DoD STTR Program Phase I Selections for FY06

Army Selections

Navy Selections

Air Force Selections

DARPA Selections

MDA Selections

OSD Selections


---------- AF ----------

ADAPTIVE TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
2020 Kraft Drive, Suite 3040
Blacksburg, VA 24060
(540) 951-1284

PI: Dr. Kenji Homma
(540) 951-1284
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0039
STANFORD UNIV.
DEPARTMENT OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY
Stanford, CA 94305
(650) 723-8089

ID#: F064-035-0277
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-035       Awarded: 08AUG06
Title: Advanced Finite Element Model Development for Characterization and Mitigation of Bone Conducted Sound Transmission in High Noise Environments
Abstract:   Improved characterization of the dominant paths of bone conducted sound transmission caused by external acoustic excitation for a person wearing a plug/earmuff combination is urgently needed for development of effective hearing protection in extremely high noise fields. This two phase program will achieve this ambitious goal through the extensive use of computer simulation techniques which are supported by bioacoustic and psychoacoustic experimental validation. The proposed research will develop an advanced finite element (FE) model of a human head with the important internal components necessary for simulating bone conduction, including the auditory system. An experienced team of experts in bone conduction, auditory mechanics, and finite element modeling has been assembled, including the Oto-Biomechanics group from Stanford University. The group's expertise in the modeling of auditory systems will be combined with the modeling of hearing protection systems offered by ATI. Phase I research will focus on the development and validation of FE models for the middle ear and the skull which are considered to be the critical components in bone conduction mechanics. These component models will be integrated into a whole head FE model during the Phase II research effort.

ADTECH SYSTEMS RESEARCH, INC.
1342 N. Fairfield Road
Beavercreek, OH 45432
(937) 426-3329

PI: Dr. Mustafa Hakan Kilic
(937) 426-3329
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0064
PURDUE UNIV.
302 Wood Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907-2108
(765) 496-3515

ID#: F064-037-0382
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-037       Awarded: 08AUG06
Title: Exploiting Microstructural Evolution for Material and Damage State Sensing
Abstract:   The objective of this project is to develop a multi-purpose combination type optical fiber sensor that enables simultaneous sensing of microstructural evolutions in the sensor materials and the environmental conditions such as pressure and temperature. It is very well known that materials subjected to fatigue and high temperature will go through microstructural changes such as plastic deformation, grain coarsen, precipitation generation, phase transition, and surface roughening. While extensive researches have been conducted to develop non-destructive detection techniques to measure these microstructural changes using ultrasonic wave, most of these techniques excite acoustic wave in the service components directly and therefore require high power excitation sources and bulky detection units. To overcome these difficulties, the proposed sensor measures the microstructural changes of a sensor material that is subjected to the same operational conditions as the service components do. The microstructural evolution of the sensor material is then used to interrogate the damage state of the service components. The proposed sensor is a stand-alone sensor probe combining laser-acoustic, laser scattering, and optical fiber interferometric sensing techniques to measure the material microstructure. In addition to its capability to measure multiple physical parameters simultaneously, the optical fiber sensor also has the advantages of being compact, lightweight, remotely operational, capable of operating in harsh environments, and immune to electro-magnetic interference.

AGILOPTICS
1717 Louisiana, NE Suite 202
Albuquerque, NM 87110
(505) 268-4742

PI: Mr. Dennis Mansell
(505) 268-4742
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0056
UNIV. OF NOTRE DAME
Department of Aero/Mech Engin.
Notre Dame, IN 46556
(574) 631-7680

ID#: F064-030-0175
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-030       Awarded: 23AUG06
Title: MEMS-Based Aero-optics Simulator System
Abstract:   This effort joins the MEMS-based deformable mirror technology available from AgilOptics, a New Mexico small business, with the aero-optics technology of the University of Notre Dame to develop an Aero-optics Simulator. This simulator will develop a library of aero-optics patterns to simulate atmospheric distortions for test and evaluation of military or commercial beam control systems.

AGILTRON CORP.
15 Cabot Road
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 935-1200

PI: Dr. Jack Salerno
(781) 935-1200
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0074
UNIV. OF CONNECTICUT
Department of Chemical, Materi
Storrs, CT 06269-3136
(860) 486-8704

ID#: F064-002-0461
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-002       Awarded: 05SEP06
Title: Polymer-ceramic Nanocomposites for High Power Capacitors
Abstract:   We propose to develop new polymer-ceramic nanoparticle composites for high power capacitors. The new approach combines the leading-edge nanomaterials development and manufacturing at Agiltron will transfer the high dielectric constant fillers to our new nanodielctrics with extremely improved breakdown strength and extensively lowered dielectric loss. We expect to fully overcome the problems of current techniques by creating a high dielectric constant interphase region around filler particles and by using low filler loading to accomplish improvements in capacitors that are orders of magnitude improved over current devices. Our nanocomposites will have a dielectric constant 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of polyimide, a breakdown strength 2-3 times higher than that of polyimide, and dielectric loss lower than 0.01. Importantly, our nanodielectric films will be flexible due to the low filler loading, and they can be folded and rolled like plastic sheets to build compact capacitors. The goal of the proposed program is to develop new nanocomposite films for high power capacitors. The proposed dielectric films will be flexible, and thermally stable with high dielectric constant (hundreds to thousands), high breakdown strength, and low loss.

APTIMA, INC.
12 Gill Street, Suite 1400
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 496-2415

PI: Dr. Rebecca Grier
(202) 842-1548
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0144
GEORGE MASON UNIV.
4400 University Drive
Fairfax, VA 22030
(703) 993-2298

ID#: F064-003-0440
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-003       Awarded: 20SEP06
Title: ADAPT: Allocation of Dynamic Attention across People & Teams
Abstract:   Effective task management is a critical component of mission success. As warfighters are given more information to monitor, however, their ability to detect and attend to critical information and tasks is stressed. An automatic task manager is needed to help ensure that responses to events occur in a timely manner. The foundation of such a tool is an accurate model of human dynamic attention. Many such models have been formulated; however none describe behavior in a command and control (C2) environment. We propose to (1) develop a model of dynamic attention in a representative C2 environment, the Dynamic Targeting Cell (DTC); and (2) develop an automated task manager that leverages this model. ADAPT will automatically inform warfighters of tasks that need to be performed. This advice will be optimized to reduce attention shifts and attentional overload and ensure that critical events are covered. When complete, ADAPT will increase the effectiveness of teams within the C2 environment, ensuring that tasks are attended to efficiently and effectively.

APTIMA, INC.
12 Gill Street, Suite 1400
Woburn, MA 01801
(751) 496-2415

PI: Dr. Shawn Weil
(781) 496-2456
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0110
COGNITIVE ENGINEERING RESEARCH INST
5865 S. Sossaman Road
Mesa, AZ 85212
(480) 988-1000

ID#: F064-027-0278
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-027       Awarded: 29AUG06
Title: CIFTS:Communications and Information Flow Tracking System
Abstract:   Electronic text chat has become a primary medium of communication throughout the military over the past fifteen years. In organizations such as the Air and Space Operations Center's Dynamic Targeting Cell (DTC), it is used extensively among team members as they collaboratively process information about time sensitive targets for prosecution. To assure the highest degree of performance, operators undergo periodic training. Training effectiveness is maximized by providing performance measurement and feedback to operators, so they can learn from their actions and errors. However, identifying reliable performance indicators is difficult. CIFTS, the Communications and Information Flow Tracking System, will provide performance measures based on patterns of communications flow and models of communications content. These measures will be correlated with external performance measures (e.g., expert ratings, outcome measures) to validate their utility for non-obtrusive performance assessment. The resulting system will improve the team performance assessment capabilities in the DTC by leveraging a largely untapped source of performance data: inter-personal communications. CIFTS has wide application in military organizations that utilize chat, including multi-vessel Naval operations and intra-brigade communication in the Army. Lessons learned from a deployed CIFTS system will increase the knowledge base in the team and organizational performance research area.

AURORA FLIGHT SCIENCES CORP.
9950 Wakeman Drive
Manassas, VA 20110
(703) 369-3633

PI: Dr. Thomas W. Vaneck
(617) 225-4377
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0127
MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECHNOLOGY
77 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-7831

ID#: F064-032-0116
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-032       Awarded: 08SEP06
Title: Integrated Visual and Inertial Sensor Information for Onboard Navigation (I-VISION)
Abstract:   Given the vulnerability of the GPS system to intentional or hostile denial of service, it is imperative that the U.S. military develop technologies that provide robust navigation solutions that do not rely on GPS data. To achieve this capability, Aurora and MIT have teamed to develop the Integrated Visual and Inertial Sensor Information Onboard Navigation (I-VISION) system, which will couple optic flow-based ego-motion estimation with inertial navigation systems to achieve precision navigation without GPS.. Current-generation inertial measurement units (IMUs) provide very accurate angular rate and linear acceleration information, which can be integrated to estimate a platform's position, velocity, and orientation over time. Unfortunately, due to sensor biases and scale factor errors, the accuracy of the estimation degrades with time. The coupling of visual flow and IMU-based ego-motion estimation enables the IMU to aid in resolving vision-based errors and ambiguities, and visual flow estimates can be used to reduce IMU sensor biases and scale factor errors. A multiple-camera system will be considered in order to better address the ambiguity that is introduced in the estimation of optical flow-based ego-motion. Both tightly coupled and ultra-tightly coupled implementations will be considered.

BEAM-WAVE RESEARCH, INC.
5406 Bradley Boulevard
Bethesda, MD 20814
(240) 535-2162

PI: Dr. Khanh T. Nguyen
(240) 535-2162
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0082
UNIV. OF MARYLAND
IREAP
College Park, MD 20742
(301) 405-4957

ID#: F064-022-0515
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-022       Awarded: 08AUG06
Title: High-Power Millimeter-Wave Micro-Sources for Communications & Radar Dominance
Abstract:   The proposed effort is to evaluate the feasibility of a W-band sheet-beam vacuum electronic device that can provide up to 1 kW of peak RF power at a minimum efficiency of 20%. Key elements of this effort are on the generation and transport of the sheet beam and its interaction with the RF circuit. The potential of employing a depressed collector to improve overall efficiency will also be investigated. As part of this effort, a proof-of-principle expreriment will be performed in the Phase-I to demonstrate the potential of the miniature plasma gun as a sheet-beam electron gun. Fabrication techniques will also be evaluated based on optimized beam and circuit parameters. The overall goal of this work is to define a Phase-II development strategy that is innovative yet based on achievable fabrication methods and tolerances.

BLACK RIVER SYSTEMS CO., INC.
162 Genesee Street
Utica, NY 13502
(315) 732-7385

PI: Mr. Walter Szczepanski
(315) 732-7385
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0094
SYRACUSE RESEARCH CORP.
6225 Running Ridge Road
North Syracuse, NY 13212-2510
(315) 452-8149

ID#: F064-024-0013
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-024       Awarded: 08SEP06
Title: Random Radar
Abstract:   Black River Systems Co., Inc. and Syracuse Research Corporation propose to develop a portable self-contained sensor, of size consistent with carriage and operation by a single airman, mounting on a pickup truck or a C-130 aircraft, capable of standoff sense-through-the-wall detection and location of humans and mapping their surroundings in real time. The key discriminators of the proposed baseline approach are: 1) an ultra wideband (UWB) random noise based transmitter with high-resolution coherent, correlation-type digital receiver, 2) a moving target detector to detect and locate very small movements of potential targets, 3) an image processor to image buildings and contents, providing real time situation awareness, and 4) covert and jam proof operation. Advanced features such as exploitation of model-based deconvolution and phenomenology, advanced imaging techniques, coherent and non-coherent clutter suppression, jamming/RFI suppression, covertness and ultra-wideband waveform diversity for long range standoff operation providing real-time, dynamic, and accurate information will be studied. Each trade will balance detection, image quality, speed, covertness and jamming resistance with system size, weight, power and cost. A Phase II program plan for development and test of a prototype system leading to high fidelity estimates and critical laboratory tests of proof-of-the-fundamental principles will be developed.

BLOCK MEMS LLC
64 Cedar Hill Street
Marlborough, MA 01752
(802) 867-2491

PI: Mr. E. Robert Schildkraut
(508) 480-9643
Contract #:
UNC AT CHARLOTTE
Dept. of Physics & Opt. Sci.
Charlotte, CA 28223-0001
(704) 687-3399

ID#: F064-030-0225
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-030       Selected for Award
Title: High-Resolution Wide-Dynamic-Range MEMS-Based Closed-Loop Adaptive Optics System
Abstract:   Block MEMS, LLC (Block) and the University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNCC) are proposing a unique approach to wave front processing and correction using an adaptive optics deformable mirror (DM) technology. The key technical challenges involve a DM that has one million pixels, each moving vertically up to 40 microns at a frame rate of 100 kHz. Not only does this present a challenge for the microelectromechanical system (MEMS), but it presents an even greater challenge for the wavefront/image-processing system. We propose a Fourier optics approach to wavefront monitoring and sharpness correction and a state-of the-art MEMS mechanism based on the Sandia Labs SUMMiT-VT MEMS fabrication process. The Fourier optics approach eliminates the need to process one million pixels in the traditional matrix multiply fashion, as this traditional approach could not process the correction at the100 kHz rate. In contrast our approach needs only to maximize a single image-sharpness metric using an iterative algorithmic approach that we contend is achievable at the 100 kHz rate.

BUCKMASTER RESEARCH
2014 Boudreau Ave
Urbana, IL 61801
(217) 621-9786

PI: Dr. John Buckmaster
(217) 621-9786
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0078
UNIV. OF ILLINOIS
4324 Siebel Center
Urbana, IL 61801
(217) 244-7235

ID#: F064-012-0024
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-012       Awarded: 15AUG06
Title: Development of commercially useable codes to simulate aluminized propellant combustion, and related issues
Abstract:   We propose to examine the necessary ingredients for the development of marketable codes which will: model the morphology of heterogeneous propellants (a packing code); calculate the thermal and mechancial properties of such a morphology or pack; simulate the combustion of the pack; predict the statistics of aluminum agglomeration on the burning pack surface; simulate the flight of these agglomerates through the chamber, after surface detachment; and calculate the performance impact of this flight.

BUSEK CO., INC.
11 Tech Circle
Natick, MA 01760
(508) 655-5565

PI: Dr. James Szabo
(508) 655-5565
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0059
STANFORD UNIV.
320 Panama Street
Stanford, CA 94305
(650) 723-5854

ID#: F064-001-0115
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-001       Awarded: 31JUL06
Title: Coaxial High Energy Thruster for Rapid Maneuvering of Space Assets
Abstract:   Busek Co. Inc. and Stanford University propose to jointly develop and test a high power plasma propulsion concept called the Coaxial High EnerGy (CHENG) thruster. This high efficiency (> 85%) pulsed system will be capable of average thrust levels commensurate to chemical propulsion (10^4 N/m^2), but with an Isp comparable to electrostatic propulsion (4000-50,000 s). Both thrust and Isp will be variable. The concept was originally demonstrated in the early 1970s, but was never fully characterized. Subsequent developments in high speed pulsed gas valves and pulsed power technology implore revisiting the concept. In Phase I, we will demonstrate a 12 kW thruster at firing rate of 4 Hz, producing an average thrust density of 103 N/m^2. In the process, we will identify key requirements for validating the technology, develop our approach to Phase II, and identify dual-use and commercialization potential. In Phase II, 12 kW performance will be measured on a thrust stand. Then the thrust density will be extended to 10^4 N/m^2. This will entail building a 50 kW, 100 Hz thruster. Throughout both phases, numerical simulations will be used to study the physics of the discharge and its impact on thruster erosion rates, believed to be very low.

BUSEK CO., INC.
11 Tech Circle
Natick, MA 01760
(508) 655-5565

PI: Dr. Charles Gasdaska
(508) 655-5565
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0058
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLO
77 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-3906

ID#: F064-018-0288
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-018       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: A High Current Microfabricated Carbon Nanotube Field Emitter Array with Ballasting
Abstract:   High current density carbon nanotube-based field emission arrays with uniform emission will be developed under this program. Working in conjunction with MIT, microfabrication techniques will be used to produce high density arrays of CNT emitters on substrates which incorporate feedback to ensure uniformity of emission between emitters. The feedback techniques employed will minimize thermal effects and will not result in excessive thermal loads. Modeling of this device will be performed to optimize the fabrication parameters to enhance uniformity of emission. During Phase I some test devices will be fabricated which can emit currents up to 100 microamps in an area 1 mm square. These devices will be characterized for emission uniformity in order to verify that the feedback system is performing as expected. The goal for Phase II is to develop devices capable of emitting at least 1 amp over an area of 1 cm^2.

CALABAZAS CREEK RESEARCH, INC.
690 Port Drive
San Mateo, CA 94404
(650) 595-2168

PI: Dr. Lawrence Ives
(650) 312-9579
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0087
SRI INTERNATIONAL
333 Ravenswood Ave.
Menlo Park, CA 94025-3493
(650) 859-4694

ID#: F064-018-0529
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-018       Awarded: 04AUG06
Title: High-current Field Emitter Arrays for Directed Energy Weapons
Abstract:   CCR will team with SRI International to develop high current field emission arrays for high power RF source. The Phase I program will utilize a combination of analytical calculation, computer simulation, and experimental verification to study various approaches and determine their effectiveness in achieving the program goals. The technical objective of the Phase I program will be to develop field emission array (FEA) cathodes with stable current at each emission site over an area greater than 1 square mm. The stability will be sufficient to avoid self destruction from over-current at a single location. The devices must function properly in environments encountered in deliverable vacuum structures. The Phase II program will extend FEA capability to currents exceeding 1 A over 1 sq cm with uniform emission for use in deliverable, high power, RF sources.

CALABAZAS CREEK RESEARCH, INC.
P.O. Box 330
Palo Alto, CA 94302
(650) 595-2168

PI: Dr. Carol Kory
(440) 554-3417
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0085
UNIV. OF WISCONSIN
1415 Engineering Drive
Madison, WI 53706
(608) 262-5469

ID#: F064-022-0209
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-022       Awarded: 04AUG06
Title: Novel, High Power, W-band, Meander Line TWT
Abstract:   This proposal contains innovative, traveling-wave tube (TWT) designs compatible with three-dimensional (3D) micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) fabrication techniques for millimeter-wave applications. The development will focus on novel planar interaction circuits; long life, high current density electron guns; and compact magnet configurations. The ultimate goal will be high power, efficient, compact, lightweight, and affordable RF sources. The batch nature of MEMS fabrication provides repeatability of components for increased yields and reliability, and reduced cost. The Phase I effort will use advanced, state-of-the-art simulation tools to design a 95 GHz traveling wave tube providing 100's of watts of peak power. We will thoroughly investigate the interaction circuit for its thermal and electrical performance, including bandwidth and efficiency. In addition, the program will design major TWTA components, including the electron gun and focusing structure. In parallel, we will explore MEMS fabrication techniques to integrate several TWT components into the fabrication process to avoid assembly and alignment procedures, which become increasingly difficult at higher frequencies. Continuing work will include fabrication and testing of a 95 GHz, miniaturized TWT with the goal of fabricating the entire system by MEMS techniques for "TWT on a chip" technology.

CASCADE TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
812 Esplanada Way
Stanford, CA 94305
(650) 224-4882

PI: Dr. Robert Moffat
(650) 799-5594
Contract #:
STANFORD UNIV.
Bldg 520, Rm K
Stanford, CA 94305
(650) 725-2019

ID#: F064-033-0053
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-033       Selected for Award
Title: Stability Models for Augmentor Design Tools and Technology Assessment
Abstract:   We are proposing a joint experimental/modeling and computational study to develop stability models for CFD codes to design advanced augmentors. Experiments will be conducted at the Research Institution to address various issues related to augmentor stability under vitiated conditions. A stream of vitiated air will be established within an existing vertical wind tunnel. Fuel jets in crossflow and bluff body stabilized jets will be placed into this stream. Available state-of-the-art measurement instruments and visualization techniques will enable us to study the role of vitiation and bluff body shedding upon the jet mixing, flame stabilization, and the downstream jet development. Moreover the effects of changes in altitude will be imitated and studied by varying the jet to momentum crossflow ratio. At our firm, a highly sophisticated, fully unstructured, multi-physics LES code for compressible turbulent combustion already exists. A newly developed auto-ignition model will first be extended for vitiated combustion conditions, and then validated against Cabra et al.'s detailed experiments of reactive flows in vitiated environments. Next, LES simulations of augmentor type geometries will be performed and validated against data from the Research Institution. Using experimental and simulation results, reduced stability models and novel flame holding concepts will be suggested and evaluated.

CERMET, INC.
1019 Collier Road, Suite C1
Atlanta, GA 30318
(404) 351-0005

PI: Dr. Varatharajan Rengarajan
(404) 351-0005
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0156
GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
777 Atlantic Drive
Atlanta, GA 30332-0250
(404) 385-2885

ID#: F064-034-0460
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-034       Awarded: 29SEP06
Title: UV TO IR LIGHT EMITTER
Abstract:   Cermet, Inc in collaboration with Georgia Institute of Technology proposes to develop ZnO based light emitter with light emission wavelengths ranging from UV to IT. On successful completion of the proposed effort, the market place will have a unified device structure based ZnO that emits light from UV to IR. The proposed work will be accomplished by the researchers from Cermet and Georgia Institute of Technology by exploiting their state-of -the-art crystal growth and MOCVD technology.

CFD RESEARCH CORP.
215 Wynn Dr., 5th Floor
Huntsville, AL 35805
(256) 726-4800

PI: Dr. H.Q. Yang
(256) 726-4800
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0047
UCLA
420 Westwood Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597
(310) 825-9933

ID#: F064-016-0487
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-016       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Novel Volume of Solid Technology for Nonlinear Aeroelastic Stability Analysis
Abstract:   Morphing technology enables aerospace vehicles to achieve a broader range of operational modes. Computational aeroelastic and design analysis tools of these vehicles must be able to handle arbitrarily large deformations and shape changes. Innovative Volume of Solid technology is proposed to cast structure/body-dynamics equations in an Eulerian reference frame, preserving the order of accuracy of the fluid and structural differencing methods. In this technology, a unified equation is derived, which requires no moving mesh or grid generation, and imbeds all the interaction forces between fluid and solid. Typical CFD codes may adapt this technology through addition of source terms related to the body motion and by changing effective areas. The technology is especially designed for arbitrary large and quick shape change and deformation in nonlinear aeroelasticity analysis. The developed modeling technology will provide more accurate descriptions of the aerodynamic forces placed on aircraft wings. In Phase I, an in-house multi-physics code will be modified to include the structure/body dynamics in an Eulerian frame. The technique will be evaluated for a telescoping wing case. An existing MEMS-instrumented flapping wing experimental test will be adapted to provide data model validation, A complementary computational-experimental study is planned for Phase II. Future validation, verification and simulation of realistic morphing air vehicle concepts, and its implementation in other DoD CFD codes will be carried out in Phase II.

CFD RESEARCH CORP.
215 Wynn Dr., 5th Floor
Huntsville, AL 35805
(256) 726-4800

PI: Dr. Alex Fedoseyev
(256) 726-4800
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0051
UC-RIVERSIDE
900 University Avenue
Riverside, CA 92521
(951) 827-1012

ID#: F064-026-0073
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-026       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Optimized Quantum Dot Superlattice Structures for Ultra-High Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells and Photodetectors
Abstract:   Higher efficiency solar cells are needed to reduce solar-array mass, volume, and cost. In this project we propose to develop: (i) a concept of the novel quantum dot superlattice (QDS) solar cells, which are estimated to be more efficient and radiation tolerant than conventional multi-junction solar cells, (ii) new computational tools for the quantum-dot nanostructure optimization for the specific applications. The developed models will be validated with experimental data from the Nano-Device Laboratory, UCR. It is anticipated that QD solar cells can achieve efficiencies of ~60% via optimization of the light absorption ("multicolor" effect via dot-size tuning), optical selection-rules relaxation and confinement-induced changes in the carrier transport (mini-band formation) and phonon dispersion. The user-friendly 3D modeling tools, to be developed at CFDRC, will be used for the QDS optimization for both photovoltaic and photodetector applications. Specific issues to be addressed include: (i) quantum dot ordering and size dispersion, (ii) enhanced photogenerated carrier separation and drift mobility; (iii) improved electric conductivity and increased collection efficiency. Phase I includes development of the numerical models for QDS and their experimental validation with prototype QDS. In Phase II we will use the developed modeling tools for the radiation-hardness optimization of QDS-based solar cells and detectors.

CFD RESEARCH CORP.
215 Wynn Dr., 5th Floor
Huntsville, AL 35805
(256) 726-4800

PI: Mr. Cliff Smith
(256) 726-4800
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0067
GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
School of Aerospace Eng.
Atlanta, GA 30332-0150
(404) 894-3000

ID#: F064-033-0270
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-033       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Novel Stability Model and Flameholder Concept for Modern Augmentors
Abstract:   Static stability is a major challenge for modern augmentors that feature close-coupled fuel injection/flameholders operating at low pressures and high inlet velocities, inlet temperatures and vitiation levels. Reduced dilatation and baroclinic vorticity effects at augmentor conditions cause large scale von Karman vortices to dominate the blowout event, in contrast to conventional bluffbody shear layer blowout theory. In this Phase I/II STTR, CFDRC and university partner Georgia Tech propose to: 1) better understand the physics involved in blowout at modern augmentor conditions, 2) develop reduced-order stability/flame transfer models based on this improved understanding, and 3) investigate improved flameholder designs. In Phase I, we will focus on understanding blowout physics at augmentor conditions by performing combustion Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of a generic configuration, and validating the predictions against AFRL HIT experiments. Using results from LES, the basic structure of a vorticity-based blowout model will be formulated that captures the effects of kinetics and transient strain rate on the blowout event. In addition, blowout experiments will be performed to test a novel flameholder that potentially eliminates von Karman vortices and improves stability. In Phase II, the reduced-order model will be further expanded to include submodels (e.g., for fuel/air nonuniformity, velocity gradients, cooling flow, spray, etc.), and thoroughly validated. Also, the blowout model will be used to conceive new flameholder concepts with improved static, as well as dynamic, stability.

CFD RESEARCH CORP.
215 Wynn Dr., 5th Floor
Huntsville, AL 35805
(256) 726-4800

PI: Dr. Vladimir Kolobov
(256) 726-4800
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0066
OHIO STATE UNIV.
1960 Kenny Rd
Columbus, OH 43210
(614) 292-2411

ID#: F064-038-0049
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-038       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: New Methods of Controlling Electron Kinetics and Plasma Chemistry in Pulsed Discharges of Electronegative Gases
Abstract:   A number of modern technologies utilize unique properties of highly non-equilibrium plasmas produced by electric discharges in molecular gases. Electron kinetics and vibrationally excited molecules define key chemical reactions in these plasmas. The goal of this project is to utilize the non-local nature of electron kinetics to improve the performance of various plasma devices under pulsed power conditions. In Phase I, the analysis of electron kinetics and vibrational kinetics will be performed for the high-pressure conditions present in the Electric Oxygen-Iodine Laser (EOIL), and for the low-pressure conditions typical to material processing reactors and MHD generators. The role of runaway electrons and nonlocal ionization in the active phase, and the role of vibrational excitation and fast electrons generated in chemical reactions in the passive phase will be investigated using computational tools developed at CFDRC. Different methods of tailoring the electron distribution function and vibrational distribution function for efficient production of singlet delta oxygen (SDO) and dynamics of negative ions (facilitating electron detachment) will be investigated via analytical models and computational experiments. The Ohio State University will provide expertise in non-equilibrium vibrational kinetics and plasma chemistry, and experimentally demonstrate the effect of fast and non-local electrons in Phase II.

