Under Extreme Loading
Abstract:   The work outlined in this Phase I proposal will advance recently developed SMA beam-column connection concepts toward practical implementation. The work consists of three main tasks: (i) a materials characterization and development program focused on large diameter NiTi martensitic and superelastic bars that will evaluate size effects and thermomechanical processing on stress-strain properties for a range of loading; (ii) designing and analytically investigating the seismic response of a partially-restrained MRF building with SMA beam-column connections, and a building with SMA brace dampers, and (iii) the development of practical design concepts for SMA beam-column connections and preliminary recommendations for the design of structures incorporating SMA connections.

SILICO INSIGHTS, INC.
400 West Cummings Park, Suite 2850
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 938-3829

PI: Dr. Christos Hatzis
(781) 938-3844
Contract #:
Tufts University School of Medicine
150 Harrison Ave, Jaharis 2
Boston, MA 02111
(617) 636-6726

ID#: A045-020-0024
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-020       Selected for Award
Title: A Metabolomic Framework in Predicting Optimal Fitness and Performance
Abstract:   The availability of the human genome and its potential in disease and health applications has spurred the development of novel methodologies in genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. These technologies represent an untapped promise in optimizing nutrition and diet for achieving optimal health and fitness levels. Defense-based programs stand to benefit highly from such initiatives because of the criticality of personnel fitness and the importance of understanding of individualized metabolism for strategic planning. A key objective of this program is to demonstrate initial analytics to link an individual's metabolic state and fitness level using techniques of genomic and metabolomic profiling. We present a partnership between the Tufts School of Medicine and Silico Insights, a computationally-driven pathway discovery company. We propose to leverage data from existing clinical studies at Tufts on the syndrome lipodystrophy as a sub-optimal fitness state and establish molecular signatures that enhance well-being based on exercise or diet. Dr. Abby Shevitz at Tufts has been leading clinical research in disease management with nutritional and exercise regimens. Silico Insights brings proven expertise in multivariate statistical analysis and an established computational infrastructure. The collaboration will merge expertise in medical, nutritional and multivariate analysis disciplines to meet feasibility objectives of this proposal.

SOAR TECHNOLOGY, INC.
3600 Green Court, Suite 600
Ann Arbor, MI 48105-2588
(734) 327-8000

PI: Dr. Randolph Jones
(207) 872-3831
Contract #: W74V8H-04-P-0485
Georgia Institute of Technology
Technology Square Research Bdg, Room S27, 85 Fifth St. NW
Atlanta, GA 30332-0280
(404) 894-8209

ID#: A045-001-0054
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-001       Awarded: 09AUG04
Title: Interactive Terrain Analysis
Abstract:   Although unmanned vehicles see increasing deployment, strategy and tactics are outpacing their technological capabilities. Advances in robotic control, human-systems interfaces, intelligent systems, vehicle autonomy and human-to-vehicle interfaces are required to lower human-to-vehicle ratios to levels required for future combat. We propose an architecture for computer-assisted control that relies on four basic subsystems: Intelligent Agent Interface, Low-Level Feature Processing, Robot Interface, and Human Interface. Each subsystem contains constituent components that have been deployed with success in military applications by the teammates on this proposal. The primary challenge is integrating these into a coherent human-system interface that integrates processed sensory information from robots, situational awareness interpretations and suggested courses of action from a decision support agent, tactical and strategic intelligence information from external sources, and mission intent information (and other data) from the human user. The integrated graphical interface, supplemented with variable levels of interaction with the intelligent decision support agent, will provide mixed levels of initiative and action between human controllers and unmanned ground robotic systems. The team has a unique combination of experience in developing knowledge-intensive intelligent agents, terrain analysis tools and interfaces, robotic platforms and simulators, processing systems for robot sensors and tactical robot control, and usable human-system interfaces.

SOAR TECHNOLOGY, INC.
3600 Green Court, Suite 600
Ann Arbor, MI 48105-2588
(734) 327-8000

PI: Dr. Scott Wood
(734) 327-8000
Contract #: W74V8H-04-P-0483
North Carolina State University
165A Venture III, 900 Main Campus Drive
Raleigh, NC 27695-8207
(919) 515-7938

ID#: A045-002-0056
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-002       Awarded: 09AUG04
Title: Human-Computer Visualization
Abstract:   In response to the Army's need for improved visualization and situation identification capabilities, Soar Technology, Inc., working with Situation Awareness Technologies and North Carolina State University, propose to combine state of the art techniques in situation awareness, agent-based cognitive systems, and information visualization to create a system that will demonstrate how information age transformation can enable fundamental improvements to a battlefield commanders tactical decision-making. In addition, the system will support the Army's ability to train human commanders visualization and conceptualization skills. We will do this by developing three core architectural components; computational models for representing situation awareness, a visualization framework for presenting information in perceptually salient forms, and an agent system based on the Soar cognitive architecture for reasoning across real-world environments, identifying battlefield situations, and matching user and system representations of events. These components will be developed within the framework of an intelligent user interface that supports information delivery in a way that is contextually-sensitive to the warfighter's needs. This solution will not only have wide military application, at multiple levels of Command and Control and battlefield systems, but also in application areas as diverse as industrial and manufacturing control, law enforcement, emergency response management, and air traffic control.

SPACEFLIGHT SYSTEMS CORP.
47 Constitution Drive
Bedford, NH 03110
(603) 472-4934

PI: Mr. Lou Ezzio
(603) 472-4934
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0097
University of New Hampshire
PO Box 3591
Durham, NH 03824-3591
(603) 862-1381

ID#: A045-017-0050
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-017       Awarded: 04AUG04
Title: A Single Engine and Adaptive Multimodal Biometric System (SEA)
Abstract:   Human biometric recognition systems are becoming more prevalent and essential in the personal identification applications market. This market spans the commercial and the military sectors to include a myriad of identification applications to include everything from secure entrance, to time card clocks, to casino players club enrollment, to automobiles that recognizer their drivers, to money transaction systems, to weapons that recognize their owners, etc. A general Fast Pattern Recognition (FPR) algorithm has been developed that demonstrates superior performance in facial recognition (visible light and IR) and fingerprint recognition even under degraded conditions. This same algorithm has also demonstrated exceptional performance on voice recognition, and face-in-a-crowd scenarios. This algorithm is not based on the typical approaches employing eigenfaces, minutia, wavelets, or other models and transforms, but uses a specialized data processing algorithm to compare input biometric features against enrolled biometrics within a database. It is envisioned that this algorithm technology can be ported from a software-implemented demonstration to a field programmable gate array (FPGA) implementation for use as a general-purpose biometric recognition engine for commercial and-or military systems requiring high speed multimodal biometric fusion based human identification.

SYNKERA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
2021 Miller Dr., Suite B
Longmont, CO 80501-6787
(720) 494-8401

PI: Dr. Oleg Polyakov
(720) 652-4001
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0088
Colorado State University
CSU Research Foundation, 601 S. Howes Street, Suite 410
Fort Collins, CO 80521
(970) 482-2916

ID#: A045-004-0110
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-004       Awarded: 28JUL04
Title: Metal-Organic Framework Adsorbents for Fuel Cell - Relevant Small Molecules
Abstract:   This Small Business Technology Transfer Phase I project seeks to develop and commercialize novel ceramic membrane-absorbers for hydrogen purification in fuel processing systems associated with polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Our innovation is based on integration of novel highly efficient reversible adsorbents, based on a metal organic framework, that are incorporated into monodisperse ceramic membranes. Commercially available adsorbents, due to the low adsorbing capacity per unit volume, have limited practical application in the fuel processing systems of fuel cells, especially if compactness and lightweight are desirable. The proposed approach addresses these limitations by synthesizing novel high capacity reversible metal-organic framework adsorbents for fuel cell - relevant small molecules (primarily CO, additionally H2S and NH3), and incorporating the adsorbents in mechanically, thermally, and chemically robust nanoporous ceramic membranes. The approach is economical and scaleable. In Phase I we will demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach, producing and characterizing MOF-based membrane-absorbers.

T/J TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
3850 Research Park Drive, P.O. Box 2150
Ann Arbor, MI 48106
(734) 213-1637

PI: Dr. Hanwei Lei
(734) 213-1637
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0082
University of Michigan
3003 South State Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1274
(734) 764-7242

ID#: A045-004-0239
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-004       Awarded: 26JUL04
Title: Metal-Organic Frameworks as Novel Adsorbents for Hydrogen Sulfide
Abstract:   This STTR project addresses the critical need for an effective sulfur removal approach for fuel processing system using diesel, JP8 fuels. The goal is to reduce sulfur content to < 0.1 ppmw from reformate for clean hydrogen required by proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) applications. Phase I will design and develop novel metal-organic framework (MOF) materials that selectively remove H2S produced by present fuel processing system. Unique MOF engineering will offer attractive advantages of selectivity, capacity, and regenerability for sulfur removal compared to existing technologies. T/J Technologies will collaborate with the University of Michigan (UM), combining the Company's expertise in nanomaterials and portable PEM fuel cell development with leading edge UM technology in metal-organic framework (MOF) materials development. The phase I feasibility demonstration will focus on developing and demonstrating new MOF adsorbents for selective H2S uptake with > 0.42 g H2S/g sorbent capacity and good regenerability. In phase II, T/J Technologies will design, construct, and evaluate a compact PEMFC fuel processing system in which the MOF material is an integral component. A prototype of fuel processor will be demonstrated to supply contaminant-removed H2 at a rate sufficient to support a 20-W PEMFC for 72 hours.

TRITON SYSTEMS, INC.
200 TURNPIKE ROAD
Chelmsford, MA 01824
(978) 250-4200

PI: Mr. Ray Denkewicz
(978) 250-4200
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0076
University of South Florida
4202 E. Fowler Ave.
Tampa, FL 33620
(813) 974-2011

ID#: A045-004-0012
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-004       Awarded: 14JUL04
Title: Selective Adsorbents for Fuel Cell Processors (1000-486)
Abstract:   Triton Systems Inc. responds to the Army's need for novel adsorbents that can selectively remove small molecule contaminants, or store hydrogen as produced by a fuel cell's processing system in order to support a 20-W Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (PEM-FC) for a minimum 72-hour operation. Current adsorbent technologies for contaminant removal and/or hydrogen storage in fuel cells are limited in their efficiency and selectivity. Highly selective and efficient adsorbents are needed in order to prevent poisoning of the PEM-FC electrocatalyst and to achieve targeted energy densities of the fuel processing system (i.e. 1.5kWhr/Kg). Triton Systems, with its partner Professor Mohamed Eddaoudi (University of South Florida), proposes to develop novel and robust Metal-Organic Framework (MOF) materials for the selective removal of small molecule contaminants and/or for the storage of hydrogen as produced by fuel cell processing systems. Synthesized materials will be tested for their capacity to adsorb H2, NH3, H2S and CO (using adsorption isotherms) over temperature and pressure ranges relevant to a compact fuel cell power systems. Adsorption hysteresis and chemical stability of the MOF materials over these same temperature and pressure ranges will also be measured.

TRITON SYSTEMS, INC.
200 TURNPIKE ROAD
Chelmsford, MA 01824
(978) 250-4200

PI: Mr. Bill Bergeron
(978) 250-4200
Contract #: W81XWH04-C-0131
Lawrence Berkeley National Laborato
1 Cyclotron Road
Berkeley, CA 94720
(510) 486-5435

ID#: A045-026-0103
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-026       Awarded: 28JUL04
Title: Trauma Patient Tracking System(1000-514)
Abstract:   Triton Systems Inc., in partnership with Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory, proposes to develop a Trauma Patient Tracking System (TPTS). This system utilizes a `Tag' that is placed on the wrist or ankle of a patient at the point of initial care, which is then activated to provide accurate location and tracking information up to the point of hospital arrival. The location system uses a synergistic combination of GPS and other wireless technologies, which are commercially available and which allow for smooth, quick, and effective transition into the marketplace. While state-of-the-art components are used, upgrading of the device's capabilities is considered in the design methodology for integration as the technologies improve. The system is designed as a standalone system for tracking trauma patients in this intended application, but it is also expandable and integrate-able into existing medical information systems. Suitable for used in both urban and rural environments, the TPTS will use a combination of wireless technologies for open air positioning, indoor and urban environment locating and tracking, Local Area Network communication, and Wide Area Network communication - all intended to communicate the information in a timely manner to both rescue and medical personnel and to record emergency responsive data.

ULTRA-SCAN CORP.
4240 Ridge Lea Rd
Amherst, NY 14226-1016
(716) 832-6269

PI: Dr. John Schneider
(716) 832-6269
Contract #: W911NF-04-C-0067
SUNY Buffalo
CUBS UB commons, , 520 Lee ent, suite202
Amherst, NY 14228-2583
(716) 616-4103

ID#: A045-017-0002
Agency: Army
Topic#: 04-017       Awarded: 13JUL04
Title: High Confidence Multimodal Biometric System
Abstract:   Rapid and accurate identification of all individuals has been the goal of the biometric industry for many years. Unfortunately, due to limitations in technology and variations in the biometric itself, no one biometric imaging modality has been able to satisfy the performance requirements of most large scale identity management applications. This research addresses the fundamental hypothesis of whether two or more biometric systems can be combined to deliver improved performance over a single biometric system. This work will develop the scientific testing methodology to combine multiple biometric measurements in order to achieve superior performance over a single biometric system. A general purpose biometric testing tool will be developed that will accept enrollment and inquiry data from multiple biometric imaging systems and generate the corresponding ROC performance curves. Upon successful completion of this initiative, system performance requirements can be presented in the form of Pfm, Pfnm, and throughput, and a metric driven approach taken to determine if those requirements are in fact, achievable. The system designer can then ascertain what types of biometric technology would be required to achieve the desired performance, and how the individual biometric technologies should be combined to meet the stated goal.

---------- DARPA ----------

AMERICAN SUPERCONDUCTOR
Two Technology Drive
Westborough, MA 01581-1727
(508) 621-4265

PI: Dr. Thomas A. Kodenkandath
(508) 621-4374
Contract #:
Argonne National Laboratory
9700 South Cass Avenue, Building 201
Argonne, IL 60439-4838
(630) 252-6797

ID#: D045-002-0013
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 04-002       Selected for Award
Title: Low Cost Fabrication of 2G Wires for AC Applications
Abstract:   Second Generation (2G) High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) wires based on the YBCO coated conductor are expected to find use in many commercial and military applications not accessible to the First Generation (1G) BSCCO HTS wires. However, the use of these 2G wires in certain applications, such as synchronous generators with both superconducting rotor field windings and armature windings, requires that the conductor be engineered to minimize ac losses. The general approach to designing a low ac loss wire is to fabricate the YBCO films into narrow filaments and then to twist the resulting multi-filamentary conductors. However, a major challenge to achieving this design is developing an industrial method to fabricate the YBCO films into narrow filaments. We propose in this Phase I STTR program to evaluate a low-cost deposition process for directly depositing multi-filamentary YBCO conductors in a striated/striped architecture without a post deposition patterning step. Our proposed approach is based on a conventional graphic arts printing technique that is currently being adapted to low-cost/high throughput fabrication of complex, high value functional materials, such as ceramic films, diode displays, transistor circuits, and biochip arrays. The proposed program will focus on demonstrating the direct deposition of patterned arrays of YBCO stripes, determining the resolution of the technique, and evaluating the electrical properties of the patterned YBCO filaments. The anticipated Phase II program will focus on fabrication of continuous lengths of patterned, striated YBCO conductors that will be fabricated into low-loss ac conductors for testing in selected pertinent applications, such as a small synchronous generator.

ANVIK CORP.
6 Skyline Drive
Hawthorne, NY 10532-2165
(914) 345-2442

PI: Mr. Marc . Zemel
(914) 345-2442
Contract #: W31P4Q04CR316
Sandia National Laboratory
Microsystem Tech. Dept. 01851 , PO Box 5800, MS 0889
Albuquerque, NM 87185-1411
(505) 845-8594

ID#: D045-005-0017
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 04-005       Awarded: 16AUG04
Title: Fabrication of High Electrical Mobility Transistors on Flexible Substrates for Phased Array Radar and Terahertz Antennas
Abstract:   Compound semiconductor films are the key ingredient enabling the construction of ultrafast (>10 GHz) transistors. Materials such as Gallium Arsenide (GaAs), Gallium Nitride (GaN), Silicon Germanium (SiGe) and Indium Phosphide (InP) have shown great potential to enable a quantum leap in transistor performance. There are numerous commercial and military applications for such ultrafast transistors. A particularly challenging application area is for phased array radar and terahertz antenna fabrication. These devices require the construction of high frequency transistors on large (over 1 m2), flexible substrates in order to meet the demanding requirements for fast beam steering and high angular resolution for rapid target identification and tracking. In this STTR program, we propose to develop a new process technology for fabrication of high electrical mobility transistors (HEMTs) on flexible substrates. Commercial Kapton substrates with upper process temperatures of 300-450øC will be used to support low (< 500øC) temperature-deposited semiconductor films including Si, Ge, GaN, and InP. Sequential lateral solidification (SLS), an excimer laser crystallization process, will be performed in an appropriate background atmosphere to convert the as-deposited compound semiconductor films into low-defect-density microstructures, including large single-crystal regions. The resulting substrates will then be suitable for large-area patterning of HEMTs.

COSTVISION
1472 North St.
Boulder, CO 80304
(303) 447-0645

PI: Mr. Charles W. Stirk
(303) 447-0645
Contract #:
ISMI
2706 Montopolis Drive
Austin, TX 78741-6499
(512) 356-3926

ID#: D045-004-0058
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 04-004       Selected for Award
Title: Technology, Cost and Capacity Optimization Software to Support Low-Volume Microfabrication
Abstract:   The proposed program will extend the CostVision technology, cost, and capacity software platform to support the needs of low-volume microfabrication. In particular, we will 1) build and demonstrate the feasibility of semiconductor technology-process models for trade-off analysis, 2) develop cost and capacity allocation methods that are flexible and leverage the CAM-I capacity model, 3) integrate the software in real-time to spreadsheets for co-simulation, and design integration infrastructure for other semiconductor IT systems, and 4) design, implement and test prototypes of advanced analysis capabilities such as sensitivity, optimization, and Monte Carlo risk analysis. Our non-profit partner, ISMI, will provide support for requirements specifications, design, and software testing. Our industrial partner, IBM Microelectronics will provide input into requirements, test cases, and usability.

EOSPACE, INC.
8711 148th Ave NE
Redmond, WA 98052-3483
(425) 869-6784

PI: Dr. Suwat . Thaniyavarn
(425) 869-6975
Contract #:
Univ. of California - San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive
La Jolla, CA 92093-0934
(858) 534-0240

ID#: D045-003-0009
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 04-003       Selected for Award
Title: Dual-Output Broadband Linearized Modulator For Analog Photonic Links
Abstract:   Practical, low-cost, broadband, multi-octave (0-20+ GHz), high-dynamic-range, "linear" analog photonic links are needed in many DoD communications, radar, and surveillance applications. EOSPACE and University of California, San Diego are proposing to develop a practical, broadband (0-20GHz) linearized RF analog fiber-optic link, by using a broadband optical modulator design whose transfer function has greatly enhanced linearity as compared to a conventional Mach-Zehnder device. In addition, our proposed device is very practical to realize due to relaxed fabrication tolerances and thus leads to low cost high-yield manufacturability.

FORTIS TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
2249 Federal Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90064
(310) 825-6030

PI: Dr. Ken K. Ho
(310) 479-7599
Contract #: W31P4Q04CR313
University of California
38-137O EIV, 405 Hilgard Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90095
(310) 825-2369

ID#: D045-001-0008
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 04-001       Awarded: 19JUL04
Title: Stress Induced Micro/Nano Caloricparticle For Improved Thermoacoustic Refrigeration
Abstract:   Traditional refrigeration systems based on the compression and expansion of refrigerant gases are complicated and limited to large dimensions. The pumps and compressors required makes it difficult if no impossible to scale down the system to miniature sizes that would be portable. Thermoacoustic based refrigeration systems promises to provide solid state refrigeration with no moving components, and could be scaled down to levels that would make it portable. However poor thermo efficiencies have prevented the concept from being fully developed. A miniature heat pump based on thermoacoustic refrigeration principles is proposed. The proposed concept utilizes a modified fluidic medium using micro/nano caloricparticles based on active materials. This novel improved thermoacoustic refrigeration system promises to provide substantial improvements in thermo efficiency over conventional thermoacoustic designs. The device is scalable to the microlevel, providing cooling for applications of varying dimensional scales. The refrigeration concept provides true refrigeration with much larger cooling temperature ranges compared to thermoelectric devices.

GPD OPTOELECTRONICS CORP.
7 Manor Parkway
Salem, NH 03079-2842
(603) 894-6865

PI: Mr. Rufus . Ward
(603) 894-6865
Contract #: W31P4Q04CR299
Auburn University
310 Samford Hall
Auburn, AL 34849
(334) 844-4438

ID#: D045-002-0031
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 04-002       Awarded: 23JUN04
Title: Novel SiGe Devices for Cryogenic Power Electronics
Abstract:   It is predicted that systems for power generation, power distribution and electric propulsion on ships and aerospace vehicles could be made smaller, lighter, more efficient, more versatile, and lower maintenance by operating these systems-partly or entirely-at cryogenic temperatures. We propose to demonstrate the advantages of cryogenic operation in regard to electronic components, specifically semiconductor devices (power diodes and transistors) based on the silicon-germanium (SiGe) materials system. Our choice of SiGe is based on: first, its versatility in device design through bandgap engineering and selective placement, which enables optimizing device performance at cryogenic temperatures; and, second, its high compatibility with standard semiconductor fabrication. Our technical approach comprises four parts: (1) device simulation, (2) device fabrication and characterization, (3) evaluation of the devices in power circuits, (4) iteration of this simulation-fabrication-characterization-evaluation cycle. The initial SiGe semiconductor devices we propose to develop are diodes and thyristors (also called silicon controlled rectifiers or SCRs).

LIGHTSPIN TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
Box 30198
Bethesda, MD 20824-0198
(301) 656-7600

PI: Dr. Eric S. Harmon
(508) 809-9052
Contract #: W31P4Q04CR309
Yale University
Suite 214, 155 Whitney Avenue
New Haven, CT 06520-8337
(203) 432-2460

ID#: D045-005-0026
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 04-005       Awarded: 02SEP04
Title: Multi-GHz InP TFT
Abstract:   This project proposes design, construction and demonstration of a new type of thin-film transistor (TFT), based on indium phosphide compound semiconductors. Models predict unity power gain and unity current gain (fT and fmax) above 10 GHz for the new TFTs in a polycrystalline form compatible with large-area deposition & patterning on flexible metal foils or polymer sheets, using low cost, large (> 1 um) feature sizes. These TFTs should eventually outperform the best high-cost, single-crystal silicon or gallium arsenide transistors at the same feature size and temperature.

LINEAR PHOTONICS, LLC
3 Nami Lane, Unit C-6
Hamilton, NJ 08619
(609) 584-8424

PI: Mr. John . MacDonald
(609) 584-5747
Contract #:
The College of New Jersey
P.O. Box 7718
Ewing, NJ 08628-0718
(609) 771-2666

ID#: D045-003-0039
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 04-003       Selected for Award
Title: Broadband Linearized Fiber Optic Transmitter Module
Abstract:   Communications applications have utilized the intrinsic broadband characteristics of analog fiber optic links for myriad purposes. Today's transmitter technology of choice for these broadband applications is an InP-based electro-absorption modulator (EAM), because of its record levels of integration, size, efficiency, dynamic range and bandwidth. However, due to the lack of availability of adaptive broadband linearization technology, the performance of applications using these links has been strictly limited. Linear Photonics, L.L.C., has successfully demonstrated that the linearity performance of EAMs can be improved dramatically using electrical predistortion circuitry. In other words, combining EAMs with inherently adaptive, broadband predistortion circuitry results in robust, compact and highly-linear transmitter modules. LPL proposes to provide a solution to the problem of limited broadband performance of analog fiber optic links by building a compact, hybrid-integrated 1-18 GHz transmitter module with RF input, optical output and DC power supply interfaces. The transmitter design will target 125 to 130 dB-Hz2/3 SFDR and will be inherently adaptive over bandwidth, temperature, and an input-modulating signal envelope. This module will be further enhanced by a highly-linear EAM that is optically linearized for improved even-order performance, as well as electronic predistortion circuitry that reduces odd-order nonlinearity to achieve the target SFDR.

MTECH LABORATORIES LLC
831 Rte. 67, Bldg. 45C, P.O. Box 227
Ballston Spa, NY 12020-0227
(518) 885-6436

PI: Dr. Michael J. Hennessy
(518) 885-6436
Contract #: W31P4Q04CR298
Oak Ridge National Lab
P.O. Box 2009, MS8071
Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8071
(865) 576-4467

ID#: D045-002-0021
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 04-002       Awarded: 23JUN04
Title: Optimized Power Conversion at Reduced Temperatures
Abstract:   Proposed is a novel development program that will lead to an ultra-efficient cryogenic motor controller operating at temperatures above 60K. The motor controller is intended to demonstrate a significant reduction in losses, compared to its room-temperature counterparts. Cryogenic motor controllers are targeted to be used in large-scale DOD power conversion systems incorporating second generation HTS conductors In Phase I, a fully integrated motor controller demo will be designed, utilizing the latest semiconductor power devices. The demonstration unit, which can be easily scaled up to megawatt power levels, will be fabricated and tested in Phase II. MTECH is constantly expanding its extensive database of cryogenically qualified semiconductors and electronic components, which will be available to the program. Oak Ridge National Laboratory will assist MTECH in the design, integration, and test of the power systems, cryogenics, and HTS busswork, and in the power lead design.

NANOSYS, INC.
2625 Hanover Street
Palo Alto, CA 94304-1118
(650) 331-2114

PI: Mr. Yaoling . Pan
(650) 331-2130
Contract #:
University of California, Berkeley
336 Sproul Hall #5940, Sponsored Projects Office
Berkeley, CA 94720-5940
(510) 642-8120

ID#: D045-005-0050
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 04-005       Selected for Award
Title: High Performance Transistors on Flexible Substrates
Abstract:   This Small Business Technology Transfer Research Phase I project determines the feasibility of developing a novel low temperature process technology for the formation of low resistance contacts for fabricating high performance, nanowire transistors on flexible plastic substrates. Our proposed approach is based on an innovative plasma ion immersion implantation doping and laser annealing recrystallization process. The proposal demonstrates the potential advantages of this process to provide low ion energy implantation, uniform and conformal doping profiles, junction profile control, ohmic-contact resistance and compatibility with low temperature plastic substrates with nanowire-based transistors. In Phase I, we determine the instrument design, setup and initial process parameters and evaluate the feasibility of applying this process technology to nanowire-based transistors on flexible substrates. In Phase II, the information gathered in Phase I will be used to fabricate fully optimized prototype large area, flexible nanowire-based transistor circuits.