CHARLES RIVER ANALYTICS, INC.
625 Mount Auburn Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 491-3474

PI: Dr. Subrata K. Das
(617) 491-3474
Contract #:
UNIV. AT BUFFALO
4455 Genesee St.
Buffalo, NY 14225
(716) 645-2357

ID#: F064-027-0465
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-027       Selected for Award
Title: Rapid Evaluation and Analysis of Communication in Teams (REACT)
Abstract:   In a Net Centric Battlespace, information is constantly shared along both formal and informal channels. Informal means of communication such as chat rooms are often employed when standard channels of communication do not fit the emergent work practice of a group. Despite its inefficiency, this unstructured communication is very natural and convenient for users. As such, it is a rich and plentiful data source for understanding group interaction. However, existing methods for analyzing such discourse are either low-fidelity (simple keyword matching) or extremely man-power intensive (manual transcription and tagging). With advances in speech recognition, part-of-speech tagging, and social networking theory, it is possible to improve on these discourse analysis techniques and use them to model an interaction. One primary output of this model is the performance of individual team members, and of the team as a whole. Such measures can be used to highlight areas of reduced performance or possible breakdown within a large team. We propose to develop a system for Rapid Evaluation and Analysis of Communication in Teams (REACT), combining traditional techniques from discourse analysis with advances in NLP and communication analysis. REACT rapidly analyzes streams of communication to highlight potential areas of coordination difficulty.

CHARLES RIVER ANALYTICS, INC.
625 Mount Auburn Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 491-3474

PI: Dr. Jonathan D. Pfautz
(617) 491-3474
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0060
UNIV. AT BUFFALO
413 Bell Hall
Buffalo, NY 14260
(716) 645-2357

ID#: F064-031-0463
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-031       Awarded: 08AUG06
Title: Enhancing IPB with Representations of Meta-information (EPROM)
Abstract:   Modern military operations increasingly require decision-makers to reason predicatively about adversary actions and the battlespace environment - a task made more challenging due to meta-information (i.e., qualities of information such as uncertainty or staleness). Understanding the role of meta-information in reasoning about intelligence and developing methods for effectively portraying it has the potential to improve the interpretation and dissemination of intelligence and therefore to encourage more battlespace-aware decisions. Therefore, we propose to design, demonstrate, and evaluate methods for Enhancing IPB with Representations Of Meta-Information (EPROM). Three core components characterize our approach. First, we will perform a work domain analysis (WDA) in a specific military domain to define the perceptual and cognitive contexts that impact the role of meta-information in reasoning, and develop case studies to illustrate these impacts. Second, we will design meta-information visualization methods that explicitly address the defined contexts illustrated in the case studies. Third, we will develop a plan for evaluating these visualization methods and will perform pilot experiments to validate our approach. Our approach will be supported by the design of a software toolkit to aid in prototyping and evaluating visualization methods, and by the integration of these methods into existing and planned DoD battlespace display systems.

CIRCULAR LOGIC
399 NW 7th Ave
Boca Raton, FL 33431
(561) 361-1922

PI: Dr. Edward Large
(561) 297-0106
Contract #:
FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIV.
777 Glades Rd
Boca Raton, FL 33431-3343
(561) 297-2312

ID#: F064-003-0507
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-003       Selected for Award
Title: Quantitative Model of Human Dynamic Attention Allocation
Abstract:   The objective of this proposal is to demonstrate the feasibility of a quantitative dynamical model of human attention and perception. Recent experimental findings have demonstrated the importance of event timing for perceiving and attending to complex sequences of events: 1) The auditory system uses active temporal mechanisms for analysis of sound from the earliest stages of sensation through the development of integrated high-level percepts; 2) Attention exploits temporal stimulus structure to coordinate perception, cognition and action in a way that is optimal for a given task environment. In both cases, the nervous system exploits nonlinear oscillation to encode and interact with complex stimuli that unfold over time, albeit over different time scales. Analysis and interaction with temporal stimuli via networks of nonlinear oscillators is referred to here as nonlinear time-frequency transformation. This proposal is to develop a nonlinear time-frequency transformation software toolbox, and to evaluate its utility as a model of human attention and perception. Evaluation will include 1) analyses of temporally complex data streams 2) analysis of data streams from multiple sources (spatial locations or perceptual modalities) and 3) production of attentional expenditure estimates for a human confronted with such a data stream in a complex task environment.

COMPOSITE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT, INC.
2600 Campus Drive, Suite D
Lafayette, CO 80026
(303) 664-0394

PI: Mr. Douglas Campbell
(303) 664-0394
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0109
GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Office of Sponsored Programs
Atlanta, GA 30332-0420
(404) 385-6797

ID#: F064-013-0121
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-013       Awarded: 18AUG06
Title: TEMBOr Foam for Morphing Wing Applications
Abstract:   In recent years there has been significant interest in developing morphing air vehicles that would be able to fly efficiently over a wide range of flight regimes to meet new mission profiles. Though morphing-wing concepts have been around for many years, it has been determined that conventional designs such as swing wings are not adequate for providing the desired improvements. Many of the new morphing wing concepts that have been developed have rigid but articulating substructures that rely on flexible skins to provide the aerodynamic surface. Because of the difficult requirements, the skin is often a limiting factor in the realization of morphing concepts. Composite Technology Development, Inc. (CTD), working with the Georgia Tech Research Corporation, proposes to use a new type of shape memory polymer (SMP) for morphing wing skin elements. Key goals of the program are to define material property requirements from system-level requirements provided, to experimentally and analytically characterize the performance of the SMP, and to design and test a preliminary wing skin element.

COMPOSITE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT, INC.
2600 Campus Drive, Suite D
Lafayette, CO 80026
(303) 664-0394

PI: Dr. Steven Arzberger
(303) 664-0394
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0073
GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Office of Sponsored Programs
Atlanta, GA 30332-0420
(404) 385-6797

ID#: F064-017-0128
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-017       Awarded: 04AUG06
Title: Adaptive Materials for Morphing Aircraft Skins
Abstract:   In the proposed Phase I program, Composite Technology Development Inc. (CTD) will work with Raytheon Missile Systems to define material requirements for morphing aircraft skins, and will perform material evaluations to demonstrate the feasibility of adaptive materials with dynamically variable stiffness. Georgia Tech Research Corporation (GTRC) will provide mechanical characterization support.

CONTINUUM DYNAMICS, INC.
34 Lexington Avenue
Ewing, NJ 08618
(609) 538-0444

PI: Dr. Glen R. Whitehouse
(609) 538-0444
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0086
NEW MEXICO STATE UNIV.
P.O. Box 30001
Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001
(505) 646-6546

ID#: F064-021-0260
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-021       Awarded: 06SEP06
Title: Novel Experimental and Numerical Methods for the Aeromechanical Design of Flapping Wing Hovering MAVs
Abstract:   Recent developments have made clear the strong potential of Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) for a wide range of surveillance and tactical reconnaissance functions, particularly if the challenging but critical hovering capability can be achieved. Implementation of a practical hovering air vehicle at very small scales, however, requires breakthroughs in understanding of the complex flow environment of such vehicles as well as development of practical design and analysis tools for this regime. The proposed effort will support these objectives by advancing the fundamental understanding of the relationship between wing kinematics and forces - including low Re and wing flexibility effects - with the ultimate goal of developing aerodynamic/aeroelastic models for use in simulation and design. This will permit generation of viable aerodynamic flight control schemes for flapping wing MAVs operating in gusty conditions. The effort will build on mutually supporting capabilities of the team members, and will feature application of a suite of both established and evolving computational modeling tools for complex vortex-dominated flows at low Re as well as use of advanced experimental methods for flow diagnostics and aeroelastically scaled models. The project will also leverage a strong foundation of experience in support of design software for vertical flight vehicles.

CREARE, INC.
P.O. Box 71
Hanover, NH 03755
(603) 643-3800

PI: Dr. Anthony J. Dietz
(603) 643-3800
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0143
UNIV. OF ILLINOIS AT U-C
4255 Beckmann Institute
Urbana, IL 61801
(217) 333-2407

ID#: F064-035-0153
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-035       Awarded: 27SEP06
Title: Bone-conducted Sound Transmission and Attenuation
Abstract:   Hearing protection for personnel working in high-noise environments remains an important challenge for the scientific and engineering community. The sound levels close to certain modern military weapons platforms approach 150 dBA. At these levels, the attenuation provided by hearing protection devices (HPDs) is limited by bone-conducted sound that bypasses the ear canal and its associated protection (earplugs and earmuffs). An improved understanding of the transmission mechanisms for bone-conducted sound is required to enable the design of improved active and passive hearing protection devices. Creare and the University of Illinois propose a three-pronged approach to investigate the transmission of bone-conducted sound and design-improved HPDs. The approach involves (1) calculation, using an acoustic wave propagation model implemented in finite element analysis software; (2) simulation, using an instrumented physical model of a human head; and (3) human subject tests, investigating the nonlinear response of the cochlea to bone conduction stimulation. In Phase I we propose to demonstrate the feasibility of each of these techniques, and in Phase II we will conduct a detailed investigation of the phenomena using these techniques and apply the results to the next generation of hearing protection devices.

CU AEROSPACE
60 Hazelwood Drive
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-8272

PI: Dr. David Carroll
(217) 333-8274
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0145
BOARD OF TRUSTEES UNIV. OF ILLINOIS
c/o OSPRA, South Research Park
Champaign, IL 61820-7406
(217) 333-2187

ID#: F064-025-0004
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-025       Awarded: 25SEP06
Title: Self-Healing Adhesives and Composites for Aerospace Systems
Abstract:   Self-healing composites and adhesives would alleviate longstanding problems in aerospace structures associated with multiple types of damage mechanisms such as mechanical/thermal fatigue, microcracking, and debonding. A composite cryogenic tank based on self-healing technology would prevent leakage by sealing microcracks throughout the lifetime of the tank and enable the use of composites in this critical application with low risk to mission success. In Phase I, the feasibility of self-healing structural composites and adhesives will be demonstrated by incorporating microencapsulated healing agents and chemical catalysts in composite systems and measuring their mechanical performance under a variety of loading conditions. A partnership between CU Aerospace (CUA) and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) has been formed to pursue the aerospace applications of this new technology. Together, we will demonstrate the technology for laboratory scale mechanical test specimens and quantify healing performance under both static and cyclic fatigue conditions. This technology is critical not only to STSS, ABL, and a variety of other Air Force mission objectives, but is fundamental to all aerospace structural composite applications.

DESIGN INTERACTIVE, INC.
1221 E. Broadway, Suite 110
Oviedo, FL 32765
(407) 706-0977

PI: Dr. Laura Milham
(407) 706-0977
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0151
EMBRY-RIDDLE AERONAUTICAL UNIVERSIT
Dept. of Human Factors & Sys.
Daytona Beach, FL 31114-3900
(386) 323-8065

ID#: F064-027-0129
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-027       Awarded: 21SEP06
Title: Communication Analysis for Enhanced Team Performance in the AOC
Abstract:   Improving team communication in distributed C2 environments must start with addressing underlying components of communication problems. First, it is important to understand what defines "good" communications (e.g., domain-specific frequencies, types, shifts from explicit to implicit communication) and what communications, or lack thereof, contribute to breakdowns. By neglecting the examination of these influences on team communication, data interpretations remain ambiguous, possibly misrepresentative. Next, it is important to know when communication failures occur to monitor and measure team performance. Finally, communication analyses must consider why errors occur (i.e., information is not exchanged, received, correct, or comprehended). The measurement of these cognitions will be described via state-of-the-art EEG and eye tracking metrics to assess the reasons for communication failure. To address these issues, this effort proposes to develop a Multi-axis APproach to Measuring and Interpreting Team Communications (MAP IT-C), a conceptual model which describes: 1) the process to develop a Predictive Framework driven by task analysis and social networks analysis, and 2) the specifications for Real-time Communication and Performance data collection and 3) an Online Diagnostic Engine used to diagnose team performance real-time (i.e., mapping a comprehensive suite of metrics [communication, physiological, and behavioral metrics] against expectation data generated from the Predictive Framework).

EIKOS, INC.
2 Master Drive
Franklin, MA 02038
(508) 528-0300

PI: Mr. Paul Glatkowski
(508) 528-0300
Contract #: FA9453-06-M-0204
NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATOR
1617 Cole Rd
Golden, CO 80401
(303) 384-6561

ID#: F064-026-0052
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-026       Awarded: 08SEP06
Title: Nanotube Transparent Electrodes for Nanomaterial Photovoltaics
Abstract:   Eikos Inc. and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory propose to develop nanomaterial transparent electrodes to enhance the efficiency of three junction solar cells. Eikos leads the world in developing transparent conductive electodes based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Branded as Invisiconr, our patented technology has already been successfully employed to improve solar cell performance. Eikos collaborates with the National Renewable Energy Lab and leading companies to fabricate organic, CIGS, and other solar cells incorporating Invisiconr for military and commercial applications. Having demonstrated our ability to integrate into a wide variety of solar technologies, we now propose to integrate Invisiconr into three junction very high efficiency solar cells as a transparent electrode. Carbon nanotube electrodes will reduce shadowing from the metal grid and will allow the AlInP layer to be thinned, while improving carrier transport and acting as an anti-reflective coating. CNT coatings are exceptionally transparent through the visible and into the infrared, improving efficiency of future four junction solar cells. Invisiconr will ease manufacturing tolerances and lower PV production cost by improving the cell performance at minimal added cost, making multi-junction PVs more attractive for terrestrial concentrators. Nanotubes are exceptionally stable at high temperatures and under intense irradiation, making them ideal materials for space applications. High performance solar cells with Invisiconr will have improved theoretical efficiencies at reduced cost, which will make them the new standard for space applications and open emerging markets for terrestrial applications.

EM PHOTONICS, INC.
51 East Main Street, Suite 203
Newark, DE 19711
(302) 456-9003

PI: Dr. Ahmed Sharkawy
(302) 456-9003
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0065
UNIV. OF DELAWARE
140 Evans Hall
Newark, DE 19711
(302) 831-8170

ID#: F064-006-0416
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-006       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Reconfigurable Nanophotonic Optical Interconnects for Advanced FPGAs
Abstract:   Optically interconnected systems provide a number of additional benefits. For example, by removing metallic traces, many signal integrity issues are also eliminated as the parasitic capacitance and inductance associated with high-speed lines are removed, which further improves systems performance. Additionally, such systems typically require less power and experience less leakage, or wasted power, which is critical in space-borne applications. Moreover, an optical system is immune to the standard radiation effects of the harsh space environment. To this end, we propose the development of an optically reconfigurable nanophotonic interconnect for advanced FPGA. By removing the electrical interconnections between logic blocks, data can be quickly and efficiently routed across the FPGA. Such a novel design will remove the routing bottleneck associated with existing FPGA architectures and enable the rapid development of high performance FPGA systems.

ENIGMATICS, INC.
9215 51st Avenue, Unit No. 7
College Park, MD 20740
(831) 624-6024

PI: Dr. David L. Book
(202) 285-2431
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0077
UNIV. OF VIRGINIA
P.O. Box 400195
Charlottesville, VA, VA 22904-4195
(434) 924-4270

ID#: F064-023-0197
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-023       Awarded: 04AUG06
Title: Deposition of Amorphous Aluminum Alloys as a Replacement for Aluminum Cladding
Abstract:   The protective properties of the oxide films that form on aluminum alloys can break down locally and allow extensive corrosion. An amorphous alloy system recently developed at the University of Virginia is promising as an environmentally compliant metal cladding. We propose a new method for converting alloy powder into coatings. This technique does not require large standoffs and has very high heating and cooling rates, which prevents grain growth and result in deposition of amorphous material. The substrate remains at low temperature during deposition.

FLUOROCHEM, INC.
680 S. Ayon Ave.
Azusa, CA 91702
(626) 334-6714

PI: Dr. Kurt Baum
(626) 334-6714
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0133
SRI INTERNATIONAL
333Ravenswood Ave.
Menlo Park, CA 94025-3493
(650) 859-3083

ID#: F064-007-0470
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-007       Awarded: 18SEP06
Title: Environmentally-Benign Oxidizers for Propulsion
Abstract:   Ammonium perchlorate (AP) is the most commonly used oxidizing ingredient in solid propellant formulations. It carries a sufficient excess of oxygen to allow for the combustion of the required binder and added metal, such as aluminum. One major drawback of AP is its chlorine content which results in the formation of hydrochloric acid (HCl) as a combustion product and can cause environmental problems. Available halogen-free oxidizers, such as ammonium nitrate (AN) or ammonium dinitramide (ADN) provide less available oxygen, than AP and, therefore, result in significantly reduced performance of their formulations. A second major drawback to AP is its high solubility in water (20g/100g water at 0°C) and subsequent contamination of ground water. Further, it is highly mobile and persistent in ground-water systems. An objective of the Phase I STTR program is to conceive potential candidate compounds and screen them based on their theoretical performance and other parameters. Experimental approaches to synthesize and characterize promising new ingredients will be designed. Ideally, sufficient amounts of target compounds will be prepared to allow determination of structure and permit necessary ingredient stability and sensitivity tests to be conducted. If the reaction scheme is complex, performance on Phase I may be limited to demonstration of feasibility of the key steps.

G A TYLER ASSOC., INC.
1341 South Sunkist Street
Anaheim, CA 92806
(714) 772-7668

PI: Dr. Glenn A. Tyler
(714) 772-7668
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0134
UNIV. OF ROCHESTER
PO Box 270140
Rochester, NY 14627
(585) 275-8036

ID#: F064-030-0178
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-030       Awarded: 05SEP06
Title: MEMS Adaptive Optics Enhancement of Quantum Entanglement for Secure Communication through the Atmosphere
Abstract:   The proposed effort develops the understanding required to assess the utility of using a MEMS device to prepare the required optical fields that not only facilitate quantum entanglement, but also maintain a sufficient level of quantum entanglement for propagation through an aberrating medium such as the atmosphere. In addition a conceptual design of an experiment that is appropriate to further the development of this capability will be developed on the proposed Phase I effort with the intent that it will form the basis of the subsequent Phase II effort.

GENVAC HOLDINGS, LTD., DBA: TERAPHYSICS CORP.
110 Alpha Park
Cleveland, OH 44143
(440) 646-9986

PI: Dr. James A. Dayton, Jr.
(440) 646-9986
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0081
RTI INTERNATIONAL
P.O. Box 12194
Research Triangle Pk, NC 27709-2194
(919) 541-6000

ID#: F064-022-0358
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-022       Awarded: 04AUG06
Title: Diamond Studded Micro Helix TWT
Abstract:   A highly efficient, very wide bandwidth, diamond studded micro helix TWT for operation at 95 GHz will be designed and fabricated by means of a novel application of solid state micro fabrication technology. Because of the nature of the fabrication process proposed here, this device can be built as a single TWT or just as readily as an array of TWTs. By spatially combining the power output of several TWTs in an array, an electronically steerable power output of hundreds of Watts is quite feasible. The design will be conducted utilizing well established computational techniques first introduced by the authors and now widely adopted. The fabrication of the micro helix TWT will rely entirely upon lithography and other solid state techniques. Because this fabrication technique results in a helical circuit that is supported by a minimal amount of low permittivity dielectric, it is anticipated that the bandwidth and efficiency will be much higher than for a conventional helix.

GEOSEMBLE TECHNOLOGIES
2041 Rosecrans Ave., Suite 245
El Segundo, CA 90245
(310) 414-9849

PI: Dr. Ching-Chien Chen
(310) 414-9849
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0120
UNIV. OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
Dept. of Contracts & Grants
Los Angeles, CA 90089-1147
(213) 740-6061

ID#: F064-004-0036
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-004       Awarded: 14SEP06
Title: Exploiting Raster Maps for Imagery Analysis
Abstract:   Maps are an incredibly rich source of information, but the information contained in a map is often locked up in a raster image. Sometimes the original source data used to create the map is available, but more often than not this information has either been lost or is not available. In the proposed project, we propose to develop the technology that will make it possible to exploit the huge number of raster maps available and use them for imagery analysis. In particular, we will develop the technology for automatically finding online raster maps, automatically aligning the raster maps with satellite imagery, and automatically extracting the information contained in a maps, such as transportation networks, hydrographic layers, and the textual labels on the information. The resulting technology will allow an analyst to view a satellite image for any place in the world, automatically find and align the maps covering that region, and then overlay selected layers from the map to better understand the information shown in an image.

GLOBAL CONTOUR LTD.
1145 Ridge Road West
Rockwall, TX 75087
(214) 514-4085

PI: Dr. Jaycee Howard Chung
(214) 514-4085
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0139
UNIV. OF SOUTH CAROLINA
Office of Intellectual Propert
Columbia, SC 29208
(803) 777-7093

ID#: F064-037-0100
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-037       Awarded: 07SEP06
Title: Exploiting Microstructural Evolution for Material and Damage State Sensing
Abstract:   The purpose of the proposed STTR project is to develop a high temperature and aggressive environment-operating structural health monitoring (SHM) sensor based on micro-structural evolution concept in the sensor material. The objective of the proposed STTR project is to develop a step-forward multi natured measurement (MNM) PWAS sensor architecture that takes advantage of both conventional and exotic structural evolutionary approaches towards quantification of specific degradation states, failure modes and usage conditions, and that is potentially applicable for remaining useful life (RUL) prognosis of jet engine components. The proposed STTR proposal outlines several materials of interest, environmental subjection properties that will be explored, and the first approach is exploiting what would be detrimental microstructural evolution in gallium orthophosphate (GaPO4) based on our technology. The sensor is to interrogate rotating jet turbine components and thermal protection system (TPS) tiles of space re-entry vehicles operating in a high temperature/aggressive environment for structural health diagnosis.

IN SPACE, L.L.C.
1220 Potter Drive, Suite 100
West Lafayette, IN 47906
(765) 775-2107

PI: Dr. William Anderson
(765) 496-2658
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0115
PURDUE UNIV.
315 North Grant St.
West Lafayette, IN 47907-2023
(765) 496-2658

ID#: F064-005-0078
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-005       Awarded: 07SEP06
Title: Combustion Stability Innovations for Liquid Rocket Engines
Abstract:   While guidelines for stable combustion in certain engine cycles and propellant combinations exist; there is no proven, mechanistic predictive model, particularly for high-performance liquid hydrocarbon-fueled engines. IN Space and Purdue propose to fill this critical need by developing a "testbed" consisting of 1) a predictive combustion stability design tool to mitigate the risk of generating instabilities in new designs or analyzing instabilities in existing designs of oxidizer-rich staged combustion (ORSC) engines and 2) a stability verification protocol to assess stability margin during full-scale engine testing. Analytical and experimental testbed elements needed to bring about these developments include subscale experiments at real-scale conditions to provide validation data; advanced CFD modeling based on detached eddy simulation, Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes and linear and non-linear Euler equations to provide fundamental understanding as well as to derive and test combustion response submodels for engineering analysis; engineering state-of-the-art level design analysis for data interpretation. State of Indiana matching funds will be used to construct and test a subscale combustor experiment needed to gather stability data in Phase I. The Phase I effort provides a strong foundation for a Phase II effort, which will focus on further product improvements and validation using a test article at full-scale conditions.

INDUSTRIAL MEASUREMENT SYSTEMS, INC.
2760 Beverly Dr., #4
Aurora, IL 60502
(630) 236-5901

PI: Dr. Donald E. Yuhas
(630) 236-5901
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0071
VANDERBILT UNIV.
VU Station B 351592
Nashville, TN 37235
(615) 343-6959

ID#: F064-009-0286
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-009       Awarded: 02AUG06
Title: Innovative Measurement Approaches for Harsh, Chemically Reacting Environments
Abstract:   In this proposal we exploit the remote sensing attributes of ultrasound to measure temperature, transient temperature and heat flux in liquid rocket combustion chambers. In previous work, we have demonstrated the capability to measure the local temperature at the inner surface of large caliber Navy guns using sensors attached to the external gun barrel surface (2.5" from the measurement point). In the proposed effort we improve the measurement methods to enable us to acquire temperature data more rapidly, modify our approach to fit the needs of the rocket combustion chamber, and enhance the analytical methods to accurately treat transients and extract heat flux from the ultrasonic data. The ability to locate sensors on the exterior surfaces of chambers removes the sensor from the chemically reactive environment and reduces the need for operation at extreme temperatures. Yet, the ability to obtain localized and instantaneous temperature data from previously inaccessible regions should enhance our ability to control and better understand liquid rocket combustion processes.

INNOVATIVE SCIENTIFIC SOLUTIONS, INC.
2766 Indian Ripple Rd
Dayton, OH 45440
(937) 429-4980

PI: Dr. Terrence R. Meyer
(937) 286-5711
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0100
UNIV. OF MASSACHUSETTS
MIE Department, ELAB 219
Amherst, MA 01003-2210
(413) 545-1393

ID#: F064-009-0437
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-009       Awarded: 18AUG06
Title: Ballistic Imaging for Dense Spray Diagnostics in Harsh Chemically Reacting Environments
Abstract:   During the Phase I effort, we propose to evaluate the feasibility of performing ultrafast-laser-based ballistic imaging for studying liquid hydrocarbon and oxygen injection characteristics for possible application in bi-propellant rocket engines. Ballistic imaging has the potential to circumvent the difficulties associated with propagating light through dense media. Through the combined use of ultrafast time gating, polarization gating, and spatial filtering, photons that propagate without interference (i.e., ballistic photons) are preferentially detected over photons that undergo significant beam steering or multiple scattering. During the Phase I effort, we will (1) assemble an ultrafast-laser-based ballistic imaging system, (2) demonstrate the feasibility of using this technique for liquid oxygen and hydrocarbon injection, (3) evaluate the use of ballistic imaging using a Monte-Carlo simulation for laser-spray interaction, and (4) develop a strategy for implementation in a demonstration bi-propellant rocket engine combustion system in collaboration with the DOD and an industry partner.

INNOVATIVE SCIENTIFIC SOLUTIONS, INC.
2766 Indian Ripple Rd
Dayton, OH 45440
(937) 429-4980

PI: Dr. Peter Bletzinger
(937) 255-2706
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0107
UNIV. OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
Department of Elect. Eng.
Los Angeles, CA 90089
(213) 740-7627

ID#: F064-018-0279
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-018       Awarded: 12SEP06
Title: High-current Field Emitter Arrays for Directed Energy Weapons
Abstract:   Field emission electron emitting arrays hold promise for use in high current density electron beam devices and can replace power consuming thermionic emitters. While single emitters can emit currents up to milliamps, large field emitter arrays are limited in total current due to non-uniformity and resulting instability problems. Solutions to these problems have been attempted using current limiting devices, including a field effect transistor (FET) for each emitter. This is a promising approach but so far has only been used for small total currents. Based on previous work ISSI in cooperation with the University of Southern California (USC) proposes to further develop both experimentally and by modeling whole arrays existing concepts and devices to meet the required total current. The work will be based on the successful demonstration of the fabrication of field effect transistor arrays combined with carbon nanotube array field emitters by USC.

INNOVATIVE SCIENTIFIC SOLUTIONS, INC.
2766 Indian Ripple Rd
Dayton, OH 45440
(937) 429-4980

PI: Dr. Peter Bletzinger
(937) 252-2706
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0114
UNIV. OF HOUSTON
316 E Cullin Bldg
Houston, TX 77204-2015
(713) 743-9104

ID#: F064-038-0247
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-038       Awarded: 12SEP06
Title: Application of Non-Local Effects to Lasers and Plasma Chemistry in Flowing-Gas and Pulsed Electric Discharges.
Abstract:   Oxygen and/or air plasmas are widely used in different processes such as etching, purifying, ashing, surface cleaning, ozone generation and for electrical oxygen/iodine laser discharges. The oxygen plasma is an important example of electronegative plasmas and has been widely studied and modeled, including non-local effects due to discharge boundaries, low pressure or unsteady-state or afterglow operation. The proposed Phase I program will investigate the so far neglected effect of the relatively high energy electrons created by associative detachment of negative ions. For some conditions, these electrons can form a major portion of the electron population and causing additional non-local effects. The contribution to the electron energy distribution by the detached electrons will be investigated, and the model will include these additional non-local effects. Appropriate modeling approaches will be considered for pulsed and flowing gas plasmas. Beneficial effects or controls using the non-local effects will be investigated. In a following Phase II program, further refinements of the model will be performed and example technical plasmas will be tested experimentally. The oxygen plasma is widely used and a more accurate model and possible improvements due to better understanding of the plasma kinetics will be important for both commercial and military applications.

INTELLIGENT AUTOMATION, INC.
15400 Calhoun Drive, Suite 400
Rockville, MD 20855
(301) 863-2602

PI: Dr. Ram M. Narayanan
(814) 863-2602
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0101
THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.
202 Electrical Engineering E.
University Park, PA 16802-2705
(814) 863-2602

ID#: F064-024-0396
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-024       Awarded: 28SEP06
Title: Heterodyne Correlation Random Noise Radar for Through Wall and Building Interior Imaging
Abstract:   Recent terrorist activities and law-enforcement situations involving hostage situations underscore the need for effective through-the-wall surveillance (TWS). Current building interior imaging systems are based on short-pulse waveforms, which are easily recognizable by the intelligent adversary who may employ countermeasures to confound detection. We propose a coherent continuous-wave ultrawideband random noise radar architecture based on heterodyne correlation and adaptive software radar techniques for covertly imaging obscured targets and interfaces. The proposed approach has the following two main advantages over competing systems: (i) random noise waveform possesses an ideal ambiguity function with separately controlled down-range and cross-range resolutions, thus providing unambiguous high resolution imaging at any distance; and (ii) random noise waveform is inherently low-probability-of-intercept (LPI), low- probability-of-detection (LPD), and anti-jam. Thus, it is an ideal candidate sensor for covert imaging of obscured regions in hostile environments. The coherency in the system can be exploited to field a fully-polarimetric system that can exploit polarization features in target recognition. Moving personnel can be detected using Doppler processing. Simulation and preliminary experimental studies not only show detection of human activity and human tracking behind walls with excellent multipath and clutter rejection, but also differences between specific activity types.

INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF VIRTUAL ORG., INC.
DBA, IAVO Research and Scientific, 1010 Gloria Ave
Durham, NC 27701
(919) 433-2402

PI: Mr. Eric Lester
(919) 433-2412
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0075
U. OF UTAH, SCHOOL OF COMPUTING
50 S. Central Campus Dr.
Salt Lake City, UT 84112
(801) 581-3601

ID#: F064-004-0143
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-004       Awarded: 09AUG06
Title: Exploiting Raster Maps for Imagery Analysis
Abstract:   The US Air Force seeks innovative technologies to exploit available map data to provide a contextual backdrop for imagery. This contextual backdrop will allow the imagery analyst to more rapidly and accurately exploit the data for further processing. Maps provide a wealth of information, such as road delineations, road names, buildings, and other cultural features which comprise the contextual backdrop for an image. In short, the desired capability should allow the analyst to rapidly "know where they are" in an image and increase their daily throughput of images without sacrificing accuracy. Accordingly, we propose to develop ContextMAX which adheres closely to the stated requirements and leverages our 20+ years of successful imagery processing development and operational transitioning. ContextMAX will incorporate novel robot-mapping techniques for performing automated map analysis, advanced tie-point extraction from imagery, and multi-source registration to create a correlated scene providing the necessary contextual backdrop to imagery analyst for a given image. By this, ContextMAX represents an innovative, low-risk solution for improved contextual awareness to the imagery analyst as well as producing modular geospatial data management and extraction techniques useful to a number of remote sensing and GIS applications.

LUNA INNOVATIONS, INC.
2851 Commerce Street
Blacksburg, VA 24060
(540) 552-5128

PI: Dr. Christy Vestal
(540) 552-5128
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0043
GEORGIA TECH
Georgia Institute of Technolog
Atlanta, GA 30332
(404) 894-4819

ID#: F064-015-0262
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-015       Awarded: 18SEP06
Title: Magnetodielectric Nanocomposite Films for RF Applications
Abstract:   Requirements for improved military communication systems operating in the GHz frequency range, such as low cost, lightweight antennas and surveillance equipment with low physical or conformal profiles, demand the development of new materials with improved electromagnetic properties. To meet this need, Luna Innovations will develop magnetodielectric nanocomposites consisting of a polymer (dielectric) matrix engineered with one or more magnetic (magneto) nanofillers. The focus of this Phase I program is to demonstrate the feasibility of a large area magnetodielectric nanocomposite film with materials properties suitable for antenna applications. To achieve this, Luna Innovations will design and prepare of unique magnetic nanofillers with tunable magnetic properties and will develop fabrication methods to prepare nanocomposite film systems incorporating these designed nanofillers into the polymer matrix. Characterization of both the filler and the magnetodielectric nanocomposite properties over a range of materials compositions and morphology will be conducted with the primary focus on the high frequency (GHz) electromagnetic properties such as the permittivity, permeability, and loss tangent. Physical attributes that lead to optimal magnetic and electromagnetic behavior will be identified and particular emphasis will be given to meeting the physical property requirements necessary to satisfy Air Force RF application requirements.

LUNA INNOVATIONS, INC.
2851 Commerce Street
Blacksburg, VA 24060
(540) 552-5128

PI: Dr. Bryan Koene
(540) 552-5128
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0079
SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INSTITUTE
6220 Culebra Rd.
San Antonio, TX 78238-5166
(210) 522-2261

ID#: F064-025-0233
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-025       Awarded: 23AUG06
Title: Self-Healing Adhesives and Composites
Abstract:   The replacement of metal aerospace structures with polymer matrix composites (PMCs) provides up to 50% weight savings. This reduction in weight will enable significant gains in performance (increased range, payload, and velocities) and decreased costs. One of the obstacles to the widespread use of composites is their susceptibility to mechanical and thermal damage, particularly at joints between adjacent components. These thermal or mechanical stresses result in microcracking, which ultimately leads to structural failure. Recent research has demonstrated the ability for microencapsulated monomers to self-heal a damaged composite by filling in these cracks as they are formed. While the fundamental demonstration of technique was successful, its large scale implementation has been obstructed due to cost limitations and material incompatibility leading to poor bonding. Luna Innovations proposes to advance this technology with the use of inexpensive healing materials that will form strong, tough bonds to the composites and adhesives to prevent crack propagation. Luna's team has extensive experience in the areas of microencapsulation, self healing materials, composites fabrication, and testing.

METACOMP TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
28632 Roadside Drive, #255
Agoura Hills, CA 91301
(818) 735-4880

PI: Dr. Sampath Palaniswamy
(818) 735-4882
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0122
THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.
Office of Sponsored Programs
University Park, PA 16802-7000
(814) 865-1372

ID#: F064-005-0505
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-005       Awarded: 22AUG06
Title: Combustion Stability Innovations for Liquid Rocket
Abstract:   The proposed effort can provide the framework for a unified modeling & simulation program to substantially improve the capability for understanding, analyzing, and predicting the underlying mechanisms dictating the combustion stability characteristics of liquid-propellant rocket engines. Emphasis will be placed on the effects of atomization, mixing, and distributed combustion of liquid oxygen (LOX) and kerosene propellants under conditions representative of oxygen-rich preburner staged-combustion cycle (ORPSC) engines. New models and solution methodologies will be developed and validated, where necessary, to further enhance the solution accuracy and efficiency. The Phase I effort will focus on the flow evolution and flame dynamics of single element coaxial swirl injectors typical of the preburner and main chamber applications with liquid/liquid and gas/liquid mixtures, respectively.

METAMATERIALS.LLC
2225 W. Braker Lane
Austin, TX 78758
(512) 228-3662

PI: Dr. Rodger Walser
(512) 228-3662
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0045
GEORGIA TECH RESEARCH INSTITUTE
400 W. 10th Street, N.W.
Atlanta, GA 30318
(404) 894-3272

ID#: F064-015-0200
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-015       Awarded: 03AUG06
Title: MetaFerrite RF Polymer
Abstract:   We propose to investigate the use of continous processing techniques to develop scalable production methods for fabricating low loss MetaFerrite composites for miniaturizing microwave antennas. MetaFerrites are low density, laminated RF polymer composites with a combination of properties not occurring in nature. We will demonstrate the feasibility of processing large areas of MetaFerrites with high permeabilities and permittivities at frequencies to 3 GHz in sufficient quantities to support studies aimed at minaturizing antennas on platforms where size and weight are mission critical.

MILCORD LLC
1050 Winter Street , Suite 1000
Waltham, MA 02451
(617) 905-1486

PI: Dr. Thomas Windholz
(207) 866-6532
Contract #:
UNIV. OF MAINE
Dept. of Spatial Information
Orono, ME 04469-5711
(207) 581-2180

ID#: F064-004-0473
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-004       Selected for Award
Title: Language Enabled Raster Imagery Exploitation (LERIX)
Abstract:   Raster Maps, which represent a significant portion of our imagery assets library, have limited intelligence value in their native raster form. To unlock their value, these raster maps must undergo a complex transformation process that extracts metadata about the geo-coordinates, georegisters the scene, and extracts the texture information (features, roads, rivers) and text labels of features and locations. Text recognition is particularly challenging with respect to text segmentation (line separation), font and character code conversion, and language recognition. And with our nation at war, the text issues regarding Arabic-scripted language maps are particularly urgent. Our proposal - Language Enabled Raster Imagery Exploitation (LERIX) - offers a new approach that combines robust GIS (geospatial Information System) methods with innovative new language-aware approaches to image and document exploitation optimized for Arabic, Farsi, and English. Our GIS capabilities represent a new approach for conflation using curvilinear features, and in particular road segments and complete road networks, for the registration of maps and imagery. Our solution uses shift-, rotation-, and scale-invariant metrics to support conflation, transforming the registration problem into a spatial similarity assessment problem. And our Language capabilities provide a novel and integrated approach to text segmentation, language recognition, text extraction, and translation.

MONOPOLE RESEARCH
739 Calle Sequoia
Thousand Oaks, CA 91360
(805) 375-0318

PI: Dr. elizabeth bleszynski
(805) 375-0319
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0034
UNIV. OF TEXAS
1 university station c0200
austin, TX 78712
(512) 232-5158

ID#: F064-035-0219
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-035       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Hearing Protection for High-Noise Environments
Abstract:   We propose to develop high-fidelity numerical simulation tools to be used in the analysis and assessment of bone conduction of sound in the human head and the desigh of noise protection devices. The proposed approach utilizes boundary and volumetric integral equation methods, and will constitute an extension of our currently developed approach from acoustics to coupled elasticity-theory and acoustics formulation.

MSNW
16436 SE 39th Place
Bellevue, WA 98008
(425) 319-5024

PI: Dr. John Slough
(425) 319-5024
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0105
UNIV. OF WASHINGTON
AERB
Seattle, WA 98195-2250
(206) 543-6321

ID#: F064-001-0146
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-001       Awarded: 16AUG06
Title: Electrodeless Lorentz Force Thruster for High-Power Propulsion
Abstract:   The Electrodeless Lorentz Force (ELF) Thruster is based on recent laboratory results on the formation and acceleration of magnetized plasmoids. The goal of the proposed research is to build and test a prototype that has the potential to surpass all current electric propulsion systems in efficiency, power, and Isp. The thrust is produced by the rapid acceleration of a compact toroidal plasmoid generated by an externally applied rotating magnetic field (RMF). The RMF directly drives an azimuthal current in the plasma, and together with the radial component of the applied magnetic field, produces a large, axial JxB force. Unlike the MPD thruster, the current is produced by the action of external antenna fields and thereby the requirement for electrodes is removed. The toroidal current is sustained by the non-inductive, steady RMF, removing the need for high-voltage pulsed power. The resultant magnetic field confines the plasmoid propellant and the external vacuum magnetic field insulates the thruster wall. The thruster can be operated with a wide range of propellants as RMF plasmas have been generated in a variety of gases from hydrogen to xenon. With a mechanism for generating a large non-thermal plasma flow, and no significant thermal loss channel, the efficiency of the ELF thruster is anticipated to be very high.

NANOTRON
1323 Banyan Drive
San Diego, CA 92028
(760) 731-8955

PI: Mr. Nathan Hiller
(760) 731-8955
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0091
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO
ECE Department
La Jolla, CA 92093-0407
(858) 534-2732

ID#: F064-026-0215
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-026       Awarded: 11AUG06
Title: Low-Cost, Laser Process for Synthesizing Nanolayered Solar Cells
Abstract:   A low-cost laser process for synthesizing nanolayers in solar cells is proposed. The net effect of these nanolayers is a wide absorption of the solar spectrum. In this proposed process a laser is used to form many p-n junctions in a thin, lightly doped wafer. Each p-n junction formed will be unique so that each p-n junction converts a different range of the sunlight's spectrum into current.

NEI CORP.
400 Apgar Drive, Suite E
Somerset, NJ 08873
(732) 868-3141

PI: Dr. Stein Schreiber Lee
(732) 868-3141
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0108
CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIV.
10900 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, OH 44106
(216) 368-2009

ID#: F064-017-0401
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-017       Awarded: 23AUG06
Title: Adaptive Liquid Crystalline Elastomer Nanocomposites with a Unique Morphology
Abstract:   As part of the trend over the years of polymers replacing metals, substituting metallic wing skins with shape memory polymers (SMPs) that have excellent mechanical properties provides an opportunity to develop a new kind of morphing aircraft that can fulfil the needs of future military missions. Additionally, SMPs that can exert large recovery and regenerative stresses are needed for a broad range of space and medical device applications. Building upon work done by our STTR partner at Case Western Reserve University, we propose to develop SMP nanocomposites based on liquid crystalline elastomers to achieve reversible contractions and expansions of more than 100% upon application of a small load and heat, along with substantially higher elastic modulus in the z-direction as compared to those in the x and y directions. The key aspect of the proposed effort is in developing a novel microstructure for the nanocomposite. Nanocomposites will be synthesized and evaluated for their structural, mechanical and shape memory properties. In the Phase I program, we will demonstrate that shape memory LCE nanocomposites can exhibit high elongation-to-break ratio and high modulus in the z-direction, along with excellent shape memory properties.

NEOCERA, INC.
10000 Virginia Manor Road, Suite 300
Beltsville, MD 20705
(301) 210-1010

PI: Dr. Solomon H. Kolagani
(301) 210-1010
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0090
MIT LINCOLN LABORATORY
244 Wood Street
Lexington, MA 02420-9108
(781) 981-7035

ID#: F064-014-0571
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-014       Awarded: 31AUG06
Title: Development of Multilayer High-Temperature Superconducting Films with High-Power Handling Capability
Abstract:   The primary objective of this STTR is to develop thick, high-temperature superconducting (HTS) multi-layer heterostructures for high-power handling microwave devices and with reduced nonlinearities. Building on the resources of Neocera's materials research on HTS heterostructures and MIT Lincoln Laboratories vast knowledge on nonlinear behavior of HTS films at microwave frequencies, this STTR Phase I seeks to establish the feasibility of the proposed approach. Thick, multilayer YBCO/CeO2 film stacks, with alternating YBCO and CeO2 layers will be deposited by Pulsed Laser Deposition technique at Neocera. The films will be patterned to form stripline resonators and will be characterized for their nonlinear behavior at MIT Lincoln Laboratories. Third order intermodulation distortion measurements will be carried out as a function of power from -50 dBm to +30 dBm and temperatures from 1.8K to Tc to establish the proposed feasibility and to verify improved nonlinearities.

NEW ERA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
3720 NW 43rd Street, Suite 105
Gainesville, FL 32606
(352) 380-9880

PI: Dr. Angelo M. Ferrari
(352) 380-9880
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0099
UNIV. OF SOUTH CAROLINA
Department of Mechanical Engin
Columbia, SC 29208
(803) 777-1465

ID#: F064-001-0435
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-001       Awarded: 15AUG06
Title: Innovative High-Power Propulsion Technologies for Orbital Transfer Vehicles
Abstract:   A fully integrated nuclear MHD-MPD electric propulsion system is proposed with potential to provide quantum improvement in the thrust level, specific impulse (ISP) and efficiency of MHD power system as well as the MPD thruster. The proposed MHD-MPD electric propulsion system is intended to be used as an orbital transfer vehicle for multiple uses with a single propellant tank and potential for in-orbit replacement of the spent propellant tank. Due to similarity in design, the power generated by the MHD generator could be conditioned to directly drive the MPD thruster. This would eliminate or at least significantly reduce the need for the power management and conditioning system that is a major weight and size burden for all conventional high power electric propulsion systems. The coupled MHD-MPD system could also share the high field magnet and some other auxiliary sub-systems to further reduce the overall weight, size, and complexity of the new reusable orbital transfer vehicle. The proposed MHD-MPD electric propulsion system function as a transformer with high mass flow rate and relatively low velocity on the primary (MHD) side and low mass flow rate and extremely high velocity on the secondary (MPD) side.

NEWCYTE, INC.
161 Forest Street
Oberlin, OH 44074
(781) 235-8726

PI: Dr. Andrew Guzelian
(617) 645-1439
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0092
GEORGIA TECH RESEARCH INSTITUTE
400 W. 10th Street, N.W.
Atlanta, GA 30332-0801
(404) 407-6036

ID#: F064-026-0235
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-026       Awarded: 11SEP06
Title: Carbon Nanotube - Quantum Dot Nanostructures for Ultra-high Efficiency Photovoltaics
Abstract:   Space applications continue to be limited by the availability of cost-effective power. Significantly higher efficiency cells with lower mass and volume are required to improve performance and lower mission costs; however, improvements in conventional multijunction technology are not expected to meet the necessary performance increases. Instead, new materials and mechanisms are needed to obtain the required efficiency levels. We propose a nanostructured material consisting of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and arrays of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to produce photovoltaic devices with ultra-high efficiencies. QDs and CNTs exhibit critical material properties that are important to achieving ultra-high efficiency photovoltaics. By combining several sizes of QDs and different QD materials, the absorbing layer may be optimally matched to the solar spectrum. In addition, QDs increased oscillator strengths result in more efficient absorption. This allows for a thinner absorber layer and therefore the opportunity to increase the efficiency of charge collection. CNTs are the ideal material for carrier collection as they can exhibit excellent conductivity and their energy levels are well-positioned for charge transfer from the QDs to the CNTs. The proposed ultra-high efficiency devices will create significant opportunities for space-based applications by lowering mission costs while increasing available power.

NEXTGEN AERONAUTICS
2780 Skypark Drive, Suite 400
Torrance, CA 90505
(310) 626-8384

PI: Dr. Jay Kudva
(310) 891-2814
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0111
PENN STATE UNIV.
101 Hammond Bldg
University Park, PA , PA 16802
(814) 863-8099

ID#: F064-013-0042
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-013       Awarded: 21AUG06
Title: Flex-Skins Using Cellular Cores (XSCL)
Abstract:   Morphing aircraft structures have been under focused development over the last five years, primarily under DARPA and Air Force sponsorship. NextGen has been a leader in this effort; prior and on-going work by the NextGen team has identified significant technology barriers which need fundamental understanding as well as innovative solutions. Key among these is the development of skins which have in-plane strain capabilities of around 100% to permit large changes in wing area, low in-plane moduli which will result in reasonable actuation force requirements, and high effective overall bending stiffness to provide efficient aerodynamic shape. To meet these requirements, NextGen and Penn State University propose to develop new morphing skin designs based on flexible cellular cores with tailor-able geometry and material properties. We will build upon the work done by Prof. Farhan Gandhi, PSU PI who has developed fundamental understanding of flexible cellular core structures. In Phase 1 the NextGen/PSU team will finalize concepts, conduct trade studies using simple models, optimize the design using high-fidelity finite element analyses, and fabricate a proof-of-concept morphing skin demonstration article. In a Phase 2 program the team will conduct detailed design addressing substructure attachment and integration within a morphing wing

NEXTGEN AERONAUTICS
2780 Skypark Drive, Suite 400
Torrance, CA 90505
(310) 626-8384

PI: Mr. Rob Bortolin
(310) 626-8389
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0049
PENN STATE UNIV.
203 Materials Research Lab
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 865-3422

ID#: F064-017-0027
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-017       Awarded: 08AUG06
Title: Mechanically Adaptive Materials for Morphing Aircraft Skins
Abstract:   The main goal of the proposed research is to develop a material with a high modulus ratio (Ez / Ex = 105 ) by the end of Phase II. This material is ideally suited for use in morphing aircraft that require large shear strains of the skin, while limiting out-of-plane pillowing at the same time. The major effort during the beginning of the program will be to characterize Shape Memory and Electroactive Polymers to match glass transition temperatures above the operating range of the material. The two polymers will be combined and used to provide stiffness when cool and to actuate the material at elevated temperatures to allow large strains. The results of the characterization will also be used to ensure accurate material models, with further efforts going towards developing a composite model of the two materials. Phase II work will increase the modulus ratio as well as design and fabricate larger skin specimens to be tested in flight conditions. NextGen Aeronautics is a highly effective company engaged in transferring research into aerospace and munitions platform technologies. NextGen will be assisted by PSU, having done significant work with both kinds of polymers that will be used in this program.

NOVA ENGINEERING, INC.
5 Circle Freeway Drive
Cincinnati, OH 45246
(513) 554-2058

PI: Mr. Ray O'Connell
(513) 483-6305
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0154
VIRGINIA TECH
302 Whittemore (0111)
Blacksburg, VA 24061
(540) 231-2950

ID#: F064-008-0132
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-008       Awarded: 27SEP06
Title: Scalable Mobile Wireless Mesh Networks
Abstract:   The proliferation of low-cost wireless devices has led to increased commercial interest in dynamic mesh networks. At the same time, similar military requirements have surfaced, stemming from Network Centric Warfare and emerging advanced MANET applications. Tactical users stand to realize enormous benefits in size, weight, power and cost by leveraging new commercial wireless technologies, with their attractive economies of scale. However, for commercial gear to be of use to military users, fundamental differences between military requirements and commercial capabilities must be reconciled. Serious shotcomings of existing commercial systems, such as security, efficiency, and reliability over multiple network hops, must be addressed in order to transition these systems. Nova Engineering and Virginia Tech have partnered to address innovative methods for leveraging existing wireless chipsets to improve the military utility of commodity wireless hardware. We introduce unique approaches in the areas of multiple description coding, TCP/IP, networking and MAC layer improvements, and encryption. We outline all-software implementation methods for these innovations, and include demonstrations of our MD coding, MANET, and MAC research. Phase 2 will build on these demonstrations to implement a cohesive demonstration network on top of an 802.11 radio set.

NSCRYPT, INC.
2100 N Alafaya Trail, Suite 200
Orlando, FL 32826
(407) 249-3683

PI: Dr. Kenneth Church, Project Ma
(407) 275-4720
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0131
UNIV. OF MICHIGAN
Dept. of Chemical Engineering
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
(734) 763-8768

ID#: F064-034-0539
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-034       Awarded: 18SEP06
Title: Direct Write Light Emitting Arrays for Display on Flexible Conformable Surfaces
Abstract:   The proposed project focuses on the development of fully inorganic phosphor TFEL arrays with NPs layer. EL arrays are thin, bright, flexible and flat and could be easily mounted on conformal surfaces. Devices have 179o viewing angle and because they do not contain filaments or mechanical parts, they are not susceptible to shock and vibration. The direct write fabrication and layer by layer methods are the elegant alternative to traditional fabrication methods of semiconductor devices such as vacuum deposition techniques, masking, high processing temperatures, etc. This project will develop an efficient, cheap, reliable method of manufacturing of novel electroluminescence arrays capable of stable, extended service, low power consumption under a wide range of environmental conditions.

PACIFIC SOFT
48 Harvey Ct.
Irvine, CA 92617
(949) 502-1877

PI: Dr. Guo-wei He
(949) 502-1877
Contract #:
NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL
Mail Code ME/Jo
Monterey, CA 93943
(831) 656-7711

ID#: F064-021-0301
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-021       Selected for Award
Title: Flapping Wing Aerodynamics and Control for Maneuverable Hovering Micro Air Vehicles
Abstract:   This STTR Phase I project proposes to use a Large Eddy Simulation (LES)-based computational tool to quantitatively identify the relationship between wing kinematics, flowfield behavior and aeroloads for the proposed tractor design of flapping-wing propelled Micro Air Vehicle with preliminary experimental validation. Both hovering and cruise flight modes will be considered. As a result, the feasibility of the selected LES-based computational tool for simulation of flapping-wing aerodynamics will be demonstrated. The identified relationship between wing kinematics and aeroloads can provide guidance for refining the design of the proposed flapping-wing propelled MAV in Phase II. A flight demonstration of a radio-controlled hovering tractor model will also be performed.

PARIETAL SYSTEMS, INC.
510 Turnpike Street, Suite 201
North Andover, MA 01845
(978) 327-5210

PI: Dr. Robert B. Washburn
(978) 327-5210
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0103
BOSTON UNIV.
Trustees of Boston University
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 353-4365

ID#: F064-020-0258
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-020       Awarded: 11SEP06
Title: Real-Time Resource Optimization of a UAV Network for Continuous Video Tracking
Abstract:   Networks of UAV's equipped with video sensors promise an affordable capability to keep track of moving ground targets of military interest in an urban environment in the presence of target occlusion, clutter, and other background traffic. But maintaining continuous track on multiple targets that move in and out of the field of view of any single UAV's sensor poses a significant problem of control, coordination, and fusion of the multiple sensor resources. In addition, limited processing onboard for video tracking and limited communication bandwidth available to transmit video data to ground stations or other UAV's, make it crucial to allocate these resources in concert to achieve the maximum system benefit. Parietal Systems, Inc. (PSI) and Boston University (BU) propose to develop a unified real-time resource optimization algorithm to control sensors, processing, and communications in a distributed tracking system that fuses data from a network of UAV's in order to continuously track multiple targets in an urban environment. In Phase I we will develop and demonstrate the algorithm using analytic and simulation models of sensor, processing, and communication subsystems. We will also validate key components of the video processing and tracking model with controlled video experiments.

PHYSICAL SCIENCES, INC.
20 New England Business Center
Andover, MA 01810
(978) 689-0003

PI: Dr. David B. Fenner
(978) 689-0003
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0053
UNIV. OF MASSACHUSETTS
UML Photonics Center
Lowell, MA 01854
(978) 934-4742

ID#: F064-010-0311
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-010       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Commercial Methods for Production of Orientation Patterned GaAs
Abstract:   The Air Force desires development of a commercial production source for nonlinear optical (NLO) gallium arsenide semiconductor crystals with orientation patterning, i.e., OP-GaAs. The need for these materials is driven primarily by applications for NLO laser frequency converters in Infrared Counter Measures (IRCM). The proposed Phase I project will demonstrate feasibility for a fabrication method of OP-GaAs crystals that exclusively utilizes processes available from commercial vendors and at PSI. Molecular beam epitaxy, wafer bonding and hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) will be employed. Development of fabrication steps for the first two of these will be done with assistance by the University of Massachusetts, Lowell. Phase I will fabricate templates, thick films, characterize the OP-GaAs and design the commercial production flow. The proposed overall program goals for the end of Phase II are to bring on-line a new OP-GaAs production foundry based on a sequence of vendors and in-house fabrications at PSI. Production volume of QPM devices of OP-GaAs in the year following Phase II will reach 30-40 units/year.

PHYSICAL SCIENCES, INC.
20 New England Business Center
Andover, MA 01810
(978) 689-0003

PI: Dr. Bryan V. Bergeron
(978) 689-0003
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0135
PURDUE UNIV.
School of Chemical Engineering
West Lafayette, IN 47907-2100
(765) 496-6706

ID#: F064-019-0325
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-019       Awarded: 18SEP06
Title: Innovative Selective Nanocatalysts in Hydrocarbon RBCC Systems
Abstract:   Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) and Purdue University (PU) propose to synthesize, characterize, and investigate the efficiency, reactivity, and selectivity of new nanocatalysts in hydrocarbon fuel liquid for RBCC applications. The nanocatalysts will have higher surface area/volume compared to conventional microcatalysts and films, thereby leading to faster reaction rates. Decreased coking will occur with use of these innovative proposed catalysts. The reaction product distribution and efficiencies of the nanocatalysts will be obtained by use of standard chromatography methods. The reaction mechanism and kinetic processes will be modeled. In the Phase II program, new nanocatalysts will be synthesized, characterized, and tested. Long-term catalytic reactivity will be optimized.

PLASMA TECHNOLOGY, INC.
1754 Crenshaw blvd.
Torrance, CA 90501
(310) 320-3373

PI: Dr. Satish Dixit
(310) 320-3373
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0112
SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INSTITUTE
6220 Culebra Road
San Antonio, TX 78228-0510
(210) 522-5204

ID#: F064-023-0293
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-023       Awarded: 21SEP06
Title: Development of Amorphous Alloy Coatings and the Application Technology for Aircraft Protection
Abstract:   This Small Business Technology Transfer Program Phase I objective is twofold. During both depot and field repair operations the coating system is removed using mechanical and chemical stripping methods that result in removal of some of the metallic cladding. The removal of the cladding during paint stripping makes the underlying high strength aluminum alloy more prone to corrosion. Thus, the first objective is to develop and evaluate new amorphous Al-based materials and demonstrate their superior corrosion resistance over other cladding materials. The enhanced corrosion resistance is the result of the amorphous state of the cladding as well as transition element and rare earth element additions. The second objective is to evaluate the thermal spray technology to meet the Air Force requirements because the application of new materials to aircrafts must be compatible with the present aircraft maintenance practice. The thermal spray technique is selected because it is highly versatile and can be easily applied at depot or in the field.