OMEGA PIEZO TECHNOLOGIES
2591 Clyde Ave., Suite 3
State College, PA 16801-7560
(814) 861-4160

PI: Dr. Gerald D. Mahan
(814) 865-6092
Contract #: W31P4Q04CRB03
Pennsylvania State Univ.
Dept. of Physics and Materials, 104 Davey Laboratory
University Park, PA 16802-1413
(814) 865-6092

ID#: D045-001-0027
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 04-001       Awarded: 14JUL04
Title: Solid State Heat Pumps
Abstract:   This research involves theoretical and experimental investigations of a novel thermoelastic effect which may be used in a completely solid state heat engine. By employing piezoelectric solids in a thermoelastic system, it may be possible to engineer a composite layered material which can use electricity to produce heat flow directly, or reversibly, to use heat to generate electricity. A composite thermo-elastic/piezoelectric material has the potential to be more efficient than the best thermoelectric device. Like material has the potential to be more efficient than the best thermoelectric device. Like a thermoelectric device, a completely solid state thermoelastic device would be more compact and robust (having no sliding parts, pressure seals, etc.) than a fluid-based heat engine. The size of a thermoeleastic device may span length scales from micrometers to centimeters, with the former having layers of nanoscale thickness. Such a span would encompass applications from microcooling electronics to personal air conditioning.

PHASEBRIDGE, INC.
859 S. Raymond Avenue
Pasadena, CA 91105
(626) 304-7610

PI: Dr. Ronald T. Logan,
(626) 304-7610
Contract #: FA875004C0263
University of California, San Diego
Dept. ECE, 9500 Gilman Drive
La Jolla, CA 92093-0407
(858) 534-6180

ID#: D045-003-0041
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 04-003       Awarded: 02AUG04
Title: Adaptive Broadband Linearization for Analog Photonic Links
Abstract:   An investigation of a broadband analog optical modulator linearization scheme is proposed. The scheme is based on the combination of multiple semiconductor modulator devices, driven from a common electrical input. The linearization is accomplished in the optical domain, making the approach suitable for wideband microwave applications that have frustrated previous attempts at electrical pre-distortion linearization schemes. The proposed Phase I effort will include investigations of the linearization scheme and required semiconductor modulator device structures to establish the feasibility of the approach, leading to a Phase II effort in which integrated linearized modulator devices will be produced.

PHIAR CORP.
1415 Arapahoe Ave.
Boulder, CO 80302
(303) 443-0373

PI: Dr. Michael J. Estes
(303) 443-0373
Contract #: W31P4Q04CR312
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
4800 Oak Grove Drive
Pasadena, CA 91109-8099
(818) 354-7647

ID#: D045-005-0040
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 04-005       Awarded: 07JUL04
Title: High Performance Metal-Insulator Transistors for Flexible Electronics
Abstract:   We propose to develop and demonstrate thin-film transistors (TFTs) capable of operation at microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies. These ultra-fast devices are based on a patented metal-insulator tunneling hot electron transistor structure. Comprising thin films of only metals and dielectrics, our TFTs require only low temperature processing and should be inherently compatible with large-area, flexible, polymer substrates. Microwave TFTs will enable a number of important defense, scientific, and commercial applications. Our two goals for the Phase I effort are to: 1) demonstrate, using simulations, the feasibility of microwave TFT performance; and 2) demonstrate experimentally the compatibility of basic metal-insulator tunneling devices with polymer substrates. The main thrust of Phase II efforts will be to build metal-insulator TFTs and demonstrate their microwave performance and compatibility with flexible polymer substrates.

---------- MDA ----------

ADA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
8100 Shaffer Parkway, Suite #130
Littleton, CO 80127-4107
(303) 792-5615

PI: Mr. James Butz
(303) 792-5615
Contract #:
Colorado School of Mines
1500 Illinois Street
Golden, CO 80401
(303) 273-3255

ID#: B045-004-0190
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-004       Selected for Award
Title: Fine Water Mist Fire Suppression for Oxidizer Fires
Abstract:   Fine water mist has been shown to be an effective fire suppression option in a number of applications, including oxidizer fires, such as could result from an incident with hydrogen peroxide. ADA Technologies, Inc. and the Colorado School of Mines will collaborate in the development of a novel system for this application, building and demonstrating a fine water mist system that uses a patented atomizer designed to generate droplets in the size range found to be most effective for fire suppression, about 30 microns in diameter. The system is modular, and configured for easy maintenance and recharge. In Phase I we will evaluate system performance in multiple configurations to determine that which is most effective against the target fire threat. Several variants to the system will be included in the test matrix, to assess their ability to enhance fire suppression performance. Tests will be conducted in a 10-foot cube test facility. In Phase II the modular effervescent atomizer system will be adapted to aircraft use, with the help of a partner experienced in military hardware integration. ADA will also develop a plan to commercialize his novel fire suppression technology to protect flammable liquid storage spaces and chemical plants.

ADVANCED CERAMICS RESEARCH, INC.
3292 E. Hemisphere Loop
Tucson, AZ 85706-5013
(520) 573-6300

PI: Mr. Michael Fulcher
(520) 573-6300
Contract #:
University of Missouri, Rolla
Office of Sponsored Programs, 1870 Miner Circle, 215 ME Anne
Rolla, MO 65409-1330
(573) 341-4134

ID#: B045-024-0166
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-024       Selected for Award
Title: High-Strength Carbide-Based Fibrous Monolith Materials for Solid Rocket Nozzles
Abstract:   On this Phase I STTR program, Advanced Ceramics Research Inc. (ACR) will team with the University of Missouri ­V Rolla (UMR) to develop high strength, thermal shock resistant tantalum carbide (TaC) or hafnium carbide (HfC)-based Fibrous Monolith composite materials for use in ultra-high temperature (>6000,aF) solid rocket motor environments. These materials will exhibit the high toughness of fiber reinforced composites with the full density and low ablation rates of monolithic structures. The three main technical challenges preventing the insertion of TaC/HfC based materials into aluminized propulsion systems are 1) material ultimate strength, 2) material oxidation/spalling resistance, and 3) thermal shock resistance. UMR will address the material strength issue through the use of a patented (pending) process which has been shown to greatly improve refractory ceramic material strength, as well as through their general expertise with respect to ceramic materials processing. The oxidation issue will be addressed by UMR and ACR through the exploration of mixed oxide systems that increase the oxide melting point and prevent phase transformation and spalling of oxide coatings at high temperature. ACR will also address the thermal shock resistance issue by using a TaC or HfC-based Fibrous Monolith composite material system which has proven thermal shock resistance.

ADVANCED COOLING TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
1046 New Holland Avenue
Lancaster, PA 17601-5688
(717) 295-6058

PI: Dr. Chanwoo Park
(717) 295-6073
Contract #:
University of Nevada-Reno
204 Ross Hall
Reno, NV 89557-0240
(775) 784-4040

ID#: B045-010-0170
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-010       Selected for Award
Title: Passive High Performance Heat Storage and Dissipation Technology for Transient High Power Thermal Management
Abstract:   Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT), supported by the University of Nevada-Reno (UNR), proposes to develop a passive, high performance heat storage and dissipation technology for high power electronics and directed energy system applications. The proposed technology incorporates heat pipes for acquisition and dissipation of high heat fluxes and metal hydrides for storage of large transient heat loads. The performance target is to remove heat fluxes in excess of 100W/cm2 for 300 seconds while maintaining a temperature variation within 25øC. The technology is modular and scalable to areas up to 100cm2. The Phase I objective is to verify the feasibility of the proposed concept in managing transient high heat fluxes. This will be achieved through system analysis and proof-of-concept device demonstration. In Phase II, full-scale prototype devices will be fabricated and tested in representative environments. Phase III will integrate the technology in military and commercial directed energy and high power electronic systems. Successful development of this passive, high performance heat storage and dissipation technology will provide substantial improvements over the current state of the art phase change material thermal storage technologies, in terms of heat storage capacity, volume, mass, isothermality and transient response time.

ADVANCED ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC.
27 Industrial Boulevard, Unit E
Medford, NY 11763
(631) 345-6264

PI: Dr. Hans Bluem
(609) 514-0315
Contract #: W9113M04P0148
Georgia Tech Applied Research
Office of Contract Admin., Georgia Institute of Tech.
Atlanta, GA 30332-0420
(404) 385-2175

ID#: B045-009-0086
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-009       Awarded: 20AUG04
Title: Compact High Power Microwave Systems
Abstract:   High Power Microwave (HPM) systems capable of generating gigawatts of power for pulse lengths of microseconds have significant military applications. The military utility would be even greater if such systems could be packaged for placement in current Army mobile platforms (long range and short range), on UAVs, or in aircraft. Previous simulations have shown that the proposed device is capable of generating gigawatt pulses in compact configurations compatible with long pulse operation. We propose to develop an HPM source that will provide gigawatt powers for pulse lengths of 1 microsecond or greater. The configuration provides flexibility in selecting a center frequency, which can be anywhere in the 1-10 GHz range, while still providing the desired energy per pulse.

ADVANCED MATERIALS TECHNOLOGY, INC.
10814 Preservation View Dr, Suite 205
Tampa, FL 33626
(813) 855-8919

PI: Dr. Akbar G Fard
(813) 855-8919
Contract #:
South Dakota School of Mines & Tech
501 E. Saint Joseph St.
Rapid City, SD 57701
(605) 394-2406

ID#: B045-006-0047
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-006       Selected for Award
Title: Polymer System for Aerospace Mirror Applications
Abstract:   Advanced Materials Technology, Inc responds to the DoD needs to develop novel polymer-based materials for aerospace mirror applications in missile defense systems. Compared to the current state-of-art mirror materials, polymeric materials will provide considerable weight and cost savings. In order to prevent significant figure error and "fiber print through", these materials should have low and tailorable coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), low coefficient of moisture expansion (CME), low cure shrinkage, low internal stresses, low outgassing, and high thermal and environmental stability. It is also required that surface figure be less than wavelength/20 and surface roughness be less than 2 nm. We propose to develop a multicomponent polymeric system that will meet the desired requirements. We shall develop polymer systems with "tunable" properties though optimizing polymer characteristics and processing parameters, thus satisfactorily fulfilling aerospace mirror requirements. The ultimate goal of the program is the development of zero CTE polymers. The morphology and physical properties of the polymer systems will be evaluated. Once the feasibility of the concept of low/near zero CTE polymers using the proposed technology is demonstrated in Phase I, we shall scale-up this concept in a Phase II program to meet DoD requirements.

ADVANCED MATERIALS TECHNOLOGY, INC.
10814 Preservation View Dr, Suite 205
Tampa, FL 33626
(813) 855-8919

PI: Dr. Akbar G Fard
(813) 855-8919
Contract #:
Tuskegee University
101 James Center
Tuskegee, AL 36088
(334) 727-8985

ID#: B045-021-0171
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-021       Selected for Award
Title: Lightweight Insulation Materials for On-orbit Thermal Management
Abstract:   Advanced Materials Technology, Inc responds to the DoD needs to develop an innovative robust thermal insulation technology to insulate cryogenic temperature-sensitive space systems and components. Sensitive cryogenic structures and their subsystems need to be protected from direct solar heating, earth's albedo, and internal heating. The Current state-of-art insulation technology is totally based on Multi Layer Insulation (MLI) Blankets. However, they suffer from many drawbacks including being extremely labor intensive and on-orbit durability issues. We propose to develop a robust capable thermal blanket technology that will be space qualified, lightweight, produce no outgassing, and have extremely low thermal conductivity. Our technology will enable the STSS optical track telescope and the SBL to minimize power consumption while maintaining critical temperature control of key components without exceeding launch vehicle lift capabilities. The proposed program will focus on developing new multifunctional polyimide foam materials for on-orbit thermal management, which will be capable of retaining structural integrity while accommodating large operating temperatures ranging from cryogenic (-250 C) to elevated (350 C) temperatures conditions. Once the feasibility of the proposed concept is demonstrated in Phase I, we shall scale-up this concept in a Phase II program to meet DoD requirements.

CORNERSTONE RESEARCH GROUP, INC.
2750 Indian Ripple Rd.
Dayton, OH 45440
(937) 320-1877

PI: Mr. Greg Karst
(937) 320-1877
Contract #:
Univ of Dyaton Research Institute
300 College Park
Dayton, OH 45469-0104
(937) 229-2919

ID#: B045-006-0087
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-006       Selected for Award
Title: E-Beam Cured Materials for Composite Mirrors
Abstract:   Cornerstone Research Group, Inc. (CRG), and partner University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) will develop a suite of materials and processes as enabling technology for achieving the radical production time and cost reductions envisioned by the replication approach to producing composite mirrors for aerospace optics. CRG will formulate and demonstrate a high-performance polymer resin cured at or near room temperature via electron-beam (e-beam) processing. E-beam cure will enable exploitation of the high-performance resin (e.g., cyanate ester or bismaleimide) in precision aerospace applications such as replica optics where conventional thermal cure processes prevent its use due to thermally induced distortions. UDRI will design and demonstrate means for optimizing e-beam cure processes for epoxy resins to yield stiffness and strength compatible with some aerospace applications. UDRI will also improve epoxy-based composites' strength, stiffness, and thermal properties through incorporation of functionalized carbon nanofibers.

DISPLAYTECH, INC.
2602 Clover Basin Drive
Longmont, CO 80503
(303) 772-2191

PI: Dr. Mark A. Handschy
(303) 772-2191
Contract #:
Kent State University
Kent State University
Kent, OH 44242-0001
(330) 672-2220

ID#: B045-020-0232
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-020       Selected for Award
Title: Fast Multi-Spectral Liquid-Crystal-on-Silicon Spatial Light Modulators (SLM)
Abstract:   We propose the development of fast (~1 ms) spatial light modulators (SLMs) for application in near (1.8 to 2.5 micron), mid (3 to 5.5 micron) and long-wave (8 to 14 micron) infrared wavelength bands. The proposed SLMs exploit a newly discovered "sheared liquid crystal" (SLC) effect to deliver fast amplitude or phase modulation regardless of design wavelength. Our SLMs add the SLC effect to the liquid-crystal-on-silicon (LCOS) platform to deliver small, rugged, and inexpensive SLMs. The Phase I effort will provide: measurement results that establish baseline IR performance achievable with existing LC and polymer materials, (2) results of wafer-scale assembly processing of prototype SLC devices, (3) designs for CMOS implementation of digital gray scale and pixel boosters, including resolution vs. gray-depth and drive voltage tradeoffs, and (4) materials choices and performance predictions for optimized SLC SLMs.

EUTECUS, INC.
5802 Cannonade Court, Austin, Texas 76746
Austin, TX 76746
(512) 327-0421

PI: Dr. Wolfgang Porod
(574) 631-6376
Contract #:
University of Notre Dame
Center for Nano Science and , Tech. University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame, IN 46556
(574) 631-6376

ID#: B045-015-0180
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-015       Selected for Award
Title: Multispectral Infrared Sensors
Abstract:   For Phase I, we propose to investigate the scientific, technical, and commercial merit and feasibility of IR sensors based on nanostructures that are compatible with standard silicon IC technology. In Phases II and III we will integrate these sensors with future generations of cellular neural network (CNN) chips. Specifically, we propose to investigate and develop nanoantennas composed of lithographically-defined metal-line dipoles separated by metal-oxide-metal rectifiers that will be integrated into each pixel of a CNN processor array. The operation of such nanoantennas as IR detectors has been reported in the literature, and they appear to be promising candidates since they offer CMOS compatibility, good prospects for achieving multispectral sensing, small size, and high speed. Conventional high-resolution imaging array sensor technology does not readily allow detection of multiple IR wavelengths at each pixel, and the resulting separation of sensing and computing functions creates a bottleneck for image processing throughput. Our proposed approach has the potential to eliminate this bottleneck by developing CMOS-compatible, multispectral nanoantennas as IR sensors that will enable systems to readily combine sensing and computing functions. Our goal is to investigate the feasibility of CNN chips with integrated MWIR- and LWIR-band nanoantenna sensors operating at 10,000 frames per second.

FARR RESEARCH, INC.
614 Paseo Del Mar NE
Albuquerque, NM 87123-2235
(505) 293-3886

PI: Dr. Everett G. Farr
(505) 293-3886
Contract #: W9113M04P0145
University of New Mexico
EECE Building, Room 125, University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-1356
(505) 277-1412

ID#: B045-009-0036
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-009       Awarded: 16AUG04
Title: An Improved Solid Dielectric Lens Impulse Radiating Antenna
Abstract:   We consider here antennas and sources for radiating high-power ultra-wideband (UWB) electromagnetic impulses from extremely compact and durable packages. Such a device will have applications either as a part of a UWB radar system or as an electromagnetic weapon. A need exists for an antenna that can radiate as broad a bandwidth as possible with maximum gain and at maximum voltage, from as small a package as possible. The antenna must also absorb the high g-forces associated with launch. To address this problem, we propose an antenna called the Solid Dielectric Lens Impulse Radiating Antenna (SDL IRA). This device is similar to a lens TEM horn that is fully immerse in dielectric material, all contained within an electrically conducting cylindrical shroud. Such devices have already been demonstrated in low-voltage versions that are somewhat larger than those required here. We propose refining the existing antenna to make it more suitable for UWB radar within a compact package that can withstand high g-forces. The refinements will include strengthening the design for mechanical shock and high voltages, and improving its low-frequency performance by using a higher dielectric material.

FOSTER-MILLER, INC.
350 Second Ave.
Waltham, MA 02451-1196
(781) 684-4242

PI: Mr. Ronald Roy
(781) 684-4183
Contract #:
Boston University
25 Buick Street
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 353-4365

ID#: B045-002-0110
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-002       Selected for Award
Title: New High Thermal Shock-Resistant Spinel IR Seeker Window Fabrication Process for Hypersonic Interceptors
Abstract:   The program will demonstrate the scientific, technical and commercial merit of our innovative spinel (MgAl2O4) infrared window material and cost-effective production process. The materials will have IR transmission characteristics better than current monolithic sapphire and ALON window materials. Additionally, our self-reinforced single crystal oxide material will provide a substantial improvement in thermal shock resistance and fracture toughness over sapphire and ALON. Also, our process can produce large and contoured windows to net shape. Our patented process involves short run times, can produce multiple components in one run, and can be automated. The resulting windows will cost substantially less than sapphire or ALON windows. Our team includes a major missile producer who will conduct optical testing for comparison to state of the art IR window materials and Boston University, who we have worked with successfully on MDA programs. The Phase I program will involve fabrication of IR window specimens, characterization (key optical, mechanical and thermal properties), preliminary performance and cost analyses, and formation of a strong team to start the commercialization process for this technology in Phase II. (P-040407)

HI-Z TECHNOLOGY, INC.
Suite 7400, 7606 Miramar Road
San Diego, CA 92126-4210
(858) 695-6660

PI: Dr. Arthur G. Metcalfe
(858) 695-6660
Contract #:
Sourthern Research Institute
2000 Ninth Avenue South
Birmingham, AL 35295
(205) 581-2873

ID#: B045-024-0149
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-024       Selected for Award
Title: High-Strength Carbide-Based Materials for Solid Rocket Nozzles
Abstract:   Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) proposes to develop improved tantalum carbide sheet materials that can be laminated with graphite sheets for a zero erosion throat for aluminized propellant rocket motors. The tantalum carbide sheet will have a uniform composition in the range TaC0.7 to TaC0.89 to take advantage of the higher melting point, lower elastic modulus and lower ductile-brittle transition temperature compared with stoichiometric TaC. The sheet will be processed to leave residual compression stresses in the surface. The laminate material will be capable of withstanding up to 0.5% strain due to thermal shock. The technology developed uses low cost, commercially available sheet as a precursor and can be applied to advanced compositions to operate at 6600øF or higher. Some work will be done on hot pressed material to provide a baseline for comparison with earlier work and will include Augier spectroscopy.

ITN ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC.
8130 Shaffer Pkwy
Littleton, CO 80127-4107
(303) 285-5111

PI: Dr. Brian Berland
(303) 285-5107
Contract #:
University of Central Florida
12443 Research Parkway, Suite 207
Orlando, FL 32826-3252
(407) 823-2836

ID#: B045-015-0078
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-015       Selected for Award
Title: Antenna Coupled MOM for Multispectral Infrared Sensors
Abstract:   ITN Energy Systems, in collaboration with the University of Central Florida and Millennium Engineering and Integration Company, propose to design a multispectral imager using an antenna-coupled metal-oxide-metal (MOM) sensor. Because the MOM sensor is patterned and processed with standard integrated circuit technology, the sensor is readily integrable with existing cellular neural network processors. In addition, the response wavelength of the sensor is a function of antenna resonance length and, therefore, the same materials and processes can be used to sense multiple wavelengths with the same technology. Using this approach, multiple wavelengths can be monitored at each pixel. Phase I will lead to a multispectral imager design that employs antenna-coupled MOM sensors integrated with a central neural network processor. The ITN team will work with the MDA to establish functional and performance requirements including tuning range and spectral bands of interest. The team will identify antenna designs that optimize sensitivity over the entire tuning range. Finally, the team will demonstrate the feasibility of antenna-coupled MOM sensors for operation throughout the frequency bands of interest. The Phase I effort will establish the feasibility of the proposed approach and provide the foundation for prototype development of a multispectral imager in Phase II.

J.A. REINHARDT & CO., INC.
Spuce Cabin Road
Mountainhome, PA 18342
(570) 595-7491

PI: Mr. Anthony Joseph
(724) 357-3800
Contract #:
Indiana Univ Pa Research Institute
Room 107E, 210 S. 10th Street
Indiana, PA 15705
(724) 357-3241

ID#: B045-011-0202
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-011       Selected for Award
Title: Innovations Leading to Greater Safety, Lower Cost, and Increased Availability in the Manufacture of Components for Missile Interceptors and Spacecraft Using Beryllium and Beryllium Alloys.
Abstract:   This J.A.Reinhardt Company and the IUP Research Institute propose to utilize an existing 5-year old health and safety management system coupled with current and proposed engineering controls as the foundation for reducing workers' beryllium concentration to less tha 0.100 micrograms per cubic meter of air during machining and other processing. During Phase I, JAR and the IUP Research Institute will develop a plan to verify preliminary data from this system, identify potential improvements to the HSMS and validate its' effectiveness in reducing Be concentration.

K TECHNOLOGY CORP.
110 Gibraltar Road, Suite 223
Horsham, PA 19044
(215) 957-7858

PI: Mr. Mark Montesano
(631) 285-6580
Contract #:
University of Dayton
300 College Park
Dayton, OH 45469-0169
(937) 255-3622

ID#: B045-010-0091
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-010       Selected for Award
Title: High Rate and Effective Thermal Energy Storage System Using Phase Change Material for Transient High Power Thermal Management
Abstract:   The team of k Technology Corporation and the University of Dayton Research Institute propose to develop an integrated packaging concept for high power density devices that combines two innovative technologies: encapsulated annealed pyrolytic (referred to as k-Core); and phase change materials (PCM). The metal encapsulation material surrounding the APG will have a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) designed to match the mounted devices(s). k-Core is a composite material with five times the conductivity of aluminum and will be used as an efficient heat spreader lowering the high flux density to a manageable level while distributing this energy into the PCM. The internal geometry will be configured to minimize the conduction paths through the PCM limiting the negative effects of the low conductance of the PCM. If deemed necessary, a metal or graphite foam will be used to further improve the conductance path into the PCM.

KENT OPTRONICS, INC.
275 Martinel Dr., Suite W
Kent, OH 44240
(845) 897-0138

PI: Dr. Le Li
(845) 897-0138
Contract #:
University of Central Florida
12443 Research Parkway, Suite 207
Olando, FL 32826-3252
(407) 823-2836

ID#: B045-020-0034
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-020       Selected for Award
Title: Multi-Band IR Scene Projection Display for Scene Simulation in Hardware-In-the-Loop
Abstract:   This STTR Phase I proposal proposes a feasibility of a novel multi-band IR scene display for scene simulation for missile interception simulation in the Hardware-in-the-Loop. This development addresses the DOD need for infrared spatial light modulators (SLM), primarily as an enabling technology for infrared scene projection, but also for dynamic control of infrared coherent light, as beamsteering, wavefront control and adaptive optics devices. The ultimate goal from this program is a multi-band IR projection display system where the central part is a liquid crystal SLM. The display operates in both middle wave Infrared (MWIR) and long wave infrared (LWIR) with optional capability in SWIR or visible. The device is suited for missile interception simulation in MDA Kinetic-kill-vehicle Hardware-in-the-Loop (KHILS) facility. The Phase I program is designed for a feasibility study addressing several critical issues such as liquid crystal (LC) materials in the IR regions, SLM backplane, and performance evaluation through a demo device development. The phase II program concentrates on developing the prototype of scene display followed by the Phase III when the product will be commercialized.

KYMA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
8829 Midway West Road
Raleigh, NC 27617
(919) 789-8880

PI: Mr. Mark Williams
(919) 789-8880
Contract #:
Auburn University
303 Allison Laboratory
Auburn, AL 36849
(334) 844-4270

ID#: B045-018-0295
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-018       Selected for Award
Title: Development of 4 inch Semi-Insulating Gallium Nitride Substrates
Abstract:   High-performance GaN-based devices, such as microwave transistors, laser diodes and light emitting diodes have been demonstrated on sapphire and silicon carbide substrates. Gallium nitride substrates are expected to further improve the performance of these devices due to close lattice and thermal expansion match with GaN-based device structures. The development of a low defect density semi insulating GaN substrate will result in improved properties of epitaxial GaN films, and subsequently will improve the performance of GaN-based devices. Moving to wafer sizes larger than 2" will also create lower cost opportunities through process scaling. This Phase I SBIR will develop 4" diameter semi insulating GaN substrates using a large area hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) system. Hydride vapor phase epitaxy has gained attention as a technique to grow high quality, free-standing bulk GaN materials for use as substrates. The HVPE technique has the advantages of a high growth rate (up to 0.5 mm/hr), relatively low cost, and demonstrated low defect densities (105 cm-2). In Phase II of this proposal we will complete GaN HVPE growth studies and proceed to develop low defect density 4" GaN substrates for commercialization.

LIGHTNING TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
10 Downing Industrial Parkway
Pittsfield, MA 01201-3890
(413) 499-2135

PI: Mr. J. Anderson Plumer
(413) 499-2135
Contract #:
University of Alaska Fairbanks, GI
903 Koyukuk Drive
Fairbanks, AL 99775-7320
(907) 474-6442

ID#: B045-008-0176
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-008       Selected for Award
Title: Stratospheric Electrical Environments Applicable To Photovoltaic Arrays On HAA Platforms
Abstract:   The objective of this program is to characterize the upper atmosphere electrical environment so that the effects of this environment on high altitude airships (HAA) and other platforms intending to operate in this environment can be determined, and protection methods developed. This includes transient luminous events (TLEs), such as red sprites and blue jets and their associated electrical properties, in the region above active thunderstorms, as well as the fair-weather ambient. The induced and directly conducted currents that may be experienced by HAA PV arrays will also be defined. The approach is to fill gaps in present knowledge with a combination of high altitude electric field measurements, laboratory experiments to examine electrical streamer/leader and spark/arc characteristics at the reduced pressures equivalent to the 40,000 - 70,000 ft altitude range, and numerical modeling to compute the field enhancements and discharge currents at a high altitude airship operating in this range.