QD VISION, INC.
313 Pleasant Street, 4th Floor
Watertown, MA 02472
(617) 926-0001

PI: Dr. Seth Coe-Sullivan
(617) 926-0001
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0128
COLUMBIA UNIV.
500 West 120th Street
New York, NY 10027
(212) 854-1745

ID#: F064-034-0334
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-034       Awarded: 01SEP06
Title: Novel Large, Flexible Light Emitting Arrays
Abstract:   It is proposed to develop a large area quantum dot light emitting devices to address the problem of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) signature management. Using photo detectors to modulate the color and intensity of incident light on opposing surfaces, flexible light emitting arrays can be actively tuned to make UAVs nearly invisible.

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS, LLC
301 Science Drive, Suite 210
Moorpark, CA 93021
(805) 529-3800

PI: Mr. Tedi Ohanian
(805) 529-3800
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0063
GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
School of Aerospace Engineerin
Atlanta, GA 30332-0150
(404) 894-3033

ID#: F064-005-0110
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-005       Awarded: 31JUL06
Title: Combustion Stability Innovations for Liquid Rocket
Abstract:   Combustion instability in liquid rocket engines (LREs) has manifested in nearly all LRE development programs. While the driving mechanisms of combustion instability are vast and coupled, in all instances, the net result is significant cost and schedule over-runs. In today's business environment, such over-runs are rarely tolerated and generally result in program cancellations. Development of high fidelity computational codes to aide combustion devices design has been limited due to unavailability and excessive cost of high-powered computing platforms. With the current low-cost state of high-powered/multi-clustered computing systems, achieving the goal of modeling and simulation of coupled physical processes in combustion is realistic.

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS, LLC
530 New Los Angeles Avenue, Suite115, # 122
Moorpark, CA 93021
(805) 529-3800

PI: Dr. Karl Christe
(805) 529-3800
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0061
UNIV. OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
Loker Research Institute
Los Angeles, CA 90089-1661
(213) 740-2692

ID#: F064-007-0147
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-007       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Environmentally-Benign Oxidizers for Propulsion
Abstract:   Ammonium perchlorate (AP) is the most commonly used oxidizing ingredient in solid propellant formulations. It carries a sufficient excess of oxygen to allow for the combustion of the required binder and added metal, such as aluminum. The major drawback of AP is its chlorine content which results in the formation of large amounts of HCl as a combustion product and causes severe environmental problems. It is therefore desirable to find a halogen-free replacement for AP. The goal of this proposal is the identification, synthesis and characterization of novel compounds which can provide equal amounts or an excess of oxygen compared to AP, result in similar or better performance than AP, have high densities, good thermal and hydrolytic stability, and eliminate the formation of undesirable halogen or other compounds which might be of damage to the environment or could cause ozone depletion.

SCIENTIFIC SYSTEMS CO., INC.
500 West Cummings Park - Ste 3000
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 933-5355

PI: Dr. Ravi Ravichandran
(781) 933-5355
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0104
UNIV. OF SOUTHERN FLORIDA
4202 E Fowler Ave, ENB 118
Tampa, FL 33620
(813) 974-2113

ID#: F064-032-0356
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-032       Awarded: 11SEP06
Title: Aided Navigation: Theory and Applications for Sensors and Architectures
Abstract:   The coupling of GPS and INS is often characterized as loose, tight, or ultra-tight depending on the nature of the GPS input to the navigation filter. Thus, considering the challenge of precision navigation without GPS, this project will test and validate the coupling of sensor (EO, IR) information such as ego-motion and position updates similar to the coupling of a GPS and INS system. This project draws from two technical fields: image processing and filter design. Based on our related work, image processing in context of developing robust algorithms for position and ego-motion estimation, is for the most part complete. Thus, most of the Phase I effort will focus on the filter design aspect of the problem. The primary objectives of this proposal are to (1) develop models representative of various types of coupling and (2) predict system level performance for each of these models based on measures of performance such as effective IMU drift, and navigation accuracy with and without sensor aiding. The project team is led by Scientific Systems Company Inc. (SSCI) and includes the University of South Florida (USF) as its academic partner.

SET ASSOC. CORP.
3811 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 350
Arlington, VA 22203
(703) 738-6277

PI: Mr. John Reed
(703) 738-6270
Contract #:
ROBERT J. BURKHOLDER
The Ohio State University
Columbus, OH 43212
(614) 292-4597

ID#: F064-024-0455
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-024       Selected for Award
Title: Random Radar
Abstract:   We propose to establish the feasibility of using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology to rapidly and accurately map building interiors and other structures (such as collapsed mines) interiors that cannot be analyzed with presently available equipment. When fully developed, the system would perform rapid map-making of the internals of unknown structures in a variety of applications by driving the system along side the structure. Furthermore, the system's auxiliary radar(s) or radar modes will detect and locate moving personnel within the structure of interest, and locate said movers on the structure's map. The SAR system and its auxiliary radars are small, light weight, and will be deployed on a small ground vehicle such as a small pick-up truck or other vehicle of convenience. In addition to this heretofore unavailable capability, the system will operate with very low transmitter power and use waveforms comprised of features that make the waveform appear to be random in nature. Such emissions properties provide for covert operation of the system, thus facilitating tactical advantages to military and law enforcement personnel who are attempting to defeat terrorist attacks and hostage situations. Feasibility of such a system will be established by 1) providing an electromagnetic wave propagation analysis base in models and simulations where the nature of the radar return signals from the target structure interiors through the building's walls becomes known, and 2) performing a detailed radar system design / analysis to meet the simultaneous requirements of good SAR performance and covert operations.

SOFTWARE & ENGINEERING ASSOC., INC.
1802 N. Carson Street, Suite 200
Carson City, NV 89701
(775) 882-1966

PI: Dr. E. Carl Hylin
(775) 882-1966
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0069
BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIV.
Dept of Cemical Engineering
Provo, UT 84602-1128
(801) 422-6239

ID#: F064-012-0313
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-012       Awarded: 13SEP06
Title: Aluminum Agglomeration and Trajectory in Solid Rocket Motors
Abstract:   The demand for higher performance rocket motors at a reduced cost requires continuous improvements in understanding and controlling propellant combustion. Numerous examples are available where seemingly minor modifications and improvements to existing solid rocket systems have caused previously well performing motors to exhibit unexpected and at times near catastrophic behavior. It is far cheaper to design out problems than fix them during the development or production phases. Various combustion issues have never been modeled in a complete motor prediction model. What is being proposed here has never been successfully done and would greatly increase the design tools available to the motor design community. The overall goal of this innovation is to provide a multi-physics based computer code which will accurately predict the entire flight of aluminum particles from the propellant surface through the nozzle exit plane together with a prediction of the effective properties (thermal and mechanical) of the binder, ammonium perchlorate, and aluminum particles which together constitute a solid propellant. The selection of the physics based models, not too simple and not too complex, is the key to producing a working model which will be able to run on computer systems becoming available in the next several years.

SPECTRUM MAGNETICS, LLC
318 Mourning Dove Dr.
Newark, DE 19711
(302) 379-9808

PI: Dr. Guixiang Yang
(302) 379-9822
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0046
UNIV. OF DELAWARE
210 Hullihen Hall
Newark, DE 19716-1551
(302) 831-8618

ID#: F064-015-0109
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-015       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: RF Polymer
Abstract:   Leveraging Spectrum Magnetics' expertise in large scale fabrication of nanomaterials together with University of Delaware's know-how in the research of magnetodielectric materials with simultaneously large permittivity and permeability, we propose to design and fabricate RF polymers that promise applications in antenna with much improved functionalities in miniaturization, impendence matching, and bandwidth. Other various applications also exist such as microwave devices, filters, and DC/DC converters which have sizable market shares. Our preliminary analysis confirmed our design concept that magnetic materials with high permeability above 1 GHz must first be developed. Guide by the physics behind high frequency materials, we choose and modify materials to achieve high magnetization, high resistivity, and low demagnetization factor. These materials will be subsequently embedded in suitable polymers to achieve RF polymers with desirable properties. Our approach will provide a commercial manufacturing technology for making RF polymers. In Phase I, we will demonstrate as obtained RF polymers with permittivity and permeability larger than 5 above 1 GHz frequency.

SRICO, INC.
2724 SAWBURY BOULEVARD
COLUMBUS, OH 43235
(614) 799-0664

PI: Dr. Sri Sriram
(614) 799-0664
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0052
UNIV. OF DAYTON
300 College Park
Dayton, OH 45469-0101
(937) 229-2919

ID#: F064-010-0069
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-010       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Innovative Methods to Produce Periodically Oriented Compound Semiconductor Nonlinear Optical Materials
Abstract:   This proposal addresses innovative, economical and safe methods to manufacture periodically oriented gallium arsenide and other III-V semiconductor materials for use in efficient quasi-phase-matched nonlinear optical devices. These crystals have the potential to revolutionize mid-IR nonlinear devices. Periodically oriented gallium arsenide allows for engineering nonlinear interactions, providing a high degree of flexibility and innovation to devices. In the infrared region, second harmonic generation of CO2 laser radiation as well as broadly tunable optical parametric oscillation in the infrared are just two examples of recent devices enabled by this technology. These devices in turn are enablers for applications such as Infrared Countermeasure (IRCM) that would greatly benefit from frequency-agile infrared sources.

STARFIRE INDUSTRIES, LLC
60 Hazelwood Drive
Champaign, IL 61820
(708) 955-6691

PI: Dr. Robert A. Stubbers
(217) 390-2784
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0117
GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Aerospace Engineering School
Altanta, GA 30332-0150
(404) 385-2757

ID#: F064-001-0414
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-001       Awarded: 22AUG06
Title: High-Efficiency Compact Toroidal Plasma Acceleration Using Annular Helicon Pre-Ionization For High-Power, High-Specific Impulse Electric Space Propulsion
Abstract:   Electromagnetic propulsion using compact toroidal plasmas is ideal for high-thrust, high-Isp missions since velocities and densities are not space charge limited, the self-field structure does not suffer magnetic detachment problems and the inductive electrode-less nature has superior lifetime. This STTR builds on a long history of research by integrating an annular helicon source with a conical theta-pinch field-reversal plasma accelerator. The traditional approach using the pulsed theta coil for both ionization and acceleration has poor efficiency since a large fraction of pulse energy is wasted to plasma magnetization during the ionization phase. Preionization with DC glow discharges improve performance at the expense of lifetime. Helicon systems yield highly conductive initial plasmas (10^12-13, 3-5eV); however, the density is peaked on the centerline far away from the theta coil. This large distance results in very poor mutual inductance with the plasma secondary. The annular helicon offers a potential solution by establishing a highly-conductive plasma shell near the outer wall for superior transformer action and high pulse energy utilization for axial plasma translation. The Phase I goal of this STTR project is to evaluate the concept for Phase II moderate-power evaluation (10-20kW) through modeling and experiment leveraging strengths and capabilities at both institutions.

STREAMLINE NUMERICS, INC.
3221 NW 13th Street, Suite A
Gainesville, FL 32609
(352) 271-8841

PI: Dr. Siddharth Thakur
(352) 271-8841
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0130
UNIV. OF MICHIGAN
1320 Beal Avenue
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
(734) 936-0102

ID#: F064-021-0050
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-021       Awarded: 14SEP06
Title: A Simulation Environment for Aerodynamic Analysis and Design of Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicles
Abstract:   The work proposed here aims to develop a combined simulation and experimental capability to enhance the understanding of unsteady wing aerodynamics of flapping micro air vehicles (MAVs) and to assist in design and control of such vehicles. The overall goal is to use an advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver in conjunction with experiments for this purpose. Specifically, we aim to study the fluid physics associated with low Reynolds number flapping wings, including the fluid/structure and flight mechanism problems, to facilitate the design of effective high-bandwidth control of wing beat kinematics for MAVs. The overall proposed effort (for Phase I and Phase II) will be aimed at building a fundamental knowledge base for the physics of flapping wing Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) including the newer "Nano" subclass called the NAVs. The proposed work will have two major components: (a) a simulation environment based on an advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver, and (b) an experimental database to validate the simulations and to guide model development.

SUNVOLT NANOSYSTEMS, INC.
2682 Middlefield Road, Suite i
Redwood City, CA 94063
(650) 367-6264

PI: Mr. David J Miller
(650) 367-6264
Contract #:
STANFORD UNIV.
Ginzton Lab, Room 279
Stanford, CA 94309
(650) 725-2160

ID#: F064-010-0096
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-010       Selected for Award
Title: Instrumentation and Process Development for the Production of Orientation-Patterned GaAs (OP-GaAs)
Abstract:   Sunvolt Nanosystems, Inc. and Stanford University propose to develop methods to enable commercial supply of high quality, periodically oriented GaAs and other III-IV semiconductor materials. To do this, we will combine our expertise in materials research, production equipment, and process development. We will employ a soon-to-be delivered state of the art HVPE system at the Stanford University Center for Integrated Systems. The quasi-phasematching in OP-GaAs allows efficient infrared frequency conversion throughout the transparency range of GaAs from 1 mm out to 17 mm. Thus OP-GaAs is an enabling technology for compact high-power mid-IR sources for IRCM and for frequency-agile sources suitable for local and remote sensing of chemical and biological species. With near-IR solid-state laser pumping, GaAs can be tuned over the entire fingerprint region of common inorganic and organic molecules. Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy (HVPE) is the best available method to produce bulk OP-GaAs. There are no commercial sources for HVPE thick film growth; the best present producer is growing 0.5 mm films in small quantities with several productivity and quality issues. To extend device performance, millimeter-plus layers are required; Sunvolt Nanosystems and Stanford University will develop robust scalable processes that yield ultra-thick layers in a single growth step.

SUPERCONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
460 Ward Drive
Santa Barbara, CA 93111
(805) 690-4512

PI: Dr. Brian Moeckly
(805) 690-4690
Contract #:
MIT LINCOLN LABORATORY
244 Wood Street
Lexington, MA 02420-9108
(781) 981-7033

ID#: F064-014-0112
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-014       Selected for Award
Title: Reduced Nonlinearity Superconducting Thin Films for Transmit and Receive Applications
Abstract:   Superconductor Technologies Inc. (STI) has deployed more than 5,800 high-performance RF filter systems incorporating high-temperature superconducting (HTS) thin films. The deposition method of reactive coevaporation (RCE) used to produce these HTS films in high volume has also allowed the optimization of their RF properties to the point at which their deleterious nonlinearities have been reduced to their intrinsic limit. A new formulation of the theory of these nonlinearities for d-wave superconductors predicts that they may be further reduced by increasing the thickness of the HTS films. The RCE growth technique provides advantages in fabricating thicker single-layer and multilayer HTS films of optimal composition while maintaining excellent crystallinity. During Phase I of this project, we propose to grow such thick HTS films and measure their RF properties at STI and at Lincoln Laboratory. HTS receive filter systems with reduced nonlinearities, and hence intermodulation distortion, will benefit by being operable in high-interference environments. Increased power handling provided by reduced nonlinearity HTS films also promises to pave the way for the introduction of HTS transmit filters, thereby opening the door to myriad important commercial and Government applications.

SYNKERA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
2021 Miller Dr., Suite B
Longmont, CO 80501
(720) 494-8401

PI: Dr. Oleg Polyakov
(720) 494-8401
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0083
ARIZONA STATE UNIV.
ASU, Main Campus
Tempe, AZ 85287-3503
(480) 965-1413

ID#: F064-002-0093
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-002       Awarded: 23AUG06
Title: Nanodielectrics for High Power Capacitors and Passive Applications
Abstract:   This Small Business Technology Transfer Phase I project seeks to develop and commercialize novel nanodielectrics with the internal structure enabling extremely high values of the dielectric constant. Lightweight, compact, high energy density capacitors capable of operation at several MJ per pulse and repetition rates on the order of 100 pps bursts are needed for directed energy weapons. High altitude operation places extra physical and structural demands on power components. Nanostructured dielectrics offer the opportunity to tailor the dielectric material on the nanometer scale to provide tremendous improvements in electrical, mechanical and thermal properties. The innovation is based on exploiting 1) Gor'kov-Eliashberg and 2) ferroelectric all-solid phase transition effects in dielectrics. The fabrication approach is economical and scalable. Phase I work is planned to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach by fabricating and testing capacitors utilizing novel nanodielectrics.

SYNKERA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
2021 Miller Dr., Suite B
Longmont, CO 80501
(720) 494-8401

PI: Dr. Oleg Polyakov
(720) 494-8401
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0084
COLORADO STATE UNIV.
CSU Research Foundation
Fort Collins, CO 80521
(970) 482-2916

ID#: F064-019-0548
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-019       Awarded: 23AUG06
Title: Nanocatalysts for Hydrocarbon-Fueled Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) Engines
Abstract:   This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project involves the development of homogeneous catalysts for cracking of hydrocarbon fuel. Future concept space vehicles employ regeneratively cooled engines which rely on the fuel to absorb engine heat to ensure survival of the engine structure at a high temperature. Using the fuel to absorb heat and burning the hot fuel efficiently keeps the heat in the cycle. For hydrocarbons, deliberate fuel cracking significantly enhances the heat sink capability of the fuel. The use of a soluble catalyst is preferred over wall-mounted catalysts because it reduces the need to develop specialized components and can be applied to a variety of platforms and configurations. The proposed catalysts - superacids- will be (1) very soluble in liquid paraffins, excluding the possibility of precipitation or aggregation and concomitant interference with the working engine; (2) highly active in catalytic cracking of hydrocarbons, including paraffins; (3) capable of thermal activation and therefore will not exhibit the corrosiveness of common superacids; (4) molecular catalysts and therefore will have all the advantageous of properties reproducibility and performance consistence; (5) inexpensive to produce in bulk and will be amenable to mass-production; (6) environmentally benign from the standpoint of ozone depletion.

SYSTEM CREATIONS
3838 N. Causeway Blvd., Suite 3070
Metairie, LA 70002
(504) 833-2340

PI: Dr. John P. Timler
(504) 833-9284
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0068
NOTRE DAME UNIV.
Dept of Electrical Engineering
Notre Dame, IN 46556
(574) 631-8835

ID#: F064-026-0176
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-026       Awarded: 15AUG06
Title: Nanomaterial Photovoltaics
Abstract:   System Creations proposes to develop and manufacture radiation-hard nitride-based photovoltaics with photon to electric power conversion efficiencies of 40% or more at Atmospheric Mass 0 (AM0). The anticipated success of System Creation's approach is based on a novel nanofabrication technique, Biased-Target Deposition (BTD) and the following properties of the nitride material system: 1. Semiconductors based on nitride chemistry are direct bandgap materials that can have their bandgap tailored anywhere between 0.7 and 6.2 eV. This energy range allows efficient conversion of the entire visible solar spectrum (1.65 to 3.1 eV) and a significant portion of the ultraviolet region (3.1 to 124 eV). 2. The nitrides, due to their low density, high ionization energy, and intrinsic defect compensation, have excellent radiation-hard properties. Aluminum Nitride, which would be the outermost layer in our proposed photovoltaic device, is more resistant to the effects of radiation than Silicon Carbide. 3. A three-junction thin-film nitride cell would be capable of achieving photovoltaic conversion efficiencies of 51% (AM1.5) or more for extraterrestrial applications (AM0). Additional junctions would further increase the efficiency attainable by this material group and could be implemented without substantial increase in processing costs over the three-junction device.

SYSTRAN FEDERAL CORP.
4027 Colonel Glenn Highway, Suite 210
Dayton, OH 45431
(937) 429-9008

PI: Dr. Lang Hong
(937) 775-2423
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0076
WRIGHT STATE UNIV.
3640 Colonel Glenn Highway
Dayton, OH 45435-0001
(937) 775-2423

ID#: F064-020-0030
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-020       Awarded: 03AUG06
Title: TrackMaster
Abstract:   Maintaining global track quality, especially track continuity, is a significant challenge for targets of interest that become occluded. The situation is complicated when clutter or tracks that are not of interest are in the proximity of the desired target. These situations are typical when attempting to track dismounted targets in an urban environment. Given the availability of image-based sensors (EO/IR) on unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) platforms, a multi-target video tracking system with global track fusion and feedback can be developed to mitigate these issues. The objective of this particular research project is to develop image-based tracking algorithms for a network of UAVs that are providing surveillance of both human and vehicular targets in an urban environment. SFC has assembled a distinguished team to address this proposal. In conjunction with our university research partner, Wright State University, we are proposing a novel and innovative approach to meeting the demanding requirements listed in the solicitation. At the conclusion of Phase II, we plan to have a pre-production version of our product ready for immediate deployment in selected applications.

TANNER RESEARCH, INC.
825 S. Myrtle Ave.
Monrovia, CA 91016
(626) 471-9778

PI: Dr. Ravi Verma
(626) 471-9712
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0072
STANFORD UNIV.
Office of Sponsored Research
Stanford, CA 94305-4100
(650) 723-5854

ID#: F064-006-0528
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-006       Awarded: 03AUG06
Title: High resolution multispectral imaging with plasmon lensing
Abstract:   It is desirable to make high resolution imagers that simultaneously acquire multispectral information from the same spatial locations; doing so enables a number of target detection and tracking applications. Currently, image resolution is limited by the pixel pitch which cannot be reduced below optical diffraction and carrier diffusion limited values, and by the need to have different pixels respond to different wavelengths. Other approaches are either exponentially more expensive (e.g. making larger imagers), or impractical to implement (e.g. stacking pixels that respond to different wavelengths). Thus, a new technology is required wherein the pixel size can be reduced to below the limits set forth by diffusion and diffraction, and wherein each pixel can simultaneously collect information from multiple spectral bands. In this proposal, we will use the multispectral plasmon lensing to that end. During Phase I, we will demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed device with finite different time domain (FDTD) and finite difference Frequency domain (FDFD) simulations and with experimental demonstrations of the proposed multispectral plasmon lensing.

TDA RESEARCH, INC.
12345 W. 52nd Ave.
Wheat Ridge, CO 80033
(303) 940-2300

PI: Dr. David T. Wickham
(303) 940-2350
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0057
UNIV. OF UTAH
Department of Chemistry
Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0850
(801) 585-7289

ID#: F064-019-0241
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-019       Awarded: 11SEP06
Title: Soluble Catalysts to Improve Jet Fuel Combustion and Fuel Heat Sink Capacity
Abstract:   Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion systems likely will be used to launch next-generation space vehicles. However, in the scramjet portion of the cycle, it is difficult to maintain stable combustion because of the high air velocity and short combustor residence times. In addition, the overall heat load in a scramjet engine exceeds the cooling capacity that can be provided from the sensible heating of hydrocarbon-based jet fuels therefore the fuel must undergo endothermic cracking reactions to augment its heat sink capacity before it reaches the combustor. However, additives may significantly improve combustion and increase endothermic cracking reactions. The additive will function by reducing the activation energy of both oxidation and cracking reaction thereby increasing the rates substantially. Moreover, the products of the cracking reaction which occurs upstream of the combustor will provide additional combustion stabilization. Thus in this Phase I STTR Project TDA Research, Inc. will synthesize and test several additives that will reduce ignition delay times when injected directly into a combustor and increase the rate of cracking when mixed with the fuel upstream of the combustor. Finally, we will also obtain fundamental structural and mechanistic information on the additive using state of the art analytical equipment.

TECHNO-SCIENCES, INC.
11785 Beltsville Drive, 9th Floor
Beltsville, MD 20705
(240) 790-0609

PI: Dr. Peter Chen
(240) 790-0608
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0132
UNIV. OF MARYLAND
Dept of Aerospace Engineering
College Park, MD 20742
(301) 405-1927

ID#: F064-013-0280
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-013       Awarded: 18SEP06
Title: Mechanized Skins for Morphing Aircraft Structures
Abstract:   Techno-Sciences, Inc. (TSi), in collaboration with the Smart Structures Laboratory of the Alfred Gessow Rotorcraft Center at the University of Maryland (UMD), proposes to develop an innovative mechanized skin technology for large-scale area changes in morphing UAVs. The pneumatically driven morphing skin (PDMS) system will exploit superior performance characteristics of McKibben actuators, in conjunction with a new deformable and passive material, compliant matrix composite (CMC), to produce a morphing system capable of large, sustainable deformations. This proposed device efficiently marries a novel skin material with a high force and high stroke pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM) to establish a foundation for mechanized skins for morphing aircraft structures.

TECHNO-SCIENCES, INC.
11785 Beltsville Drive, 9th Floor
Beltsville, MD 20705
(240) 790-0609

PI: Dr. Peter Chen
(240) 790-0608
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0116
UNIV. OF MARYLAND
Dept of Aerospace Engineering
College Park, MD 20742
(301) 405-1927

ID#: F064-016-0281
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-016       Awarded: 30SEP06
Title: A Variable-fidelity Simulation Tool for Dynamic Non-linear Fluid/Structure Interaction Problems
Abstract:   Techno-Sciences, Inc. (TSi), in collaboration with the Smart Structures Laboratory of the Alfred Gessow Rotorcraft Center at the University of Maryland (UMD), propose to develop a high-fidelity fluid-structure interaction model that is uniquely suited to morphing wing aeroelastic and response prediction. We propose to produce a flapping wing fluid-structure interaction (FWFSI) analysis method to develop an aeroelastic stability augmentation (AESA) system and response prediction for morphing aircraft. A framework will be constructed by link all necessary components in the FWFSI model and the analytical results will be validated using an existing database of experimental results.

TOUCHSTONE RESEARCH LABORATORY, LTD.
The Millennium Centre, R.R. 1, Box 100B
Triadelphia, WV 26059
(304) 547-5800

PI: Dr. G.S. Murty
(304) 547-5800
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0113
FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIV.
11200 SW 8th St.
Miami, FL 33199
(305) 348-2494

ID#: F064-023-0130
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-023       Awarded: 30AUG06
Title: Development of Spray Coating Methods and Materials to Replace Aluminum Cladding of Aging Aircraft for Corrosion Protection
Abstract:   The proposed work will be directed towards developing aluminum-based crystalline and glassy/amorphous coating using thermal spray techniques (plasma and cold spray) for the corrosion protection of high-strength aluminum alloys (2024 and 7075). The coating material should be anodic to the base material for protection against galvanic corrosion. Glassy metal coatings generally exhibit superior corrosion resistance because of their structural and compositional homogeneity. While significant progress has been made recently in developing bulk metallic glasses including aluminum-based alloys, problems of depositing glassy metal coatings remain to be resolved. Plasma spray technique involves rapid cooling rates and can successfully synthesize metallic glassy coatings. Cold spray technique can also deposit amorphous or glassy aluminum coatings using precursor amorphous or glassy powder. The addition of rare earth elements to aluminum will be considered for this purpose. Optimal processing parameters of plasma spray and cold spray methods will be identified. Coatings will be characterized, and their corrosion performance will be evaluated through corrosion-potential measurements and accelerated corrosion tests in the laboratory. On the basis of Phase I results, the most promising materials and spray coating methods will be selected for more extensive trials and evaluations towards exploring their commercial potential in Phase II.

TOYON RESEARCH CORP.
Suite A, 75 Aero Camino
Goleta, CA 93117
(805) 968-6787

PI: Dr. Mahendra K. Mallick
(805) 968-6787
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0121
GEORGE MASON UNIV.
Office of Sponsored Programs
Fairfax, VA 22032
(703) 993-8927

ID#: F064-020-0399
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-020       Awarded: 11SEP06
Title: Image-based Tracking and Resource Allocation Algorithms for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
Abstract:   We propose to develop advanced algorithms and software to collaboratively track people and vehicles in an urban environment using video imagery (visible, IR) from a network of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The tracking and data fusion architecture will have one fusion node in a surveillance region, with a number of UAVs associated with the fusion node. We propose the multiple hypotheses tracking (MHT) algorithm for each UAV local tracker, as well as the fusion node. This will provide cost effective algorithm and software development and maintenance. The local UAV tracker will process target centroid pixel locations and feature measurements extracted from its video imagery. The video processor at each UAV will perform frame registration, change detection, target segmentation, target location measurement, and target feature measurement. The pixel location measurement in the image plane is a nonlinear function of the 3D target location in the global coordinate frame. This nonlinear mapping depends on the camera location, orientation, focal length, and intrinsic camera parameters. Thus the local UAV tracker will use a nonlinear filtering algorithm such as the extended Kalman filter (EKF) or unscented Kalman filter (UKF). The UAV tracker will also process track data as feedback received from the fusion node. The fusion node will process track data received from a number of local UAV MHT trackers. We shall explore a number of track-to-track association and fusion algorithms in Phase I, and recommend the best candidate track-to-track association and fusion algorithm for Phase II. Furthermore, we will address dynamic, collaborative UAV trajectory planning and camera pointing based on the Fisher information, which is a natural choice in the context of multi-platform tracking and fusion. Proof of concept for the selected architecture and algorithms will be demonstrated using simulated and real video data.

TPL, INC.
3921 Academy Parkway North, NE
Albuquerque, NM 87109
(505) 342-4412

PI: Mr. Kirk Slenes
(505) 342-4437
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0062
ELECTRICAL INSULATION RESEARCH CENT
Inst of Materials Sci. Rm 157
Storrs, CT 06269-3136
(860) 486-0915

ID#: F064-002-0249
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-002       Awarded: 28JUL06
Title: Nanodielectrics Dielectrics for High Power Capacitors
Abstract:   Future power conditioning, control electronics and directed energy weapons will require significant energy storage for a wide range of power applications. Systems will depend on capacitors to deliver high current and high voltage under repetition. In order to find practical embodiment on mobile platforms, significant advances in compact power sources will be required. In response this need, TPL has established unique capabilities in the area of dielectrics. Revolutionary materials and processes have been identified for power sources with significant size and weight reductions. The technology is based on novel nanocomposite structures with a combination of high dielectric constant, high dielectric strength and unique mechanical and thermal properties. It is projected that the material technology will allow for capacitance power with an order of magnitude increase in energy density over current technology. The proposed program is directed at establishing the baseline performance characteristics of five uniquely different nanocomposite dielectric systems relative to Air Force applications. Detailed material characterization and theoretical material modeling will be used to support atomistic phenomenon with macro scale properties. It is anticipated that the result from the Phase I effort will establish the necessary groundwork for the fabrication prototype capacitors and pulse generators.

UES, INC.
4401 Dayton-Xenia Road
Dayton, OH 45432
(937) 426-6900

PI: Dr. Yongli Xu
(937) 426-6900
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0093
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLO
Lincoln Laboratory
Lexington, MA 02420-9108
(781) 981-4707

ID#: F064-014-0023
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-014       Awarded: 10AUG06
Title: Reduced Nonlinearity Superconducting Thin Films for Transmit and Receive Applications
Abstract:   This STTR Phase I project is directed towards the development of high performance large-area thick YBCO films on suitable single crystal substrates through solution approach for transmit and receive applications. Two architectures of multilayer (YBCO/CeO2)xn and single layer YBCO will be explored to accomplish thick films with low surface resistance and improved intrinsic nonlinearities as measured by intermodulation distortion. A unique modified TFA-MOD approach with each coat of about 0.6-0.8čYm of YBCO and buffered with 100nm CeO2 will be used to build a sandwich structure with a total thickness of few microns. To achieve high performance thick YBCO films with improved microwave nonlinearity and power handling capability, layered growth mode is suggested and will be pursued by the control of driving force and saturation in precursor. With successful growth of high performance thick YBCO films, Stripline resonator will be built and measured. YBCO films by solution approach are cost effective and scalable technology. The proposed method is based on our previous success in making thick YBCO films. Hence, the use of solution route to make large area thick YBCO films for transmit and receive applications is a viable approach and the feasibility will be demonstrated in this Phase I research.

UES, INC.
4401 Dayton-Xenia Road
Dayton, OH 45432
(937) 426-6900

PI: Dr. Sarath Menon
(937) 255-9835
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0095
UNIV. OF CINCINNATI
Edwards Center I, Suite 7148
Cincinnati, OH 45221-0222
(513) 558-5440

ID#: F064-037-0007
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-037       Awarded: 10AUG06
Title: Development of a High Temperature Sensor Based on Metallurgical Transformations
Abstract:   Development of materials for sensor technology is a significant and challenging area in current and future aerospace applications. There is increasing demand for high temperature sensors that operate accurately and reliably in extreme environments to enable vehicle health monitoring. In this proposal, a novel idea for high temperature exposure sensor, which is based on metallurgical transformations is proposed. The main focus during the Phase I program will be the demonstration of concept and to develop the most suited alloy composition and measurement method. The reliability of this method of high temperature sensing will be determined by careful experimentation.

UES, INC.
4401 Dayton-Xenia Road
Dayton, OH 45432
(937) 426-6900

PI: Dr. Vladimir Demidov
(937) 255-6794
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0096
PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY
P. O. Box 451
Princeton, NJ 08543-0451
(609) 243-3306

ID#: F064-038-0010
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-038       Awarded: 11AUG06
Title: Utilizing Nonlocal Effects for Development of Novel Technologies for Plasma Chemistry and Laser Applications
Abstract:   UES proposes to develop and perfect a new method of controlling plasma parameters based on nonlocal nature of the electron energy distribution function in the pulsed plasmas, i.e., develop nonlocal plasma technology (NLP technology). The NLP technology is based on application of nonlocal properties of fast electrons, which have energies essentially greater than the average electron energy. Particular attention will be paid to electronegative plasma and to the role of negative ions on fast electron density. The overall tasks during the Phase I are (a) Perform theoretical analysis of volumetric processes responsible for production of fast electrons and negative ions in electronegative plasmas; (b) Complete numerical simulations of density profiles of charged particles, including fast electrons and negative ions, in oxygen and oxygen-argon mixture plasmas. Analyze fluxes of fast electrons and ions to the walls with the purpose to demonstrate the self-trapping effects; (c) Conduct initial experimental measurements of ion and electron density to benchmark the numerical simulations. The completion of the Phase I will provide validation of the NLP technology. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory will be a partner in this project.

ZOLO TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
4946 N. 63rd Street
Boulder, CO 80301
(303) 604-5819

PI: Dr. Andrew D. Sappey
(303) 604-5804
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0126
STANFORD UNIV.
Mech. Engineering Bldg. 530
Stanford, CA 94035-3030
(650) 723-3148

ID#: F064-009-0329
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-009       Awarded: 11SEP06
Title: Wavelength-Multiplexed Diode Laser Diagnostics for Harsh, Chemically Reacting Environments
Abstract:   Zolo Technologies and Stanford University's High Temperature GasDynamics Lab have teamed to propose the development of wavelength-multiplexed diode laser absorption measurements for a novel environment - the combustion zone of a liquid fueled rocket motor. A number of unique challenges will need to be overcome to enable these measurements. First, the pressure of the measurement zone approaches 100 atmospheres making any spectroscopic measurements difficult to quantify due to pressure broadening. Second, intense scattering of the diagnostic beam is expected from fuel droplets leading to low signal beam transmission. Third, high temperature, high pressure optical access must be engineered which is not expected to be trivial. During Phase I, we intend to show that these obstacles can be surmounted so that a system to measure temperature can be designed, built and tested during Phase II.

ZONA TECHNOLOGY, INC.
9489 E. Ironwood Square Drive, Suite 100
Scottsdale, AZ 85258
(480) 945-9988

PI: Dr. Danny Liu
(480) 945-9988
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0070
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE
4200 Engineering Gateway Build
Irvine, CA 92697-3975
(949) 824-3787

ID#: F064-016-0261
Agency: AF
Topic#: 06-016       Awarded: 10AUG06
Title: Continuous Dynamic Simulation of Nonlinear Aerodynamics/Nonlinear Structure Interaction (NANSI) for Morphing Vehicles
Abstract:   ZONA Technology proposes in Phase I to develop a general methodology for the assembly of nonlinear reduced order models of the multiple contracting substructures that will likely provide the morphing of future vehicles. In addition it is proposed to extend the existing 2D Gridless-Boundary-Condition Cartesian-Grid (GBCC) to 3D. Finally, these novel developments will be integrated with the existing Boundary Element Method (BEM) solver for grid interfacing between aerodynamic and structural grids. The outcome of the Phase I effort will be a prototypical Nonlinear Aerodynamic and Nonlinear Structural Interface (NANSI) solver for continuously morphing configurations. This NANSI solver will be validated on a folding wing by comparison with existing linear aerodynamic solutions in low speed regimes.

---------- Army ----------

21ST CENTURY TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
4515 Seton Center Parkway
Austin, TX 78759
(512) 342-0010

PI: Robby Morgan
(512) 342-0010
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0128
GEORGE MASON UNIV.
Office of Sponsored Programs
Fairfax, VA 22030
(703) 993-2298

ID#: A064-018-0189
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-018       Awarded: 08AUG06
Title: NAVIGATOR
Abstract:   21st Century Technologies, in partnership with George Mason University, present Navigator, a system to inspect and analyze network traffic and configurations in order to prevent and detect intrusions. Navigator's graph-based representation will combine information about configuration (including vulnerabilities, topology, and trust relationships) with real-time input from sensors such as Snort and host event logs. By analyzing these combined graphs, Navigator will provide unparalleled analysis capabilities by effectively presenting both actual and potential network attacks. This will provide both the ability to execute pre-emptive hardening and rapid response to actual attacks in the context of the entire network. A key challenge in such a system is a rich and highly interactive visualization of graphs. Navigator's multi-level graph aggregation abilities will enable the analyst to drilldown and inspect data relating to a detected attack. One of Navigator's unique graph aggregation abilities is the power to reduce graphs based on common patterns - effectively hiding redundant information until it is needed. Navigator's innovative combination of powerful event correlation, attack prediction, and forensics capabilities will provide the next generation of network analysis and automated reasoning.

ACHRONIX SEMICONDUCTOR LLC
95 Brown Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 821-1751

PI: Clinton W. Kelly, IV
(607) 351-3668
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0129
CORNELL UNIV.
330 Rhodes Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853
(607) 592-4539

ID#: A064-008-0026
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-008       Awarded: 10AUG06
Title: NOC - Network-on-a-Chip for Hardware-based Accelerated Simulation of Ad Hoc Mobile Communications Networks
Abstract:   Large scale Wireless ad hoc networks are growing in use in both military and commercial environments. In the military environment, the Future Combat Systems (FCS) initiative will rely upon the Tactical Mobile Ad Hoc Communications Network (TMACN) for all communications between warfighters, manned and unmanned military equipment, and sensors. Simulation and performance estimation of the TMACN is of utmost importance to the design and eventual deployment of this mission-critical solution. The proposed innovation is a wireless MANET simulator consisting of a semiconductor-based highly-parallel multiprocessor asynchronous Network-on-a-Chip (NoC) and an associated software architecture to enable faster-than-realtime (FTR) simulation of ad hoc networks with many thousands of nodes. By leveraging an existing NoC prototype, built in 2005 by the PI and Cornell University in a 0.18Źm CMOS process, and the existing software environment, we will develop an architecture design for a scalable hardware architecture and an associated software environment to simulate large TMACNs. We will then perform a detailed scalability analysis and trade-off analysis to assist in the development of a software design and low cost highly parallel multiprocessor-based single-chip hardware platform for a 90nm prototype in Phase II that will support several hundred to several thousand node TMACNs.

ACREE TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
1900 Bates Ave.
Concord, CA 94520
(925) 798-5770

PI: Mike McFarland
(925) 798-5770
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0135
UNIV. OF NEBRASKA
112 Brace Laboratory
Lincoln, NE 68588-0113
(402) 472-7886

ID#: A064-003-0076
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-003       Awarded: 08AUG06
Title: Bulk Nitride, Exchange-Coupled Magnet
Abstract:   The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the effectiveness of using an innovative deposition process for making Sm2Fe17Nx/á-Fe16N2 magnetic materials in bulk quantities. In addition, exchange-coupled nanostructured composites of these materials will be produced. The advantage of this process is that it allows precise control over the deposition ions so that the morphology of the materials can be accurately tailored, leading to superior magnetic properties. In addition, the production rate is about 100 times that of other processes, for example sputtering, CVD or molecular beam epitaxy, so that bulk magnets can be fabricated in commercially viable sizes and quantities.

ADVANCED ACOUSTIC CONCEPTS, INC.
425 Oser Avenue
Hauppauge, NY 11788
(631) 273-5700

PI: Sebastian Pascarelle
(410) 872-0024
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0130
RESEARCH TRIANGLE INSTITUTE
3040 Cornwallis Road
Research Triangle Pa, NC 27709-2194
(919) 248-1847

ID#: A064-008-0087
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-008       Awarded: 10AUG06
Title: An Integrated Hardware-Software Platform for Real-Time Modeling and Simulation of TMACNs
Abstract:   The Army's Future Combat System will rely on a data communications backbone based on the tactical mobile ad-hoc communications network (TMACN). The unique nature of TMACNs - their mobility, adaptability, and potentially substantial sizes - makes performance prediction a difficult task, and one that is best carried out through simulation. The team of Advanced Acoustic Concepts and RTI International proposes to provide a performance prediction solution for TMACNs based on simulation through the development of an integrated hardware-software platform with two components: (1) software-based emulation for observability, reproducibility of results, and reusability and (2) hardware to accelerate run-time performance via `soft' CPUs on field programmable gate arrays for improved scalability, flexibility, and rapid reconfigurability. This simulation solution will ensure stable and effective TMACNs, which can be realistically simulated, tested, and improved more quickly, are fielded for the Warfighter.

ADVANCED MATERIALS CORP.
850 Poplar Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15220
(412) 921-9600

PI: S.G. Sankar
(412) 921-9600
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0106
GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
771 Ferst Drive
Atlanta, GA 30332-0245
(404) 894-2651

ID#: A064-003-0148
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-003       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Bulk, Exchange-Coupled Nitride Magnets
Abstract:   The objective of this proposal is to demonstrate the feasibility of producing exchange-coupled magnets with a mixture of Sm2Fe17Nx and alpha double prime-iron nitride powders as starting materials. Advanced Materials Corporation (AMC), together with Georgia Institute of Technology propose to produce these powders with the use of a fluidized bed reactor and consolidate mixtures of these powders utilizing shock compaction techniques to produce exchange coupled magnets. During Phase I, AMC will examine a number of experimental variables (such as relative concentraions of the two nitrides, pressures of compaction and temperatures of consolidation to produce isostropic permanent magnets. The goal in Phase I is to demonstrate overall feasibility for manufacturing nitrided magnets. During Phase II, AMC and Georgia Tech will undertake the feasibility of producing anisotropic exchange coupled magnets.

AERODYNE RESEARCH, INC.
45 Manning Road
Billerica, MA 01821
(978) 663-9500

PI: Kurt D. Annen
(978) 663-9500
Contract #: W81XWH-06-C-0384
VANDERBILT UNIV.
VU Station B #357749
Nashville, TN 37235-7749
(615) 322-3979

ID#: A064-031-0151
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-031       Awarded: 15AUG06
Title: Miniature Generator Power for Advanced Prostheses
Abstract:   The capabilities of current prostheses are substantially limited by the lack of suitable high energy density portable power. Specifically, current myoelectric prostheses utilize rechargeable batteries, which provide typically less than 10% of the daily energy required for typical activities of daily living. Such limitations in the energy source significantly limit the utility of these prostheses, and impede the motivation for addressing other shortcomings such as number of degrees of freedom and power output. Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) and Vanderbilt University propose to address this need for high energy density power for prosthetic device by developing powered prostheses using ARI's miniature internal combustion engine (MICE) generator for the electric power source. A MICE-generator-powered myoelectric prosthesis could provide power for a full day of activities using a single 50 cc cartridge of butane, representing a vast improvement over current prostheses. In this proposed Phase I program, the operation of a MICE generator at the nominal power output level required for transfemoral and transhumeral prostheses will be demonstrated. Also, the power requirements for transfemoral and transhumeral prostheses will be characterized, and conceptual designs for these prostheses will be developed based on a MICE generator power source.

AGAVE BIOSYSTEMS, INC.
P.O. Box 80010
Austin, TX 78708
(512) 671-1369

PI: Joel Tabb
(607) 272-0002
Contract #: W9132V-06-C-0027
UNIVERSITIES SPACE RESEARCH ASSOC.
USRA c/o The NCSER
Cleveland, OH 44135
(216) 433-9065

ID#: A064-025-0256
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-025       Awarded: 12SEP06
Title: Detection of Explosive Materials Using an Encapsulated Fluorescent Bioprobe
Abstract:   The use of explosives over the last 100 years has left up to 16,000 military ranges contaminated with highly toxic compounds. A major challenge to the remediation of these ranges is identifying the location of persistent explosive residues. To meet this challenge, Agave BioSystems in collaboration with Universities Space Research Agency (USRA) proposes to develop an encapsulated fluorescent bioprobe for detection of explosive materials. Encapsulation of the bioprobe will rely on porous silica nanoparticles, which will provide a matrix for the probe and enhance its environmental stability by allowing chemical agents of interest to enter while leaving the bioprobe impervious to other compounds and pH fluctuations. Detection will rely on a displacement immunoassay that results in fluorescence in the presence of explosives. Dye-labeled anti-TNT antibody fragments will provide fluorescence, and antibody fragments will be attached within porous silica nanoparticles. In the absence of TNT, the TNT quencher analogue will bind to the dye-labeled antibody fragments, preventing fluorescence. When TNT is present, the TNT quencher analogue will be displaced, removing the fluorescence quenching effect. The Phase I effort will focus on encapsulating the bioprobe and detecting 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT).

AGAVE BIOSYSTEMS, INC.
P.O. Box 80010
Austin, TX 78708
(512) 671-1369

PI: Joel Tabb
(607) 272-0002
Contract #: W9132T-06-C-0029
THE UNIV. OF ROCHESTER
The Institute of Optics
Rochester, NY 14627
(585) 275-2329

ID#: A064-026-0240
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-026       Awarded: 01SEP06
Title: Microfluidic Optical Biosensor for Detection of Biowarfare Agents
Abstract:   This STTR Phase I project will develop a microfluidic optical biosensor based on whispering gallery mode resonator technology for the detection of bioterrorism agents. The proposed device will bridge biological sciences with optics and material sciences to develop a commerically useful tool for homeland security. This microfluidic optical biosensor proposed by Agave BioSystems, in collaboration with Dr. Robert Boyd of the Institute of Optics at the University of Rochester, has the potential to detect low levels of pathogens within minutes after air sampling has been completed and will not be prone to the ambiguous results associated with PCR based detection technologies. The device relies on measuring the direct absorption of biological materials on the whispering gallery mode resonators by monitoring their effect on the light resonating within its microcavity. The proposed device will respond to the specific capture of Bacillus anthracis spores by antibodies on the resonator surface. By coupling the detection mechanism to a microfluidic delivery system, the device will have the potential to be automated and rely on small sample volumes. The microfluidics will be designed and fabricated at the wafer-level using glass wafer etching to embrace the current trend in the microsystems industry.

AGILTRON CORP.
15 Cabot Road
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 935-1200

PI: Matthew Erdtmann
(781) 935-1200
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0108
RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE
110 8th Street, JEC 6003
Troy, NY 12180-3590
(518) 276-6177

ID#: A064-021-0289
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-021       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Control of Dislocations for Improved IR Sensors
Abstract:   ???

ANP TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
824 Interchange Boulevard
Newark, DE 19711
(302) 283-1730

PI: Matthew Odom
(302) 283-1730
Contract #: W911SR-06-C-0039
THE OHIO STATE UNIV.
2041 College Road
Columbus, OH 43210-1178
(614) 292-9970

ID#: A064-022-0206
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-022       Awarded: 16AUG06
Title: Pathogen Concentration from Complex Water Supplies
Abstract:   ANP Technologies proposes to develop a sample concentration system that uses commercial hollow fiber filtration technology with permanent anti-fouling coatings to concentrate biological contaminants in water sources or supplies to a level high enough to be readily detected. The filter technology will allow simple and quick release of the contaminants into a much smaller volume without the use of recovery buffers, and be reusable. The concentrator can be used to monitor water supplies for a wide variety of Biological Warfare (BW) agents and non-BW water borne pathogens.

APPLIED QUANTUM TECHNOLOGIES
4602 Sycamore Shoals Rd
Durham, NC 27705
(858) 229-3524

PI: Jungsang Kim
(919) 660-5258
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0112
DUKE UNIV.
Office of Research Support
Durham, NC 27708-0077
(919) 684-5132

ID#: A064-010-0128
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-010       Awarded: 04AUG06
Title: MEMS-Based Optical Beam Steering System for Multi-Color 2D Spot Arrays
Abstract:   Optically addressing a large number of atoms trapped in a periodic lattice would be a critical missing technology necessary to achieve scalable quantum computation. A micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) based beam steering optical system is proposed to meet the needs of this topic. The system utilizes (a set of) tilting mirrors to create reconfigurable spots on a target of square lattice. The system can provide multi-color, polarization independent, nearly diffraction limited optical system without any frequency shift on the laser beams. We propose to build a Phase I prototype capable of directing the input laser beam to a 5x5 array of spots. Other research activities to demonstrate the long-term feasibility of this approach include high speed mirror development, MEMS mirrors with high power handling capability, and scalable optical design to achieve a 100x100 array of spots.

BOSTON MICROMACHINES COPORATION
108 Water Street
Watertown, MA 02472
(617) 926-4178

PI: Steven Cornelissen
(617) 926-4178
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0109
BOSTON UNIV.
881 Commonwealth Ave
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 353-3529

ID#: A064-005-0292
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-005       Awarded: 04AUG06
Title: Low Power MEMS Retroreflectors for Optical Communications
Abstract:   This proposal describes a new communication device that can provide information from remote sensors through modulated retro-reflection using an active optical mirror. Through the integration of optical micro-electromechanical (MEMS) devices, high speed, low power electronics, and high precision corner cubes the project team will be able to demonstrate a modulating retro-reflector that can transmit data at 100kHz over a 1km link, while being no larger than 50cm3 and consuming no more than 50mW power. A key component of this project will be the ability to make this modulating retro-reflector for a cost of $50 in high volume. The implementation of batch foundry micromachining for the MEMS, the use of commercial off the shelf electronics, and glass molding manufacturing of the corner cube will allow this. Details of how this will be achieved are discussed in this proposal.

BRIMROSE CORP.OF AMERICA
19 Loveton Circle
Sparks, MD 21152
(512) 303-2362

PI: Jolanta Soos Rosemeier
(410) 472-7070
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0111
THE REGENTS OF THEUNIV. OF COLORADO
Dept. of Elect. & Computer Eng
Boulder, CO 80309-0572
(303) 492-4661

ID#: A064-010-0300
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-010       Awarded: 04AUG06
Title: 2-D 2-Color Laser Spot Array Generation for Quantum Computing Applications:Doppler-free Acousto-Optic Multi-beam Scanners to Address and Trap Atom Arrays
Abstract:   We propose to develop and fabricate an optical scanner required to address a 2-D array of trapped Rubidium atomic qubits with two lasers simultaneously. One of the most scalable approaches to quantum information processing (QIP) is Optical addressing of arrays of trapped atoms. This is done with focused spots using tuned lasers which program initial states and implement 2-quibt gates. High spatial resolution of this approach will allow, simultaneously, the individual trapping of ions/atoms to be addressed and the spectral selectivity of stabilized lasers addressing these atomic transitions. The current approaches to laser beam scanning fall short of speed, efficiency, and Doppler-free operation required for QIP. We propose to design and optimize novel acousto-optic scanner system which will allow Doppler-free operation with high speed and reasonably good efficieny. In addition our novel approach to 2-color deflectors enables simultaneous multiple beam operation and is compatible with 2-D scanning to 100x100 atom arrays. The proposed multi-beam acousto-optic scanner system will be optimized for dual wavelengths at 480 nm and 780 nm, but the design architecture will have the potential to operate in a variety of visible and near-IR wavelengths.

CALDERA PHARMACEUTICALS, INC.
3491 Trinity Drive, Suite B
Los Alamos, NM 87544
(505) 412-2345

PI: Benjamin Warner
(505) 412-2345
Contract #: W81XWH-06-C-0403
LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY
Mail Stop J514
Los Alamos, NM 87545
(505) 667-8457

ID#: A064-032-0110
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-032       Awarded: 23AUG06
Title: High-throughput Direct Structural Screening for Drug Lead Compounds
Abstract:   U.S. Government personnel deployed in tropical and neotropical regions continue to be at risk for developing malaria. Drug resistant malaria parasites are becoming more common in these areas, increasing the risk of American personnel developing a serious, life-threatening disease. Cross resistance between drugs is becoming much more common. Due to the emergence of drug resistance, derivates of known anti-malarial drug classes are not long term solutions. Faced with the realities of the malaria threat, novel, unbiased technologies are required to prime the drug discovery programs. High-throughput techniques for lead compound generation are well known, but these techniques tend to be too expensive for use on tropical diseases, which do not affect rich populations. New techniques to bring down the costs are required. A method for measuring small molecules and molecule fragments will make tropical disease cures more affordable, and therefore allow the possibility of cures. This project will demonstrate the ability to of X-ray techniques to detect the interactions of cycloguanil, a known dihydrofolate reductase inhibitor, with wild-type and quadruple mutant P. falciparium DHFR-TS. This project will demonstrate automated x-ray data collection and processing to demonstrate the complete direct screening technology package.

CFD RESEARCH CORP.
215 Wynn Dr., 5th Floor
Huntsville, AL 35805
(256) 726-4800

PI: Andrzej Przekewas
(256) 726-4800
Contract #: W81XWH-06-C-0385
GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
505 Tenth St NW
Atlanta, GA 30332
(404) 385-6697

ID#: A064-033-0346
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-033       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: High-Fidelity Modeling Tools for Bone Conduction Communication Systems
Abstract:   Warfighters increasingly rely on radio communication equipment to ensure safety, mission effectiveness, and situational awareness. Current military communication gear involves headphones and acoustic microphones. Unfortunately, headphones cover the ears and deteriorate detection and localization of ambient sounds that may be important for tactical situations. They also prevent ear plug usage and necessitate noise canceling headsets in high-noise environments. An alternative to air conduction is bone conduction (BC), where sound is transmitted/received through vibration transducers attached to the human head. Existing BC technology is not mature enough to provide high fidelity devices required for military operations, while their development is limited by the lack of adequate modeling and design tools. In this project we will develop, validate, and deliver anatomy and physics based modeling tools for analysis and design of cranial BC communication systems. The tools will be used to optimize the design, attachment, and anatomical location of BC speakers and microphones for best communication clarity in various military environments. CFDRC's high-fidelity Fluid-Structures-Interaction software will be used to model the filtering effects of the skull, brain, fluids, and other tissues as vibrations transit from points on the head surface to the cochlea. Resulting transfer functions will be used to predict speech intelligibility and evaluated empirically at Georgia Tech's Sonification Lab through validation studies involving human listeners.

CFD RESEARCH CORP.
215 Wynn Dr., 5th Floor
Huntsville, AL 35805
(256) 726-4800

PI: Jerry Jenkins
(256) 726-4800
Contract #: W81XWH-06-C-0391
VANDERBILT UNIV.
Dept of Pediatrics & Pharma.
Nashville, TN 37235
(615) 322-8024

ID#: A064-034-0034
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-034       Awarded: 01SEP06
Title: A Systems Biology Approach to Enable Safe Administration of Mefloquine
Abstract:   The objective of this effort is to apply a systems-biology-centered methodology for the identification of subcellular mechanisms of mefloquine neurotoxicity, with the goal of developing a genetic profile to identify individuals predisposed to mefloquine neurotoxicity. The core hypothesis is that elucidating subcellular mechanisms of mefloquine neurotoxicity requires the combination of cellular level measurements and computational analysis of validated intracellular pathway models. Microarray analysis will determine the dose/response of cells exposed to mefloquine. Gene expression data combined with scientific literature, and expert guidance will be used to construct a pathway model of mefloquine neurotoxicity. The pathway model will be validated/modified using novel computational methods and gene silencing experiments. Sensitivity analysis will be performed to identify the critical pathways involved in mefloquine neurotoxicity. In Phase II, the critical pathways will be used to develop a genetic profile, including specific single nucleotide polymorphisms, capable of predicting mefloquine-induced neurotoxicity, ultimately enabling the development and commercialization of a test kit to identify individuals susceptible to mefloquine neurotoxicity. A multi-disciplinary partnership with expertise in (a) experimental measurements of cellular toxicology and (b) in silico analysis of pathway models has been assembled. This project will be leveraged off of multiple, ongoing research efforts aimed at constructing predictive intracellular pathway models to develop understanding of neurotoxic response to metal ions and organophosphorous compounds.