LYNNTECH, INC.
7607 Eastmark Drive, Suite 102
College Station, TX 77840
(979) 693-0017

PI: Mr. Brad Fiebig
(979) 693-0017
Contract #:
Connecticut Global Fuel Cell Center
University of Connecticut, 44 Weaver Rd., Unit 5233
Storrs, CT 06269-5233
(860) 486-2898

ID#: B045-008-0193
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-008       Selected for Award
Title: A Novel High-Temperature PEM Electrolyzer Resulting In Dramatically Improved Regenerative Fuel Cell System Performance
Abstract:   The most promising energy conversion and storage system for HAAs is the combination of photovoltaic (PV) arrays with a regenerative fuel cell energy storage system. This system uses the PV arrays during the day to power the airship and electronics, while utilizing excess power to split water with an electrolyzer, generating hydrogen and oxygen at high pressures. At night, the stored hydrogen and oxygen are fed to a fuel cell where they are converted to electricity, allowing the HAA to continue operation. The electrolyzer has a significant effect on the specific energy (Wh/kg) of the overall system, affecting the size of the reactant storage based on its operating pressure, and affecting the size of PV arrays needed based on its operating efficiency. The conditions at which the electrolyzer operates, such as temperature and pressure, can also dramatically affect the electrolyzer's balance-of-plant mass and parasitic power requirements. To take advantage of operating at higher temperature and pressure, development of both membrane electrode assemblies and lightweight electrolyzer stack components are needed that can operate at high temperature and pressure. Although there has been much research on high temperature PEM fuel cells, there has been little focus on high temperature PEM electrolysis.

MATERIALS & ELECTROCHEMICAL RESEARCH (MER) CORP.
7960 S. Kolb Rd.
Tucson, AZ 85706-9237
(520) 574-1980

PI: Dr. James C. Withers
(520) 574-1980
Contract #:
Los Alamos National Laboratory
P.O. Box 1663
Los Alamos, NM 87545-4598
(505) 665-8223

ID#: B045-011-0077
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-011       Selected for Award
Title: A Process That Rapidly Produces Be/Be Alloys in Net Shape at Low Cost Without Exposure of the Workforce
Abstract:   Beryllium and beryllium alloys are strategic to many defense/aerospace applications, but whose use is limited due to current and anticipated more stringent health and safety concerns which result in long lead times for fabrication and very high cost. An innovative approach that reduces fabrication time to a matter of hours to a few days results in low cost and produces net shapes without exposure of the workforce to Be. This paradigm for beryllium fabrication utilizes a melt forming solid free form fabrication process that will be performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) established beryllium facility in coordination with a beryllium fabricator/supplier and two MDA prime contractor system suppliers. Be/Be alloys will be net shape produced and charaterized as well as fabricating a demonstraion mirror and structural components.

METAL MATRIX CAST COMPOSITES, LLC (DBA MMCC, LLC)
101 Clematis Avenue, Unit #1
Waltham, MA 02453-7012
(781) 893-4449

PI: Dr. James A. Cornie
(781) 893-4449
Contract #:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab
PO Box 808
Livermore, CA 94551
(925) 423-7796

ID#: B045-005-0241
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-005       Selected for Award
Title: Low Expansion Metallic Nanolaminate Replicated Mirrors with CTE Matched High Conductivity Graphite Fiber Reinforced Magnesium Mirror Substrate Structure
Abstract:   Magnetron sputtering of "Invar-like" nanolaminates onto a pre-finished/figured mandrel is proposed to produce strong, stiff, damage tolerant, low CTE replicas. The structural substrate will be a high performance discontinuous graphite fiber reinforced Mg AZ31 metal matrix composite manufactured by pressure infiltration casting. MetGraf Mg composites have the following attractive attributes for structural substrates:  CTE precisely matched to the Invar-like nanolaminate replica.  High specific stiffness  High thermal conductivity  High thermal stability  Low manufacturing cost This combination will result in a robust stiff, lightweight (< 8 kg/m2 areal density) meter class mirror. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a sputter deposition process, which has been applied to the production of high quality mirror replicas. LLNL will produce ~400 m thick Invar-like 250 mm convex and flat nanolaminate replicas for this project with expected expansion coefficients of 2 to 4 ppm/K. MMCC will upgrade its graphite fiber preform to produce highly uniform materials that, after pressure infiltration, results in exact CTE matches to the nanolaminate. MMCC will investigate both resin and solder base approaches to attachment of pre figured and finished nanolaminate to figured MetGraf Mg substructures. 250 mm convex and flat mirrors will be demonstrated.

MILITARY SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGIES, LLC
1018 W 9th Ave , Suite 202
King of Prussia, PA 19406
(610) 354-9100

PI: Mr. Michael Wilson
(610) 905-5896
Contract #:
John Hopkins Univ
Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 John Hopkins Rd
Laurel, MD 20723-6099
(443) 778-4414

ID#: B045-002-0187
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-002       Selected for Award
Title: Adaptively Cooled Wavefront Error Correction for Enhanced Hypersonic KV IR Seeker Windows
Abstract:   Strategic missile defense will directly benefit from increasing the operational infrared bandwidth from just a 3mm-5.5mm capability to a 1mm - 12mm capability. Increased seeker spectral bandwidth will enable improvements in detection range, acquisition performance, discrimination of unresolved objects, and aimpoint selection in the presence of a target plume. The mission outlined requiring an operational system to function effectively in the atmosphere at velocities ranging between 5 km/s to 8 km/s (25km < alt < 45km) dictates that an innovative approach involving thin film cooling and real time dynamic wavefront error correction is needed. Issues related to the adverse conditions experienced during hypersonic flight virtually eliminate all candidate infrared materials currently available for potential deployment. Any candidate material must be robust enough to withstand the aerothermal heating environment (thermal shock), be chemically robust, possess a high cut-off temperature and be broadband. Both GaP and GaAs have relatively high cut-off temperatures , greater thermal shock characteristics than either ALON or sapphire, and are broadband performers. The operational environment requires that any infrared window material be actively cooled and that mission performance be optimized with a real time dynamic wavefront error correction capability to minimize or eliminate the wavefront distortion due to inhomogeneous window deformation and dn/dT.

MOUND LASER & PHOTONICS CENTER, INC.
P.O. Box 223
Miamisburg, OH 45343
(937) 865-4481

PI: Mr. Kenneth E. Hix
(937) 865-3041
Contract #: W9113M04P0147
University of Dayton
300 College Park
Dayton, OH 45469-0121
(937) 229-2919

ID#: B045-016-0205
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-016       Awarded: 05AUG04
Title: Laser Micromachining of Optical Structures and Surfaces
Abstract:   Advanced laser micromachining technology will prove to be a vital fabrication tool for high precision devices having functional features on the mesoscopic and microscopic scale. The proposed program will establish the fundamentals of advanced 3-D high precision laser micromachining of SiC and Si3N4 devices. The approach utilizes next generation high pulse repetition rate solid-state laser systems having pulse durations in the nanosecond, picosecond, and femtoseconds regimens. The laser-material interaction is an extremely dynamical process and changes imposed on the material may include morphological defects, oxidation, chemical decomposition, nano/micro cracking, and compressive or tensile stresses. The dependence of these effects on the laser processing parameters will be quantified using various high-resolution micro non-destructive evaluation (micro-NDE) techniques employing advanced sensor technology (AST). Micro-NDE will be utilized to define the optimal processing window for laser micromachining SiC and Si3N4. AST techniques such as laser-ultrasonics and thermal wave imaging will be used as a process monitoring and a quality assurance technique. Additionally, AST process monitoring will be evaluated as a possible process control technology.

OPTICAL RESEARCH ASSOC.
3280 E. FOOTHILL BLVD.,, SUITE 300
PASADENA, CA 91107-3103
(626) 795-9101

PI: Dr. Thomas Bruegge
(626) 795-9101
Contract #:
North Carolina State University
Box 7918
Raleigh, NC 27695-7918
(919) 515-3096

ID#: B045-007-0081
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-007       Selected for Award
Title: Advanced Design Tools for Freeform Optics
Abstract:   Advanced optical systems play a pivotal role in military applications of interest to the Missile Defense Agency including advanced optical telescopes and imaging LADARs. Optics provides the eyes for surveillance, target detection and tracking. Therefore, improvements in optical design and fabrication are important targets for research and development. One significant improvement is the inclusion of freeform elements. However, to create such designs, a new environment is needed; one that gives the designer feedback on the manufacturability of the design as well as the optical performance. This environment needs a fundamentally new figure of merit to simultaneously maximize optical performance and minimize fabrication complexity. The kernel of a design environment that leverages advances in design and fabrication capabilities for freeform optical components is the subject of Phase I. Future phases will address other issues including: enhanced manufacturing processes, improved measurement capabilities, and accurate assembly procedures. This new software will enable defense system designers to deploy optimized designs using freeform shapes that will dramatically reduce the amount of exotic materials, such as beryllium, required. The ensuing mass reductions in multi-band (IR and visible) imagery systems will provide enhanced performance for interceptors that require high accelerations to reach their targets.

OPTIMAL SYNTHESIS, INC.
868 San Antonio Road
Palo Alto, CA 94303-4622
(650) 213-8585

PI: Dr. P. K. Menon
(650) 213-8585
Contract #:
University of California
Mech & Aero Department
Irvine, CA 92697-3975
(949) 824-5855

ID#: B045-003-0243
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-003       Selected for Award
Title: Integrated Flight Control Systems for Kinetic Kill Vehicles with Novel Internal Actuators
Abstract:   Development of integrated flight control systems for kinetic kill vehicles incorporating novel internal actuators is proposed. The benefits of the new internal actuators are that they are contained entirely within the airframe and do not require mass expulsion. The actuator technology can be used in both the atmosphere and in vacuum, and in any speed range. However, due to the complexity of the dynamics they introduce, integrated design of flight control systems are essential for satisfactory vehicle performance. Unlike the previously reported internal actuation technology, the methodologies advanced in this proposal are effective even in the absence of any external thrust or aerodynamic forces. Phase I research will demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed internally actuated integrated flight control concepts using high-fidelity nonlinear simulations. Limited-scale Monte-Carlo simulations will be carried out to demonstrate the flight control system robustness to parameter variations and disturbances. Phase II work will use the Phase I research results to develop a working model of the internally actuated kinetic kill vehicle. Operation of the working model will then be demonstrated in a multi-axis motion table. Phase III research will develop and flight test an internally actuated kinetic kill vehicle of interest to the MDA.

QUOIN INTERNATIONAL, INC.
3000 Conestoga Drive
Carson City, NV 89706
(775) 882-8100

PI: Mr. Michael D. Jacobson
(775) 882-8100
Contract #:
University of North Texas
P.O. Box 305250 , 1501 Chestnut St
Denton TX, TX 76203-5220
(940) 565-3940

ID#: B045-003-0103
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-003       Selected for Award
Title: Flywheel ACS Integrated KV
Abstract:   The Missile Defense Agency is seeking concepts and associated technologies for the next generation multi use kinetic kill vehicle that will allow effective vehicle attitude and divert control in both exo- and endo-atmospheric flight regimes. In addition, they seek new concepts for internal vehicle control that do not rely on side thrusters and ejection of propellant products. They require a kinetic kill vehicle capable of seamless operation in both endo-atmospheric and exo-atmospheric flight regimes from low to high supersonic speeds, with the kill vehicle attitude control mechanism entirely contained within the vehicle body. Quoin, working with University of North Texas and Aerojet, will develop an integrated kinetic kill vehicle design that incorporates flywheels to provide active attitude control for endo- and exo-atmospheric flight. The studies will include a means of active trim control for endo operation and a mass translation for unloading the flywheels during thruster operation. Preliminary simulations coupled with hardware demonstrations will demonstrate that an integrated Kinetic Kill Vehicle can be can be developed that meets desired performance requirements. A streamlined multi-use vehicle will greatly reduce the overall cost of missile defense.

REMOTEREALITY CORP.
4 Technology Dr
Westborough, MA 01581
(508) 898-8613

PI: Dr. Terrance F. Boult
(719) 262-3510
Contract #:
Univ. of Colorado, Colorado Springs
1420 Austin Bluffs Pkwy
Colorado Springs, CO 80933-7150
(719) 262-3153

ID#: B045-001-0302
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-001       Selected for Award
Title: Surface Contour Design Models for Foveated Optical Systems
Abstract:   Catadioptic imaging systems, the mixing mirrors and lenses in an optical system, presents many advantages. The mirror surfaces can provide for a complex remapping of the scene while the mirror itself presents virtually no chromatic aberration. Catadioptric systems have been used for both long-focal length lens (to increase light gathering) and for ultra-wide field of view imaging such as the commercially successful immersive imaging system from RemoteReality. A Catadioptric system offers the potential for simultaneously capturing an image with a foveated region (high resolution on target) as well as a wide-field-of-view periphery. Recent academic advances have developed a theory that allows the design of the mirror shape to provide any specified geometric mapping of scene points into the image. The resulting spline-based shape representation can be used to define the catadioptric system. However, an effective imaging system requires more than just the mirror shape, the overall system needs to be designed to minimize distortions, provide sufficient light for imaging and to maintain focus. The physical optics component of the design is critical to the overall system performance. RemoteReality Inc.'s experience in turning basic geometric catadioptric system designs into effective optical systems provide a an important foundation in that process. The proposed project will develop a software system for flexible imaging system design that will integrate tools for mirror design with the necessary tools for physical optics design to provide rapid turn around for Catadioptic systems.

SCHAFER CORP.
321 Billerica Road
Chelmsford, MA 01824
(978) 256-2070

PI: Dr. Bruce Peters
(256) 721-9572
Contract #: W9113M04P0144
University Alabama Huntsville
Center for Applied Optics, UAH in Huntsville
Huntsville, AL 35899
(256) 824-2514

ID#: B045-007-0016
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-007       Awarded: 29JUL04
Title: Advanced Optical System Technologies
Abstract:   Detection of missiles during the boost phase requires a sensor located on a high altitude forward deployed platform or on a spacecraft. Unlike a spacecraft, a forward deployed high altitude airship (HAA) or an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is relatively mobile and can be quickly deployed to areas of concern. For a single sensor to fit on a HAA or UAV, it must be compact, low-mass, and energy efficient while still being highly versatile to fulfill the broad mission requirements. A lightweight, high-resolution, all-reflective, zoom magnification, optical sensor is preferred because it delivers a large field of view with lower magnification during threat acquisition and a greatly magnified field of view to track and classify targets. The Schafer / University of Alabama in Huntsville Team has an innovative design approach that delivers the functional flexibility needed in the sensor. A unique telescope material choice is the silicon lightweight mirror technology, that is lighter than beryllium, as structurally efficient as SiC, and lower in cost to fabricate than comparable mirror technologies. This permits the deployment of many low cost sensors on many platforms to completely cover all possible threat areas.

SCIENTIFIC SYSTEMS CO., INC.
500 West Cummings Park - Ste 3000
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 933-5355

PI: Alex Zatezalo
(781) 933-5355
Contract #: W9113M04P0146
University of Southern California
Dept of Mathematics, 3620 S. Vermont Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90089
(213) 740-2389

ID#: B045-014-0185
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-014       Awarded: 19AUG04
Title: PTHH Estimation using Stochastic Analysis
Abstract:   The goal of this project is, as stated in the STTR topic, to ``develop candidate digital image processing algorithms for determining the physical centroid of ballistic missiles hard body in presence of their rocket plumes'', to ``test the algorithms against simulated target digital image sequences'', and to ``compute the ballistic missile body centroid and preferred target aim point''. In achieving this goal we have to keep in mind that the developed technology should be applicable to ``detection and tracking objects in presence of background clutter'' as stated in the STTR topic. The Phase I will identify and develop models and algorithms for detection and tracking of missile's hard body in presence of its rocket plume on simulated sequence of digital images. The major objectives will be: (1) simulate target and plume IR digital images addressing the diversity of aspect angles, altitude, rocket fuel types, different ranges from sensor to the target, background clutter, and transient and anomalous events; (2) develop and formulate analytical model of states, noisy observations, and unknown parameters; (3) address, identify, and develop algorithms for parameter estimation, detection, and tracking; (4) test and compare the performance of the algorithms in different scenarios; (5) develop a detailed plan for further analysis and implementation in Phase II effort. The proposal team includes Scientific Systems Company, Inc., the University of Southern California, and MZA Associates Corporation.

SCIMITAR DESIGN LLC
2005 Big Horn Drive
Austin, TX 78734-3303
(512) 266-9748

PI: Mr. Brian Muskopf
(512) 266-9748
Contract #:
University of Texas at Austin
High-Res X-ray CT Facility
Austin, TX 78712-1101
(512) 471-6942

ID#: B045-012-0001
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-012       Selected for Award
Title: Techniques For Radiation Hardening of EKV Through Incorporation of Shielding In Component Structures Fabricated From Be/Be Alloy Substitute Materials
Abstract:   Beryllium (Be) has been the material of choice for many MDA Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle (EKV) components due to its desirable physical characteristics despite health hazard concerns and its high cost. However, Be/Be alloys have poor radiation shielding properties against x-ray, gamma and space radiation. Lead shielding materials must be used in conjunction with Be/Be alloy materials where radiation shielding is required. The use of lead radiation shielding materials adds manufacturing cost and mass to the EKV. Innovative alternative materials are required that can reduce or maintain a net zero increase in mass, while incorporating radiation shielding directly into the EKV component. This project proposes to develop Tungsten Coated Carbon Fiber (TCCF) and tungsten powder (TP) polymer composite materials to replace beryllium/lead material combinations used in EKV components. The use of TCCF and tungsten powder composite materials will allow for the design of lower cost, lighter weight EKV components and structures, that can provide the same structural strength and stiffness as Be components while incorporating equivalent radiation shielding as lead into the composite EKV component. Significant cost and weight savings are expected using this manufacturing approach since the radiation shielding material will be incorporated directly into the EKV component.

SEMISOUTH LABORATORIES
One Research Blvd., Suite 201B
Starkville, MS 39759
(662) 324-7607

PI: Ms. Janna B. Casady
(662) 324-7607
Contract #:
Auburn University
310 Leach Science Center
Auburn, AL 36849
(334) 844-4678

ID#: B045-019-0252
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-019       Selected for Award
Title: Development of Radiation Hard 4H-SiC Power Switches and Rectifiers for Circuit Applications In Harsh Environments
Abstract:   SiC power switch devices such as Vertical Junction Field Effect Transistors (VJFETs) and Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs) are being developed for power conditioning applications in a variety of rugged environments. While the SiC devices have been well characterized for high-temperature behavior, much less data is available for radiation effects, including gamma and proton radiation. Here, SemiSouth, Auburn, and Georgia Tech propose testing of SemiSouth SiC VJFETs and Auburn MOSFETs over a temperature range of ambient to 300C, both DC and dynamic testing, done pre- and post-radiation test. Gamma radiation will be from a Co 60 source, at 1.33 MeV, and the proton radiation will be from 1-4 MeV and 63 MeV. The analyis will help steer the development of radiation-hardened SiC switches in Phase II.

SENSOR ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY, INC.
1195 Atlas Road
Columbia, SC 29209
(803) 647-9757

PI: Dr. Yuriy Bilenko
(803) 647-9757
Contract #:
University of South Carolina
Byrnes Building, 901 Sumter Street
Columbia, SC 29208
(803) 777-4457

ID#: B045-013-0270
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-013       Selected for Award
Title: Highly Efficient MOSHFET Based X-band Transmitter-Switch Module
Abstract:   The output power and power added efficiency are the key performance parameters of modern transmitter/receiver (T/R) modules. The optimization of these parameters depends mostly on the RF characteristics of the active elements used in the T/R module output stages. GaAs FETs and HFETs that are currently used do not allow for high drain bias and large input signal swings. Power combining elements result in additional RF losses. Similar limitations are present for the T/R RF switches based on p-i-n diodes or GaAs transistors. GaN based HFETs allow for much higher single element output powers. However, the power added efficiency optimization is limited by severe increase in the gate leakage currents both under the reverse and forward biases. We propose to use our proprietary and patented III-Nitride based Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Heterostructure Field Effect Transistor (MOSHFET) technology and develop high power added efficiency output stages integrated with RF switches. GaN has been under intense investigation in the last ten years due to its high breakdown field and high temperature operation. GaN transistors operating up to 600C is available in reports from various researchers.

SENTIENT CORP.
850 Energy Drive, Suite 307
Idaho Falls, ID 83401
(208) 522-8560

PI: Mr. Sean Marble
(208) 522-8560
Contract #:
Purdue University
Mechanical Engineering, 585 Purdue Mall
West Lafayette, IN 47907-2088
(765) 494-5719

ID#: B045-022-0120
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-022       Selected for Award
Title: Strategic Monitoring of Spacecraft Mechanical Parts Assemblies
Abstract:   Lubrication problems in rolling element bearings are the leading cause of failure in spacecraft momentum/reaction wheels, control moment gyros, gimbals, and similar applications. Condition monitoring technologies developed for terrestrial or aircraft applications are not adequate due to unique spacecraft conditions and the need to prevent rather than just detect damage. Sentient Corporation, in collaboration with Purdue University and The Aerospace Corporation, will develop and implement a Spacecraft Bearing Health Management (SBHM) system that will identify early stage lubrication problems, administer corrective actions (quantity and timing of lubricant application), and accurately predict remaining life. During Phase I, innovative sensing technologies developed for a closely related project will be utilized alongside traditional sensing parameters to identify optimal combinations for monitoring lubrication effectiveness. An extensive experimental program will be conducted using an existing bearing test rig that emulates a satellite momentum/reaction wheel. During Phase II, a prototype SBHM system will be installed on the test rig along with a working lubricant micro-applicator to demonstrate proper control of lubrication under all conditions. Opportunities for space flight testing and evaluation will also be explored.

SORDAL, INC.
12813 Riley Street
Holland, MI 49424-9201
(616) 994-6000

PI: Dr. Robert P. Smart
(616) 331-3302
Contract #:
Grand Valley State University
336C DeVos Center, 401 West Fulton
Grand Rapids, MI 49504
(616) 331-7265

ID#: B045-021-0010
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-021       Selected for Award
Title: Innovative Thermal Insulation Technologies
Abstract:   The MDA seeks innovative technologies for materials, processes, and manufacturing that will provide reliable, robust, and lightweight components for major space defense acquisition programs. The proposed STTR Phase I project will develop polyimide insulation materials that will protect sensitive cryogenic structures and subsystems from excessive heat buildup as result of direct solar heating, radiation from the earth's Aledo, or heating due to internal component radiation. Introduction of closed-cell polyimide SOLREX r materials will result in significant reductions in the weight of cryogenic insulation and high temperature Thermal Protection Systems (TPS). SOLREX materials typically demonstrate significant improvement in conductivity over traditional insulation materials. When specifically engineered to work with current integrated insulation systems, a marked reduction in thickness and overall weight will be realized. Therefore, with team partner Grand Valley State University, Sordal proposes to circumvent the current challenges associated with current TPS and provide greater mission flexibility by producing an insulation that will be 200% lighter (e.g. as low as 0.5 PCF), thermally stable from -260C to over +330C, non-flammable, non-toxic, will have a very high limiting oxygen index, and yet be very strong. Throughout the Phase I efforts, Sordal will actively work with system integrators for future demonstration efforts.

SP3 CORP.
505 E. Evelyn Ave.
Mountain View, CA 94041-1613
(650) 966-0630

PI: Mr. Jerry Zimmer
(650) 966-0630
Contract #:
Univ. of Cal., Berkeley
336 Sproul Hall, #5940, UC, Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720-5940
(510) 642-2734

ID#: B045-018-0136
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-018       Selected for Award
Title: Wide Bandgap Material and Device Development
Abstract:   The purpose of the proposed research is to develop GaN molecular beam epitaxy on diamond substrates up to 3 inches in diameter. This unique substrate/epilayer combination will provide electronic materials suitable for high-power and opto-electronic devices without the commonly observed limitations due to the production of excess heat during device operation. The resulting devices will have built-in thermal heat spreading capability which should result in better performance and higher reliability. It will also have the capability of being extended to wafer sizes of 200mm or larger. This project will combine UC Berkeley's expertise in buffer layer development for GaN growth by MBE, advanced transmission electron microscopy techniques and state-of-the-art optical and electrical characterization, with unique diamond substrate growth and processing from sp3 and device reliability expertise and modeling capabilities at the Naval Postgraduate School. A precise substrate characterization and optimization for crystal orientation and grain size and the development of an optimized buffer layer on diamond are essential parts of this research project. The team will frequently exchange their results to optimize their respective deliverables such as buffer layer with GaN overgrowth for UC Berkeley, optimized diamond substrate characteristics for sp3, and adjusted device reliability model for NPS.

SPACEWORKS, INC.
7301 E. Sundance Trail, P.O. Box 2014
Carefree, AZ 85377-2014
(480) 575-1676

PI: Mr. John A. DiPalma
(480) 575-1676
Contract #:
Georgia Institute of Technology
801 Ferst Dr.
Atlanta, GA 30332-0405
(404) 894-3270

ID#: B045-022-0246
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-022       Selected for Award
Title: A Predictive Diagnostic System with Self-Learning for Space Mechanisms
Abstract:   SpaceWorks and the Georgia Institute of Technology propose an integrated predictive diagnostic system for evaluating the condition of spacecraft moving parts. Specific mechanisms to be addressed include reaction and momentum wheels, gimbals, flywheels and cryocoolers. To accurately estimate the remaining life of components, an intelligent diagnostic and prognostic monitoring and computational strategy is proposed, capable of using sensor data with adaptive and stochastic algorithms employing self-learning capability and statistical confidence. It is envisioned that the failure lifetime of the application will be asymptotically realized in real-time. Given that prognostic techniques have not been well developed to address uncertainties in defect growth behavior, the proposed methodology will use built-in computational capability to instantly update the predictive algorithms for reliable health assessment and reporting. Our investigation will focus on low-mass sensors and miniaturized electronics for on-board data acquisition, storage and processing.

SPIRE CORP.
One Patriots Park
Bedford, MA 01730-2396
(781) 275-6000

PI: Dr. Steven Wojtczuk
(603) 595-8900
Contract #:
Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory
One Cyclotron Road
Berkeley, CA 94720
(510) 486-6715

ID#: B045-017-0097
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-017       Selected for Award
Title: Radiation-Hard, High Efficiency InP/InN Tandem Cells
Abstract:   Spire proposes to investigate InP/InN tandem solar cells for applications where extreme radiation-hardness is needed. Indium phosphide (InP) has proven itself as a radiation-hard cell material, and indium nitride (InN) has shown superior radiation resistance to 2MeV protons. InP (1.34 eV) and InN (0.7eV) bandgaps allow current-matching (38 mA/cm2) under the AM0 spectrum, enabling two-terminal operation. We will investigate use of a pseudomorphic InGaP window to boost InP top cell efficiency from its current 19% one-sun AM0 level to 22%. We describe a process that allows the InP top cell to be undisturbed by dislocations from the InN growth. The 0.7eV InN bottom cell has an upper efficiency limit of ~9% AM0; however, the growth of InN would introduce substantial dislocations, and its efficiency would likely be about 4%. However, the dislocations should not compromise the InN radiation hardness, and we believe that the proposed research should lead to tandem space cells with efficiencies of ~26% (1 sun AM0, 25C) which would be flat in power output to fluences beyond 1e16 1MeV electrons/cm2.

SRA
400 Meridian St., Ste 107
Huntsville, AL 35801
(256) 534-7727

PI: Mr. David A. Keen, P.C.
(256) 534-7727
Contract #:
University of Alabama in Huntsville
Von Braun Research Hall, Rm 43
Huntsville, AL 35899
(256) 824-6846

ID#: B045-023-0062
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-023       Selected for Award
Title: Low-cost, multi-spectral frequency augmenter for exo-atmospheric ballistic missile targets
Abstract:   A specialty coating, adaptable to existing and future modular MDA target systems and survivable in exo-atmospheric environments, may be achieved by combining contemporary indium tin oxide (ITO) appliqu‚s onto a surface capable of achieving luminescence and hue levels found in adjacent backgrounds. This active coating will exploit known vulnerabilities found in interceptor infrared and visual scanning cameras such that detection, discrimination and identification may be sufficiently altered for specific flight profiles. This active coating will be relatively lightweight, use domestically supplied, polymer-based conductive fillers and operate without interfering with other systems on-board the target system.

STELLAR MICRO DEVICES
2020 Centimeter Circle
Austin, TX 78758-4956
(512) 997-7781

PI: Dr. Leonid D. Karpov
(512) 997-7782
Contract #:
MIT
39-553a, MIT
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 258-7974

ID#: B045-013-0282
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-013       Selected for Award
Title: High Power Vacuum GaN
Abstract:   High power GaN devices are proposed in which vacuum gaps increase anode voltage and power. Anode placement will be optimized for device performance and power dissipation.

STREAMLINE AUTOMATION, LLC
1109 Chesterfield Road
Huntsville, AL 35803
(256) 694-5063

PI: Mr. Alton Reich
(256) 694-5063
Contract #:
Worcester Polytechnic Institute
100 Institute Road
Worcester, MA 01609
(508) 831-5811

ID#: B045-004-0124
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-004       Selected for Award
Title: Design and Testing of a Water Based Fire Extinguishing System for On-Board Hydrogen Peroxide Fires
Abstract:   The Air Force has demonstrated that a water is capable of extinguishing comparable H2O2 oxidizer fires with 23 pounds of water vs 67 pounds of halon. Recent advances in sensor technology make it possible to detect an H2O2 leak prior to ignition, or to rapidly detect ignition in order to initiate fire protection system water flow. Recent findings by Streamline Automation also indicate that fire extinguishing enhancement is possible via electrostatic charging of the water mist. Streamline Automation and Worcester Polytechnic Institute will leverage advanced sensors, and explore the impact of electrostatic charging, to provide a more effective H2O2 fire extinguishing system for ABL than the current Halon system. During Phase I Streamline Automation proposes to: 1.Develop a water mist fire extinguishing system that incorporates an advanced H2O2 sensor developed by Argonne National Laboratory and a rapid response COTS flame sensor. 2.Adapt our electrostatic charging approach to Fike Corporation's P/N 73-010 micro-mist nozzle. 3.Demonstrate a system (water and hardware total weight less than 75 pounds) able to extinguish an obscured "Red Mechanic's Rag" fire at any location on the floor of the 8x10x10 ft fire test chamber at WPI. Streamline Automation has teamed with the WPI Fire Science Laboratory, a premier University in fire science, to assist in optimizing our charged water mist system during Phase I development testing. The Phase I test matrix will include multiple fire energy levels and water mist flow rates, both with and without electrostatic charging. During Phase II CFDRC will develop and provide for test a prototype Fire Extinguishing System (total weight < 5000 lbs) scaled to protect all likely H2O2 spill locations in the laser and laser chemical supply areas of the Airborne Laser, Block 08 installation.

STRUCTURED MATERIALS INDUSTRIES
Suite 102, 201 Circle Drive
Piscataway, NJ 08854-3723
(732) 302-9274

PI: Dr. Catherine E. Rice
(732) 302-9274
Contract #:
Cornell University
120 Day Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853-2801
(607) 255-2939

ID#: B045-017-0236
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-017       Selected for Award
Title: High Efficiency InGaN Multijunction Solar Cells
Abstract:   This Phase I STTR program will demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating inherently radiation hard, high efficiency solar cells based on In(1-x)Ga(x)N photovoltaic devices using MOCVD. Recent results show that InN has a much narrower bandgap than previously believed: 0.7 eV, compared to earlier estimates of 2 eV. This discovery opens the door to fabrication of photovoltaic devices responsive from the near infrared through UV ranges. Thus, unprecedented efficiencies should be possible. In addition, GaN-based solar cells have potentially greater radiation resistance and ability to operate under temperature extremes than those currently available. In this program, Dr. William Schaff of Cornell University (a pioneer in InN and InGaN technology) will lead material optimization efforts and Structured Materials Industries, Inc. (SMI) will focus on demonstrating high efficient nitride MOCVD, to carry GaN-based solar cells from laboratory to production. The team will deposit In(1-x)Ga(x)N films of varied composition, and demonstrate p- and n-doping and junction formation, and develop cell designs, to demonstrate the feasibility of radiation hard, high efficiency In(1-x)Ga(x)N solar cells. Fabrication and demonstration of prototype devices and process scale-up will take place in Phase II. Successful completion of this program will enable a new class of radiation-hardened, robust, efficient, economical solar cells for space and terrestrial applications.

TEAM SPECIALTY PRODUCTS, CORP.
1400 Eubank SE
Albuquerque, NM 87123
(505) 291-0182

PI: Mr. Frank Thome
(505) 291-0182
Contract #:
Sandia National Laboratory
MS 1146, PO Box 5800
Albuquerque, NM 87185-1146
(505) 845-7842

ID#: B045-019-0146
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-019       Selected for Award
Title: Radiation Hardened Silicon Carbide Devices and Circuits
Abstract:   When successfully completed, this R&D will generate a low cost process for qualification of a wide range of radiation hardened (rad-hard) devices for military and space applications. The project will also help validate the inherent radiation-hardness characteristics of Silicon Carbide as an improvement over currently available silicon materials. Team Specialty Products (TSP) proposes a 5-step feasibility plan in Phase I that will demonstrate a low-cost test program to verify an available new generation semiconductor material that will alter the current process of locating rad-hard devices and qualifying them for military and space missions. TSP has identified the opportunity to greatly reduce test and qualification costs from the current complex process by reduction of steps and using a lower dose-rate at lower-cost facilities. The problem for manufacturing for radiation hardness is in both material and device type and the TSP test program will demonstrate through radiation testing an alternative to past and current practices. This proposal includes Sandia as a partner and work with Cree, Inc., the developers of Silicon Carbide as a semiconductor material that is very promising for rad-hard applications. If Phase I is successful, Cree will supply samples in Phase II for prototype test and evaluation.

TECHFINITY, INC.
4505 Las Virgenes Road, Suite 117
Calabasas, CA 91302
(818) 878-9341

PI: Dr. Berta Sandberg
(818) 878-9341
Contract #:
UCLA
Mathematics Department, Physical Sciences Division
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597
(310) 825-1042

ID#: B045-014-0221
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-014       Selected for Award
Title: Target Scene Resolution and Calibration Using Innovative Region Based Active Contour Techniques
Abstract:   During terminal homing, when the interceptor aim point is guided principally by its IR seeker, there are many events within the seeker field of view (FOV) that can contribute to a failure to intercept. Some major events and associated IR image phenomena are: (1) Booster intensity overwhelming the intensity of the hard body. (2) Re-entry vehicle (RV) separation from a post boost vehicle (PBV), and (3) transient shock wave for an endo-atmospheric intercept. Given the stressing timelines of KEI, there is a need to quickly and accurately determine the precise location of the physical centroid of a ballistic missile hard body in order to find the desired point of intercept for the kill vehicle. A recently developed set of image processing algorithms developed at the UCLA Math Department will help solve this problem. These algorithms will differentiate several objects of different intensities, using the image data directly to find the centroid of the hard body. In this context, the only detection heuristic is that there may be more than one object within the images. The proposed image processing algorithms will be combined in an integrated fashion with the physical dynamics of the plume, shock wave and hard body. Our algorithms include feature detection, identification, tracking, and aim point selection. Approaches that will be investigated will include the following: 1. Image segmentation (active contour methods) to detect the separate parts of the boosting missile; 2. Use the object region rather then edge information for tracking; and 3. Considering that the image may be noisy. This approach has been successfully demostrated in a laboratory environment at UCLA on MIR ans commerciaal avaition applications.

TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT & TRANSFER, INC.
133 Defense Highway, Suite 212
Annapolis, MD 21401
(410) 224-3710

PI: Dr. Anthony DiGiovanni
(410) 987-1656
Contract #:
Johns Hopkins University
1110 Johns Hopkins Road
Laurel, MD 20723-6099
(443) 778-5034

ID#: B045-002-0258
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-002       Selected for Award
Title: Aero-Thermal Modeling for Spinel Asphere Development
Abstract:   While aspherical dome geometries provide enhanced aerodynamics versus hemispherical domes, they have been problematic to manufacture due to inadequate finishing techniques. However, recent advances in finishing technology have made their production possible. Magnesium aluminate spinel is a hard, transparent material, which is currently being scaled up to produce hemispherical transparent domes to support the Joint Common Missile. Development of aspherical spinel domes is also underway, but only recently has finishing technology been capable of dealing with these complicated geometries. Therefore, little analytical data exists as to the performance of spinel domes during hypersonic flight. In order to produce an aspherical, spinel dome design that mitigates the effects of aero-thermal heating during hypersonic flight, Technology Assessment and Transfer and Johns Hopkins University Advanced Physics Laboratory will optically characterize spinel at elevated temperatures, model the aerodynamic performance of three dome geometries, and produce two aspherical, transparent spinel dome blanks.

TRANSLUME
655 Phoenix Drive
Ann Arbor, MI 48108-2222
(734) 528-6371

PI: Dr. Philippe Bado
(734) 528-6330
Contract #:
Kettering University
1700 West Third Ave
Flint, MI 48504-4898
(810) 762-9934

ID#: B045-016-0100
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-016       Selected for Award
Title: Femtosecond Laser Micromachining of Optical Structures and Surfaces
Abstract:   Translume is proposing a glass manufacturing process that combines anisotropic wet chemical etching with femtosecond-laser nanostructuring to shape three-dimensional glass objects. This innovative fabrication technique can be used to machine optical structures, optical sensors, and optical surfaces with micron and submicron accuracy. It can also be used to texture surfaces. Our technique is cost-effective and can be readily transferred from the R&D laboratory to manufacturing.

UES, INC.
4401 Dayton-Xenia Road
Dayton, OH 45432-1894
(937) 426-6900

PI: Dr. Tai-il Mah
(937) 255-9829
Contract #:
New Mexico Tech
801 Leroy Place
Socorro, NM 87801
(505) 835-5152

ID#: B045-005-0008
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-005       Selected for Award
Title: Rapid Mirror Fabrication with Nanolaminate Surface
Abstract:   The objectives of the Phase I work are: 1) to demonstrate the fabrication of a small scale (~2 inches) replicated hybrid/composite mirror assemblage, based on the SiC/Si3N4 nano-laminates and 2) to measure the optical qualities of the mirror surface. The proposed replication technique is capable of providing fast and low-cost production of the high optical surface finish of large mirrors. The ceramic nano-laminate mirror deposition will be accomplished through magnetron sputtering technique. The nano-laminate mirror will be bonded to the SiC substructure using a negative CTE nano-powder reinforced geopolymer bonding phase and the entire hybrid/composite mirror system will be removed from a polished mandrel. The optical measurement (e.g., surface micro-roughness) of the mirror surface after being replicated from the mandrel will be carried out. The bond strength of the negative CTE nano-powder reinforced geopolymer will be measured through indirect means (e.g., SiC/SiC sandwich). The mechanical properties (strength and toughness) of SiC/Si3N4 nano-laminates will be also measured.

VANGUARD COMPOSITES GROUP/DR TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
5550 Oberlin Drive, Suite B
San Diego, CA 92121-1717
(858) 587-4210

PI: Mr. Robert Kolozs
(858) 587-4210
Contract #: W9113M04P0143
UCSD
Dept. of Mechanical and Aerosp, 9500 Gilman Drive
La Jolla, CA 92093-0411
(858) 534-6076

ID#: B045-012-0156
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 04-012       Awarded: 30JUL04
Title: Techniques For Radiation Hardening of EKV Through Incorporation of Shielding In Component Structures Fabricated From Be/Be Alloy Substitute Materials
Abstract:   Future Exoatmospheric Interceptor Kill Vehicle (EKV) system upgrades and Kinetic Energy Interceptors (KEI) are expected to require nuclear radiation hardening of electro-optics subsystems. Alternative approaches include hardening of individual electronic components or external shielding of the subsystem using the structural elements. High atomic number materials, such as gold, tantalum, tungsten or steel, are candidates for structural radiation shielding. A lightweight, low cost, producible structural radiation shielding approach is needed to address this EKV and KEI nuclear radiation hardening issue. A low cost, producible composite manufacturing process with integral metallic foil liner materials and designs is an alternative lightweight and low cost approach. A program is proposed to develop and demonstrate a low cost, producible, lightweight composite structure with integral nuclear radiation shielding for EKV structures and electro-optic subsystem hardening using integrated graphite composites and metallic foil materials and design technologies (called "InteGraFoil", a trademark of Vanguard Composites). The foil will be a tantalum-aluminum hybrid material designed to gradual decrease radiation effects from nuclear events. The process for making these Metallic Intermetallic Laminates (MIL) foils has been patented by UCSD, our team partner for this project. The Phase I program will demonstrate feasibility of the InteGraFoil-MIL radiation shielding approach by integrating EKV composite structural components and radiation shielding metallic foils and fabricating test articles using the composite manufacturing processes and conducting subscale testing. In Phase II, the composite structure manufacturing process and InteGraFoil-MIL radiation shielding approach will be developed and demonstrated by fabrication of a full-size EKV composite structure and conduct of structural and simulated nuclear radiation ground tests demonstrating performance of the concept for representative EKV design environments.

---------- NAVY ----------

21ST CENTURY SYSTEMS, INC.
12152 Windsor Hall Way
Herndon, VA 20170-2359
(571) 323-0080

PI: Dr. Plamen Petrov
(402) 505-7886
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0290
University of Nebraska, Omaha
EAB 203, 6001 Dodge Street
Omaha, NE 68182-0210
(402) 554-2286

ID#: N045-005-0112
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-005       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: COoperative Multiagent System for automated TArget Recognition by UAVs (COMSTAR)
Abstract:   Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) use has increased significantly, from rudimentary reconnaissance to complex missions. In the process of becoming smarter, UAVs have also become larger, more complex, and a lot more expensive. An alternative to the complex and costly UAV model is a new paradigm employing multiple, small or mini-UAVs, that operate in virtual swarms to achieve the complex objectives of today's reconnaissance missions. The advantage of this UAV swarm approach is clearly in the overall cost, increased redundancy, and a drastic reduction in single points of failure. The challenge is to develop swarming behaviors that can cope with the difficult conditions of combat. The team of 21st Century Systems, Inc. and the University of Nebraska, Omaha propose researching a concept called Co-Operative Multi-agent Automated Target Recognition UAVs (COMSTAR-UAV) to take advantage of advances in multi-agent system software ands the latest sensor and processing capabilities. The COMSTAR-UAV concept will be able to scale up efficiently in the number of UAVs deployed and in the amount of data collected and processed. Members of a COMSTAR-UAV swarm can congregate to exchange information and resources with each other making them more resilient to wireless network communication failures and loss of line of sight.

21ST CENTURY SYSTEMS, INC.
12152 Windsor Hall Way
Herndon, VA 20170-2359
(571) 323-0080

PI: Mr. Jeffrey Hicks
(402) 212-7474
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0274
University of Nebraska, Omaha
EAB 203, 6001 Dodge Street
Omaha, NE 68182-0210
(402) 554-2286

ID#: N045-025-0111
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-025       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Hybrid Intrinsic Cellular Inference Network (HICIN)
Abstract:   The capability to gather, analyze, and integrate vast amount of information from diverse data resources in various heterogeneous types and forms, and to distill from them the valuable intelligence leads or cohesions with respect to command and control decisions has become the top priority for U.S. military commanders. Correspondingly, inference mechanisms of automated systems must be empowered with hybrid ways of reasoning and integration. The team of 21st Century Systems Inc. and the University of Nebraska, Omaha propose a system concept entitled "HICIN," (Hybrid Intrinsic Cellular Inference Network) to address these issues. HICIN is an intelligent inference structure that accommodates multiple inference mechanisms for reasoning and integration of hybrid data sets in heterogeneous forms with quantitative and qualitative accounts of data certainties and source reliabilities. The technique will allow a more accurate and reliable account of complex intelligences from multiple sources of hidden and diversely dispersed information pieces. The highest priority of the application areas of the research will be Navy multi-source combat information integration and intelligence support within the Navy's FORCEnet capabilities. A prototype to demonstrate the feasibility of the structure and its application to battlespace data fusion and C2 decision support will be implemented.

3 PHOENIX, LLC
9607 Jomar Drive
Fairfax, VA 22032-2014
(571) 331-9431

PI: Dr. Russell Jeffers
(703) 795-8574
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0233
George Mason University
230 Science and Technology II, 4400 University Drive
Fairfax, VA 22030-4444
(703) 993-1569

ID#: N045-011-0415
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-011       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Shallow Water Beamformer
Abstract:   Spatial processing for Navy arrays has been designed in nearly all cases based on the a horizontally propagating plane wave model, the underlying assumption being that energy arrives from far field targets as a superposition of free field traveling waves at frequencies determined by the target signature. For most situations this model has been considered "good enough", particularly in deep water operations. Multi-path, has been ignored in spatial processing and dealt with in various ad hoc ways for target localization. It is well known that acoustic propagation is much more complex than the simple model due to boundary interactions (as evidenced by multi-path), sound velocity variability, and other more complicated effects. These effects are most prominent in shallow water and at low frequencies where surface and bottom interactions are prevalent. Shallow water environment presents the technical challenge of designing beamformers based on a suitable shallow water signal model rather than the simple horizontal plane wave assumption. Our proposal is to design such a beamformer based on state-of-the-practice characterization of shallow water sound fields. We will focus our efforts first on horizontal line arrays (design will be extendable to volumetric arrays), and surface noise sources (ships and surf hot spots).

ADVANCED CERAMICS RESEARCH, INC.
3292 E. Hemisphere Loop
Tucson, AZ 85706-5013
(520) 573-6300

PI: Mr. Anthony C. Mulligan
(520) 434-6392
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0291
University of Arizona
P. O. Box 210012
Tucson, AZ 85721
(520) 621-3513

ID#: N045-004-0428
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-004       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Sonobuoy Launched small UAV system
Abstract:   During this program ACR will design, develop, test and demonstrate a low cost, fully autonomous, sonobuoy launched UAV with interchangeable payloads. The vehicle will meet all deployment, speed, endurance, power, fuel and range requirements set forth in the solicitation. In conjunction with that effort ACR will solve the aircraft control and deployment problems unique to this application. ACR's university partner will support the unique control and sensor needs associated with operating a UAV in this environment. The university partner will focus on the optimization of flight sensors and control surfaces in order to control and orient the UAV.

ADVANCED CERAMICS RESEARCH, INC.
3292 E. Hemisphere Loop
Tucson, AZ 85706-5013
(520) 573-6300

PI: Dr. Mark Patterson
(520) 573-6300
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0260
Penn State University
101 Hammond Bldg
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 865-1804

ID#: N045-015-0388
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-015       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Advanced Blast Packaging Materials
Abstract:   Advanced Ceramics Research Inc., (ACR) will collaborate with Professor Ted Krauthammer Director, Protective Technology Center, Penn State University, to screen materials, design and validate a ballistic vessel capable of safely containing detonation of a 2000lb bomb for a minimum container mass and size. This proposal will assess new technologies and new state-of-the-art materials, and through a thorough understanding of the technology and challenges that the problem presents, optimize the overall design and materials configuration to achieve detonation confinement with the minimum mass. The performance of new energy adsorbing ceramics will be integrated with light weight ballistic composites capable of blast containment. Aspects of shrapnel containment will be addressed through the integration of capture/defeat mechanisms and modeling will be used to predict the shock and gas pressure magnitudes and durations. A structural dynamics model will be used to perform parametric studies on the response of different design configurations thereby optimizing the materials configuration to provide minimum vessel mass.

ADVANCED MATERIALS TECHNOLOGY, INC.
10814 Preservation View Dr, Suite 205
Tampa, FL 33626
(813) 855-8919

PI: Dr. Akbar G Fard
(813) 855-8919
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0261
Southwest Research Institute
6220 Culebra Road
San Antonio, TX 78238
(210) 522-2340

ID#: N045-015-0001
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-015       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Advanced Blast Packaging Materials
Abstract:   Advanced Materials Technology, Inc responds to the Navy need to develop novel blast packaging materials that will contain blast effects of an accidentally detonated weapon, namely MK84 bomb. The container should be lightweight and strong for ease of handling and must meet shipboard fire, smoke, and toxicity requirements. We propose to develop a highly innovative and lightweight container structure that will meet the desired requirements. The novel blast packaging design will incorporate two essential principles, namely energy (shock) absorption and fragment containment. The design goals can be accomplished via several layers of different materials, each performing a separate function. Moreover, we shall perform a numerical simulation of the detonation of a MK84 bomb to define parameters required for blast containment, in particular: (1) tensile and compression properties of new materials such as modulus, strength, elongation at high strain rates, (2) container configuration such as thickness and diameter of container, and (3) layer configuration in multi-layer container structure. The simulation study will help us guide the development of unique materials and design configuration to meet program objectives. Once the feasibility of the proposed concept is demonstrated in Phase I, we shall scale-up the proposed technology in the Phase II program.

ADVATECH PACIFIC, INC.
2015 Park Avenue, Suite 8
Redlands, CA 92373
(703) 815-0757

PI: Mr. Robert Agnew
(909) 307-6218
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0223
Sandia National Laboratories
PO Box 5800
Albuquerque, NM 87185-0382
(505) 844-7707

ID#: N045-024-0358
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-024       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Multi-disciplinary Computational Tools for Naval Design
Abstract:   This STTR provides the Navy with a unique opportunity to fundamentally change the way ship design and analysis is accomplished by defining in Phase I the tools and computational infrastructure required to integrate selected individual specialty design and analysis tools into an overall Naval Engineering Analysis Tool (NEAT). NEAT, when mature has the potential to significantly reduce the design and analysis cycle time which will allow earlier inclusion of higher fidelity analysis into the design process. This will establish the integration framework that relatively easily allows the inclusion of specialty analysis such for the assessment of IR, EM, and acoustic signatures, along with explosive damage and implosion. This will reduce design cost, improve mission performance, reduce technical risk during acquisition and get systems to the fleet earlier with a higher state of initial maturity.

AFS TRINITY POWER CORP.
Post Office Box 449
Medina, WA 98039
(925) 455-7231

PI: Mr. Donald Bender
(925) 455-7990
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0271
Lawrence Livermore National Lab
P.O. Box 808, L-644
Livermore, CA 94551
(925) 422-7802

ID#: N045-013-0421
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-013       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Advanced Flywheel Energy Storage for Pulsed Power Applications
Abstract:   AFS Trinity Power proposes to develop the design concept for an advanced shipboard flywheel power system. The design will minimize the size and weight of a complete flywheel system including all ancillary components. The end products will be a design concept review and final report describing follow-on Phase II work. AFS Trinity will team with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on this STTR. The Lab is well known for its expertise in flywheel power systems and other advanced energy technologies for both commercial and military applications Critical issues we will address in Phase I are: specific power, specific energy, compact power electronics design, optimum use of shipboard interfaces such as cooling and electric power, optimized packaging of the complete system including ancillary equipment and a shock and vibration mounting design. AFS Trinity has over ten years experience developing advanced flywheel systems using high-speed composite rotors, magnetic bearings and proprietary motor control software. The Company plans to reach commercial success by manufacturing and selling flywheel power systems for several markets. Our business plan shows initial commercial flywheel systems for power quality applications followed by distributed generation, hybrid vehicles, industrial and military applications.

AGILTRON CORP.
220 Ballardvale St., Suite D
Wilmington, MA 01887-1050
(978) 694-1006

PI: Dr. Jack Salerno
(978) 694-1006
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0213
University of Oklahoma
660 Parrington Oval, Room 201, Office of Technology Dev.
Norman, OK 73019
(405) 325-3800

ID#: N045-016-0383
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-016       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Multi-Band / Multi-Threat Warning System with a Single Sensor
Abstract:   Agiltron and University of Oklahoma jointly propose a revolutionary multi-band/multi-threat warning system having intrinsic advantages in sensitivity, speed, energy efficiency, reliability, and cost as compared with the competitive approaches. The device integrates three-band detection and identification within a single sensor, eliminating the need of pixel registration and data fusion from multiple sensors while providing fast operation speed capable of over one hundred frames per second for each of the three bands. Equipped with Agiltron's proprietary 360-degree FOV fisheye lens and a 512x512 MEMS IR sensor array, the system can provide better than 1-degree over a field of view of 360-degrees in azimuth and in elevation (-10-degrees to +60-degrees). Moreover, the design is simple, compact, lightweight, low power consumption, rugged, and long operating life. The innovation is based on pixel-level integration of micro-machined thermal-mechanical and optical-reflective structures of bi-materials that directly convert an IR image into a visible image. The design incorporates direct optical readout, which eliminates the drawback of electronic means that inevitably introduces chip complexity and additional signal loss due to thermal contact made to the detector element.