CHEMIMAGE BIOTHREAT LLC
7301 Penn Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15208
(412) 241-7335

PI: Patrick J. Treado
(412) 241-7335
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0098
UNIV. OF CENTRAL FLORIDA
Central Florida Blvd
Orlando, FL 32816-2700
(407) 823-6819

ID#: A064-006-0233
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-006       Awarded: 21JUL06
Title: TSR-SHIELD: Time & Spatially Resolved Standoff Hyperspectral Imaging Explosives LIDAR Detector
Abstract:   Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is being successfully transitioned to field applications in both close-contact (proximity) and standoff detection modes. LIBS is attractive since it can be used to detect a wide range of chemical, biological and explosive (CBE) hazardous materials. While LIBS is well suited to evaluation of complex hazards, including improvised explosive devices (IEDs), technology approaches that will improve probability of detection (Pd) and reduce false alarm rates (FAR) are desired. Improvements in sensor performance can be accomplished by combining LIBS with Raman spectroscopy, a highly complementary spectroscopic technique, and employing state-of-the-art sensor data fusion algorithms. ChemImage Corporation (CI) teaming with the University of Central Florida proposes to combine state of the art LIBS and Raman standoff optical sensors into a leap-ahead system for hazardous materials detection. In this Phase I program, we will focus on standoff explosives detection using a novel LIBS/Raman sensor, the Time and Spatially Resolved Standoff Hyperspectral Imaging Explosives LIDAR Detector (TSR-SHIELD

DIGITAL FUSION
4940 Corporate Drive
Huntsville, AL 35805
(256) 837-2620

PI: Michael W. Jones
(256) 327-0017
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0115
THE UNIV. OF ALABAMA IN HUNTSV
301 Sparkman Drive
Huntsville, AL 35899
(256) 824-2657

ID#: A064-017-0121
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-017       Awarded: 04AUG06
Title: Compact Mobile Light Filament Sensor System
Abstract:   Digital Fusion and The University of Alabama in Huntsville propose to develop a light filament based sensor system suitable for incorporation in an unmanned-aerial-system (UAS). This sensor system is intended to be useful, e.g., for sensing explosive residue or biotoxins at up to kilometer class distances. It has been demonstrated that white light filaments, which can propagate through the atmosphere with little divergence, are generated by sufficiently short and sufficiently intense laser pulses. This phenomenon offers a means to improve the performance of hyperspectral stand-off sensors as well as stand-off laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of materials. Potential applications are, e.g., detection at a distance of improvised explosive devices (IED) or plastic mines on the ground and of biotoxins in the atmosphere. A technology roadmap will be developed detailing means of reducing power, mass, dimensions, and cooling requirements of the required laser systems so as to transition laser capabilities for such light filament generation to UAS platforms. In parallel with this effort, we will develop a design for a UAS-based hyper-spectral sensor. This UAS-based sensor system will be developed during Phase II. We expect to seek a prototypical model having power, mass, dimensions, and cooling requirements consistent with incorporation on a UAS platform in Phase III.

DUTTA TECHNOLOGIES
4810 Eugenia Drive
Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418
(561) 627-8806

PI: Piyush Dutta
(561) 627-8806
Contract #: W9132T-06-C-0028
THE UNIV. OF ALABAMA
152 Rose Administration Bldg.
Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0104
(205) 348-5092

ID#: A064-027-0159
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-027       Awarded: 05SEP06
Title: Prediction of the Degradation of Composite Materials for Emerging Army Facilities
Abstract:   An innovative methodology, based on mechanistic models, will be developed for prediction of long-term (25+ years) durability of composites for the US Army's emerging facilities in different climatic zones. Accelerated testing simulating the Army's composites applications in various constructions and fields will validate it. Phase I will develop the basic predictive model using the in-house NOVA-3D computer code and will use Arrehenius principles adapted to the TTS (Time Temperature Superposition) for experiment design to measure composites degradation under simultaneous UV (Ultra Violet), stress, and hygrothermal exposure. The test will capture the synergistic effects of field exposure and extreme temperatures, viz., hot/dry, hot/wet, cold/dry, and cold/wet. The capacity loss from changes at the molecular level, such as hydrolysis, microcracks, and UV induced polymer chain-scission, will be incorporated in the model using a unique finite-element (FE) based multi-scale, multi-mechanism degradation model that was developed in-house. Phase II will refine the model to include additional chemical degradation mechanisms, relaxation and creep threshold, stress induced crack growth in fibers and fiber/matrix debond, and dynamic effects of blast and seismic events. The model will predict service life and remaining life and will be incorporated in a user-friendly Field Usable Design Tool software, to be commercialized in Phase III.

DZYMETECH, INC.
2001 South First St. Suite 201
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 377-9806

PI: Lu, Yi
(217) 333-2619
Contract #: W9132T-06-C-0037
UNIV. OF ILLINOIS AT U-C
1901 S. First St. , Ste. A
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-6323

ID#: A064-024-0120
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-024       Awarded: 12SEP06
Title: Colorimetric Sensors for Chemical and Biological Warfare Agents
Abstract:   We aim to construct litmus paper-like colorimetric sensors for detection and quantification of chemical and biological agents in water by performing combinatorial selection of DNA aptamers for cyanobacteria toxins such as microcystins and saxitoxins. Aptamers are single stranded DNA that can bind target molecules with high affinity and specificity. Such DNA aptamers are biocompatible, biodegradable, and highly stable even at elevated temperatures and dry conditions, especially when conjugated with nanoparticles. Cyanobacteria toxins are the most encountered toxins in water sources. After obtaining toxin-specific aptamers, DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles will be used to obtain rapid, autonomous, cost-effective and easily interpretable sensors for soldiers in the field. The sensors will be made into a test strip format that can be easily used by soldiers or other users without a chemistry background. Importantly, the same technology will be applicable to detect a broad range of chemical and biological agents without an extensive support system. In the Phase I research, the feasibility of using the proposed approach will be demonstrated and prototype test kits will be constructed and characterized in Phase II.

EDENSPACE SYSTEMS CORP.
3810 Concorde Parkway
Dulles, VA 20151
(703) 961-8700

PI: David Lee
(703) 961-8700
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0103
MICHIGAN STATE UNIV.
301 Administration Building
Lansing, MI 48824
(517) 353-9751

ID#: A064-015-0242
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-015       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Low-Cost Production of Engineered Proteins in Transgenic Plants
Abstract:   Plants provide an attractive platform for the production of recombinant proteins because they require significantly less capital investment than microbial fermentation systems and can be easily scaled up to produce additional protein. Edenspace proposes to develop a versatile plant expression system with tobacco to produce and purify proteins with therapeutic and industrial purposes. The gene expression cassette to be developed will include a molecular tag to simplify purification of the recombinant protein before being cleaved in order to preserve the biological activity of the protein. To demonstrate this system, Edenspace has created transgenic tobacco with its research partner at Michigan State University, Dr. Mariam Sticklen, expressing the human secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) protein. SLPI is well known for its anti-microbial, wound healing and anti-inflammatory activities, and through this project Edenspace will demonstrate the effectiveness of producing active SLPI in tobacco.

ELECTRON ENERGY CORP.
924 Links Avenue
Landisville, PA 17538
(717) 898-2294

PI: Jinfang Liu
(717) 898-2294
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0104
UNIV. OF DELAWARE
210 Hullihen Hall
Newark, DE 19716
(302) 831-8618

ID#: A064-003-0260
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-003       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Bulk Nitride, Exchange-Coupled Magnet
Abstract:   The main goal of the proposed program is to develop Sm2Fe17Nx/Fe16N2 high performance bulk nanocomposite magnets with maximum energy product approaching 100 MGOe. The proposed study includes: (1) Development of Sm2Fe17Nx single-phase powder with superior magnetic properties; (2) Development of Ti-stabilized Fe16N2 nanoparticles; (3) Development of nanocrystalline composite hard magnetic materials by nanoscale precipitation; (4) Development of Sm2Fe17Nx/Fe16N2 composite core/shell structure by electroless deposition. We will investigate compaction techniques which will maintain the Sm2Fe17Nx and Ti-stabilized Fe16N2 phases and will not promote grain growth. We will also develop and study a model nanocomposite thin film composed of FeN nanoparticles embedded in a SmFeN matrix, which will help to establish parameters for bulk nanocomposite magnet development

ELTRON RESEARCH, INC.
4600 Nautilus Court South
Boulder, CO 80301
(303) 530-0263

PI: Subhash Dutta
(321) 674-8068
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0127
FLORIDA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
150 West University Boulevard
Melbourne, FL 32901-6975
(321) 674-8043

ID#: A064-001-0266
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-001       Awarded: 07AUG06
Title: Gaseous, Liquid and Gelled Propellant Hypergolic Reaction Mechanisms
Abstract:   This proposed STTR Phase I program addresses elucidation of the underlying physics and chemistry associated with ignition delay in hypergolic propulsion systems. More specifically it addresses if the differences observed in ignition delay for liquid and gelled hypergolic propulsion systems are due to mainly physical and/or chemical effects. Proposed mechanisms will be developed for the gas/gas, liquid/liquid and gel/gel hypergolic reactions of mono-methyl hydrazine (MMH) and inhibited red fuming nitric acid (IRFNA) based on literature search, previous research, thermo-chemistry predictions, and engine test results. Reaction mechanisms will include both physical and chemical effects so as to enable prediction of changing ignition delays for the different hypergolic systems being considered. Following mechanism compilation, a set of test methods and apparatus will be devised that provides the best way forward in validating/invalidating the proposed mechanisms.

ELTRON RESEARCH, INC.
4600 Nautilus Court South
Boulder, CO 80301
(303) 530-0263

PI: Subhash Dutta
(321) 674-8068
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0097
FLORIDA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
150 West University Boulevard
Melbourne, FL 32901-6975
(321) 674-8043

ID#: A064-004-0323
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-004       Awarded: 21JUL06
Title: A Portable Microreactor System to Synthesize Hydrogen Peroxide
Abstract:   This proposed STTR Phase I program addresses design, development, fabrication and testing of a safe, convenient and economical catalytic microreactor that is capable of generating vaporous hydrogen peroxide (VHP) on demand by direct synthesis of hydrogen and oxygen that could be generated by electrolysis of water aboard a portable hydrogen peroxide generator. Phase I will consist of two major and distinct tasks carried out in parallel: 1) design, development and fabrication of a microreactor, and 2) development of a suitable catalyst for the direct synthesis reaction in the vapor phase. The catalyst developed will be properly deposited/ loaded inside the channels of the microreactor. An experimental unit will then be built to carry out the microreactor performance tests and the results will be evaluated. The operating conditions will be optimized to achieve the best hydrogen peroxide yields and throughputs possible. At the end of the Phase I program an estimate of the size and cost of a large-scale unit to be built in Phase II will be developed. The program will also identify further research or research and development needs for improvement of the new process.

ENERGID TECHNOLOGIES
124 Mount Auburn Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
(888) 547-4100

PI: John Hu
(888) 547-4100
Contract #: W81XWH-06-C-0393
HARVARD UNIV.
Department of Physics
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 495-8729

ID#: A064-029-0349
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-029       Awarded: 15AUG06
Title: Advanced Robotic Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents, Toxic Industrial Gases, and IEDs for Force Health Protection.
Abstract:   The recent rise in asymmetric warfare and terrorism has brought about an increased threat from biological and chemical weapons. Their potential lethality and their indiscriminate nature make them natural choices for use as a terror weapon. Quick, reliable, and safe detection of these agents is imperative. The Energid team proposes a novel teleoperated robotic system for the rapid detection of chemical and biological agents, including toxic gases and the chemical components of IEDs. The system, which employs an iRobot UGV PackBot platform and a novel arm for manipulation, seamlessly integrates sampling tools and assay devices. The arm will use series elastic actuators and a control system based on Energid's Actin robot control software. The system will be controlled through a JAUS compliant command, control and communication system, and will integrate chemical and bioagent detection systems by MesoSystems and Alexeter Technologies. As part of this project, we are also advancing the state-of-the-art in chemical and bioagent detection systems. We will develop an inexpensive, high enhancement factor, SERS-based spectrometer capable of quickly (<1 sec) and accurately identifying chemical and biological agents. The SERS technology will potentially provide a universal detection subsystem for chemical/bio-agents, industrial toxic gases and chemical components of IEDs.

EPIR TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
590 Territorial Drive, Suite B
Bolingbrook, IL 60440
(630) 771-0201

PI: James Garland
(630) 771-0203
Contract #: W9132T-06-C-0032
UNIV. OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO
Science and Engineering Offic
Chicago, IL 60607
(312) 413-5968

ID#: A064-026-0064
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-026       Awarded: 06SEP06
Title: Rapid Detection Nano-Sensors for Biological Warfare Agents in Buildings and HVAC Systems
Abstract:   Currently there is no real-time technology to detect airborne biological warfare agents (BWAs). Conventional technologies require 30 minutes to 1 hour. We propose to design, fabricate and test user-friendly, low-logistical-load biosensors capable of the real-time (~ 30 s. or less) detection and identification of airborne BWAs with high sensitivity and specificity for all classes of bioagents - bacterial spores, viruses, vegetative bacteria, and bacterial toxins - and many chemical agents. The biosensors developed will be easily used within building infrastructures, in particular HVAC systems. They will be user-friendly, have low-logistical-loads (i.e., reagents and consumables), and will allow the quantification of the density of airborne BWAs. They will allow automated remote response and the automated refreshing of antibodies and filters. They will utilize standard biofluidic techniques augmented with quantum-dot technology and optoelectronic techniques. They will incorporate two, or possibly three, different techniques for the detection and identification of BWAs: (1) the localization of antigens on grids having different pore sizes, (2) the tagging of these antigens with antibody-QD complexes and the observation of photoluminescence from the QDs bound to the localized antigens, and (3) for chemical agents and possibly small antigens, observing FRET between QDs and dies bound to the same antigen.

GALT LLC
5714 West 71st Pl
Arvada, CO 80003
(303) 335-7688

PI: Byron Wells
(303) 335-7688
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0122
UNIV. OF MICHIGAN
3003 S. State St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1274
(734) 764-7250

ID#: A064-016-0303
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-016       Awarded: 07AUG06
Title: An Array of Silicon-based Direction-Sensitive Detectors for Imaging the Gamma-Ray Background
Abstract:   A gamma ray camera, based principally on position-sensitive silicon detectors, is proposed as a means to imaging the radioactive materials in the background. In order to maximize its utility, the background imager should be able to sense environmental alterations out to reasonable ranges, be of relatively low cost so that it can be widely deployed, and finally, it should have a large active volume so that statistical fluctuations in the count do not out-compete the environmental fluctuations of interest. In general, the qualities "low cost" and "large volume" are mutually exclusive, especially if the solid-state detectors with the best energy and spatial resolution are deployed; however, if batch-processed silicon-based detectors can be deployed, then greater detector areas can be realized, at the cost of mass attenuation and absorption probability. We will compensate for the reduced differential detection efficiency by building layers of silicon detectors, in which each individual component detector will be 3D position-sensitive, in which the interaction depth is sensed via drift time measurements, and the 2D lateral position measured via charge sharing techniques. The silicon scatter layers will be coupled with position-sensitive scintillator sensors that we are currently developing, if a high Z, high-density stopping detector is required.

GINER ELECTROCHEMICAL SYSTEMS, LLC
89 Rumford Avenue
Newton, MA 02466
(778) 529-0504

PI: Simon Stone
(781) 529-0525
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0100
UNIV. OF SOUTH CAROLINA
USC Research Foundation
Columbia, SC 29208-0000
(803) 777-1119

ID#: A064-004-0005
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-004       Awarded: 21JUL06
Title: Portable Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generator for Enclosed-Area Decontamination
Abstract:   GES proposes to develop the electrochemical alkaline hydrogen peroxide (HP) generator and integrate it with neutralization and evaporation subsystems to form a prototype HP vapor generator for decontamination of enclosed areas. The focus of GES's involvement shall be the advancement of our electrolyzer technology and the evaluation of various evaporation schemes. USC will focus on modeling the complicated transport phenomena inherent to this unique electrolyzer technology.

HORIZON MOLECULAR MEDICINE, LLC
Suite 250
Atlanta, GA 30338
(678) 225-0222

PI: John Shoffner
(678) 225-0215
Contract #: W81XWH-06-C-0388
ATLANTA MOLECULAR MEDICINE RESEARCH
One Dunwoody Park, Suite 238
Atlanta, GA 30338-6723
(678) 597-5650

ID#: A064-034-0315
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-034       Awarded: 01SEP06
Title: Neurotoxicity Associated with Mefloquine, an Anti-Malarial Drug
Abstract:   The objective of this proposal is to demonstrate that mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) impairment is critical to development of mefloquine neurotoxicity and to develop a test that can screen for susceptibility to mefloquine neurotoxicity. The interaction between mefloquine and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) induces a cascade of events leading to OXPHOS dysfunction. Mefloquine disrupts neuronal calcium homeostasis via liberation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) store and induction of calcium influx across the plasma membrane. Mitochondrial dysfunction is mediated by a variety of mechanism including increased calcium in mitochondria derived from ER. Once ATP synthesis by oxidative phosphorylation is impaired, the cellular toxicity of mefloquine is enhanced by mechanisms discussed below. We propose to test this hypothesis and develop testing that quantitates an individual's cellular ATP generation in response to mefloquine. Given the complex nature of the neurotoxicity to mefloquine and the high frequency of adverse effects in the population, it is unlikely that a simple approach using single nucleotide polymorphisms will predict an individual's susceptibility to neurotoxicity. Establishing a physiological assay that predicts mefloquine toxicity is more practical and has a higher likelihood of success and rapid implementation.

INFOSCITEX CORP.
303 Bear Hill Road
Waltham, MA 02451
(781) 890-1338

PI: Vladmir Gilman
(781) 890-1338
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0094
UNIV. OF MASSACHUSETTS LOWELLI
Office of Research Administrat
Lowell, MA 01854
(978) 934-4723

ID#: A064-013-0183
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-013       Awarded: 21JUL06
Title: Development of a Neuronal Co-Culture Bioactive Compound Sensor with Digital Stimulation and Recording Capacity
Abstract:   Infoscitex Corporation and the University of Massachusetts Lowell will investigate the physiology of interactions of important cortical regions by culturing murine associative and motor neurons within physically-separated culture environments in a single culture dish, connected only via axons elaborating from the associative neurons. The entire culture dish will be mounted on previously-validated electrode arrays, which will allow selective stimulation of associative neurons and recording of resultant synaptic signaling of motor neurons via a well-established digital biosensor. Communication efficiency will be compared under conditions that maximize or impede synaptic and response performance. Biomarkers for enhanced function, including neurotransmitter levels and alterations in mRNA levels will be determined. Cultures will be generated from normal mice and from mice harboring genetic alterations, also present within the human population, which diminish their cognitive performance, increase stress, and promote aggressive behavior, and for which we have been able to compensate by simple nutriceutical supplementation. Comparative studies of neural networks from these genetically-compromised mice with networks from normal mice will therefore be directly applicable for testing of therapeutic or protective interventions, and exposure to environmental insults or pathogens.

INFOSCITEX CORP.
303 Bear Hill Road
Waltham, MA 02451
(781) 890-1338

PI: Vladimir Gilman
(781) 890-1338
Contract #: W9132V-06-C-0028
TEXAS A&M UNIV.
3000 TAMU
College Station, TX 77843-3000
(979) 862-1696

ID#: A064-025-0268
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-025       Awarded: 12SEP06
Title: Microbial Detectors of Explosives
Abstract:   The presence of residual explosive materials in areas previously used as ranges by the US military presents a significant safety and environmental health hazard. Current methods of detecting explosives in soils require extensive soil and/or water sampling and analysis using portable laboratories. These impose significant cost and time burdens during the site remediation process. In this Phase I program, Infoscitex Corporation (IST), Texas A&M University (TAMU), and the University of Rhode Island (URI) propose the development of a new microbial detector for explosives. This detector will contain microorganisms that react specifically with targeted energetic materials (EM) and reveal their presence via intensive fluorescence. Experimental efforts will focus on development of microorganisms, production of microbial sensors, and validation on a selected energetic material.

INFOSCITEX CORP.
303 Bear Hill Road
Waltham, MA 02451
(781) 890-1338

PI: Anna Galea
(781) 890-1339
Contract #: W81XWH-06-C-0400
CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL BOSTON
300 Longwood Ave
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 355-6005

ID#: A064-028-0170
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-028       Awarded: 11SEP06
Title: Deployable Intracranial Sensor Array
Abstract:   Cortical Spreading Depression (CSD) as a secondary phenomenon to traumatic head injury can herald further brain tissue damage well after the initial injury. The only way to reliably record CSD is through direct electrode contact with the brain. With modern equipment this requires that the skull and dura be removed, which is only feasible in a small number of patients. Infoscitex and our partners at Children's Hospital Boston propose a novel subdural electrode array capable of being inserted through a standard hole used for intra-cranial pressure (ICP) monitoring. One of our arrays alone can cover 6 cm2 of cortical tissue, and has electrodes spaced up to 1 cm apart. The design of our array is ideal for recording the low-frequency waves of CSD. Our array will be beneficial in cases both of traumatic head injury and also brain injuries from stroke. The potential benefits to monitoring for CSD in all patients who require ICP monitoring is vast, due to the number of potential patients and the high incidence of secondary injury. The team assembled for this program involves experts in the field of subdural electrode placement and signal recording, as well as considerable experience in developing minimally invasive medical devices.

INLUSTRA TECHNOLOGIES, LLC
4117A Via Andorra
Santa Barbara, CA 93110
(805) 453-3257

PI: Paul T. Fini
(805) 451-3556
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0133
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA
Office of Research
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-2050
(805) 893-4034

ID#: A064-019-0032
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-019       Awarded: 08AUG06
Title: Development of On-Demand Non-Polar and Semi-Polar Bulk Gallium Nitride Materials for Next Generation Electronic and Optoelectronic Devices
Abstract:   Inlustra Technologies and the University of California, Santa Barbara propose to grow and characterize thick non-polar and semi-polar gallium nitride (GaN) wafers that will act as seeds for subsequent GaN boule growth. In this Phase I STTR effort, Inlustra will first develop non-polar and semi-polar GaN films with smooth surfaces and minimal wafer bowing and cracking. The growth conditions for each type of crystallographic plane will be primarily optimized with respect to surface morphology. Defect reduction methods will then be applied to achieve uniformly low extended defect density across the wafer. UCSB researchers will conduct extensive microstructural, optical, and electrical characterization on these non-polar and semi-polar thick films to evaluate their utility as seeds for equiaxed GaN boule growth.

INTELLIGENT AUTOMATION, INC.
15400 Calhoun Drive
Rockville, MD 20855
(301) 294-5221

PI: Leonard Haynes
(301) 294-5250
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0146
PENNSTATE
313G IST Bulding
University Park, PA 16801
(814) 863-0641

ID#: A064-018-0244
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-018       Awarded: 09AUG06
Title: Analysis and Visualization of Large Complex Multi-Step Cyber Attack Graphs
Abstract:   We propose a comprehensive and innovative approach for analysis and visualization of large, complex, multi-step cyber attack graphs. First, we select the radial space-filling hierarchy visualization module for large complex multi-step cyber attack graph due to its strengths in space efficiency and ease of interpretation. Once an attack is correlated, the attack notification service retrieves the correlated alerts that comprise the attack scenario and uses it to instantiate an attack node, binding formal parameters to arguments along the way. Second, we build our plan recognition system after a low-level alert correlation step that includes alert aggregation and alert correlation. Third, we do not require a complete ordered alert sequence for inference. We have the capability of handling partial order and unobserved activity evidence sets. Fourth, we provide advanced approaches to predict potential attacks based on observed intrusion evidence. Bayesian Network based predication can incorporate prior knowledge of attack transition patterns and handle uncertainty in the correlation process. Moreover, we apply dynamic games for graph-based attack prediction and response since the integration of attack graphs and alert correlation graphs provide "perfect" knowledge about the attacker's strategy space which is necessary to compute (Nash) equilibriums out of any mathematical game.

INTERACTIVE DATA VISUALIZATION
5446 Sunset Blvd.
Lexington, SC, SC 29072
(803) 356-1999

PI: Ralph White
(803) 777-7093
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0099
UNIV. OF SOUTH CAROLINA
901 Sumter St.
Columbia, SC 29208
(803) 777-7093

ID#: A064-014-0204
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-014       Awarded: 04AUG06
Title: Optimal Design of Compact Fuel Cell Hybrid Power Systems
Abstract:   This work will use numerical methods to determine optimal design parameters for a compact hybrid fuel cell power system driven by a statistically determined load profile. Detailed physics-based models will be used to represent the behavior of the components in the hybrid system. The components considered in the hybrid system for Phase I will be a PEM fuel cell, Li-ion batteries and electrochemical capacitors. For the design of hybrid systems, the component models will be implemented in VTB Pro. Existing methods for bound constrained optimization will be used to design and optimize hybrid systems. Completion of Phase I will allow one to design accurately and specify hybrid systems subject to user-defined constraints.

IONATRON, INC.
3590 East Columbia St
Tucson, AZ 85714
(520) 917-3061

PI: Stephen McCahon
(520) 917-3063
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0113
UNIV. OF ARIZONA
Department of Chemistry
Tucson, AZ 85721-0041
(520) 621-8246

ID#: A064-017-0142
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-017       Awarded: 04AUG06
Title: Light Filament Sensor
Abstract:   Optical filaments, formed by high intensity ultra-short laser pulses, provide high-intensity coherent white light in the atmosphere at great distances from the laser source. This high-intensity interrogation of the atmosphere yields backward directed emissions for detection from a sensor co-located with the laser system. This has clear advantages for remote sensing in hostile environments, or environments that require rapid deployment of remote sensing equipment, or where a single mobile platform is required. Unlike narrow bandwidth systems, the broad-spectrum generated with optical filamentation may simultaneously provide identification of many different substances with varying spectral signatures. Ionatron has extensive experience and facilities that are necessary for exploring the feasibility of filamentation-based remote sensing concepts and proposes a series of experiments to determine potential capabilities. Should the results of a Phase I effort show promise, Ionatron is uniquely positioned to integrate remote sensing capabilities in currently planned laser-guided electrical discharge products. While, Ionatron possesses world class capabilities in the atmospheric optical filamentation applications, The Denton group at the University of Arizona possesses world class capabilities and facilities related to spectral sensing applications. This collaborative effort joins two organizations with core specialties uniquely tailored for this proposal.

IONFINITY, LLC
2400 Lincoln Ave.
Altadena, CA 91001
(818) 354-5420

PI: Frank Hartley (PM)
(626) 447-2404
Contract #: W81XWH-06-C-0386
JPL
4800 Oak Grove Drive
Pasadena, CA 91109
(818) 354-8360

ID#: A064-029-0047
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-029       Awarded: 15AUG06
Title: Advanced Robotic Detection of Chemical Agents, Toxic Industrial Gases, and IEDs for Force Health Protection.
Abstract:   We propose to develop a novel chemical agent sensor through a joint collaborative effort between IonFinity, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Imaginative Technologies. This chemical sensor consists of 1) a new and powerful detector called a Differential Mobility Spectrometer which has been developed at Imaginative Technologies by team member Dr. Gary Eiceman, and 2) a novel "soft-ionization" method, based upon the micro field-soft ionizing membrane that does not fragment or multiply-ionize the sampled species which has been developed recently at JPL in collaboration with IonFinity. Our goal is to design and prototype an inexpensive, compact - 2 Kg, field portable, stand-off high-efficiency, rugged, integrated detection and identification system (TRL 6 ) for chemical warfare agents, industrial toxic gases, and chemical components of Improvised Explosive Devices in air, water and solid and integrate it with one of the emerging family of Joint Architecture for Unmanned Systems compliant unmanned ground vehicles intended for medical force health protection and combat casualty care missions. The device detects chemicals at low ppb levels after 10 seconds. Detection levels are similar to those of mass spectrometry but without the complicated, bulky vacuum system.