ALPHATECH, INC.
6 New England Executive Park
Burlington, MA 01803-5012
(781) 273-3388

PI: Dr. Craig T. Lawrence
(703) 524-6263
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0325
George Mason University
4400 University Drive, MS 4C6
Fairfax, VA 22030-4444
(703) 993-2295

ID#: N045-003-0354
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-003       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Automated Synchronized Routing and Scheduling for Agile Aerial Platforms
Abstract:   ALPHATECH proposes to develop a tool addressing the challenging problem of computing operationally realistic routes and activity schedules for aerial vehicles, accounting for the competing objectives and nonlinear constraints inherent in military path planning. Using an innovative combination of optimization techniques, this tool will generate platform trajectories and platform-task assignments as well as generate new plans in response to changes in the theater over time. We will accomplish this by hierarchically decomposing the flight path construction problem. In the first stage, an approximate dynamic programming formulation will be used, incrementally building synchronized coarse platform trajectories. In the second stage, multi-grid methods will be applied to refine the routes based on detailed models (platform capabilities, terrain, and environment). Finally, based on the agile routes, detailed activity schedules will be computed. Implementation of this methodology will provide mission planners with a robust planning and re-planning tool for unmanned vehicles. Phase I development will focus on the ISR planning problem, though the algorithms and techniques that will be developed will extend to other applications, such as strike.

ANALYTIC POWER LLC
2-X Gill Street
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 935-1333

PI: Ms. Valerie Bloomfield
(781) 935-1333
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0300
Tufts University
4 Colby Street
Medford, MA 02155
(617) 627-4358

ID#: N045-034-0153
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-034       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Clean Gas Reformer - A Compact Fuel Reformer for Undersea Vehicle Fuel Cells
Abstract:   Diesel fuel is a primary candidate for use aboard submarines. It has a high energy density and it is already in the Navy inventory. Fuel cells are attractive for submarines from an energy density perspective. Unfortunately, in hydrocarbon reforming power systems, the fuel cell power density is overshadowed by the fuel processing system which is often several times the size and cost of the fuel cell. The system complexity decreases efficiency. Hydrocarbon reformate contains unacceptable amounts of impurities, such as carbon oxides and ammonia, which have been shown to adversely affect the life of PEM cells. Diesel fuel reformate has a low hydrogen concentration resulting in large shift converters and selective oxidizers. The Clean Gas Reformer (CGR) addresses the deficiencies of conventional fuel processors and integrates efficiently with a PEM fuel cell. The CGR combines an ATR with a novel hydrogen separator - glass - resulting in fuel cell reactant gas that is clean and 100% hydrogen, increasing performance, lifetime and reliability. Based on MEMS technology, the ATR is a simple, reliable method of generating syngas from diesel fuel. The CGR supplies pure hydrogen to the fuel cell.

APPLIED EM, INC.
24 Research Drive
Hampton, VA 23666
(757) 224-2035

PI: Dr. C. J. Reddy
(757) 224-2035
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0236
The Ohio State University
1320 Kinnear Road
Columbus, OH 43212
(614) 292-8671

ID#: N045-010-0199
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-010       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Miniature Ultra-Wideband Antenna on Novel Substrates
Abstract:   Submarines require a suite of antennas for communications, navigation, and identification of Friend or Foe (IFF). As compared to surface ship antennas, submarine antennas are unique in design, shape, materials, and performance due to space and weight limitations often in extreme environmental conditions. Under this effort, we propose a new class of more capable communication and data reception apertures as well as surveillance components to address the network-centric requirements envisioned for future Navy combat operations. Particular emphasis is given on the design of a single untrawideband aperture that covers most of the communciation needs. A novel miniature broadband antenna is proposed that incorporates newly designed materials and metallization shapes. Various high contrast inhomogeneous dielectrics are proposed along with a new class of magnetic photonic crystals whose potential for antenna miniaturization and field control has been previously demonstrated. Formal design optimization methods will be employed as part of the design process to achieve an optimal design (including impedance matching, gain and return loss) subject to the proposed objectives and availability of ceramic materials and crystals from off-the-shelf. Full wave analysis and preliminary measurement will be performed for verification of the design.

APPLIED PHYSICAL SCIENCES CORP.
2 State Street, Suite 300
New London, CT 06320-6356
(860) 440-3253

PI: Dr. Charles Corrado
(860) 440-3253
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0234
Massachusetts Institute of Technolo
77 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-3529

ID#: N045-011-0301
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-011       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Non-Plane-Wave noise source localization for horizontal arrays at low frequency in very shallow water (VSW)
Abstract:   Localizing low frequency noise sources in shallow water using a horizontal array is complicated by waveguide dispersion and maneuverability constraints. If the dispersive properties of the sound propagation channel are well known, waveguide effects can be used advantageously for the purpose of localizing sources without requiring a relative change in bearing to the target. Here we propose to investigate the feasibility of using optimal waveguide source localization (OWSL). In this approach, the approximate bearing of a source is first obtained using plane-wave beamforming. Sophisticated processing techniques exploiting broadband waveguide physics and waveguide invariant theory are then used to efficiently refine the bearing estimate and simultaneously estimate the range of the source. Our Phase I effort will include development of a high fidelity system simulation to determine the expected performance of OWSL for representative scenarios assuming expected uncertainties in both the important environmental (e.g., sound speed) and system (e.g., noise levels and sensor locations) parameters. Utilizing a new statistical methodology, we will determine measurement system requirements, such as synthetic array aperture length and measurement sample size, necessary to attain desired design accuracy. A detailed evaluation and demonstration process required for Fleet implementation will also be developed.

APPLIED PHYSICAL SCIENCES CORP.
2 State Street, Suite 300
New London, CT 06320-6356
(860) 440-3253

PI: Mr. Jason Rudzinsky
(860) 440-3253
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0257
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institutio
98 Water Street
Woods Hole, MA 02543
(508) 289-2462

ID#: N045-020-0300
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-020       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Smart Tether for Relative Localization of Moored and Towed Bodies
Abstract:   Determining a geo-reference of an underwater object is a critical requirement for marine applications such as mine-hunting and marine surveying. Although a GPS fix can be obtained at the surface, the watch circle of a tether connecting a surface and underwater body can impose positional errors that are far greater than GPS errors. Here we propose to develop a technology to automatically determine the geodetic location of an underwater body by acoustically measuring the relative position vector to a surface expression, equipped with an acoustic transmitter. The proposed system makes use of vector hydrophones, allowing determination of the bearing of a surface expression relative to a moored body with a single, relatively small sensor. Significantly, the angle of arrival accuracy of vector sensor is nearly independent of frequency, facilitating a compact, low frequency localizing system. This is an important consideration in very shallow water or surf zone regions where bubbles and suspended sediment can have impose enormous high frequency acoustic attenuation. The proposed system is envisioned to provide a low cost, general purpose solution to a host of underwater positioning applications. One important potential application to be investigated is the enabling of a sea-based Differential Global Positioning Base Station.

APTIMA, INC.
12 Gill Street, Suite 1400
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 496-2424

PI: Dr. Jared Freeman
(202) 842-1548
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0250
Carnegie Mellon University
405 Warner Hall, 5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 268-9912

ID#: N045-026-0303
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-026       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: IMAGES: Instrument for the Measurement and Advancement of Group Environmental SA
Abstract:   The objective of the proposed work is to assess and enhance team situational awareness in distributed, mixed-synchrony environments. To do so, we will integrate existing state-of-the-art conceptual mapping and analysis technologies with a cutting edge peer-to-peer infrastructure. The aggregate tool will have the ability to construct a representation of each team member's situational awareness (using text-based analysis tools), associate each representation with the positional context of team member, identify discrepancies within the team and/or between the team and its commander, and suggest possible strategies for greater team synchronization and understanding of the commander's intent. The measures, diagnosis, and remediation will be communicated using dynamic, intuitive visualizations. We call this tool for improving team cognition IMAGES, an Instrument for the Measurement and Advancement of Group Environmental SA (situational awareness).

ARCHITECTURE TECHNOLOGY CORP.
9971 Valley View Road
Eden Prairie, MN 55344
(952) 829-5864

PI: Mr. Eric J. Dahlman
(952) 829-5864
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0222
University of Minnesota
Sponsored Projects Administrat, 200 Oak Street SE, Suite 405
Minneapolis, MN 55455-2070
(612) 625-3415

ID#: N045-017-0151
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-017       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: SIMON: Simulation and Modeling for SANs
Abstract:   The use of Net-Centric Enterprise Services (NCES) to provide ubiquitous access to information within the Department of Defense presents challenges in both the design and implementation of these systems. The need to provide information to the war-fighter in a timely manner while maintaining the security of the system in challenging environments far exceeds the capabilities of present day enterprise storage solutions. New technologies are becoming available that promise the ability to go beyond present limitations and create a data infrastructure for the DoD. These systems would allow the information to be quickly disseminated to the field where it is needed while maintaining the requisite level of security. The present challenge facing the DoD is properly identifying the roles of these emerging technologies and evaluating candidate designs for their deployment in the field. To address this need Architecture Technology Corporation (ATC) and the University of Minnesota are proposing the creation of SIMON (Simulation and Modeling for SANs) which will provide the DoD with the means to evaluate potential storage solutions and technologies through simulation and modeling. This approach will allow the impact of various technologies and design decisions within NCES to be evaluated quickly and efficiently.

ARIZANT HEALTHCARE, INC.
10393 W. 70th St.
Eden Prairie, MN 55344
(952) 947-1308

PI: Dr. Gary Hansen
(952) 947-1388
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0273
University of Minnesota
Mechanical Engineering, R. 238, 111 Church st SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455
(612) 625-5502

ID#: N045-021-0053
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-021       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Patient Warming Device for Casualty Care
Abstract:   The intent of this phase 1 proposal is to demonstrate the feasibility of forced air convective warming to prevent hypothermia among battlefield casualties. The consequences of hypothermia for trauma victims can be severe, and the technical requirements of providing safe warming therapy in the field are challenging. Unfortunately while the need is great, no product currently on the market acceptably meets this challenge. Convective warming is a safe, effective, and widely accepted means for treating hypothermia in hospitals and clinics. In order to run a portable convective warming device, alternative high energy-density power sources must be identified. Then it is necessary to control the energy source with enough confidence to meet the stringent demands of medical safety. Because of its uniform heat flow, we believe that convective warming has the best chance of doing this, as long as the energy source can be contained and managed. We have developed a device, the DCRTM ("direct contact rotating temperature mixer") that is likely to solve the problem. By building a working proof-of-concept prototype we will assess whether the DCRTM or equivalent meets the need for field warming.

AUGUSTA SYSTEMS, INC.
3606 Collins Ferry Road, Suite 202
Morgantown, WV 26505
(304) 599-3200

PI: Dr. John Moody
(304) 599-4255
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0288
West Virginia University
P.O. Box 6109
Morgantown, WV 26506-6109
(304) 293-6371

ID#: N045-005-0116
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-005       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Development of a Concept for Swarmed mini-UAVs for Automatic Target Recognition
Abstract:   Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have served to enhance and augment the surveillance and reconnaissance abilities of the military of the United States of America. In developing the next generation of UAVs, the application of novel methodologies to UAV control will become more important as the number and mission criticality of deployed UAVs continues to increase. One of these novel approaches, long considered to possess some ideal characteristics, is the idea of reactive agents and the associated emergent behavior. This technique possesses the potential to provide minimal user intervention, a high level of robustness, and largely autonomous operation provided that suitable algorithms and techniques can be developed. The proposed work should provide the basic mathematical framework for reactive agent based Automatic Target Recognition in which these reactive agents could be simulated and, based on this simulation, optimization strategies for simple emergent behaviors developed along with mission based parameters estimated. The proposed approach models sensing behavior from an information theory perspective and then utilizes this in generating mission based system parameters followed by optimization of those parameters. If successful, this should allow for the implementation of reactive agent based techniques for UAV control embodying the benefits as appropriate.

BARRON ASSOC., INC.
1410 Sachem Place, Suite 202
Charlottesville, VA 22901-2496
(434) 973-1215

PI: Mr. Jason O. Burkholder
(434) 973-1215
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0284
University of South Carolina
Byrnes International Building, 5th Floor, 901 Sumter Street
Columbia, SC 29208
(803) 777-7093

ID#: N045-023-0256
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-023       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Reconfigurable Electrical Power System
Abstract:   Under this STTR Phase I program, we propose to develop and demonstrate dual-use Reconfigurable Electrical Power System (REPS) technology that will provide the intelligence and capability to automatically and dynamically reconfigure naval and commercial marine shipboard power systems (SPSs) while maintaining uninterrupted power to vital and sensitive loads. The proposed approach includes an intelligent control algorithm that optimizes the electrical system configuration with respect to specified system constraints. The Phase I effort will exploit recent work by Barron Associates that demonstrated an approach for the fast protection of shipboard electrical power systems based on a novel high-speed relay (HSR) algorithm. The HSR algorithm and REPS will work together to ensure that continuous quality power is maintained automatically to all vital and sensitive shipboard loads, thereby reducing manning and minimizing the ship's operating costs. The proposing team includes Barron Associates, a company with the proven ability to deliver high-quality algorithms, software, and hardware; the University of South Carolina, which has a sophisticated virtual test bed capability for simulating shipboard power systems; and Power Paragon, a manufacturer of SPS equipment for both military and commercial customers, which will enable rapid transition of the REPS technology into the fleet.

BOSTON APPLIED TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
150H New Boston Street
Woburn, MA 01801-6204
(781) 935-2800

PI: Dr. Kewen K. Li
(781) 935-2800
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0229
University of Puerto Rico
Research & Development Center, University of Puerto Rico
Mayagez, PR 00681
(787) 831-2065

ID#: N045-008-0381
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-008       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Nanograin Ceramic Optical Composite Window
Abstract:   Infrared (IR) window materials possessing both good optical and mechanical properties have been identified and developed for several decades. While their optical properties have been perfected to approaching the theoretical limits, higher mechanical strengths are still sought to meet the ever-demanding application needs. One route to improved mechanical and other properties will be through nanostructure engineering. It is possible to realize the next-generation IR window materials with properly designed nanostructural composite materials, in which two or more phases are combined at the nano scale to give enhanced properties not achievable with any of the single components. Boston Applied Technologies, in collaboration with University of Puerto Rico, proposes a novel chemical process to conveniently synthesize nanograin ceramic IR windows in production volume. The high purities of the starting materials will be maintained in the final products since the entire nanoparticle synthesis process will be eliminated. A recently developed combinatorial forming technique will be used to quickly and economically scan a few candidate systems. This unique approach will enable us to establish a vast materials database, from which the best composite formulation can be identified and further optimized. The availability of higher strength IR windows will certainly advance U.S. defense capabilities, and at the same time find many new applications in numerous commercial markets.

CALNETIX
12880 Moore Street
Cerritos, CA 90703
(562) 293-1685

PI: Mr. Patrick McMullen
(562) 293-1685
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0272
Texas A&M - EMPE
332 Wisenbaker Engineering RC, 3000 TAMU
College Station, TX 77843-3000
(979) 862-1696

ID#: N045-013-0384
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-013       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Advanced Flywheel Energy Storage for Pulsed Power Applications
Abstract:   Existing battery based energy storage systems are not suited for short duration, high cycle life, deep discharge, and small required size applications. Ultra/super capacitors (UC) are limited by some of the same issues as batteries, i.e. cycle life limitations, disposal, and continue to remain at a much higher cost than batteries. Flywheels can cost effectively fill the short duration, high cycle life applications that batteries and UC's cannot, specifically as products that are cost competitive with existing battery based systems for specific applications where flywheels out perform and offer benefits. Adequate energy is present in conventional flywheel storage systems to provide more power for a shorter duration. A flywheel designed for 125kw for 16 seconds stores enough energy to provide 2MW for 1 second. To provide high discharge for very short durations, the generator and power electronics must be configured such that the power from the stored energy can be realized. Higher speed flywheels allow the generator to be much smaller, minimizing its size and cost. This Phase I will focus on developing a conceptual design for a pulsed power flywheel system. The focus of this effort will be on the motor/generator design and the power electronics design.

CARACAL, INC.
4514 Plummer street
Pittsburgh, PA 15201
(724) 272-7250

PI: Dr. olle kordina
(813) 842-7398
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0226
University of South Florida
4202 East Fowler Avenue, ENB 118
Tampa, FL 33620
(813) 974-4773

ID#: N045-029-0200
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-029       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: SiC Epitaxial Growth by Halo-hydrocarbon Precursor Growth
Abstract:   The epitaxial growth of SiC is limited by two main processes; homogeneous nucleation and surface mobility at high growth rates. We propose to investigate the growth of SiC using three different halo-hydrocarbons and two or three different chlorinated Si chemistries and also combine the most promising carbon and silicon chemistries. The goal from phase I is to suggest a suitable chemistry eliminating homogeneous nucleation and furthermore investigate the lower limits in temperature where significantly higher growth rates (> 20 micrometer/h) can be achieved without deteriorating the crystalline quality. Low temperature growth is believed to greatly reduce the impurities leeching out of the hot graphite susceptor and the quartz. Lower temperature processes giving impeccable crystalline quality are thus essential if high voltage (>10kV) power devices are to be made. Another goal of the phase I effort is to suggest a suitable reactor configuration for improved utilization of the proposed chemistry.

CARACAL, INC.
4514 Plummer street
Pittsburgh, PA 15201
(724) 272-7250

PI: Dr. Olle Kordina
(813) 841-7398
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0237
University of South Florida
4202 East Fowler Avenue, ENB 118
Tampa, FL 33620
(813) 974-4773

ID#: N045-030-0202
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-030       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Halo-hydrocarbon Growth of Bulk SiC
Abstract:   We propose to use a gas fed vertical style sublimation reactor that can accomodate several different types of chemistries and be modified to a number of different approaches. The reactor is similar to the HTCVD reactor developed by Link”ping University and Okmetic. The approach will be to initially try out different chemistries at fairly high temperatures where sublimation is a dominant process. By studying the gas phase nucleation a high degree of understanding can be derived and a moderate temperature process can be developed. Using the knowledge from these experiments and from similar experiments conducted in a CVD reactor, a low temperature CVD approach will be developed with no thermal gradient. It is believed that a growth rate of at least 300 micrometer/h can be achieved at modest temperatures around 1500 - 1600C using the correct chemistry. The main issue is to be able to transport the material to the wafer with a minimum of parasitic processes and deposit the material on the wafer in a uniform and orderly fashion. The level of success is greatly increased since both a sublimation approach and a CVD approach will be tried and compared against each other.

CHARLES RIVER ANALYTICS, INC.
625 Mount Auburn Street
Cambridge, MA 02138-4555
(617) 491-3474

PI: Dr. Subrata K. Das
(617) 491-3474
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0276
Harvard University
Maxwell-Dworkin Laboratory , 33 Oxford Street, Room 251
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 496-1876

ID#: N045-025-0168
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-025       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Hybrid Inferencing for Data Fusion and Situation Assessment
Abstract:   We propose to develop a hybrid inference system for data fusion and situation assessment for multi-source intelligence analysis with an application to Marine Corps operations in urban environments. Our proposed approach views an urban environment as a physical system whose state vector at any particular time is composed of a large number of both discrete and continuous variables representing properties of tracked entities. Inferencing on such vector-based models exploits both causal dependencies among variables in the state vector via its Dynamic Belief Network (DBN) representation and vector decomposition into weakly interacting subcomponents; such decomposition naturally occurs due to multiple tracked adversarial units working autonomously with intermittent communications amongst themselves. To efficiently utilize the decomposition, instead of straightforward particle filtering based inferencing, the proposed algorithm maintains factored particles over clusters of state variables. Because the clusters have far fewer variables than the entire state space, the variance resulting from maintaining cluster distributions is much smaller than that from maintaining the belief state as a whole. Based on the DBN structure of each cluster of variables, the algorithm samples discrete modes and approximates the continuous variables by a multi-normal distribution updated at each time step by the unscented Kalman filter.

CHIRP CORP.
8248 Sugarman Drive
La Jolla, CA 92037
(858) 453-4406

PI: Dr. Richard A. Altes
(858) 453-4406
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0239
University of Rochester
P.O. Box 270231
Rochester, NY 14627-0231
(716) 275-4054

ID#: N045-007-0319
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-007       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Adaptive Space-Time Radar Techniques and Waveforms
Abstract:   Energy-on-target is maximized in optics and ocean acoustics by transmitting a time-reversed (spectral phase conjugated) version of received data at each array element or subarray. This process uses an unknown propagation channel as its own space-time matched filter to implement a RAKE receiver at the target location. (A RAKE receiver passes data through a filter that is matched to the channel impulse response.) Several techniques for improving the phase conjugation process for radar applications are introduced in this proposal. A competing process is to estimate the space-time channel filter at the receiver and to perform internal RAKE processing. Part of the proposal is to compare the detection (ROC) performance of conventional phase conjugation, improved phase conjugation, and internal RAKE processing for monostatic and bistatic operation. The proposal also considers other ways to maximize energy-on-target: (1) Coherent combining of echoes from a sequence of waveforms that have low mutual interference, (2) SAR processing, and (3) adaptive waveform design to maximize signal-to-interference ratio (SIR). Phase conjugation processing, internal RAKE processing, multi-echo coherent combining, SAR, and SIR maximization require waveforms with different properties. Hyperbolic frequency modulation (HFM), modified hyperbolic-congruence frequency-hop codes, and modified Welch-Costas frequency-hop codes are considered for the various tasks.

CSA ENGINEERING, INC.
2565 Leghorn Street
Mountain View, CA 94043-1613
(650) 210-9000

PI: Dr. Sean Fahey
(650) 210-9000
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0303
Virginia Polytechnic Institute
Office of Sponsored Programs, 460 Turner Street, Suite 306
Blacksburg, VA 24060
(540) 231-5281

ID#: N045-022-0248
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-022       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Polymeric Energy Harvester for Underwater Propulsor Applications
Abstract:   One particular class of electroactive polymers, ionomeric polymers, offers electromechanical properties highly conducive to energy harvesting. The proposed research will show the feasibility of a self-powered remote sensing device that exploits key ionomeric polymer properties. The materials exhibit strong electromechanical coupling, much as do piezoceramic and other smart materials. Elastic modulus is roughly two orders of magnitude lower than piezoceramics and two orders of magnitude higher than rubber. Ionomeric polymers can strain in excess of 10% without failure. This unique combination of high strains - or low modulus to yield ratio - and strong electromechanical coupling make ionomeric polymers ideal for low frequency energy harvesting under large static preloads, a relevant environment for condition based monitoring in underwater propulsors. After a survey that updates properties of available materials, we will construct and test a multi-layer transducer. A circuit for sensing, power extraction, storage and transmission will be designed and built. A second engineering model will then be built and tested. Phase 1 will conclude with a survey of micro-power sensing and communications components, and a scaling analysis of the energy harvester. Phase 2 will demonstrate a full-scale device in meaningful field environment in collaboration with our industrial partner.

CUSTOM MANUFACTURING & ENGINEERING, INC.
2904 44th Avenue North
St. Petersburg, FL 33714
(727) 547-9799

PI: Mr. Rick Silva
(727) 547-9799
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0283
Texas A&M University
Power Systems Automation Lab, 3128 TAMUS
College Station, TX 77843-3128
(979) 862-8869

ID#: N045-023-0325
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-023       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Advanced Electrical Power Management System
Abstract:   Shipboard operations can be improved with automated monitoring/control of the power distribution networks using our concept for an advanced electrical power system. Current or future naval systems need a capability to automatically manage and adapt to dynamic shipboard loads, fault conditions and battle damage. In Phase I, an innovative, flexible solution for the Advanced Electrical Power Management System will be developed by our team. With significant intelligent power control R&D experience at CME, we will leverage the software and algorithm work of our research institution partner, Texas A&M's Power Systems Automation Laboratory. We provide the experience with hardware and software in power distribution networks, user interfaces, power electronics, power sources, and military platform operations including ships. In Phase I, we will leverage several technologies from CME and Texas A&M to integrate into a single power analysis and reconfiguration engine with an interface module. We will design a monitor/control system simulation to demonstrate effective communication of essential power network information to ship personnel. The engine and interface module will evolve into the Phase III Advanced Electrical Power System fully capable of controlling shipboard power distribution systems. Our team includes Dr Butler-Purry, an ONR award-winning expert in shipboard power who provides one of the key technologies we will transition during this project.

DETECCA COMMUNICATIONS, INC.
13017 Wisteria Drive, Suite 420
Germantown, MD 20874
(301) 455-8104

PI: Dr. Michael S. Babst
(301) 455-8104
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0278
The Applied Research Laboratory
P.O. Box 30, N. Atherton Street
State College, PA 16804
(814) 865-1493

ID#: N045-031-0055
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-031       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Advanced Robust Modulation (ARM)
Abstract:   Naval communications environments, both undersea and through-the-air, are typically more demanding than most applications, offering many exciting challenges and creative opportunities for the communication system designer. Challenges in undersea acoustic, optical, and radio-frequency channels include dispersion, multipath, severe signal attenuation, noise, limited bandwidth, and many other detriments to robust, secure, long-range, high-data rate, networked communications. Shipboard satellite communications also has the added challenges of time-varying Doppler due to ship motion and antenna handover outages. Finally, Turbo codes now allow communications systems to operate at much lower signal to noise ratios, making synchronization more challenging. Fortunately, a creative and new application of wavelets to communications solves many of these difficult problems and will help to reliably and securely connect OSD's undersea assets to the Global Information Grid. Scale-Time Offset Robust Modulation (STORM) is a unique modulation technique that simultaneously possesses the features of robustness, security, high data rate, rapid synchronization and ad-hoc configuration for high bandwidth mobile platform communications. The performance of STORM excels in challenging communication environments. This technique has been described in several recent publications and shows much promise in both undersea and RF communications. It can be used as a stand-alone modulation technique, or as a plug-in to enhance existing maritime communication systems. In addition, the technology shows significant promise for applications in Joint-Tactical Radio System (JTRS), Transformational Communication Satellite (TCS) systems, and commercial SATCOM.

DIRECTED VAPOR TECHNOLOGIES INTERNATIONAL, INC.
2 Boar's Head Lane
Charlottesville, VA 22903
(434) 977-1405

PI: Dr. Derek D. Hass
(434) 977-1405
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0315
Iowa State University
Dept. of Materials Science, 107 Metals Development
Ames, IA 50011-2207
(515) 294-4713

ID#: N045-001-0240
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-001       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: High-Temperature Coatings for Turbine Blades and Vanes
Abstract:   Advanced thermal barrier coating systems are desired for naval gas turbine engines. These coatings will increase the durability of hot-section engine components to significantly improve the time "on-wing", safety and readiness of these engines. In this work, we will use novel coating synthesis techniques that enable the deposition of advanced bond coat and top coat compositions and microstructures to achieve a comprehensive thermal barrier coating system that provides unprecedented thermal protection and substantially extended thermal cycle lifetimes. Low cost, high throughput processing for the entire TBC system is also envisioned. The proposed Phase I effort will identify TBC systems that are anticipated to meet the performance goals at both current and future engine operating temperatures and demonstrate the feasibility of applying entire TBC systems using our advanced processing techniques. The successful completion of the Phase I work will lead to a follow-on Phase II program focused on down-selecting candidate material(s) and applying the new coating onto bars for burner-rig testing and real aircraft components. Success in this objective will offer the military a pathway toward production implementation of these advanced coatings and the new deposition processing capabilities required for applying coatings of this type onto engine components.