KCF TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
112 W. Foster Ave
State College, PA 16801
(814) 867-4097

PI: Richard Geiger
(814) 867-4097
Contract #: W81XWH-06-C-0387
PENN STATE UNIV.
0029 RECREATION BLDG
UNIVERSITY PARK, PA 16802
(814) 863-4755

ID#: A064-031-0361
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-031       Awarded: 15AUG06
Title: Energy Scavenging Ankle Component for Self-Charging Batteries on Prosthetic Limbs
Abstract:   KCF Technologies will develop an energy scavenging device as a component in the ankle of a lower extremity prosthetic limb. The component will be designed and demonstrated on a C-Leg, in collaboration with Otto Bock USA. The component will capture and store energy during normal activities such as walking and running. The captured energy will automatically recharge the batteries of the C-Leg. This energy will greatly extend the operational time of a battery charge, or eliminate the need for battery charge altogether. In Phase I, KCF will model, develop, fabricate and test a prototype energy harvesting ankle component in laboratory demonstrations. We will collaborate with our partners at Penn State University to model the dynamic forces at the ankle joint during walking and running, and use this information to optimize the component design and placement. In Phase II, KCF will demonstrate an energy-scavenging component in-use on an Otto Bock C-Leg.

KNOWLEDGE SYSTEMS RESEARCH, LLC
81 East Main Street
Forsyth, GA 31029
(478) 992-8737

PI: Zhidong Han
(949) 302-7888
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0141
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE
5251 California Ave, Suite 140
Irvine, CA 92617
(949) 824-9946

ID#: A064-002-0135
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-002       Awarded: 09AUG06
Title: Modeling Software and Tools for Reliability Engineering of Micro/Nano-Device Systems and Components
Abstract:   To develop a general MLPG approach for bridging the length & time scales and computational frameworks to address multi-scale / multi-physics applications, by integrating multi-scale algorithms, for multifunctional material systems.. The emphasis will be on the broad goal for simulating nonequilibrium thermal and shock physics at meso and microstructural scales where dominant physical mechanisms that govern reliability are beyond the reach of either molecular mechanics or unstructured finite element methods alone.

KYMA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
8829 Midway West Road
Raleigh, NC 27617
(919) 789-8880

PI: Drew Hanser
(919) 789-8880
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0154
DUKE UNIV.
128 Hudson Hall
Durham, NC 27708
(919) 660-5498

ID#: A064-019-0343
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-019       Awarded: 15AUG06
Title: Materials Development in GaN for Non-polar Substrates Sliced From Bulk Crystals
Abstract:   Kyma Technologies will lead a team of researchers in the development and optimization of bulk GaN crystal growth processes for fabricating non-polar GaN substrates. Processes for extended growth of GaN crystals in the c-axis direction will be developed to fabricate non-polar and semi-polar substrates of selected orientations. This approach will be compared to heteroepitaxial growth in non-polar directions on non-native seed materials. Bulk non-polar substrates will be demonstrated and characterized, and an in-depth cost analysis of the manufacturing approach for large area substrates will be undertaken.

LEVEL SET SYSTEMS
1058 Embury Street
Pacific Palisades, CA 90272
(310) 573-9339

PI: Susan Chen
(310) 573-9339
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0143
UNIV. OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN
Office of Sponsored Projects
Austin, TX 78713-7726
(512) 471-6234

ID#: A064-011-0059
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-011       Awarded: 09AUG06
Title: Implicit Level Set Based Software for Generating Geometrically and Topologically Accurate Urban Terrain Models Using Implicit Methods
Abstract:   We propose a new method developed by our employees and collaborators for the digital representation of real world objects. This will result in an implicit surface urban terrain model that interpolates raw point cloud data. The method can handle complex topologies and geometries easily. Topology changes pose no difficulties. The key idea involves shrink wrapping an implicit surface around data points using the level set method. No assumptions about connectivity of these points is needed. New multiresolution techniques for speeding up the algorithm, reducing storage requirements, including information about the normals to the surface, weighting points according to their statistical significance, removing outliers, tensor voting, using dynamic visibility based interpolation, ENO interpolation and Level Set System's new, proprietary level set based compression will be developed and used here. New visual metrics involving Hausdorff distance for implicit surfaces will measure the accuracy and reliability of the resulting software package.

LYNNTECH, INC.
7607 Eastmark Drive, Suite 102
College Station, TX 77840
(979) 693-0017

PI: Charles Tennakoon
(979) 693-0017
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0102
CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIV.
10900 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, OH 44106-4971
(216) 368-5186

ID#: A064-004-0166
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-004       Awarded: 21JUL06
Title: Portable High Efficiency Electrochemical Cell for Hydrogen Peroxide Production
Abstract:   A portable, safe, and efficient source of hydrogen peroxide that can be coupled with the Army's existing evaporation technology provides an efficient means of generating vaporous hydrogen peroxide to neutralize chemical and biological agents in enclosed areas such as buildings, aircraft, or tanks. Lynntech, Inc. has developed a patented electrochemical device which utilizes air and the electrolysis of water to generate liquid phase hydrogen peroxide. To meet the need for a high yield, efficient, portable peroxide generator, in Phase I Lynntech proposes to maximize the yield of hydrogen peroxide by (a) utilizing a modified membrane to minimize water crossover and (b) incorporating a highly efficient catalyst developed at CASE Western Reserve University. In tandem, Lynntech will optimize a vaporization process that directly couples with the electrochemical cell and to produce vapor phase peroxide. Lynntech's innovative, high efficiency electrochemical system provides a route to generate both 35 weight % liquid phase and 250-500 ppm vapor phase hydrogen peroxide and operates on water and electricity which are available in the field. The power, cost, and size of the portable hydrogen peroxide generator will be evaluated to optimize the peroxide yield and minimize the power requirements for large-scale production.

MESOSCOPIC DEVICES, LLC
510 Compton Street, Suite 106
Broomfield, CO 80020
(303) 466-6968

PI: Charles Booten
(303) 466-6968
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0096
COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES
1500 Illinois Street
Golden, CO 80401
(303) 273-3379

ID#: A064-014-0358
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-014       Awarded: 21JUL06
Title: Software tools for optimization of hybrid fuel cell power supplies
Abstract:   The military's needs for soldier portable power are growing rapidly, and the only way to address this power need today is through batteries. Fuel cell power systems offer the potential of greatly reduced weight to support the soldier's power needs, but fuel cell power systems today are only poorly optimized. To enable optimization of the fuel cell power systems for given user-specified power-profiles and energy-use constraints, Mesoscopic Devices and its partner, the Colorado School of Mines, propose to develop a system-level software model to accomplish this optimization. This software tool will incorporate component and system level modeling for the fuel cell power supply and its components, as well as energy storage devices (e.g. batteries), devices to support power peaking (e.g. ultracapacitors) and power management systems. The general nature of the software will support a range of fuel cell technologies, including direct methanol, proton exchange, reformed methanol and solid oxide fuel cells. We will implement the software to provide a general framework for optimizing these systems, allowing users to enter component models for any components they wish to specify and to define the power and energy profiles required.

METIS DESIGN CORP.
222 Third Street
Cambridge, MA 02142
(617) 661-5616

PI: Seth Kessler
(617) 661-5616
Contract #: W9132T-06-C-0026
MIT
77 Massachusetts Av
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-3628

ID#: A064-027-0306
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-027       Awarded: 25AUG06
Title: Software Tool for Composite Durability Prediction
Abstract:   Durability is the effect of time dependant processes, including fatigue, creep, moisture absorption, thermal-oxidation, abrasion, chemical reactions and physical ageing on mechanical properties. The ability to predict accurately the durability of composite materials and structures is critical to successfully designing for longevity. The existence of models alone is not sufficient; practical software tools must exist to employ these models reliably and efficiently in design. They must also link the multiple lengthscales at which the physical aspects of these models are based in order to provide an overall integrated tool. During the proposed research, MDC will leverage extensive composite design experience to develop a software tool for rapid durability analysis of proposed repair/upgrade/reinforcement. First, a simple graphical interface will collect information regarding the material system, cure cycle, surface onto which the composite is applied and the anticipated environmental load profile over time. Next, these characteristics will be used within several interactive models to deduce the degraded performance predicted. Finally, figures will represent key mechanical properties of the composite over time, which could use for design purposes. MIT will work with MDC during the course of this research to assist in the experimental validation and calibration of the various composite durability models.

MIRMAR SENSOR, LLC
5959 Hollister Ave
Goleta, CA 93101
(805) 692-1575

PI: Albert Beyerle
(805) 692-1575
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0144
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA AT IRVINE
Office of Research and Admin
Irvine, CA 92697-7600
(949) 824-7106

ID#: A064-016-0263
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-016       Awarded: 09AUG06
Title: Passive Object Detection System
Abstract:   Imaging with X-rays and gamma rays is a long established technique. It is possible with recent technological advances that standard transmission radiography may be extended to self-radiography, where the natural radioactivity of the object itself and the surrounding matrix is used as the source of X-rays. Self-radiography is much more complex than traditional radiography, chiefly because it depends on a distributed, non-quantified, and low intensity source. Mirmar Sensor builds high-pressure xenon spectrometers. These detectors provide medium resolution, highly stable, very large, room temperature spectrometers. The work proposed here leverages on the extensive detector work, nuclear search work, and soil assay work done by the team at Mirmar Sensor. Also important to this project is the additional interaction information and the flexibility of configuration provided by Mirmar Sensor's patented gridless HPXe technology.

MSDPO
806 Albury Ct.
Moorestown, NJ 08057
(215) 895-1311

PI: Brent Adams
(801) 422-7124
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0152
BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIV.
Office of Research
Provo, UT 85602-1231
(801) 422-6177

ID#: A064-009-0089
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-009       Awarded: 14AUG06
Title: Performance Map for Low-Cost Titanium Armor
Abstract:   The research solicited under the STTR A06-T009 is ideally matched to the core technology strengths of MSDPO - microstructure sensitive design for performance optimization. MSDPO embodies a rigorous mathematical framework for systematic design of material microstructure to meet the requirements of the designer. This methodology starts with the specification of a microstructure hull, defined as the set of all possible microstructures deemed relevant by the governing physics of the design problem. The microstructure hulls facilitate the delineation of the properties closures, depicting the complete set of all theoretically feasible combinations of anisotropic properties. It is emphasized here that it would be impossible to establish the most typical property closures desired by the designer without the specification of the microstructure hull. It is proposed to develop a comprehensive set of microstructure hulls, anisotropic property closures, and processing maps for Ti and its alloys. Armed with these datasets, the designer will be fully empowered to suitably alter the microstructures in the available stock materials and customize them for optimal (or close to optimal) performance for a given application.

NANOLAB, INC.
55 Chapel St
Newton, MA 02458
(617) 581-6747

PI: David L. Carnahan
(617) 581-6747
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0117
UNIV. OF ARIZONA
P.O. Box 210104
Tucson, AZ 85721
(520) 626-6941

ID#: A064-012-0102
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-012       Awarded: 07AUG06
Title: Nanoscale Antennas
Abstract:   This effort will culminate in the demonstration of a new class of antennas, to allow the coupling of RF signals with nanoscale devices and sensors. An antenna for RF must be millimeters long, and nanoscale in diameter, if it is to interact with nanoscale devices. The aligned carbon nanotubes grown at NanoLab are synthesized in millimeter lengths, have good conductivity, and therefore should make excellent antennas. The work will entail the growth, characterization, and attachment of these antennas on test substrates, and their performance will be evaluated in collaboration with the University of Arizona.

NANOSPHERE, INC.
4088 Commercial Drive
Northbrook, IL 60062
(847) 400-9112

PI: Chad Mirkin
(847) 467-7302
Contract #: W9132T-06-C-0039
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSTIY
2145 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL 60208
(847) 467-7302

ID#: A064-024-0255
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-024       Awarded: 15SEP06
Title: Colorimetric Sensors for Chemical and Biological Warfare Agents
Abstract:   1. Abstract. The Mirkin group at Nortwestern University has developed methods for exquisitely sensitive analyte detection that rely upon forming hybridized arrays of nucleic acid-derivatized gold nanoparticles. These methods lend themselves immediately to colorimetric detection and dipstick-style applications. The hybridized nanoparticles are (quite literally) `blue,' the separated nanoparticles are `red.' Dr. Mirkin is working closely with a company, Nanosphere Inc., on the commercial applications of these technologies. In parallel, the Ellington group at the University of Texas at Austin has developed methods for transducing analyte-binding to nucleic acid receptors into conformational or bond changes that can alter hybridization. By combining these technologies it should be possible to produce generalized, sensitive, and simple detection methods for the detection of a variety of analytes relevant to biodefense. As a proof-of-principle in Phase I, we will generate dipsticks that will change color from blue to red at low (nanomolar) concentrations of the biothreat agent ricin. In Phase II we will generalize these methods to a much wider array of chemical and biological threat agents, and will continue to partner with Nanosphere Inc. on the commercialization of these technologies.

NATURAL SELECTION, INC.
3333 N. Torrey Pines Ct.
La Jolla, CA 92037
(858) 455-6449

PI: Gary B. Fogel
(858) 455-6449
Contract #: W81XWH-06-C-0399
SOUTHWESTERN COLLEGE
900 Otay Lakes Road
Chula Vista, CA 91910
(619) 482-6563

ID#: A064-032-0056
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-032       Awarded: 18AUG06
Title: High-throughput Direct Structural Screening for Drug Lead Compounds
Abstract:   The Army has an obvious and immediate need for greater exploration of small molecules in the search for novel anti-malarial drugs. The innovative techniques offered in this proposal utilize methods of iterated automated fragment assembly coupled with an intelligent compound screening tool to facilitate scientific advancement. The resulting computational methods can increase the rate and exploration of small molecule space for novel malaria inhibitors. The proposed Phase I research makes use of docking algorithms as prototyping methods for these computational approaches with DHFR as the target of interest. Docking methods will be expanded to include NMR research in Phase II. The Phase I research and development sets the stage for continued Phase II research and development and transition for field use. The technology's applications go beyond Army needs to all branches of the military, and also commercial and academic drug discovery pipelines. The prospect for commercialization for the resulting technology in the bioinformatics sector is high in light of the increased need for rapid small molecule search strategies.

NEI CORP.
400 Apgar Drive, Suite E
Somerset, NJ 08873
(732) 868-3141

PI: Stein Schreiber Lee
(732) 868-3141
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0124
CORNELL IUNIV.
Sponsored Program Services
Ithaca, NY 14853
(607) 255-0655

ID#: A064-007-0187
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-007       Awarded: 07AUG06
Title: Ceramic encapsulated nanoparticle-based covert taggants for tracking of materiel
Abstract:   We propose to develop nanoparticle-based taggants that are stable and non-toxic, and are capable of producing UV, visible and IR signatures. Combining nanoparticles with different compositions will provide the ability to produce a multitude of unique markers, each specific to a certain combination of nanoparticles. The proposed program to develop covert taggant particles builds upon recent research by our University STTR partner, who has developed core-shell structured non-toxic and highly fluorescent nanoparticles. The ceramic outer shell imparts stability to the nanoparticles against the ambient, including moisture and temperature extremes, thereby overcoming barriers associated with the use of organic dyes. The proposed effort also builds upon work done at NEI Corporation, where we have developed and commercialized processes for producing core-shell nanoparticles, along with surface modification technologies to render nanoparticles compatible with the matrix in which they are dispersed. The Phase I program will deliver to the Army sample quantities of nanoparticles with the desired fluorescent and adhesion characteristics. The emphasis of the Phase I effort will be on incorporating different chromophores within the nanoparticles, and characterizing the spectral response, along with rendering the particle ensemble adherent. A provider of covert tagging technology solutions is a partner in this effort as well, thereby providing an early path to implementing the technology in the field.

NEVA RIDGE TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
4750 Walnut Street
Boulder, CO 80301
(303) 443-9966

PI: Richard Carande
(303) 443-9966
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0123
UNIV. OF NEW HAMPSHIRE
Office of Sponsored Research
Duraham, NH 03824
(603) 862-0533

ID#: A064-016-0090
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-016       Awarded: 07AUG06
Title: Gamma Ray Array for Passive Detection of Hidden Objects
Abstract:   Neva Ridge Technologies and its academic partner the University of New Hampshire, introduce an innovative application of technology originally developed for gamma ray astronomy. Under this phase 1 effort we will show the feasibility of an approach that will allow for the detection of hidden objects in buildings and of voids and tunnels underground. It will rely on naturally occurring "background" gamma radiation associated with materials that compose the objects of interest. Imaging technology borrowed from the low energy gamma ray astronomy community, together with advanced signal processing techniques, will be applied in this Phase 1 effort to provide a proof of feasibility.

NEXTGEN AERONAUTICS
2780 Skypark Drive
Torrance, CA 90505
(310) 626-8384

PI: Akhilesh Jha
(310) 626-8374
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0140
UNIV. OF IOWA
2 Gilmore Hall
Iowa City, IA 52242
(319) 335-2123

ID#: A064-002-0008
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-002       Awarded: 09AUG06
Title: Modeling Software and Tools for Reliability Engineering of Micro/Nano-Device Systems and Components
Abstract:   Simulation techniques play an important role in material and device design at the nanoscale. Among these techniques, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has become a powerful tool for revealing complex physical phenomena. However, completely modeling nano-structured materials and nano-devices of tangible size using MD simulation is unrealistic, even when using today's most powerful supercomputers. Most recently developed concurrent multiscale modeling techniques have shown promise in treating phenomena at nano and larger scales. However, these methods are still subject to some limitations. In the proposed work, we are specifically addressing these drawbacks by developing several advanced algorithms for maturization and commercialization of the Bridging Domain Method, developed by Dr. Xiao and his colleagues at the University of Iowa. At the end of the Phase I program, we will demonstrate the feasibility of seamlessly integrated multiscale and multi-physics modeling tool.

OMEGA OPTICS, INC.
10435 Burnet Rd., Suite 108
Austin, TX 78758
(512) 996-8833

PI: Maggie Y. Chen
(512) 996-8833
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0116
DUKE UNIV.
104 Bryan University Center
Durham, NC 27708
(919) 660-1549

ID#: A064-012-0353
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-012       Awarded: 07AUG06
Title: Nanoscale Dipole Antennas Based On Centimeter Long Carbon Nanotubes For Coupling Nanoscale Devices To Microwaves
Abstract:   The key challenge in coupling RF signals into and out of nanoscale devices and sensors is the development of suitable nanoscale antennas. Omega Optics proposes to collaborate with Jie Liu's group at Duke University, which has developed the first method that can grow centimeter-long, well-aligned individual single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on flat substrates suitable for device fabrication, to demonstrate the feasibility of using such long nanotubes as nanoscale antennas. It was shown that SWNTs with their length more than 2cm-long can be synthesized, which is comparable to the wavelength of microwaves. To fabricate such antenna structure, well separated and well aligned individual nanotubes will be grown by adopting a newly developed method to pattern catalyst islands with uniform size catalyst nanoparticles. The length of nanotubes can be precisely controlled by chemical etching using oxygen plasma treatment at desired locations. Dipoles will be fabricated on individual long nanotubes using photolithography method. The antennas will be characterized using HP vector network analyzer and microwave spectrum analyzer in the microwave and RF frequency range. Input impedance, antenna efficiency, radiation resistance and antenna pattern will be measured and the relation between these parameters and the structure of the nanotubes (length, diameter etc.) will be extracted from the measurements. Synthesis method that can prepare nanotubes with optimized structures for antenna applications will be developed.

OPTRA, INC.
461 Boston Street
Topsfield, MA 01983
(978) 887-6600

PI: Julia Rentz Dupuis
(978) 887-6600
Contract #: W911SR-06-P-0046
UNIV. OF NORTH CAROLINA
Dept of Environmental Sciences
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1350
(919) 966-3411

ID#: A064-023-0264
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-023       Awarded: 28AUG06
Title: Real Time Parallel Channel Spectrometer for 3D Cloud Profiling
Abstract:   OPTRA is proposing the development of a 3D cloud profiling system that combines an innovative Imaging Open Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (I-OPFTIR) with advanced computational tomography algorithms. The proposed technology expands the capability of OP-FTIR systems to 3D profiling applications. It does this by adding a spatially dispersed array of sensors at the focal plane of a single interferometer. In this way, we maintain the high-performance of the OP-FTIR system without adding the bulk and expense of multiple systems. Moreover, the active measurement allows for detection when there would otherwise be zero contrast between the plume and background (a likely scenario for indoor test applications). System cost and weight will be further reduced by the use OPTRA's lightweight, low-cost retroreflector array. OPTRA will partner with Dr. Lori Todd of the University of North Carolina. Dr. Todd and her associates at UNC's School of Public Health have been applying infrared tomographic techniques to environmental monitoring applications for over ten years now and are the ideal partners for this STTR development The proposed system is an innovative and cost-effective means of profiling a chemical cloud in three dimensions. The proposed team represents decades of spectroscopic and tomographic experience

ORBITAL TECHNOLOGIES CORP.(ORBITEC)
Space Center, 1212 Fourier Drive
Madison, WI 53717
(608) 827-5000

PI: Millicent Coil
(608) 827-5000
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0126
JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV.
Department of Mechanical Eng.
Baltimore, MD 21218
(410) 516-8637

ID#: A064-001-0235
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-001       Awarded: 07AUG06
Title: Gaseous, Liquid, and Gelled Propellant Hypergolic Reaction Mechanisms
Abstract:   ORBITEC proposes a parallel computational and experimental effort to understand the phenomena underlying hypergolic ignition of gelled propellants. Gelled hypergolic propellants offer many benefits to modern propulsion systems. They offer good insensitive munitions characteristics and versatile performance. However, gelled propellants typically exhibit longer ignition delays than liquid propellants. In order to realize their advantages without risking potential catastrophic failures associated with long delays, these ignition issues must be understood and overcome. The proposed program will break the complex ignition delay behavior into fundamental problems and devise laboratory and modeling experiments to address each. In each case, the experiments will assay the effect of the gellant on the particular phenomenon. The Phase I work will accomplish the majority of the modeling and will include exploratory laboratory experiments to select diagnostics appropriate for investigating each selected process. The Phase II program will conduct these experiments and measure ignition delays in a multiple impinging stream vortex injection (MISVI) thrust chamber. Via a suite of analytical techniques, the proposed work will elucidate each of the fundamental phenomena along the path to ignition, yielding an understanding of each process, the competition among them, the effect of the gellants, and the resulting regimes of ignition.

ORBITAL TECHNOLOGIES CORP.(ORBITEC)
Space Center, 1212 Fourier Drive
Madison, WI 53717
(608) 827-5000

PI: Robert Morrow
(608) 827-5000
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0101
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA-RIVERSIDE
Sponsored Programs Admin
Riverside, CA 92521
(951) 827-5535

ID#: A064-015-0327
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-015       Awarded: 21JUL06
Title: High-yield plant based manufacturing of bioengineered spider silk (Phytosilk)
Abstract:   The high strength to weight and elasticity properties of spider silk make it of significant interest for the production of advanced fibers for military and civilian applications. Plants may offer the only feasible mechanism to produce quantities of spider silk proteins sufficient to sustain large scale manufacturing of these high performance fibers. Successful implementation of bioengineered spider silks requires appropriate genetic constructs, crop plants that can be successfully transformed with the constructs, and the technology and protocols necessary to produce high yields of the expressed protein. This project proposes to bring together plants transformed with spider dragline silk constructs from the University of California-Riverside with advanced environmental control technologies and protocols developed by Orbital Technologies Corporation to provide a system capable of high yield spider silk protein production.

ORION INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
2201 Buena Vista Dr. SE
Albuquerque, NM 87106
(505) 998-4000

PI: Peter Soliz
(505) 998-4000
Contract #: W81XWH-06-C-0396
UNIV. OF IOWA
200 Hawkins Drive
Iowa City, IA 52242
(319) 384-5833

ID#: A064-030-0075
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-030       Awarded: 01SEP06
Title: Online Treatment of Subretinal Neovascular Membranes from Laser Eye Injury
Abstract:   The eye is extremely sensitive to laser radiation and can be permanently damaged from direct or reflected beams. In the military environments, laser injuries may be a result of battlefield laser rangefinders, target designators, or enemy action. Individuals involved in high energy laser research or medical therapeutic lasers are also at risk from direct and reflected laser radiation. One possible result from laser irradiation is subretinal neovascular membranes on the macula, which are particularly debilitating. A procedure known as photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used to treat these abnormal membranes. Today, a system does not exist that can perform both the imaging of the retina and the treatment. One effect is that pre-surgical planning and precise application of the therapeutic laser are not optimal. The goal of this proposed project is to treat more precisely the affected area. With today's digital imaging system, especially as implemented in scanning laser ophthalmoscopes (SLOs) and with high speed image processing algorithms, we will devise a system whereby all the steps leading to the laser therapy are integrated into one diagnostic and treatment device, thereby decreasing the risk of unintended damage to the retina, unwanted visual loss, and possibly improving the outcome of the treatment.

PHOTON SYSTEMS
1512 Industrial Park St.
Covina, CA 91722
(626) 967-6431

PI: William F. Hug
(626) 967-6431
Contract #: W81XWH-06-C-0395
JET PROPULSION LABORATORY
4800 Oak Grove Drive
Covina, CA 91109
(818) 354-2725

ID#: A064-029-0033
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-029       Awarded: 15AUG06
Title: SUGV-Integrated Non-Contact Deep UV Biochemical Agent Surface Detector (UVBASD)
Abstract:   This proposal addresses the need for miniature, low power, reagentless, robot-mounted, instruments for real-time detection and classification of trace concentrations of biological and chemical agents on surfaces. Deep UV laser induced native fluorescence (UVLINF) is the most sensitive technique for detection and rough classification of trace amounts of biological and organic materials. Photon Systems has used this technique to demonstrate detection of single spores at a working distance of 30cm. Higher levels of classification specificity can be obtained using deep UV resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRRS), with similar levels of sensitivity to surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), although the sensitivity is less than UVLINF. We propose an advanced, robot-mounted, electro-optical instrument that combines UVLINF and UVRRS for non-contact detection and classification of trace concentrations of biological and chemical agents while requiring no consumables or sample preparation and producing no waste products. At the heart of this instrument is a deep UV laser consuming less than 5W of battery power that simultaneously generates Raman scattering and excites native of fluorophores contained within microorganisms and many organic and inorganic materials. Using an onboard real-time algorithm the UVLINF and UVRRS data are processed to identify and classify contaminants in less than 1 second.

PHYSICAL SCIENCES, INC.
20 New England Business Center
Andover, MA 01810
(978) 689-0003

PI: Amy J. Ray Bauer
(978) 689-0003
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0131
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA
Department of Mechanical and A
La Jolla, CA 92093-0411
(858) 534-5681

ID#: A064-006-0205
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-006       Awarded: 04AUG06
Title: WBS Edge-Effect Dissassociation Detected by LIF
Abstract:   The problem of detecting hazardous trace species rapidly and sensitively is a difficult spectroscopic problem. Potentially, this problem might be solved with an elemental detection method such as LIBS combined with a molecular detection method. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) might be a candidate for the detection of small molecules, but for larger polyatomic molecules, the resulting fluorescence is often spread between many states and too weak for molecular detection at concentrations of interest. Simple molecules and radicals that results from high temperature combustion and plasma-interaction processes, on the other hand, are known to be readily and sensitively detected with LIF. We hypothesize that such molecular radicals will exist in the perimeter of the LIBS plasma, and can in those locations be accessed with LIF, providing orthogonal detection inside the LIBS event itself. Physical Sciences Inc. and the University of California at San Diego hereby propose to examine the potential of using LIF in the perimeter of a LIBS plasma. We will make use of the spectral information gathered during this program to develop a design for a simple LIF system that can be added to instruments like the Man-Portable (MP) LIBS system now under development by ARL and Ocean Optics Inc.