ELECTRO ENERGY, INC.
30 Shelter Rock Road
Danbury, CT 06810
(203) 797-2699

PI: Mr. Martin Klein
(203) 797-2699
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0287
Rutgers University
607 Taylor Road
Piscataway, NJ 08854-8065
(732) 445-5700

ID#: N045-009-0245
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-009       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Extremely Power Dense Bipolar Nickel-Metal Hydride Energy Storage System
Abstract:   The project focuses on the development of an extremely power dense bipolar nickel-metal hydride energy storage system for the Rotary Electromagnetic Launcher (REML). The program centers on optimizing the design of EEI's bipolar battery using very thin electrode materials. The performance goals for the battery are to achieve power densities over 8 kW/L. This would represent a complete power system which would occupy about 10-20% of the target volume of 70 cubic feet, and would represent a 3-4x improvement over current state-of-the-art nickel metal hydride technology.

EUTECUS, INC.
5802 Cannonade Court, Austin, Texas 76746
Austin, TX 76746
(512) 327-0421

PI: Dr. Akos Zarandy
(512) 327-0421
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0212
University of Notre Dame
Center for Nano Science and , Tech. University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame, IN 46556
(574) 631-6376

ID#: N045-028-0279
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-028       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Intelligent Imaging System
Abstract:   The development of two different types of image sensors integrated in image processing computers is proposed. The first kind of sensors is an advanced 512x512 sized photodiode array with locally adaptive integration time control. The specialty of the local control is that it depends on the illumination of the neighboring pixels. The adaptive sensor control method and the neighborhood size are fully programmable. This sensor array will be sensitive in the visual range and also in the lower end of the near IR. The sensor array will be embedded in a CNN technology based focal plane sensor-processor array. This large size processor array will have close to 1 TerOPS computational power, and it will enable above 10,000 Fps operation. It will have a roughly 1000 times speed advantage compared to a 3GHz Pentium processor, while its power consumption will be only a few watts. The second kind of sensor will be an array of nanoantennas and nonlinear detectors for direct detection at wavelengths from the far infrared into the THz regime. The design of nanoantennas for long-wavelength infrared and THz radiation will be explored, and evaluation of possible nonlinear devices for direct detection at the antenna feed will be performed. Nano-mesa Si Schottky detectors and metal-oxide-metal tunnel diodes will be evaluated for use as the detector, with a down-selection to the most promising device candidate and antenna design for co-integration with the CNN technology based processor.

EVIDENCE BASED RESEARCH, INC.
1595 Spring Hill Road , Suite 250
Vienna, VA 22182-2216
(703) 893-6800

PI: Dr. David F. Noble
(703) 893-6800
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0270
Navy Postgraduate School
1 University Circle
Monterey, CA 93943
(831) 656-2441

ID#: N045-026-0273
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-026       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: A Human-Centric Architecture for Net-Centric Operations
Abstract:   Abstract. This research will create a collaboration environment that improves situation understanding to support net-centric operations. Guided by theories of transfer of meaning and situation understanding, Evidence Based Research (EBR) and the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) will integrate advanced agent-middleware and emerging collaboration tools into a state-of-the art operational system that supports quick analysis of uncertain open source data. EBR and NPS will demonstrate through this system how cognitive theories can guide development of an agent-based collaboration infrastructure that significantly improves team situation understanding.

FERRO SOLUTIONS, INC.
215 First Street, Suite 203
Cambridge, MA 02142
(617) 225-7878

PI: Mr. Jiankang Huang
(617) 225-7878
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0305
Steven R. Hall
Room 33-207, MIT, 77 Massachusetts Avenue.
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-0869

ID#: N045-022-0380
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-022       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: High-efficiency vibration energy harvester and sensor
Abstract:   Ferro Solutions will demonstrate a self powered system for vibration monitoring of rotating machine parts (propulsion rotating components.). A significant challenge of harvesting vibrations in such machines is that the harvester proof mass must be relatively free to move in response to unwanted vibrations, but it should not be pinned or damaged by the large centrifugal forces. We propose a modification of our prior vibration energy harvester that meets these constraints. It is suitable for integration in a rotor blade and is capable of powering an array of strain gauges or accelerometers as well as a wireless transmitter. The system includes integrated electronics for rectification, regulation and storage of the harvested power.

FOSTER-MILLER, INC.
350 Second Ave.
Waltham, MA 02451-1196
(781) 684-4242

PI: Mr. Stephen Chen
(781) 684-4382
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0279
George Washington U Medical Center
Ronald Reagan Institute , 2150 Pennsylvania Ave.
Washington, DC 20037
(202) 746-8428

ID#: N045-021-0166
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-021       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Casualty Patient Warning Device
Abstract:   Hypothermia is a common threat to injured soldiers in the battlefield. Environmental exposure and hemorrhage are the primary culprits in the development of hypothermia. Normal battlefield clothing is inadequate to maintain normothermia, especially in the setting of trauma. This research project aims to develop portable devices that can effectively prevent hypothermia and maintain normothermia in trauma patients. The proposed solution consists of two different devices that can be used independently or collaboratively to deliver heat to the patient's core in a long lasting and controlled manner. These devices are designed to provide caregivers maximum access to the patient. A noninvasive core temperature monitoring device will also be developed as a complementary accessory. Both electrical and chemical based heat generation and delivery systems are to be investigated and prototyped. The Department of Emergency Medicine at the George Washington University Medical Center (letter of intent attached) will team up with Foster-Miller to develop clinical procedures and treatment guidelines. (P-040313)

GUIDED SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
P.O. Box 1453
McDonough, GA 30253-1453
(770) 898-9100

PI: Dr. J. Eric Corban
(770) 898-9100
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0293
Georgia Institute of Technology
Office of Sponsored Programs, Industry Contracting Office
Atlanta, GA 30332-0420
(404) 894-6932

ID#: N045-004-0254
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-004       Awarded: 01JUL03
Title: Sonobuoy Tube Launched UAV
Abstract:   Expendable, sonobuoy tube-launched unmanned aerial vehicles employing a variety of sensor systems are recognized as providing an economical means to enhance P-3 aircraft operations and assure crew safety. The proposed phase I program develops a preliminary design for a tube-launched vehicle by optimizing the system design parameters along optimized trajectories that are developed for a representative set of mission scenarios. The high performance design is then balanced using requirements for reliability and affordability through a formal cost-benefit analysis to obtain the best overall design. The deployment strategy depends directly from existing sonobuoy technology in order to minimize the cost of introduction and qualification on the P-3. The system employs advanced technology for real-time optimal path planning to produce maximum flight performance, and employs neural network adaptive guidance and control to largely eliminate dependence on high fidelity aerodynamic modeling, wind tunnel testing, gain scheduling, and a costly flight validation program for the controller. The adaptive system also enables a true plug and play capability for interchangeable payload modules. Design for low-cost manufacturing is addressed from the outset. The phase II program provides for detailed design and fabrication, testing, and initial operational demonstration from a P-3 in partnership with the sponsor.

IC TECH, INC.
4295 Okemos Road, Suite 100
Okemos, MI 48864
(517) 349-9000

PI: Dr. Gail Erten
(517) 349-9000
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0319
Michigan State University
301 Admin Bldg
East Lansing, MI 48824
(517) 355-5040

ID#: N045-012-0045
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-012       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Speech recognition with built in noise and chatter immunity
Abstract:   Two obstacles to expanding speech technology application domains are the limited discrimination of intentional speech from (i) background noise, and (ii) incidental interfering speech, or background chatter. Since 1997, our company IC Tech has been engaged in developing technologies and solutions for speech enhancement towards better speech intelligibility and speech recognition accuracy in noisy environments. Our technologies have already been channeled to the marketplace, especially to automotive telematics applications. With this effort, we are proposing to apply our technology and know-how in noise cancellation and speech applications to develop speech recognition systems that are capable of reliable and robust performance in very noisy and chaotic military environments. Our target application is for command and control of vehicles and machines in Submarine Portable Ship Control Unit (PSCU) and Submarine Command Workstations. Our extensive use of commercial off-the-shelf technologies will keep the cost of the system well under $25,000 per copy, even in small quantities. Our Phase I effort will be geared towards investigating the optimum selections for microphone type and placement, noise cancellation technology, and automatic speech recognition (ASR) engine for this application. During the option phase, we will define the grammar and design and demonstrate the advantages of our system.

IC TECH, INC.
4295 Okemos Road, Suite 100
Okemos, MI 48864
(517) 349-9000

PI: Dr. Gail Erten
(517) 349-9000
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0219
Michigan State University
301 Admin Bldg
East Lansing, MI 48824
(517) 355-5040

ID#: N045-014-0044
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-014       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Trainable 3-D Audio Rendering for Enhanced Immersion in Virtual Training
Abstract:   The quality of the training experience provided by virtual reality (VR) systems is directly related to the degree to which the range of human sensory modalities is stimulated. Audio cues are an essential for immersion in virtual environments, and also vital for situation awareness for soldiers. Therefore, realistic auditory cues should be part of a virtual training system. Our company IC Tech has been engaged in developing biologically inspired technologies and solutions for audio and speech processing since 1997. We are proposing, to combine our audio signal processing technology and know-how with the expertise of our collaborators to develop dependable 3-D audio rendering for soldiers. Our goal is realism to preserve both the spatial and temporal qualities of the `real' cues and to create, to the extent possible, a state of mind consistent with the real experience. Our Phase I investigation will involve selecting the best sound delivery front end, as well as the optimum algorithms for creating 3-D auditory cues. Then, we will study the calibration needed to accommodate individual variations and follow that by the integration of position sensors for an interactive experience and synchronization with visual scenes. Finally, we will formulate a training efficacy assessment plan to establish that the lessons learned in the virtual environment transfer to the real one.

INFORMATION EXTRACTION & TRANSPORT, INC.
1911 N. Ft. Myer Drive, Suite 600
Arlington, VA 22209
(703) 284-0605

PI: Dr. Francis Fung
(541) 752-7473
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0277
George Mason University
Office of Sponsored Programs, 4400 University Drive, MS4C6
Fairfax, VA 22030
(703) 993-2978

ID#: N045-025-0371
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-025       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Predicate Logic-based Assembly of Situation-specific
Abstract:   Applications such as decision support systems and data fusion must reason about inherently uncertain properties of entities in a domain of application, as well as their behavior and relations. Tasks such as information fusion for battlespace awareness require both reasoning under uncertainty and logical reasoning about discrete entities. Probability is the most well-understood and widely applied logic for computational scientific reasoning under uncertainty. However, appropriate application of probability theory often requires logical reasoning about which variables to include and what the appropriate probabilities are, in order to maintain tractably-sized models. To address this need, Information Extraction and Transport, Inc. proposes a Predicate Logic-based Assembly of Situation-specific probabilistic Models for battlespace C2 Assistance (PLASMA) architecture for combining logical and probabilistic reasoning with discrete and continuous variables to perform data fusion and decision support by supporting parsimonious situation-specific probabilistic model construction guided by first-order logic model construction specifications. The architecture applies logical reasoning to identify relevant variables for the constructed network, and to build the Bayesian network from a knowledge base of Multi-Entity Bayesian Network fragments, and constructs situation-specific models using probabilistic generalizations of forward-chaining and backward-chaining of rules, encoded in first-order logic suggestors.

INFRAMAT CORP.
74 Batterson Park Road
Farmington, CT 06032-2597
(860) 678-7561

PI: Dr. Xinqing Ma
(860) 678-7561
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0316
University of Connecticut
Office for Sponsored Programs, 438 Whitney Road Ext., U-1133
Storrs, CT 06269-1133
(860) 486-8704

ID#: N045-001-0222
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-001       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Durable Thermal Barrier Coating with Low Thermal Conductivity Composition and Unique Microstructure
Abstract:   The Navy seeks to develop an innovative thermal barrier coating (TBC) system that will exhibit twice the durability and half the thermal conductivity (TC) compared with that of today's EB-PVD TBC systems. This Phase I program will demonstrate the feasibility of exploiting a novel TBC with unique fabrication process, composition and microstructure for lower TC, better durability and high sintering resistance. The uniqueness of this new TBC, compared to EB-PVD TBCs, is the use of a multi-component rare earth oxide doped zirconia (lower TC) ceramic topcoat, generated by a novel solution precursor plasma spray ("SPPS") technique. The unique SPPS TBC microstructure, consisting of vertical microcracks, uniform nanometer and micrometer sized pores, and ultrafine splats, will increase thermal cycle resistance through enhanced strain tolerance to thermal stresses. A 7YSZ thin inner layer, or primer, and a robust LPPS CoNiCrAlY bond coat will be applied to improve interfacial bond strength / toughness, and oxidation resistance, respectively. Inframat Corporation has assembled a strong team with the University of Connecticut, industrial partners Pratt & Whitney and Rolls Royce, Indianapolis, plus consultant NASA-Glenn Research. With this team and in-house experience, the new SPPS TBC should readily meet the program goals.

INNOVATEK, INC.
350 Hills Street, Suite 104
Richland, WA 99352
(509) 375-1093

PI: Dr. Jeffrey B. Harrison
(509) 375-1093
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0301
University of Florida
336 MEB, PO Box 116300
Gainesville, FL 32611-6300
(352) 392-9607

ID#: N045-034-0243
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-034       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Microchannel Reactor with Low Oxygen Consumption For Highly Efficient Hydrogen Production from Liquid Hydrocarbons
Abstract:   InnovaTek will determine the feasibility of combining microchannel prereformer and reformer reactors with microchannel heat exchangers into a single novel component for advanced fuel processing in undersea vehicles. The unique design of the proposed integrated system is characterized by very high internal surface areas for heat exchange and a high proportion of internal flow channels for the catalytic reaction but with greatly reduced system volume. This innovative approach will improve thermal efficiency and resource utilization (principally fuel and oxygen) by reducing the amount of steam required for the reforming reaction and minimizing flow paths, piping, valves and component surfaces that can produce external sources of heat loss. Through computational modeling, the University of Florida will provide the critical numerical simulations of heat transfer, mass transfer, and kinetic reaction rates in microchannels, required to design the architecture and select the materials for the integrated components. Those simulation results will be validated and refined from experimental data generated using InnovaTek's microchannel reactors and heat exchangers. The key deliverable from Phase 1 is a feasibility assessment of the approach and a preliminary design that will form the basis for a detailed system design and cost estimate (Phase 1 Option).

INTELLIGENT AUTOMATION, INC.
7519 Standish Place, Suite 200
Rockville, MD 20855
(301) 294-5221

PI: Dr. Chiman Kwan
(301) 294-5238
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0324
The Ohio State University
205 Dreese Laboratories, 2015 Neil Avenue
Columbus, OH 43210-1272
(614) 292-1588

ID#: N045-003-0244
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-003       Awarded: 01JUL05
Title: Adaptive Cooperative Path and Mission Planning for Multiple Aerial Platforms
Abstract:   Path planning and mission planning are two core steps to effectively exploit the capabilities of multi-level cooperative control of multiple aerial platforms. In this proposal, Intelligent Automation, Inc. (IAI) and its subcontractor, Prof. Jose B. Cruz of the Ohio State University, propose to develop innovative algorithms and software tools that are built on a hierarchical game-theoretic framework to automate path planning and mission planning for multiple unmanned platforms to enhance system effectiveness and robustness. The mission planning is formulated as a non-cooperative non-zero-sum game and a co-evolutionary algorithm is proposed for calculating the Nash strategies for target assignment. Cooperative path planning is formulated in the framework of Pareto optimization and its solution would serve as a reference trajectory for Foraging algorithm. Essential to the framework is the networked communication and intelligence for sharing real-time data among the command facilities and the individual platforms. Real time information for target or threat locations before and during engagements may necessitate re-plan of path and mission.

INTELLIGENT AUTOMATION, INC.
7519 Standish Place, Suite 200
Rockville, MD 20855
(301) 294-5221

PI: Dr. Xianyang Zhu
(301) 294-5278
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0235
The Pennsylvania State University
319 Electrical Engineering Eas
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 865-1298

ID#: N045-010-0352
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-010       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Miniaturized Ultra-Broadband Antenna Design by the Shape and Topology Optimization
Abstract:   With the fast paced development of mobile communications, the demand for smaller antennas has risen dramatically. Conventionally, emphasis has been on size and shape optimization rather than material optimization. However, by using the conventional optimization methods, size reduction and bandwidth increase are difficult to reach simultaneously due to the low dielectric constants of available materials. For ceramics with high dielectric constants, bandwidth and gain reductions will still be inevitable if the substrates are not topologically optimized. In this phase I project we will focus on both shape and material optimizations. Finite-Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method will be incorporated with Genetic Algorithm (GA) to realize optimizations. FDTD is a time domain method, thus it is very suitable for the design of broadband systems. Combined with Message-Passing Interface (MPI) technique, the FDTD method can be easily parallelized, which will reduce CPU time dramatically and make the design process much more practical. We will also include double negative (DNG) materials in the optimization. Better gain and bandwidth properties can be expected with the inclusion of such new materials.

INTELLIGENT AUTOMATION, INC.
7519 Standish Place, Suite 200
Rockville, MD 20855
(301) 294-5221

PI: Dr. Chiman Kwan
(301) 294-5238
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0318
Carnegie Mellon
Electrical & Computer , Engineering Department
Pittsburg, PA 15213-3890
(412) 268-6535

ID#: N045-012-0247
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-012       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: A Novel Speech Recognition Approach in Non-stationary and Chaotic Environment
Abstract:   Existing speech recognition software such as IBM via Voice works well in quiet and stationary background noise environments. However, the recognition performance drops quite significantly in crowded and noisy control room, battle stations, emergency room, factory floor, etc. The main reason is that the noise is non-stationary and chaotic. In this proposal, Intelligent Automation, Inc. (IAI) and its subcontractor, Prof. Richard Stern of Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), propose a novel system to improve the speech recognition performance in chaotic and non-stationary environment. The core technology will be a Robust Speech Recognition method developed by CMU. However, we will make an important improvement. The key idea is to use a new sensor called General Electromagnetic Movement Sensor (GEMS), which can be attached to the neck, to identify voiced and un-voiced regions in the speech. GEMS was designed and built by Aliph. IAI purchased one GEMS and used it for an Army project on multi-modal speech enhancement project. The approach combines the state-of-the-art technology in speech recognition and will significantly improve the recognition rate in non-stationary and chaotic environment.

INTELLIGENT AUTOMATION, INC.
7519 Standish Place, Suite 200
Rockville, MD 20855
(301) 294-5221

PI: Dr. Eric van Doorn
(301) 294-5229
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0253
University of Central Florida
Department of Engineering, 3280 Progress Drive
Orlando, FL 32826-0544
(407) 882-1300

ID#: N045-019-0124
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-019       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Ultra Wide Band Time Difference Of Arrival Sensor
Abstract:   We propose to develop an innovative way to wirelessly synchronize multiple RF receivers using ultra wideband (UWB) transceivers (radios). UWB spreads its energy over several Giga Hertz so it is highly LPI/LPD. This method does not rely on GPS so the synchronization will be maintained when the GPS signal is not available. A time resolution better than 1 nanosecond is achievable using existing UWB chipsets. The same link that is used for time synchronization can also carry data for two-way communication, and provide fast, accurate ranging in both Line of Sight (LOS), and non-LOS environments. The synchronization, ranging, and data link capabilities of UWB technology provide all the key elements of an extremely capable Time Difference Of Arrival Sensor. The most critical functions are already implemented in Silicon-Germanium (SiGe) chips, so the hardware to implement this time synchronization and ranging scheme can be very low-cost and simple.

INTELLIGENT AUTOMATION, INC.
7519 Standish Place, Suite 200
Rockville, MD 20855
(301) 294-5221

PI: Dr. Chiman Kwan
(301) 294-5238
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0275
Pennsylvania State University
121 Electrical Engineering Eas
University Park, PA 16802-2705
(814) 565-6510

ID#: N045-025-0133
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-025       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: A Novel Maximum Entropy Inference Engine for Data Fusion in Fault Diagnosis
Abstract:   Inferencing and reasoning algorithms are widely used in various applications where root causes need to be inferenced based on observed evidence. One typical application is fault diagnosis of complex systems based on symptoms reported by various diagnostic monitors. The symptoms may contain both continuous and discrete variables. Intelligent Automation, Inc. and Professor David J. Miller of Penn State University propose to develop a new inference engine based on Maximum Entropy. The key capabilities include: 1) making principled, effective use of both continuous and discrete features; 2) solving general inferencing tasks, wherein any subset of features may need to be inferred, given values for the remaining features; and 3) handling large feature space. The work is built on efficient learning of maximum entropy Probability Mass Functions (PMFs). Our algorithm avoids an artificial mapping of continuous features, leading to a significant edge in solving mixed feature space inference tasks. Our learning algorithm builds the PMF directly from training data and consequently does not require making any explicit conditional independence assessments as compared to Bayesian Networks (BNs). In Phase 1 we will perform comparative studies between our proposed algorithm and other algorithm candidates. In Phase 2, we will implement the algorithm in real-time.

KALSCOTT ENGINEERING, INC.
3226 SW Timberlake Ln.
Topeka, KS 66614
(785) 979-1113

PI: Mr. Tom Sherwood
(785) 979-1113
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0294
University of Kansas
2120 Learned Hall, Dept. of Aero Eng.
Lawrence, KS 66045
(785) 864-2904

ID#: N045-004-0212
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-004       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Sonobuoy Tube Launched UAV
Abstract:   The need for a small tube launched UAV is presented. Such a UAV would allow pilots of the delivery platform to remain several miles away from harm's way. A few candidate concepts are presented, which would allow stand-off delivery of small UAVs for close-in data gathering. In addition to vehicle analysis, details on the background systems required are also discussed.

KCF TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
119 S. Burrowes St., Suite #605
State College, PA 16801
(814) 867-4097

PI: Dr. Jeremy Frank
(814) 867-4097
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0258
Pennsylvania State University
157 Hammond Building
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 865-6237

ID#: N045-020-0329
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-020       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: KCF/PSU Smart Tether Retrofit Device for Localization of Tethered Bodies
Abstract:   A method is needed to measure the location of a submerged body relative to a tethered buoy. The application targeted in this proposal is unmanned crawling robots used to localize submerged mines and other targets. The crawlers require a 60-70 foot tether, creating a large error circle when operating in shallow water. A simpler application that will also benefit from this technology is Long Base Line (LBL) navigation transponders. We propose to retrofit the tether with an inexpensive yet robust sensing system to accurately predict the crawler position relative to the buoy. The system derives the relative position using a simple crawler-mounted tri-axial load cell tension sensor and a time-tracking position integrating algorithm. The retrofit device will be simple and robust. Installation will require only an external load cell mounting bracket on the crawler, and no modification of the tether or buoy. In Phase I, we will assess the feasibility and outline the benefit to be achieved by retrofitting LBL navigation transponders and unmanned crawling robots with the proposed device. After building a scaled demonstration unit, we will test the prototype under various flow conditions in a simulated flow tank at Penn State University. In Phase II, we will develop and demonstrate a full-scale KCF/PSU Smart Tether and test it in a large test tank the Penn State Applied Research Laboratory.

KERNCO, INC.
28 Harbor Street
Danvers, MA 01923
(978) 777-1956

PI: Dr. Kent D. Choquette
(217) 265-0563
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0220
University of Illinois
208 North Wright Street
Urbana, IL 60801
(217) 265-0563

ID#: N045-032-0284
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-032       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: VCSEL Laser Source for CPT Atomic Clock Program
Abstract:   Vertical-Cavity-Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELs) are a key component in the development and ultimate commercialization of a new class of atomic clocks, the coherent-population-trapping (CPT)passive rubidium standard. Each of the available classes of VCSEL devices offer certain advantages and disadvantages for the CPT clock application. The proposed investigation will determine the optimum configuration(s) and attempt to develop reliable sources of supply. The laser characteristics of particular interest are optical power, threshold current, modulation bandwidth, relative-intensity noise (RIN) and optical linewidth. Optical power is of major interest as CPT performance is a function of the applied optical intensity. Threshold current levels affect the efficiency of the laser and, in turn the overall power consumption of the clock. RIN and optical linewidth contribute to the CPT signal-to-noise and the short-term stability, Allan Variance. Modulation bandwidth determines the efficiency with which the required optical sidebands can be generated. These interrelated characteristics will be measured and compared for each of the available VCSEL fabrication technologies in order to select an optimum approach for CPT clock applications.

LITE MACHINES CORP.
1291 Cumberland Ave
West Lafayette, IN 47906-1385
(765) 463-0959

PI: Mr. Paul Arlton
(765) 463-0959
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0337
Purdue University
Dept of Aviation Technology, 1401 Aviation Drive
West Lafayette, IN 47907-2015
(765) 494-2334

ID#: N045-004-0003
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-004       Awarded: 26JUL04
Title: Tube-Launched Rotary Wing UAV for Remote Surveillance Operations
Abstract:   The Navy desires to equip P-3's and similar future aircraft with UAV's that can be launched from a standard A-size sonobouy tube and return real-time information including video images from remote locations to the P-3 for further analysis and action. Lite Machines has previously developed an electric-powered rotary-wing UAV having a cylindrical body and a counter-rotating, coaxial, rotor system, that fits within these tight size constraints, and that could be reconfigured for use in the Navy program. This Phase I work plan will measure the flight performance of the existing prototype UAV and use these measurements to calibrate a computer software model. This model will then be used to predict the flight performance of variants of the current UAV developed to meet specific P-3 mission requirements.

MAINSTREAM ENGINEERING CORP.
200 Yellow Place, Pines Industrial Center
Rockledge, FL 32955-5327
(321) 631-3550

PI: Mr. Russell Davis
(321) 631-3550
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0286
Rensselaer Ploytechnic Institute
Mechanical Engineering Dept, 110 8th Street
Troy, NY 12180-3590
(518) 276-2630

ID#: N045-009-0375
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-009       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Carbon Nanotube-Based Ultracapacitors for High Pulse - Power Applications
Abstract:   Ultracapacitors are an emerging technology that have already found use in high pulse-power applications, being able to deliver tens or hundreds of kJ of energy over thousands of deep-discharge cycles from a package roughly a quarter cubic foot in size. Recently, Mainstream demonstrated a new proprietary method of fabricating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that allowed lithium-ion batteries with reversible discharge capacities of more than an order of magnitude greater than that of normal carbonaceous electrodes and for a fraction of the cost of current CNT production techniques. This same process can be used to make extremely high power density ultracapacitors that are over an order of magnitude better than the conventional devices outlined above, resulting in an small, light-weight, and inexpensive technology that is robust and environmentally friendly. It is estimated that the core energy storage system necessary to deliver the 8 MJ required by the solicitation's REML (four 2 MJ pulses) will be less than 30 cubic feet in size. In view of Mainstream's long-term commitment to the design and development of improved nanotube technology and our past record of successful performance and SBIR commercialization, we believe funding of this Phase I is warranted.

MECHMATH LLC
14530 Bluebird Trail
Prior Lake, MN 55372-1283
(405) 229-8299

PI: Dr. Eduard Amromin
(952) 402-9642
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0306
California State University Long Be
Dep.Mechanical & Aerospace Eng, 1250 Bellflower Blvd.
Long Beach, CA 90840-8305
(562) 985-1502

ID#: N045-024-0223
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-024       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Multi-disciplinary Computational Tools for Naval Design
Abstract:   Accurate prediction and assessment of a high performance Ship Design & Optimization Systems is an emerging problem. The NAVSEA is interested in technologies that might be capable to support development of a multi-disciplinary computational tool for Naval platforms, including the area of ship hull and damage control. The proposed Phase I work will provide a detailed concept of design tools for predicting and quantifying the MDO methodology as well as basic prototype demonstration for high performance multihull Ship Design System. In further Phases of the work the development of the instrumented Multi-Level MDO Design System with tactical criteria that need to be taken into consideration during the design process would be undertaken. This integrated approach would include operational considerations from the uniformed officers' point-of-view, coordination strategies in Hierarchy Multi-Level Design Systems with establishment of quantitative tactical assessment criteria that are needed at "synthesis" top level, and numerical experimental validation at further "lower" design phases based on developed in Phase I MDO methodology and computational tools.

METAMATERIA PARTNERS LLC
1275 Kinnear Rd.
Columbus, OH 43212-1155
(614) 340-1690

PI: Dr. Suvankar Sengupta
(614) 340-1690
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0334
Pennsylvania State University
Materials Research Institute, 203 MRL Building
University Park, PA 16801
(814) 865-3422

ID#: N045-008-0377
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-008       Awarded: 26JUL04
Title: Nanograin Ceramic Optical Composite Window
Abstract:   The proposed project will demonstrate the feasibility of making nanocomposite materials with microstructures having grains <50nm that are suitable for use in IR windows. MetaMateria Partners and the Particulate Materials Center (PMC) at The Pennsylvania State University have developed methods to make concentrated colloids of nano-particles, including alumina and zirconia with grain sizes <15nm. Uniform colloid mixtures of the alumina and zirconia nanoparticles will be cast into 2.5cm discs using a pressure filtration technique that was previously used to cast zirconia and yttria nanoparticles. It is expected that these immiscible nanoparticles will separate the phases and prevent or limit grain growth during sintering. The project will utilize extensive characterization and processing facilities at the PMC. Methods for drying, organic removal and densification with minimum grain growth will be developed, with the goal to make fully dense nanocomposites with grains <50nm.

MIGMA SYSTEMS, INC.
1600 Providence Highway
Walpole, MA 02081
(508) 660-0328

PI: Dr. Bo Ling
(508) 660-0328
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0232
University of Virginia
Department of Computer Science, 151 Engineer's Way, P.O. Box
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4740
(804) 982-2205

ID#: N045-018-0193
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-018       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: A New Automated Undersea Wireless Sensor Detection and Fusion System
Abstract:   Acoustic sensors are the primary sensor of choice to detect threat submarines operating below periscope depth. The increasingly quieter nuclear threat and the diesel-electric-on-battery threat limits traditional narrow-band processing, yielding shorter detection ranges and requires more array gain via more sensors and adaptive signal processing to counter the quieting trends. One of the key functionalities of embedded sensor networks is to detect events of interest efficiently. Traditional event services allow for the definition of events including correlated events, registering for events, and notification of events upon its occurrence. In embedded sensor networks, events are not binary, but are based on sensor fusion from several noisy sensors in a complicated environment. In Phase I, we propose to develop wireless network services focusing on functions such as real-time, energy efficiency, reliability, and security. In particular, we propose to develop a location-aware event service which takes both temporal and spatial issues into consideration for accuracy. For the event detection, we propose a new cluster trending analysis method which is sensitive to small abnormal signals. To classify undersea quieter targets, we propose to develop a set of hierarchical Gaussian Mixture classifiers and a multi-classifier fusion mechanism based on the statistical evidence theory.

MORGAN RESEARCH CORP.
4811A Bradford Drive
Huntsville, AL 35805-1948
(256) 533-3233

PI: Dr. Philip Reiner
(256) 533-3233
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0304
Cornell University
402 Phillips Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853
(607) 255-9374

ID#: N045-022-0218
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-022       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: MEMS-Based Rotational Energy Scavenging System
Abstract:   An SBIR Phase I program is proposed to research, design, and develop a MEMS-based rotational energy scavenging system. MORGAN is proposing the development of a flexible mechanical-to-electrical energy conversion structure that can be used to extract energy from a nmber of sources available in a rotating system. Cornell University will be partnered with MORGAN to provide specific expertise in miniature power systems. MORGAN has developed an approach to creating a system that will be compatible with powering a wide range of MEMS and miniaturized sensors. Upon completion of the Phase I, MORGAN will have developed and demonstrated proof of concept for this energy scavenging system. The Phase II effort will mature the technology and realize a manufacturing prototype.

NANOSONIC, INC.
P.O. Box 618
Christiansburg, VA 24068
(540) 953-1785

PI: Dr. Bradley Davis
(540) 953-1785
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0217
University of Kentucky
685 Anderson Hall 0046, DEPARTMENT 7-8042
Lexington, KY 40506
(859) 257-1775

ID#: N045-006-0187
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-006       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Reconfigurable, Compact Conformal Antennas on Flexible Substrates
Abstract:   This Phase I STTR program proposes to investigate the feasibility of constructing a reconfigurable antenna on a custom substrate. To this end, we propose to investigate a promising method by which the antenna's elements can be remotely interconnected. Additionally, NanoSonic's unique material methods will be applied to create antenna elements on flexible substrates or conformally applied to curved surfaces. This method allows conformal construction without de-bonding or cracking; it has been already been successfully applied to severe, doubly curved surfaces. In the creation of the substrate, particular attention will be directed toward the construction of a ferromagnetic composite. The NanoSonic team will characterize the resulting film's electromagnetic and mechanical properties. Following material and device characterization, NanoSonic will construct an antenna element for S-parameter evaluation. In support of these efforts, NanoSonic will work with the University of Kentucky (UK) to customize an advanced simulation model which will assist in the evaluation and selection of the proper materials. From this model, the radiation properties of test article can be evaluated. UK is a major research university, well respected in the measurement and computational electromagnetics communities. The team will also work with the antenna group from a major defense contractor.

NAVMAR APPLIED SCIENCES CORP.
65 West Street Road, Suite B-104
Warminster, PA 18974
(215) 675-4900

PI: Mr. Roger A. Holler
(215) 675-4900
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0292
Applied Research Lab/PA State Univ.
P.O. Box 30
State College, PA 16804-0030
(814) 863-3001

ID#: N045-004-0368
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-004       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Sonobuoy Tube Launched UAV
Abstract:   The P-3 aircraft flies multiple diverse missions which could intrude into contested or hostile environments, jeopardizing crew and aircraft safety. The aircraft can reduce this vulnerability by conducting its mission from high altitude and standoff range by using tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). These UAVs will deploy sensors to a remote location, using autonomous and manual guidance, allowing the aircraft to maintain a safe distance. The UAVs can investigate and confirm contact data and conduct operations in more than one location. The air-launched UAV will be small, lightweight, low-cost, and packaged in A-size. It will be launched from the sonobuoy launch tubes. The UAV will safely separate from the aircraft, deploy wings, and glide. The interchangeable modular payloads would include sensor packages (e.g., optical and infrared video). The P-3 on-board sensor operator can control the UAV in flight and change its course based on sensor, navigation, and position data transmitted from the UAV. The UAV will have a minimum range of 50 nautical miles at a speed of 50 knots. A powered phase will be initiated once the UAV descends to a specific altitude to extend its duration to more than 90 minutes.

NAVSYS CORP.
14960 Woodcarver Road
Colorado Springs, CO 80921
(719) 481-4877

PI: Dr. Alison Brown
(719) 481-4877
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0336
U.S. Air Force Academy
2354 Fairchild Drive , Suite 6H27
USAF Academy, CO 80840
(800) 555-1212

ID#: N045-004-0316
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-004       Awarded: 27AUG04
Title: Sonobuoy Tube Launched UAV
Abstract:   The objective of this STTR effort is to demonstrate the capability of small autonomous Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) to be launched from a P-3 aircraft via its size "A" sonobuoy launch system. The technology innovations that we propose to develop and demonstrate under this Phase I STTR effort address the need to (1) Design a small UAV that can successfully be launched from a size "A" sonobuoy (2) Design a size "A" sonobuoy that can successfully launch a small UAV (3) Design a P-3 UAV Control System. Our proposed approach is to leverage a BATCAM Micro-Air Vehicle (MAV) design that has been previously designed by the government to launch from a slim cylindrical canister and a UAV flight planning system that is also free to the government and in use by over 13,000 users. Under this Phase I effort we shall leverage a large amount of current and previous work to develop the MAV, Sonobuoy, and RF system requirements, and also provide a top-level design for the integration of the Sonobuoy Tube Launched UAV into the existing P-3 aircraft's sonobuoy system.

NEPTUNE SCIENCES, INC.
40201 Highway 190 East
Slidell, LA 70461
(985) 649-7252

PI: Mr. Donald R. Delbalzo
(985) 649-7252
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0323
University of New Orleans
Office of Research and Sponsor, CERM Bldg., Room No. 422 Lak
New Orleans, LA 70148
(504) 280-7489

ID#: N045-003-0085
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-003       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: CURVE (Coordinated UAV Routing in Variable Environments)
Abstract:   The objective is to determine the best algorithmic approach to optimally select unmanned vehicle flight paths that maximize mission success for attached sensors. That involves trade-offs between a) active emissions and passive collections, b) high and low altitudes, c) high and low speeds, d) day and night operations, e) rough and smooth terrain, f) accuracy and efficiency, etc. The solutions will optimize altitude and speed, accounting for the tradeoff between mission success, sensor performance, fuel efficiency, and vulnerability. The solution will involve a strategy for active emissions that considers target reaction. Optimal emission strategies (in space and time) will be evaluated that cause desired threat behavior (i.e., herding), so that passive sensor performance will be enhanced. The solution will represent a blend of accuracy and efficiency, and the operator will have control over this trade-off. Quick calculations (with loss in accuracy) are required in order to plan over large areas or to consider and choose between many reasonable plans. A layered, iterative approach will be followed so that intermediate solutions can be considered automatically. Physical assumptions and constraints will be relaxed, in an objective controlled way, in order to achieve the correct blend of accuracy and efficiency.

NOVA ENGINEERING, INC.
5 Circle Freeway Drive
Cincinnati, OH 45246-1201
(513) 642-3109

PI: Mr. Steve Warden
(513) 642-3159
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0282
Univ. of California - San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive
La Jolla, CA 92093
(858) 534-5369

ID#: N045-031-0028
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-031       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Advanced Robust Modulation (ARM)
Abstract:   A new approach to OFDM modulation is proposed employing a constant-envelope technique that eliminates the need to reduce the operational range of the power amplifier. This approach provides the robust and spectrally efficient benefits of OFDM without the degredation in performance from the amplifier output power backoff (OBO). This proposal addresses the need for a cost/benefit analysis of the constant envelope approach versus the standard OFDM waveform and a study of the implementation issues involved in realizing this new approach.

PACIFIC SCIENCE & ENGINEERING GROUP, INC.
9180 Brown Deer Road
San Diego, CA 92121-2238
(858) 535-1661

PI: Mr. Ron Moore
(858) 535-1661
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0251
Board of Governors, Colorado State
408 University Services, Colorado State University
Fort Collins, CA 80523-2002
(970) 491-5574

ID#: N045-026-0032
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-026       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: A Human-Centric Architecture for Net-Centric Operations
Abstract:   To be effective, modern military command and control requires an enormous amount of communication, coordination, and collaboration among the various forces, services, and coalition partners involved. Many tools have been developed or adopted from industry to meet this need; however, these same tools have significant limitations, the most important being that none of the technologies are "aware of" the other or able to easily share information with one another. As a result, each of the information "spaces" addressed by these tools effectively remains separate and uncoordinated, and effective communication, coordination, and collaboration suffer. To address this situation we propose developing a single, multi-purpose information exchange and knowledge management tool that leverages the strengths of the various tools in use today while overcoming their weaknesses; and that facilitates distributed, coordinated, collaboration by military personnel - in other words, a Distributed Coordinated Collaboration Spaces (DCCS) tool. The DCCS tool will, a) facilitate the rapid development of shared mental models and improved SA among its users, b) support distributed synchronous and asynchronous collaboration, c) allow users working in one information space to coordinate and collaborate with users in other information spaces, and d) promote collaborative discussion and analysis of uncertain, ambiguous, or conflicting data.

PARAGON SPACE DEVELOPMENT CORP.
2700 East Executive Drive, Suite 100
Tucson, AZ 85706
(520) 903-1000

PI: Mr. David Bergeron
(520) 903-1000
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0335
Technology Development & Research I
6339 E. Speedway, Suite 103
Tucson, AZ 85710
(520) 546-2492

ID#: N045-004-0040
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-004       Awarded: 26JUL04
Title: Griffin: A Sonobuoy Tube Launched Low Cost Expendable UAV
Abstract:   This proposal is for the development of a Sonobuoy Tube Launched, Low Cost, and Expendable UAV called Griffin. Paragon Space Development Corp. (Paragon) and the Technology Development Research Institute (TDRI) have formed a uniquely capable team with demonstrated experience building and flying UAVs that meet the Sonobuoy Tube Launched UAV performance requirements described in the STTR topic. The proposed UAV will use the existing small UAV platforms, technology and engineering expertise held by Paragon and TDRI to address all significant technical risk in Phase I. This proposal is not for design concept studies. The team will develop mechanical solutions to the flight deployment in Phase I basic and perform flight test demonstrations in the Phase I Option. A low temperature high strength rapid injection molding technique is used with proprietary crosslinking polymer materials to mass-produce the Griffin. Tailored digital electronics packages are encapsulated within the injection molded material for a rapid low cost production technique that eliminates hand mounting of components, while providing shock protection during the sonobuoy tube launch. An innovative energy management and wing deployment technique optimizes the UAVs performance in transit and loiter flight modes.

POLATOMIC, INC.
1810 N. Glenville Dr., Suite 116
Richardson, TX 75081-1954
(972) 690-0099

PI: Dr. Robert E. Slocum
(972) 690-0099
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0295
University of Texas at Dallas
P.O.Box 830688, EC33
Richardson, TX 75083-0688
(972) 883-2165

ID#: N045-002-0311
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-002       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Advanced Optically-driven Spin Precession Magnetometer for ASW
Abstract:   This SBIR Phase I proposal describes the development of a conceptual design for the Advanced Optically-driven Spin Precession Magnetometer (AOSPM), an ultra high-sensitivity scalar laser magnetometer for airborne ASW. The AOSPM is an innovative high-sensitivity instrument capable of measuring scalar DC and ELF magnetic fields with a sensitivity better than 10.0 fT/root-Hz. Since the high sensitivity AOSPM is a scalar instrument, it is free of the extreme motional noise effects associated with all high performance superconducting and optical vector magnetometers. This is a major advantage for airborne ASW applications where future ASW operation will use two high sensitivity scalar magnetometers in a gradiometer mode on a pair of collaborative airborne platforms to reduce geomagnetic noise in the detection band. The POLATOMIC 2000 laser magnetometer has demonstrated a sensitivity of 100 fT/root-Hz. Under this STTR project, the laser magnetometer sensitivity will be improved by more than one order of magnitude through laser noise reduction, improvement in sensor components and use of Optically-driven Spin Precession (OSP) to induce magnetic resonance. The feasibility of fabricating a high sensitivity breadboard AOSP magnetometer in Phase II will be established under this Phase I Project.

PRESCHUTTI & ASSOC., INC.
204 East Calder Way, Suite 401
State College, PA 16801
(814) 234-6223

PI: Dr. John Ross
(814) 234-6223
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0218
Michigan State University
Electrical and Computer Engr. , 2120 Engr. Bldg.
East Lansing, MI 48824-1226
(517) 355-5231

ID#: N045-006-0224
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-006       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Compact conformal arrays
Abstract:   This proposal requests funds to pursue development and demonstration of compact conformal array antennas that are based on the concept of a Self-Structuring Antenna (SSA). The SSA is an entirely new class of re-configurable antenna can automatically adapt to assure optimal performance regardless of environment or signal conditions. Advanced search algorithms in the SSA efficiently find optimal states from among billions of possible configurations. By pre-configuring the SSA memory with known good states for various modes and frequencies, the SSA can be used as a dynamically configurable antenna. In the proposed work, the SSA is investigated as an array and as an array element for use in compact conformal arrays. Applying the SSA concept to array antennas may allow added increased bandwidth and functionality with reduced size and weight. The inherent adaptability of the SSA allows multi-mission functionality and the ability to continue operating if portions of the array or array elements are damaged.

ROBTRE CONSULTING GROUP, L.L.C.
11846 Simpson Rd.
Clarksville, MD 21029
(301) 617-0091

PI: Dr. Richard Pitre
(301) 617-0091
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0231
George Mason University
Dept.App.&Eng.Stat.,MS 4A7
Fairfax, VA 22030-4444
(703) 993-1707

ID#: N045-018-0309
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-018       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Automated Processing For Distributed Undersea Sensor Systems
Abstract:   Future expeditionary forces in littoral environments will confront the submarine threat by using networks of small, easily deployable arrays. For small arrays passive detection ranges can be too short to support practical system concepts. Limited detection ranges are partially due to source-motion-limited integration times. Detection of quiet submarines requires longer integration times than are allowed by quasi-static assumptions of beamform-detect-track methods. George Mason University(GMU) has developed a broad-band passive tracking algorithm that automatically associates source spectra with tracks. The method can exploit very long integration times. RobTre proposes to develop an algorithm for robust submarine track detection which exploits the GMU tracking algorithms extended integration and signal separation capabilities. In Phase I, simulations will demonstrate robust track detection in the presence of a loud moving surface ship. During Phase II, the method will be extended to incorporate advanced submarine broad-band signature characteristics for improved noise rejection. Additionally, a robust shallow water signal model will be incorporated that increases signal gain and enables motion detection through multipath differential Doppler without the need for matched field processing. The effectiveness of the new method will also be demonstrated using data in Phase II.

ROCKY RESEARCH
1598 Foothill Dr, PO Box 61800
Boulder City, NV 89006
(702) 293-0851

PI: Mr. Paul Sarkisian
(702) 293-0851
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0281
University of Nevada
Trauma Institute, 2040 W. Charleston Blvd, Suite
Las Vegas, NV 89102
(702) 671-2338

ID#: N045-021-0029
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-021       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Portable Trauma Patient Warming Blanket and Heat Source
Abstract:   Prevention and treatment of hypothermia during casualty transport is a major concern during military operations. Warming blankets are available at some field surgical centers, but nothing is currently available during air transport. Proposed is a rechargeable portable warming blanket system comprising a thermal energy storage module and blanket. The device will operate from electrical power sources when available, and can operate without external power for up to 2 hours. The blanket and TES unit will be designed for easy movement with patient, and will provide uninterrupted warming while waiting for transportation, during transport, and waiting for treatment. Thermal energy storage will be based on absorption of a refrigerant by a solid absorbent. This technology provides the highest heat energy storage density of all known heat storage media, is quickly and easily recharged from any electrical power source, has virtually infinite recharge cycle life, and no standby losses once the TES system is charged. Heat will be transferred from the thermal energy storage module to the blanket using liquid and a small battery-powered circulation pump. Small tubes will be woven into the blanket for liquid circulation.

SCHUPP ADVANCED MATERIALS
10770 Chillicothe Rd
Kirtland, Oh, OH 44094
(216) 965-2936

PI: Dr. John Schupp
(216) 965-2936
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0228
Carneige Mellon University
143 North Craig Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890
(412) 268-2710

ID#: N045-030-0147
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-030       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Halo-hydrocarbon Growth of Bulk SiC
Abstract:   Schupp Advanced Materials Inc. along with Glennan Microsystems, Inc. and The Carneige Mellon University are teaming to develop and commercialize a new process for the growth of Silicon Carbide bulk crystals. The new process will include the use of halogenated precursor gases and proprietary furnace components and process control systems. These developments will be facilitated by advance modeling and analysis techniques developed at the Carneige Mellon University. The resultant process will enable crystal growth to occur at substantially reduced temperatures.

SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS & RESEARCH ASSOC., INC.
6300 Gateway Dr.
Cypress, CA 90630-4844
(714) 224-4410

PI: Mrs. Edward "Ned" Patton
(714) 224-4410
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0299
University of California at Irvine
4129 Frederick Reines Hall
Irvine, CA 92697-4575
(949) 824-6228

ID#: N045-034-0041
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-034       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Compact Fuel Reformer for Undersea Vehicle Fuel Cells
Abstract:   SARA is proposing to demonstrate the technology required to build a practical device which can reform a liquid hydrocarbon fuel into (1) a pure gaseous stream of hydrogen at a temperature that will allow it to be used immediately by a PEM cell, and (2) a solid waste product that contains the carbon and all of the other impurities in the liquid hydrocarbon fuel, that reformer would be uniquely well suited to the UUV mission. SARA has devised a concept for such a device which is based on physical phenomena that we have convincingly demonstrated in our work in several different fields of endeavor. This proposal is therefore a description of the SARA concept and how we believe we, along with our University partner the University of California at Irvine can achieve the production of most of the hydrogen from a long chain liquid hydrocarbon at PEM fuel cell temperature, while retaining the remaining carbon in solid form, and in a compact and inherently simple and robust device.

SCIENTIFIC SYSTEMS CO., INC.
500 West Cummings Park - Ste 3000
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 933-5355

PI: B. Ravichandran
(781) 933-5355
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0322
Naval Postgraduate School
Operations Research Department, Naval Postgraduate School
Moterey, CA 93943
(831) 656-2795

ID#: N045-003-0282
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-003       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: UVARS: Unmanned Vehicle Autonomous Routing System
Abstract:   The objective of this project is to develop UVARS: Unmanned Vehicle Autonomous Routing System an automated path and mission planning for aerial platforms under dynamic conditions and constraints. UVARS is based on evolutionary algorithms for global optimization that accounts for factors such as terrain, the platform's dynamic maneuvering capabilities, minimize visibility to threats, and navigational constraints and will respond to a changing environment such as new threats/targets detected, changes in no-fly zones or rules of engagement, new mission tasks required, new target priorities, new prioritization between threat exposure and image quality requirements. Phase I will demonstrate prototype performance and Phase II will demonstrate operational performance. Commercial applications of the approach will also be investigated during the Phase I and fully developed during the Phase II. A candidate platform for project demonstration and Phase III transition will be the Tomahawk cruise missile (through PMA 281 - Cruise Missiles Command and Control Program), or through the Time Critical Strike FNC and/or Autonomous Operations FNC. Scientific Systems Company Inc. (SSCI) leads this proposal team that includes the Operations Research Department at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, CA as our academic partner and Boeing Mission Planning Systems in St. Louis MO as our industrial partner.

SCIENTIFIC SYSTEMS CO., INC.
500 West Cummings Park - Ste 3000
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 933-5355

PI: Dr. Denis Garagic
(781) 933-5355
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0289
University of California Berkeley
Mechanical Engineering, 6117 Etcheverry Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720
(510) 642-9172

ID#: N045-005-0283
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-005       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Distributed , Decentralized Optimization for Cooperative Control of Multi-Agent Swarm-like Systems
Abstract:   Scientific Systems Co. Inc. and University of California at Berkeley (UCB) propose to develop, test and evaluate a computationally Distributed,Decentralized Optimization for Cooperative Control of Multi-Agent Swarm-like Systems (DOCMASS)such as groups of autonomous Unmanned Air-Vehicles (UAVs). A primary goal of the proposed work is to develop computational models amenable to high-speed simulation, design and control of multi-agent swarm-like systems, and to determine how relatively simple and controllable, interaction rules between individual agents (e.g. UAVs) can lead to sophisticated aggregate behavior which is required; for example, to accomplish autonomous reconnaissance military missions in a hostile terrain. In order to develop, test and implement the DOCMASS system, the following tasks will be carried out: (i) Develop computationally distributed and decentralized cooperative control algorithms for multi-agent swarm-like systems such as groups of UAVs operating under environmental, dynamic, kinematic and communication constraints, (ii) Perform stability analysis of multiple-agent swarm-like systems and develop performance metrics to analyze the effects of inter-vehicle communication constraints on the overall system performance, (iii) Implement and evaluate proposed algorithms on the UC Berkeley multi-agent swarm-like systems simulator, which will be modified to include for a realistic model of an UAV dynamics, sensors and a mobile military network, (iv) Simulation testing on a scenario involving up to two hundred UAVs operating in dynamic and uncertain environment while executing cooperative reconnaissance missions.

SIGNATRON TECHNOLOGY CORP.
29 Domino Drive
Concord, MA 01742-2845
(978) 371-0550

PI: Dr. Steen Parl
(978) 371-0550
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0252
University of Massachusetts Lowell
1 University Avenue
Lowell, MA 01854
(978) 934-3315

ID#: N045-019-0241
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-019       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: TDOA-Enhanced Geolocation For the Team Portable Collection System
Abstract:   An innovative system for geolocation of emitters in the field is proposed. The system integrates short baseline calibration methods and the effects of platform motion with recent emitter location advances by Signatron Technology Corporation that combines TDOA, DF, and signal strength in directly optimized location estimate. The system requires significantly less data to be transmitted than conventional TDOA systems. The system uses signal decomposition to isolate only those signal characteristics necessary for locating, thus minimizing the required data communication bandwidth. The system is suitable for implementation as modular plug-in modules and is scaleable in the sense that modules can be added to increase the capacity of the system, making it ideally suited for integration with the Team Portable Collection System. In Phase I, the system performance will be established using analysis and computer simulations. Sensor self-positioning, synchronization, and calibration procedures will be established. A prototype demonstration is planned for Phase II.

SOUTHWEST SCIENCES, INC.
1570 Pacheco Street, Suite E-11
Santa Fe, NM 87505
(505) 984-1322

PI: Dr. David Christian Hovde
(513) 272-1323
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0255
University of California, Berkeley
Sponsored Projects Office, 336 Sproul Hall, Mail Code 594
Berkeley, CA 94720-5940
(510) 642-8120

ID#: N045-002-0048
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-002       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Sensitive Magnetometer based on FM NMOR
Abstract:   This Phase I STTR project will demonstrate that frequency-modulated magneto-optical rotation (FM-NMOR) can provide high sensitivity for an airborne magnetometer. FM-NMOR uses a diode laser to produce a coherent, aligned population of atoms. Polarimetry is used to measure the rotation rate of the atomic alignment, which is proportional to magnetic field. Both magnetometer and gradiometer designs will be evaluated for their capability to detect target magnetic signatures from a distance of 9000 ft.

STIEFVATER CONSULTANTS
10002 Hillside terrace
Marcy, NY 13403
(315) 338-0932

PI: Dr. Richard Schneible
(315) 338-0932
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0216
Syrcause University
121 Link Hall
Syracuse, NY 13224-1240
(315) 443-3775

ID#: N045-006-0075
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-006       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Compact Conformal Arrays
Abstract:   Full advantage of digital adaptive processing for phased arrays can only be achieved if the mutual coupling between elements and between the elements and near-field scatters is taken into account. Compact and conformal arrays will have increased mutual coupling effects when compared to planar arrays (increased element blockage). This effort will develop an integrated electromagnetic and super-resolution analysis capability that will support the design of compact conformal arrays, including those with highly directive elements. This capability must simultaneously address (1) scattering from electrically large structure of conductors and high electrical constant materials, (2) near-field interactions and (3) radiation transient effects. In addressing these goals, the capability must be both accurate and efficient. The method-of-moments (MOM) codes that we are proposing (WIPL-D, parallelized WIPL-D) will provide the greatest capability in terms of modeling electrically large structures and accuracy of modeling. These will be integrated with adaptive/super-resolution signal processing to meet the requirement of high-resolution spatial enhancement. Our signal processing approach (uniform linear virtual array, direct data domain) will address highly non-stationary and transient interference environments. Issues for maintaining efficiency and accuracy in wideband radar and communication systems will be identified. A combination of MOM and marching-in-time (MOT) will be analyzed for efficient modeling of wideband scattering.

STREAM PROCESSORS, INC.
1068 Vernier Place
Stanford, CA 94305
(650) 725-8086

PI: Dr. William J. Dally
(650) 725-8945
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0221
Univ of Colorado - Colorado Springs
1420 Austin Bluffs Pkwy
Colorado Springs, CO 80933-7150
(719) 262-3150

ID#: N045-028-0321
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-028       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Intelligent Imaging System
Abstract:   Intelligent imaging systems of the future require Teraops of arithmetic performance with low power dissipation. However, they also demand full programmability and functionality over a wide range of application characteristics present in intelligent imaging systems. Stream processors have recently emerged as a technology that can provide Teraops of performance at a power effieincy of 200 GOPS/W of performance with full programmability from high-level C. This technology has broad application in surveillance, UAVs, mobile robots, and many other computer vision and intelligent image processing systems. We propose to evaluate stream processors as a single-chip solution for meeting the processing and programmability requirements in these imaging systems. A stream processor based hardware platform will be developed, imaging processing performance on key applications will be evaluated, and comparisons to competitive technologies such as the hybrid CNN-UM/DSP approach will be carried out. Furthermore, advanced "intelligent" imaging functions such as quasi-connected component, target motion analysis, and location/appearance predictions will be mapped to the stream programming model in order to evaluate their performance on stream processors.

SURFACE OPTICS CORP.
11555 Rancho Bernardo Road
San Diego, CA 92127
(858) 675-7404

PI: Mr. Mark Dombrowski
(858) 675-7404
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0214
University of Maryland
1000 Hilltop Circle
Baltimore, MD 21250
(410) 455-3502

ID#: N045-016-0060
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-016       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Multi-Band / Multi-Threat Warning Sensor
Abstract:   A program to develop a high speed, multi-band, multi-threat warning sensor capable of simultaneously imaging the CO2 red-spike and blue-spike, and laser designators at 1.06 um and 1.55 um is proposed. The proposed system builds upon Surface Optics' real-time hyperspectral imaging activities, modifying the high-speed camera electronics developed for the real-time hyperspectral imagers, and integrating them with Rockwell Scientific's brand new TCM6504 high-speed 512x640 FPA. Capable of 200 frames-per-second (fps) operation at 512 x 512 resolution, and 17,000 fps when windowed down to 32 x 32 resolution, the proposed imager is ideal for a wide variety of applications, including threat warning, detection, and tracking. Under the Phase I effort, Surface Optics Corporation (SOC) and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) will investigate extending SOC's current dual-band imaging technology to accommodate four bands without any significant changes to the imager architecture, and how to properly separate and process the multi-band imagery for robust threat detection and identification. By building on Surface Optics Corporation's, University of Maryland's, and Rockwell Scientific's, combined decades experience in high-speed imaging system development, sensor development, and algorithm development, the proposed program will produce a new four-band Threat Warning IR (TWIR-4) imager of unsurpassed capability, with varied military and commercial applications.

SYNKERA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
2021 Miller Dr., Suite B
Longmont, CO 80501-6787
(720) 494-8401

PI: Dr. Dmitri Routkevitch
(720) 652-4001
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0238
University fo Colorado at Boulder
Office of Contracts and Grants, 3100 Marine Street, Box 572
Boulder, CO 80309-0572
(303) 492-6221

ID#: N045-008-0122
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-008       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Optical Windows from Nanostructured Ceramic Composites
Abstract:   Future weapon and aircraft systems require IR windows and domes capable of withstanding greater heating rates, greater mechanical loads, and more severe rain and particle impact environments than can be withstood by sapphire. Nanostructured ceramic composites with grain size below 50 nm have the potential to achieve such performance. Synkera Technologies proposes the development of a new nanostructured ceramic composite with innovative architecture for fabricating IR windows and domes. The proposed composite architecture incorporates a nanostructured honeycomb-like matrix of one ceramic reinforced with another nanostructured ceramic phase of different composition. The intrinsic features of the proposed composite will allow the retention of sub-50 nm grain size. Precision nanoengineering of the composite structure and chemical composition will enable the low-cost production of IR windows and domes with good transparency, superior strength and thermal shock resistance. The proposed approach will be implemented by combining core expertise and capabilities of Synkera Technologies and the University of Colorado at Boulder.

SYSTEMS PLANNING & ANALYSIS, INC.
2000 N. Beauregard St, Suite 400
Alexandria, VA 22311
(703) 578-5601

PI: Dr. Chris S. Baldwin
(301) 474-1310
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0259
University of California, San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive
La Jolla, CA 92093
(858) 534-5951

ID#: N045-020-0065
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-020       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Smart Tether for Relative Localization of Moored and Towed Bodies
Abstract:   SPA and our subcontractor, UCSD, propose the development of a Smart Optical Fiber Tether (SOFT) system capable of providing real-time location data with respect to an anchor position to within 3.3 feet (1 meter) for a 100-foot (~30 meter) long tether. The system consists of integrated fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors to monitor the strains on the smart tether and an instrumentation system to interrogate the deformation data of the tether and provide real-time location data. The proposed shape measurement technology is an extension of SPA's ongoing research efforts to monitor the shape of towed sonar arrays. During Phase I, the research team will develop a breadboard prototype SOFT system to demonstrate on a 20 foot (6 meter) tether section. The scientific research to be explored in the Phase I effort includes examining the strain transfer from the tether structure to the FBG sensors, the effect of the number of sensors to shape complexity resolution, and investigating error sources in the system for mitigation analysis. During the Phase I Option, the research team will continue to experiment with the breadboard system and begin development efforts for the Phase II program by investigating integration design issues with a cable manufacturer.

SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, INC.
13766 S. Hawthorne Blvd.
Hawthorne, CA 90250-7083
(310) 679-2281

PI: Mr. Ed Bachelder
(310) 679-2281
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0321
M.I.T.
77 Massachusetts Avenue, Building E19-750
Cambridge, MA 02139-4307
(617) 253-1991

ID#: N045-003-0401
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-003       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Automated Path and Mission Planning for Aerial Platforms under Dynamic Conditions and Constraints
Abstract:   The proposal herein merges two novel and different algorithms for unmanned platform dynamic path-planning in obstacle fields. The first employs a recently published technique, Focused Dynamic Programming [1], which offers the benefits of both the LAO* algorithm [2] (LAO* subsumes Dijkstra's algorithm) and the Prioritized Sweeping algorithm [3]. Focused Dynamic Programming uses heuristics to limit the number of states examined during the value iteration so that the value updates are used most effectively. The second algorithm formulates the path optimization as a Mixed Integer Linear Programming problem. This approach is particularly convenient because (i) it allows a wide range of operationally relevant elements to be accounted for in the optimization and (ii) the formulated problem can be immediately solved by existing commercial or non-commercial optimization software. Both of the proposed algorithms appear well-suited to account for multi-objective cost functions and incorporate constraints driven by platform dynamics and rules of engagement. Additionally, the algorithms have been selected because of their potential to produce solutions for rapidly changing battlespace conditions. MIT has already applied Mixed Integer Linear Programming to solve the path planning problem for a highly maneuverable UAV helicopter.

TECHNO-SCIENCES, INC.
10001 Derekwood Lane, Suite 204
Lanham, MD 20706
(301) 577-6000

PI: Dr. Carole Teolis
(301) 577-6000
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0285
Drexel University
Dept of Elec and Computer Eng, 3141 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 895-6749

ID#: N045-023-0236
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-023       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Electrical Power Systems Management
Abstract:   The problem of `voltage collapse' is a serious issue in isolated and complex systems like shipboard power systems, especially in military craft where the ability to sustain substantial damage to the power system without complete failure is vital. Intelligent reconfiguration of the power system including energy storage, shifting loads, or shedding loads that are non-critical to combat operations might enable a battle-impaired ship to continue performing essential operations. The concepts and methods of intelligent control have advanced significantly and we propose to use these new techniques to build an Electric Power System Management tool that will improve reliability and enable fight through capability of shipboard electric power systems. We will design, implement and evaluate a Shipboard Power System Management tool that will prevent loss of power in critical buses when damage conditions are encountered. Our approach is to optimally reconfigure a ship power network following the occurrence of disruptive events. We view the power system as a hybrid system involving highly nonlinear continuous dynamics described by differential-algebraic-equations and discrete dynamics characterized by a nondeterministic finite state machine. We will integrate the new hybrid systems finite horizon optimal controllers with our techniques for designing nonlinear and discrete event state estimators.

TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT & TRANSFER, INC.
133 Defense Highway, Suite 212
Annapolis, MD 21401
(410) 224-3710

PI: Dr. Anthony A. DiGiovanni
(410) 987-1656
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0230
Lehigh University
Whitaker Lab, 5 E. Packer Ave
Bethlehem, PA 18015
(610) 758-5554

ID#: N045-008-0391
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-008       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Nanograin Ceramic Optical Composite Window
Abstract:   A high-strength low-cost alternative to single-crystal sapphire is required to meet the increased performance demands of the Navy's next-generation E/O applications. Technology Assessment & Transfer is the leading supplier of polycrystalline transparent spinel ceramics. Spinel, with a hardness that is slightly lower than that of sapphire and a lower strength (350 MPa vs. 750 MPa), has the benefits of being cubic, polycrystalline, and possessing a slight increase in transmission over sapphire in the MWIR. Although the monolithic values of strength are lower than that of sapphire, in opaque systems such as alumina, toughness, strength, and hardness were found to nearly triple over the single phase values with additions of SiC. Similar gains in strength values for spinel can be realized through the successful fabrication of a transparent nanocomposite and would equal if not eclipse that of sapphire. Using the well researched systems containing phases of alumina, silicon carbide, and zirconia, nanocomposites will be fabricated to achieve peak transparency in the MWIR. After characterizing the mechanisms and microstructure for the initial material, process refinements will attempt to achieve visible transparency in the Phase I option and Phase II efforts.

TECHNOSOFT, INC.
11180 Reed Hartman Highway
Cincinnati, OH 45242-1829
(513) 985-9877

PI: Mr. Adel Chemaly
(513) 985-9877
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0215
University of Colorado at Boulder
Aerospace Engineering
Boulder, CO 80309-0429
(303) 492-4990

ID#: N045-024-0110
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-024       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Integration Software Tool for Multidisciplinary Design of Ships
Abstract:   Ship engineering is an iterative process requiring interaction among different disciplines involved in the design at the various stages of the design cycle from the early concept to the final detailing stages. This process follows a design spiral, as the requirements from each discipline are addressed as the design process sequentially. Although the research community has developed many computational tools for individual disciplinary analysis, the interaction across the disciplines is limited, and often manual. The integration of the design and analysis processes at all stages of the engineering cycle and across all disciplines would bring about a revolution in ship industry. No single environment has yet enabled multidisciplinary and collaborative engineering seamlessly integrating the various engineering processes. This proposal focuses on the development of an integrated design and synthesis environment with an underlying object-oriented, multi-user, multidisciplinary, distributed framework supporting the rapid engineering of Naval ships. It integrates the design and analysis processes through all stages of the engineering process across all disciplines and subsystems. This multi-disciplinary computational modeling framework will reduce the computational time and cost of Naval platform designs, and increase the reliability of numerical assessment of damage and control.

TESLA LABORATORIES, INC.
3524 S Street NW
Washington, DC 20007
(414) 807-0006

PI: Dr. George Stejic
(414) 807-0006
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0225
Naval Postgraduate School
1 University Circle, 831-656-2765
Monterey, CA 93943
(831) 656-2765

ID#: N045-027-0404
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-027       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Content and Information Flow Modeling Toolkit
Abstract:   This proposed program seeks to develop, demonstrate, and commercialize a versatile new computer modeling approach for simulating and assessing the operation state of the information space in information networks. Currently there is a lack of tools for assessing the administration and operation of information networks at a component level (i.e. the interaction of the networks, computers, and software with data). The goal of this proposal is to solve this deficiency. The proposed modular model will quantity and visualize information network performance by: 1.) modeling each network component, 2.) simulating the digital passed between the network components and 3.) emulating data flow through the information system. The program will calculate the: 1.) Data Latency, 2.) Component Loading and 3.) Economic Cost for potential engineering designs; thereby providing system architects, managers, and operators with an urgently needed tool to better evaluate, visualize, and control information network traffic under various stresses. It will assess the effects of the stresses on the resultant quality of service provided by the network and will readily allow exploration of the effects of adding new clients and/or making network component changes via API compatible plug-ins.

THERMOGEAR, INC.
18005 Lower Boones Ferry Rd.
Tigard, OR 97224-7228
(503) 624-1415

PI: Dr. R. Wayne Fields
(503) 624-1415
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0280
Portland State University
PO Box 751
Portland, OR 97207-0751
(503) 725-4296

ID#: N045-021-0033
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-021       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Patient Warming Device for Casualty Care
Abstract:   We review why battery-powered, rechargeable, electric resistive heating is the approach of choice, and propose a device concept that is thin, conforms to the body, weighs under 14 lbs., and is about 2.5 cubic feet in volume. Phase I involves literature research, mathematical modeling, experimental studies, and technical development structured to tightly control design risk. We give utmost attention to the physics of energy transfer from a heating device, through the device-skin interface and skin, tissues below, the body core, and other avenues of energy exchange that circumvent the warming device. During Phase I, we optimize a device specification and analyze its feasibility during the Base Interval, and further verify and enhance these elements in the Option Interval. Our proposal includes a number of specific approaches to key problems that carry significant TGI proprietary content. Generic topics include minimizing system power requirements, applying heat in a fashion that efficiently reaches the body core, and ways to best manage certain significant parameters of patient care.

THOR TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
2415 Princeton Dr. NE, Suite B
Albuquerque, NM 87107-1731
(505) 830-6986

PI: Dr. Stuart T Schwab
(505) 830-6986
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0333
Southwest Research Institute
PO Drawer 28510
San Antonio, TX 78228-0510
(210) 684-5111

ID#: N045-001-0106
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-001       Awarded: 15JUL04
Title: Advanced Thermal Barrier Coating Materials
Abstract:   Military and commercial gas turbine engines used in aircraft, in ships, and for utility power generation require more durable and more reliable hot-section components to achieve their "design" service life. Less durable parts lead to increases in unscheduled (and costly) outages, inspections, repairs, and major overhauls. For aircraft applications, these inspections, repairs and overhauls result in a significant reduction in operational readiness and have a negative impact on flight safety. Advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with lower thermal conductivities are needed to improve the performance and durability of hot-section components in gas-fired turbine engines. For this STTR project, Thor Technologies has teamed with Southwest Research Institute to leverage the results of recent and on-going material development programs. Novel chemical precursors will be combined with innovative processing methods to produce low thermal conductivity thermal barrier coatings.

TPL, INC.
3921 Academy Parkway North, NE
Albuquerque, NM 87109
(505) 342-4412

PI: Dr. Charles Lakeman
(505) 342-4427
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0302
Washington State University
School of Mech. and Mater. Eng, P.O. Box 642940
Pullman, WA 99164-2940
(509) 335-8523

ID#: N045-022-0149
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-022       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Piezoelectric-based Energy Scavenging for Wireless Sensors
Abstract:   The smaller warcraft envisioned by The Electric Warships and Combat Vehicles Future Naval Capability need to reduce the size and weight of shipboard systems such as auxiliary systems, sensors, or other items embedded within the propeller or its associated hub, ducting, or shaft. Wireless sensors based on MEMS technologies offer enormous potential for meeting these needs by eliminating heavy, costly and failure-prone wiring, and reducing sensor size, weight and power. TPL proposes to develop a MEMS Electrical Power System for embedded propulsion train sensors. The approach will combine a piezoelectric micropower generator (MPG) developed at Washington State University to harvest ambient vibrational energy, with TPL's patented volumetric micro-supercapacitors to store the energy and deliver it as needed for high power transients. This approach integrates energy harvesting and energy storage in a single hybrid device that delivers longevity with high power density without the need for refueling or recharging. The unique combination of energy harvesting and microsupercapacitors is the ONLY way to meet the disparate energy generation, storage and delivery needs for embedded wireless sensors with a minimum volume, and a minimum weight system. Supercapacitors enable more than AN ORDER OF MAGNITUDE reduction in size compared with energy harvesting systems alone.

TRISTAN TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
6185 Cornerstone Court East, Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92121
(858) 550-2798

PI: Dr. Tatiana Starr
(858) 550-2722
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0254
Princeton University
Physics Department, 203 Jadwin Hall, PO Box 708
Princeton, NJ 08544
(609) 258-4331

ID#: N045-002-0070
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-002       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Ultra-sensitive atomic magnetometer system for airborne magnetic anomaly detection
Abstract:   Tristan Technologies, in collaboration with Prof. Romalis of Princeton University, propose to develop a magnetic anomaly detection (MAD) system based on a unique ultra-sensitive atomic magnetometer technology. Magnetometers developed at Princeton achieved world-record sensitivity of 0.5 fT/,cHz with a measurement volume of 0.3 cc. A primary challenge in airborne MAD is achieving high field sensitivities in a low frequency range (0.04-0.5 Hz) in the environment of large magnetic noise and motion platform vibration. Based on the platform dynamics, optimal magnetometer operation and detection parameters will be chosen, including vector magnetometer in zero field and scalar magnetometers with high spin polarization and modulated pumping light. A synthetic gradiometer will be constructed from two atomic magnetometers and a 3-axis fluxgate, operating in a feedback mode. The goal is to demonstrate real-world operation of the gradiometer system, gradiometer sensitivity, effectiveness of feedback, and dynamic range sufficient for deployment on a motion platform. We will demonstrate 1/f noise reduction through use of two-probe laser operation mode. Phase I will culminate in the conceptual system design for airborne MAD, including sensor array, data acquisition, algorithms for noise cancellation, control of motion/vibration induced noise, ruggedization and packaging suitable for fleet operation.

TRS CERAMICS, INC.
2820 East College Avenue
State College, PA 16801-1680
(814) 238-7485

PI: Dr. Paul W. Rehrig
(814) 238-7485
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0211
The Pennsylvania State University
Applied Research Laboratory, P.O. Box 30
State College, PA 16804
(814) 865-9607

ID#: N045-033-0295
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-033       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Single Crystal Piezoelectric Tonpilz Elements for Small Footprint, High Power Acoustic Sensors
Abstract:   For this Phase I STTR program, TRS proposes to investigate the use of single crystal piezoelectric tonpilz elements for small footprint, high power acoustic sensors. Target applications are detection and homing acoustic sensors for small diameter (less than seven inches) vehicle platforms. Planar high power tonpilz arrays are the optimum way to obtain the required acoustic pressure and bandwidth for small footprint sensors. Tonpilz elements are designed with mechanical bias to reduce stress-induced failures and typically have electro-acoustic efficiencies greater than 70 percent. As the vehicle diameter becomes smaller, packaging the acoustic sensor power delivery electronics, energy storage, guidance and control intelligence, and propulsion become increasingly more difficult. The approach to providing viable small footprint sensors is to utilize single crystal piezoelectrics to reduce the length of the tonpilz transducer while maintaining the fundamental resonance frequency and acoustic intensity. Single crystal piezoelectrics may also reduce the size of the power delivery electronics as well. TRS Technologies Inc. will combine its single crystal piezoelectric expertise with the acoustic transducer expertise of the Applied Research Laboratory Penn State University for this Phase I STTR research.

UES, INC.
4401 Dayton-Xenia Road
Dayton, OH 45432-1894
(937) 426-6900

PI: Dr. HeeDong Lee
(937) 255-6535
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0317
Univ. of Dayton Research Institute
300 College Park
Dayton, OH 45469-0104
(937) 229-2919

ID#: N045-001-0009
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-001       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: High-Temperature Coatings for Turbine Blades and Vanes
Abstract:   This Small Business Technology Transfer Program (STTR) Phase I project seeks to develop a new oxidation barrier for preventing oxidation of the bond-coat in current state-of-the art thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). TBCs have been applied to the hot sections of aircraft turbine engines to increase engine efficiency and to extend the life of metal components; however, they have not been fully integrated to the engine design due to the potential catastrophic failures at the interfaces where crack formation takes place. This failure is closely linked to the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer on the bond-coats during thermal exposures. Due to this fact, current efforts are focused on developing new alloys or barrier coatings, but only minimal benefits have been achieved. We propose the development of a new oxidation barrier layer based on yttrium aluminates that react to form YAG (Y3Al5O12) to solve the oxidation problems of the bond coats. During Phase I, we will also try to deposit a single phase rare earth orthophosphate (LaPO4) in order to seek a new TBC system exhibiting a high thermal insulation efficiency as well as a high thermochemical stability.

UMEVOICE, INC.
73 Digital Drive
Novato, CA 94949
(415) 883-1500

PI: Ms. Mary Seeley
(415) 883-1500
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0314
Vanderbilt University ISIS
Dept of EECS, Box 1824, Sta B, Vanderbilt University
Nashville, TN 37235
(615) 343-6204

ID#: N045-012-0314
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-012       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Speech Recognition in a Chaotic Aural Environment
Abstract:   This proposal will demonstrate the feasibility of exploiting core noise canceling technology of UmeVoice, Inc. in conjunction with research/development in windscreen design, dynamic adjustments to microphone sensitivity, and filtering to cancel residual signal noise in order to eliminate the effects of noise in chaotic aural environments on Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) performance in mission critical situations. In collaboration with Vanderbilt University/ISIS, we propose building a modeling environment in which spatial auditory scenes are created that include a wide array of noise sources and (an) operator(s) equipped with a voice interface to the command/control system. This will provide formal evaluation of core noise canceling technology of UmeVoice, Inc. in a variety of complex auditory scenarios. We intend to develop a simulation environment based on the model that will allow us to answer complex design questions, including deriving the optimal design of the noise canceling ASR input device, defining optimal arrangement of multiple operators in a room, determining optimal locations for other audio sources, including intercom or auditory alarm systems in order to minimize their effects on the system. This research will provide an input signal free from environmental noise and unintentional speech for improving ASR use/performance.

VERSATILE INFORMATION SYSTEMS, INC.
5 Mountainview Drive
Framingham, MA 01701
(508) 277-0242

PI: Dr. Christopher J. Matheus
(617) 285-0315
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0224
Northeastern University
360 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 373-8810

ID#: N045-027-0161
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-027       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: Development of Battlespace Information Flow and Content Methodology
Abstract:   We propose to develop a new methodology for enabling dynamically controlled-information flow between battlespace systems. This methodology will be grounded in three core capabilities: ontologically-based messaging, goal-driven information retrieval and negotiation-based information interchange. A feasibility prototype will be developed in the form of a simulated WDA (warfighter digital assistant) connected to a semantic information bus on which there will be two or more agent-based data sources (most likely linked to GCCS and/or C2PC). The WDA will be capable of accepting level 1 fusion goals (i.e., tracking, classification, identification) that it will use to probe for information sources available on the semantic information bus and then submit appropriate negotiation-based queries to gather or listen for relevant information from multiple sources. We will use the prototype to conduct experiments in which we quantitatively measure and contrast performance improvements and cost savings afforded by the proposed approach relative to existing methods.

VRSONIC, INC.
1025 N. Fillmore St., Suite 200
Arlington, VA 22201
(703) 248-3200

PI: Dr. Hesham Fouad
(703) 248-3200
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0210
University of Central Florida
4000 Central Florida Blvd.
Orlando, FL 32816
(407) 823-5582

ID#: N045-014-0411
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-014       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: An Optimized Spatial Audio System for Virtual Training Simulations
Abstract:   The objective of this proposal is to develop the requisite architecture and theoretical framework for incorporating optimized spatial auditory cues in Virtual Reality (VR) Military training systems used in training Close Quarters Battle for Military Operations in Urban Terrain (CQB for MOUT). Increasingly, combat operations are occurring in the urban environments where soldiers are fighting non-traditional warfare in unfamiliar territory. Military training systems will have to adapt to this reality by providing effective, deployable and contextual training to deployed troops. The proposed effort will lay the groundwork for developing such a training system with a primary focus on finding suitable cues for CQB room clearing tasks. Several steps are needed in order to fulfill this objective. First, auditory scene analysis will be carried out in order to determine important auditory cues for room clearing. Second, a framework and architecture will be developed for integrating optimized spatial auditory cues into training simulations. And third, research experiments will be designed and conducted in order to explore the effect of spatialization fidelity on training a room clearing task. The end result will be a dynamic, multi-modal, and deployable training system for individual combatants in CQB for MOUT environments.

WIDETRONIX
2250 NORTH TRIPHAMMER RD, APPT H1F
ITHACA, NY 14852
(607) 255-6271

PI: Dr. Yuri Makarov
(607) 255-6271
Contract #: N00014-04-M-0227
Cornell University
418 Phillips Hall, School of ECE
Ithaca, NY 14853
(607) 255-6271

ID#: N045-029-0414
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 04-029       Awarded: 01JUL04
Title: SiC Epitaxial Growth by Halo-hydrocarbon Precursor Growth
Abstract:   We propose to demonstrate the feasibility of high quality SiC epitaxial layer growth using low-temperature (1000 oC) Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) from chlorine containing carbon precursors. In this effort, we will focus on determining the optimal growth conditions, and select the most promising halogenated hydrocarbon precursors from available precursors such as CH3Cl, CH2Cl2, CHCl3, CCl4, etc. By using a halo-carbon precursor, and simultaneously optimizing the temperature gradients in the growth chamber, we will be able to achieve about 500 oC reduction in the growth temperature of SiC grown on SiC substrates. Growth rate and material quality will be demonstrated at Cornell University in a commercially manufactured rotating disk reactor. Widetronix is partnering with Veeco Corporation (formerly EMCORE) in this effort to develop turbo disk reactor technology and processes for SiC applications. Utilizing this improved technology and processes Widetronix will supply epitaxial device structures for power and optoelectronic applications.