PHYSICAL SCIENCES, INC.
20 New England Business Center
Andover, MA 01810
(978) 689-0003

PI: Edward A. Rietman
(978) 689-0003
Contract #: W911SR-06-C-0040
WESTERN NEW ENGLAND COLLEGE
1215 Wilbraham Road
Springfield, MA 01119-2684
(413) 782-1247

ID#: A064-022-0171
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-022       Awarded: 15AUG06
Title: Rapid Concentration of Particles in Large Volumes of Fluid
Abstract:   Physical Sciences Inc. proposes an innovative approach to rapidly concentrate (1000:1) bacterial spores from large volumes of water for identification. The technique is based on acoustophoresis - the separation of particles with sound. Since the technology has already been demonstrated on a small scale our primary focus is on scalability for large volumes (1000 L) in short periods of time (10 min). A primary advantage of our proposed technology is that there are no filters to replace, and after concentrating the bacterial spores can be withdrawn with a few drops of water to facilitate their analysis on biochemical spot tests.

PHYSICAL SCIENCES, INC.
20 New England Business Center
Andover, MA 01810
(978) 689-0003

PI: Chad E. Bigelow
(978) 689-0003
Contract #: W81XWH-06-C-0408
MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL
50 Staniford Street
Boston, MA 02114-2554
(617) 724-2725

ID#: A064-028-0229
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-028       Awarded: 11SEP06
Title: Near-infrared Diffuse Optical Imaging for Noninvasive Monitoring of Cortical Spreading Depression
Abstract:   Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is a region of transient electrical and metabolic failure that propagates through peri-lesional brain tissue. Although characteristics of CSD have been shown to be relevant to injury outcome, subdural electrode measurements currently in use restrict monitoring only to patients requiring craniotomy. A portable, noninvasive monitoring device applicable to all patients experiencing CSD would therefore be of great clinical utility from the standpoint of furthering our basic understanding as well as guiding treatment strategies. Ultimately, the device will have broad utility across military and civilian populations for real-time monitoring of a wide variety of events ranging from penetrating brain injury to stroke and migraine. Physical Sciences, Inc. and Massachusetts General Hospital propose to develop a near-infrared spectroscopic device to monitor CSD noninvasively and with minimal interference with routine patient care. The device will produce real-time, 2-dimensional images of cerebral blood flow changes by spatial localization of the absorption coefficients of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin. Phase I studies will determine the feasibility of the technique for monitoring CSD in a piglet model. In Phase II, a prototype device will be developed that is compact, robust, and suitable for field deployment.

PHYSICAL SCIENCES, INC.
20 New England Business Center
Andover, MA 01810
(978) 689-0003

PI: Daniel X. Hammer
(978) 689-0003
Contract #: W81XWH-06-C-0397
BOSTON UNIV.
School of Medicine
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 638-8877

ID#: A064-030-0270
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-030       Awarded: 01SEP06
Title: Online Treatment of Subretinal Neovascular Membranes from Laser Eye Injury
Abstract:   Subretinal neovascular membranes (SRNM) are a deleterious complication of laser eye injury and retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, choroiditis, and myopic retinopathy. The membranes are difficult to treat with conventional photocoagulation because they form near the fovea directly below sensitive photoreceptors. Photodynamic therapy is a promising treatment that acts by selective dye accumulation, activation by laser light, and disruption and clotting of the new leaky vessels. However, PDT surgery is currently not image-guided, nor does it proceed in an efficient or automated manner. This may contribute to the high rate of re-treatment. Physical Sciences Inc. and Boston University School of Medicine Department of Ophthalmology propose to develop an on-line, automated PDT treatment system. The system will be built around core technologies of scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and retinal tracking. The system will include fluorescein and ICG angiography as well as precise delivery of a PDT laser beam. Instrument components and software algorithms will be developed in Phase I and in Phase II the system will be built and tested in human subject trials on patients with SRNM. After the Phase II program, the system will be delivered to the U.S. Army Medical Research Detachment at Brooks City Base TX.

RADIANCE TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
350 Wynn Drive
Huntsville, AL 35805
(256) 489-8964

PI: Andrew Thies
(256) 489-8963
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0145
THE UNIV. OF SOUTH CAROLINA
1200 Catawba St., Room 204
Columbia, SC 29208
(803) 777-1119

ID#: A064-011-0245
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-011       Awarded: 09AUG06
Title: Software for Generating Geometrically and Topologically Accurate Urban Terrain Models Using Implicit Methods
Abstract:   Under this program, Radiance will develop software for generating geometrically and topologically accurate urban terrain models using implicit methods.

REACTION SYSTEMS, LLC
1814 19th Street
Golden, CO 80401
(303) 881-7992

PI: Brad Hitch
(303) 216-2950
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0125
STANFORD UNIV.
Office of Sponsored Research
Stanford, CA 94305-4100
(650) 723-5854

ID#: A064-001-0079
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-001       Awarded: 08AUG06
Title: Gaseous, Liquid, and Gelled Propellant Hypergolic Reaction Mechanisms
Abstract:   Contemporary storable hypergolic bipropellants such as MMH and IRFNA are desirable for use in military rocket applications due to their high specific impulse, no separate ignition system, and to actively control engine thrust. There is also great interest in safer munitions using gelled and lower-toxicity propellants. Unfortunately, the computational tools needed to accurately predict performance with these propellants do not yet exist, costing a great deal of time and money in testing and redesigning under-performing hardware. A validated, modular, multi-phase, chemically reacting Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code capable of accurately simulating gelled propellant ignition and combustion could therefore substantially decrease the cost of developing new IM-compliant weapons systems. We propose to develop such a code employing new reaction chemistry mechanism reduction techniques, non-Newtonian gel atomization, and spray vaporization and solid-particle combustion sub-models incorporated into an existing multi-phase reacting flow CFD code. Success in this effort will allow us to characterize engine performance with gelled propellants and accurately predict ignition delays in engine hardware, decreasing the risk of energetic disassemblies during development. The understanding gained could also help design a relatively simple bench-scale test for gel propellants instead of using full-scale engine hardware, making the screening of lower-toxicity and alternative propellants much more efficient.

RF NANO CORP.
232 Trafalgar Lane
San Clemente, CA 92672
(949) 388-3582

PI: Steffen McKernan
(949) 388-3582
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0118
U.C. IRVINE
INRF
Irvine, CA 92697-2625
(949) 824-9326

ID#: A064-012-0043
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-012       Awarded: 04AUG06
Title: Carbon Nanotube Antennnas
Abstract:   It is the purpose of this Phase I STTR program to both demonstrate proof of concept of long nanotubes as receiving and transmitting microwave antennas, and to develop detailed simulation tools to predict their performance and determine the optimum geometry. This will build on four years of UC Irvine experience fabricating mm long individual single walled carbon nanotubes, and pioneering theoretical work by the two groups that have simulated nanotube antennas from an RF engineering point of view. If successful, this will lead to work on developing techniques to economically fabricate optimized antennas, including arrays. The work plan will involve close coordination of all participating institutions. RF Nano work will proceed according to standard processes it is currently developing. UC Irvine work will involve laboratory measurements of antenna performance. UWM work will involve simulation for the control experiments and possibly new electrode or nanotube antenna designs. The work will be divided into 4 tasks: Task 1: Manufacture prototype ultralong nanotube antennas (RF Nano Corporation Lead) Task 2: Demonstrate nanotube antenna (UCI lead) Task 3: Demonstrate wireless bio-sensor and RFID proof of concept (UCI lead) Task 4: Simulate effects of substrate, feed electrodes (UWM lead)

RXOA BIOSCIENCES LLC
1212 Fourier Drive
Madison, WI 53717
(608) 229-2833

PI: William L. Petersen
(608) 229-2833
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0105
ARIZONA BOARD OF REGENTS, ASUNIV.
P.O. Box 873503
Tempe, AZ 85287-3503
(408) 727-0749

ID#: A064-015-0073
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-015       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Protein Production in Tobacco from an Amplified Inducible System
Abstract:   This Phase I proposal will test a UV-B light inducible system in tobacco to produce exceptionally large amounts of protein. There are three principal components to the system: 1) a tightly regulated, UV-B inducible promoter fused to a geminivirus replication associated protein (Rep) coding region, 2) a geminivirus-derived vector that is rapidly amplified by the Rep protein to produce very high yields of the target protein, and 3) plant growth under light-emitting diode (LED) lighting for precise control of the expression system. After sufficient plant biomass accumulation, exposure to UV-B will trigger production of Rep. The Gemini vector DNA will then be precisely excised from the plant genome and replicated episomally, leading to very high intracellular concentrations of transgene mRNA and the encoded transgenic protein product. The specific aims of the Phase I proposal are to: 1 Assemble UV-B inducible genetic constructs to express Rep protein and introduce them into tobacco plants. 2 Test a prototype LED-based lighting system for plant biomass production. 3 Test background expression levels and upon UV-B activation, test the ability of the constructs to induce the geminivirus based expression system in tobacco. 4 Determine the total amount of protein produced per gram of plant biomass.

SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS & RESEARCH ASSOC., INC.
6300 Gateway Dr.
Cypress, CA 90630
(714) 224-4410

PI: Jim Hauck
(714) 224-4410
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0110
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO
9500 Gilman Dr
La Jolla, CA 92093
(858) 534-7891

ID#: A064-005-0150
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-005       Awarded: 04AUG06
Title: Low Power Retroreflectors for Optical Communications
Abstract:   Optical retro-reflectors have been used for communications for many years. The approach has many advantages, when one terminal has limited power, space, weight, and a low cost as requirements. The major limitation for "Retro-Comms" has been that the modulator consumes too much power at higher modulation rates. What we propose is to reduce the power, size, weight and cost of the Retro-Modulator (RM) by improving the design of a deformable mirror, and its drive electronics. The RM device is largely capacitive, and the drive electronics and the modulation approach can be optimized so that the energy is recycled and dissipation is minimized. Further, we propose to use a co-located Photo-Voltaic converter to convert a part of the incident light to power the RM driver, and electronics. A further aspect of our design is that it can be deployed as a projectile. During Phase I we will design the circuitry, and test existing RM devices, capable of 100 kHz modulation, to improve the basis for designing higher performance devices. In Phase II, we will demonstrate the new design, and show modulation of beams at ~1500 kHz, with high beam quality retro-reflections. In Phase III we will do a full system demonstration.

SENSOR ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY, INC.
1195 Atlas Road
Columbia, SC 29209
(803) 647-9757

PI: Qhalid Fareed
(803) 647-9757
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0134
UNIV. OF SOUTH CAROLINA
301 South Main Street
Columbia, SC 29208
(803) 777-7941

ID#: A064-019-0362
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-019       Awarded: 09AUG06
Title: Development of On-Demand Non-Polar and Semi-Polar Bulk Gallium Nitride Materials for Next Generation Electronic and Optoelectronic Devices
Abstract:   GaN-based electronic and optoelectronic devices have demonstrated superior properties for applications involving visible and ultraviolet light emitting diodes (LEDs), laser diodes, and high-power electronic devices. Despite the significant improvement in the performance of these devices, they still suffer from strong built-in electrostatic field due to spontaneous and piezoelectric polarizations, and high defect density and biaxial strain due to the heteroepitaxial growth on foreign substrates, both being undesirable in the operation of devices. In response, Sensor Electronic Technology, Inc. has defined a novel approach for producing free-standing low-defect density non-polar a-plane GaN substrates suitable for the growth of the next generation of devices. Thick a-plane GaN boules will be grown by a combination of growth processes, including selective area lateral epitaxy (SALE) and HVPE, which will lead to defect densities below 107 cm-2. SALE will provide low-defect smooth templates for subsequent thick boule growth by modified HVPE. SALE templates will help in preventing cracking and bowing of the wafers.

SIMBEX
10 Water Street
Lebanon, NH 03766
(603) 448-2367

PI: Richard M. Greenwald
(603) 448-2367
Contract #: W81XWH-06-C-0392
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLO
Media Lab
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 258-6574

ID#: A064-031-0215
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-031       Awarded: 15AUG06
Title: A powered foot and ankle prosthesis for improved maneuverability and reduced metabolic cost
Abstract:   This Phase I STTR proposal seeks to address the need for development and implementation of novel powered prosthetic foot-ankle components that can by used by military personnel with lower-limb loss in typical military and civilian environments. A cost-effective, biomemetic, dynamic foot-ankle system is proposed that improves balance, walking speed, gait metabolism, and prosthesis control compared to current passive foot-ankle technologies. Additionally, the system will be developed for use by military and civilian personnel in situations that include stair ascent and descent and uneven terrains. We propose to develop a prototype of an active ankle-foot prosthesis comprising motor, spring and variable-damping elements. These electromechanical components and power components will meet practical size, weight and energy requirements. With this prosthesis, both ankle joint impedance and mechanical power generation will be controlled, offering the civilian and military below-knee amputee improvements in walking metabolism and gait pattern. The muscle like-actuation and biomimetic control will be validated for stair and slop ascent, descent, and uneven terrain. This project proposes research and development of the current prototype towards a viable commercial solution for military and civilian application.

SIMMETRIX, INC.
10 Halfmoon Executive Park Drive
Clifton Park, NY 12065
(518) 348-1639

PI: Ottmar Klaas
(518) 348-1639
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0139
RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE
100 8th St
Troy, NY 12180-3590
(518) 276-6283

ID#: A064-002-0185
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-002       Awarded: 09AUG06
Title: Modeling Software and Tools for Reliability Engineering of Micro/Nano-Device Systems and Components
Abstract:   The ability to develop new generations of superior military systems and civilian products requires the use of multifunctional materials and ever smaller components for which key design parameters are associated with nano-scale constituents. The ability to understand and design these materials and components requires the application of multiscale simulation technologies that can account for interactions across many decades of spatial and temporal scales starting from the atomic scale. The goal of this project is to build on the research efforts on multiscale modeling of the past decade to develop a set of integrated computational methods and associated software components that seamlessly couples and spans multiple spatial and temporal scales needed in the simulation of systems that are subject to thermal and shock loading. To meet this goal the areas to be considered include (i) determination of the models and scale linking functions required for non-equilibrium problems subject to a combination of high speed thermal and mechanical loads, (ii) the adaptive methods needed to ensure reliability of multiscale analysis, (iii) methods to execute the massive computations required on parallel computers and (iv) verification and demonstration of the methods developed on problems of interest to the Army.

SOUTHWEST SCIENCES, INC.
1570 Pacheco Street, Suite E-11
Santa Fe, NM 87505
(505) 984-1322

PI: Kristen A. Peterson
(505) 984-1322
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0114
UNIV. OF NEW MEXICO
MSC05 3180
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001
(505) 277-6132

ID#: A064-017-0123
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-017       Awarded: 04AUG06
Title: Light Filament Sensor
Abstract:   When high powered laser pulses are focused in air, light filaments with extremely long propagation distances and high intensities can form. In this STTR Phase I project, we will investigate the potential of laser light filaments for sensing applications. Direct comparisons will be made between ultra-violet and near-infrared filaments and an assessment of suitability these filaments for standoff or remote sensing will be made. Phase I will demonstrate the feasibility of light filament sensing. In Phase II a prototype instrument based on light filaments will be constructed and tested.

SYNKERA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
2021 Miller Dr.
Longmont, CO 80501
(720) 494-8401

PI: Elizabeth Mirowski
(720) 494-8401
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0093
UNIV. OF COLORADO
Office of Contracts and Grants
Boulder, CO 80309
(303) 492-2695

ID#: A064-013-0249
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-013       Awarded: 21JUL06
Title: Development of a Neural Co-Culture Bioactive Compound Sensor
Abstract:   Synkera Technologies proposes to develop a bipartite Living Neural Networks (LNN) platform capable of sustaining two different types of intercommunicating neuronal modules that can be independently exposed to and record electrical and biochemical perturbations. The focal point of the proposed sensor will be a micromachined biochip platform for guided and reproducible growth of LNN on ceramic substrates. The advantages of this platform include the following: (1) improved growth characteristics of the neural co-culture, (2) the ability to reproducibly control neuronal and axonal outgrowth between two LNN, (3) the ability to provide discrete access of biochemical perturbations to each LNN, (4) the ability to provide nanoelectrode access with superior electrical characteristics and contact to the LNN, and (5) fewer processing steps for less expensive devices.

TERA-X, LLC
8551 Research Way, Suite 175
Middleton, WI 53562
(608) 217-1660

PI: John Grade
(608) 345-1519
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0119
UNIV. OF WISCONSIN-MADISON
Research & Sponsored Programs
Madison, WI 53706-1490
(608) 262-3822

ID#: A064-020-0025
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-020       Awarded: 04AUG06
Title: Ranging and Acuity Enhancement for Terahertz Imaging Spectrometers
Abstract:   This Phase I effort identifies and analyzes a variety of antennas that can be used to mitigate standing-wave effects for pulsed and/or CW sub-millimeter-wave and THz imaging spectrometers independent of their technology (e.g. mm-wave vector network analyzers vs. fast-pulse time-domain THz systems). A close collaboration with Prof. Susan Hagness, who is an expert in computational electromagnetics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, ensures that the antenna designs we propose will be both simulated and optimized computationally to reduce effort in fabrication and testing, which will be the focus of a Phase II effort. This Phase I effort will establish the initial antenna designs, plans and preliminary measurements required to substantiate a demonstration plan in the future and to make predictions for range and acuity enhancements, while the Phase II effort will result in a prototype system capable of mitigating standing wave effects in THz-frequency spectral imaging applications of interest to the U.S. Army and DoD.

TETRAGENETICS, INC.
95 Brown Rd.
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 257-1199

PI: Theodore G. Clark
(607) 255-4042
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0095
CORNELL UNIV.
Sponsored Programs Services
Ithaca, NY 14853
(607) 255-6841

ID#: A064-015-0046
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-015       Awarded: 21JUL06
Title: Recombinant and Engineered Protein Accumulation System (REPAS)
Abstract:   To fully realize the benefits of genetically engineered proteins, manufacturing costs and development time must be significantly reduced. Technologies that combine robust expression, and inexpensive methods of purification are key to this goal. This Phase I proposal will demonstrate the feasibility of Tetrahymena thermophila, a common pondwater ciliate, as a novel system for low cost production of recombinant proteins using strategies that focus on a "model" vaccine antigen with considerable importance in human and animal health, namely, the hemagglutinin protein (HA) of influenza virus. Our specific goals are to 1) introduce the HA gene from the current H5N1 strain of avian flu into T. thermophilia 2) screen recombinant cell lines for the expression of HA using antibodies specific for the protein; and 3) devise rapid, inexpensive methods for downstream purification of candidate vaccine antigens.

TRITON SYSTEMS, INC.
200 TURNPIKE ROAD
CHELMSFORD, MA 01824
(978) 250-4200

PI: Manoj Ram
(978) 250-4200
Contract #: W9132V-06-C-0029
SAMUEL GINN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Material Research/Edu Ctr.
Auburn University, AL 36849-5341
(334) 844-4485

ID#: A064-025-0042
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-025       Awarded: 12SEP06
Title: In Situ Near Real-time Detection of RDX in Soil(1000-908)
Abstract:   Triton Systems, Inc., with Prof Aleksandr Simonian of Auburn University proposes to develop an in-situ, on-site, near real time response detector of explosive particles in large areas of soil for the BRAC program. The explosive detector is designed to withstand the environmental factors such as pH, temperature, soil moisture, and salinity changes of soil. The device detects ultra-low concentrations of explosives in soil, and distinguishes RDX from other explosive materials. Additionally, the device meets the user requirements for selectivity and reliability in the field.

VOXTEL, INC.
12725 SW Millikan Way
Beaverton, OR 97005
(971) 223-5646

PI: David M. Schut
(971) 223-5646
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0121
UNIV. OF OREGON
Dept. of Chemistry
Eugene, OR 97403-1253
(541) 346-4228

ID#: A064-007-0288
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-007       Awarded: 07AUG06
Title: Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Tracking of Materiel
Abstract:   The ability to tag and track equipment and other supplies is an important logistical need for military operations. To address the need for covert material taggants, a non-toxic, highly stable nanocrystal quantum dot (NQD) based taggant with covert chromophoric spectral emission signatures will be developed. Based on our experience and ongoing research, strong candidates for initial particle composition and size have been identified and the baseline chromophore/NQD coupling chemistry results in a taggant technology that is both distinct from and superior to contemporary solutions, in terms of the number of unique taggants, the distinguishability of tags, and their long term environmental stability. It is also non-toxic, and therefore adheres to the increasing worldwide regulations against toxic materials. During Phase I, a series of taggants will be synthesized and the taggants ability to be easily applied to a variety material, including fabric, by simple methods, such as aerosol spray will be demonstrated. The NQD-chromophor taggant, as well as the delivery technology will then be optimized for both response function and environmental stability. Our strong expertise in functional nanoparticle synthesis, ink chemistry, and optoelectronic systems gives us great confidence that our proposed solution will meet the Army's application requirements.

WEIDLINGER ASSOC., INC.
375 Hudson St FL 12
New York, NY 10014
(650) 230-0214

PI: Roland Krause
(650) 230-0297
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0142
CORNELL UNIV.
643 Rhodes Hall
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 254-8844

ID#: A064-002-0211
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-002       Awarded: 09AUG06
Title: Modeling Software and Tools for Reliability Engineering of Micro/Nano-Device Systems and Components
Abstract:   Weidlinger Associates Inc and Cornell University propose to create a Computational Environment for Simulation of Micro/Nano-Devices (NanoSE). We will develop a fully integrated software tool that will enable army researchers and design engineers to simulate the behavior of devices, such as multi-function sensors, with extreme thermal and mechanical loading typical of battlefield conditions. The resulting tool will allow for seamless incorporation of physical effects on multiple length and time scales in one integrated simulation. Mathematically consistent and numerically stable algorithms will be evaluated to achieve full coupling of a flexible, modern and powerful molecular dynamics code with a proven, industrial strength, explicit finite-element wave propagation simulation package. We will evaluate an option to couple the explicit finite-element code to a high-order adaptive hp-version finite element code to incorporate macroscopic behavior on a even larger length scale. Key to the efficiency of our integrated multiscale modeling package is the utilization of an adaptive software, adaptive modeling, adaptive discretization (A-SMD) approach.

WIZDOM SYSTEMS, INC.
1300 Iroquois Avenue
Naperville, IL 60563
(630) 357-3000

PI: Hisham Abad
(630) 357-3000
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0107
UNIV. OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO
Department of Physics
Chicago, IL 60607-7059
(312) 413-2789

ID#: A064-021-0281
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-021       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Confinement of Threading Dislocations at the CdTe/Si Interface for Improved HgCdTe IR Sensors
Abstract:   Stringent requirements on the performance of third generation HgCdTe infrared detectors demand the availability of affordable high quality substrates with very large areas. The large areas are needed both for the fabrication of single very large focal plane arrays (FPAs) (2048x2048) and to increase the yield of smaller size FBAs per wafer. The quality of commercial CdTe/Si technology, the best large-area composite substrate available for the epitaxial growth HgCdTe, has reached a plateau such that significant improvements using current growth techniques are doubtful. However, the growth of CdTe on Si/Si (and potentially on Ge/Si) twist-bonded substrates (TBS) promises to transform this technology to markedly higher quality levels. We propose the epitaxial growth of CdTe on Si/Si substrates by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) as a promising method to prepare CdTe layers. Such layers will have significantly reduced threading dislocation density at the CdTe surface than what is available today. The CdTe/Si substrates will then be used as composite substrates for the growth of large area HgCdTe epilayers. We further propose to identify the requirements and design a high vacuum wafer bonding system for the fabrication of Si/Si and Ge/Si twist bonding structures.

ZOMEGA TERAHERTZ CORP.
1737 Union St - PMB #309
Schenectady, NY 12309
(518) 312-8913

PI: Jianming Dai
(518) 312-8919
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0132
RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE
110 8th Street
Troy, NY 12309
(518) 276-3096

ID#: A064-006-0336
Agency: Army
Topic#: 06-006       Awarded: 08AUG06
Title: Orthogonal Spectroscopic Technologies for the Detection of Hazardous Substances
Abstract:   Reliable, high-sensitivity detection and identification of hazardous substances at stand-off distances is beyond the reach current commercial solutions, such as laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. To improve the possibility of detection and lower false alarm rates, spectroscopic techniques orthogonal to conventional LIBS systems are required. We propose to combine femtosecond LIBS with a radical new air-based THz generation and detection technique to create an orthogonal spectroscopic system with unparalleled capabilities to detect and identify hazardous materials in field conditions. Nonlinear optical mixing in ambient air using a portable Ti:sapphire laser generates unprecedented intense and ultrabroad bandwidth THz pulses, exceeding the performance of current solid state materials. Heterodyne detection of pulsed THz waves by using the ambient air has also been demonstrated, and holds the potential to be the most sensitive detection method yet. This revolutionary technique can be applied anywhere there is air, even at distances considered impossible using conventional methods. The proposed project will integrate a commercial femtosecond LIBS with a THz-ABCD system, and prove the feasibility of using the two techniques together to improve detection reliability. A prototype with stand-off capability will be demonstrated in Phase II to detect explosive compounds in an site survey security context.

---------- DARPA ----------

APTIMA, INC.
12 Gill Street
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 496-2415

PI: Dr. Kari Kelton
(202) 842-1548
Contract #: W31P4Q-06-C-0398
MASSACUUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-3529

ID#: 06ST1-0035
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 06-004       Awarded: 16AUG06
Title: SCALE: Spontaneous Collaboration Assistant and Linking Engine
Abstract:   Static organization charts and standard processes define roles, methods, and authority in useful ways for common missions. But these same, rigid structures force the organization to behave inefficiently, often ineffectively on problems in new domains, problems requiring new coordination methods and ad hoc teams. What is needed to facilitate rapid formation of effective human networks is a system that non-invasively monitors the rich content of digital media and conversation, builds knowledge of ad hoc and potential networks, and accurately recommends new opportunities for collaboration. The proposed research addresses this need by developing the Spontaneous Collaboration Assistant and Linking Engine (SCALE), an innovative new technology that integrates three cutting-edge approaches: . Text mining of digital documents and communications to construct an organizational model of members' areas of knowledge/work and existing collaboration relationships; . Reality mining of physical interactions between people to augment the model of organizational knowledge and collaboration; . Social network analysis to identify new productivity-enhancing opportunities for spontaneous collaboration between members of the organization.

CORNERSTONE RESEARCH GROUP, INC.
2750 Indian Ripple Road
Dayton, OH 45440
(937) 320-1877

PI: Mr. Jason Hermiller
(937) 320-1877
Contract #: W31P4Q-06-C-0406
UNIV. OF COLORADO
3100 Marine St Room 481, 572 UCB
Boulder, CO 80309
(303) 492-2692

ID#: 06ST1-0055
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 06-005       Awarded: 09AUG06
Title: Design Methodology for Attaching Morphing Components
Abstract:   Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) and the University of Colorado at Boulder (CU-Boulder) will establish the fundamental understanding of materials and mechanical interaction necessary to develop modeling capabilities and fabrication processes for fastening morphing skins. During Phase I, CRG will conduct a broad array of multidisciplinary research ranging from biological systems to emerging mechanical design methodology related to fastening. Phase I efforts will focus on demonstrating the feasibility of overcoming existing fastening challenges at boundary conditions as well as demonstrating predictive modeling capabilities. CU-Boulder will develop and validate a constitutive continuum model for use in finite element analysis (FEA) of morphing materials. Phase II will optimize and extend the fastening methodology and modeling capability to tackle more complex fastening situations beyond simple perimeter boundary conditions. The establishment of the proposed advanced fastening methodology will provide significant enhancements over existing morphing materials performance enabling orders of magnitude increase in lifecycle performance, cost, aerodynamic performance, and signature control.

CORNERSTONE RESEARCH GROUP, INC.
2750 Indian Ripple Road
Dayton, OH 45440
(937) 320-1877

PI: Mr. Ernie Havens
(937) 320-1877
Contract #: W31P4Q-06-C-0408
UNIV. OF PITTSBURGH
Office of Research 350 Thackeray Hall
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
(412) 624-7400

ID#: 06ST1-0061
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 06-007       Awarded: 28AUG06
Title: Light-Activated Shape Memory Composite
Abstract:   Cornerstone Research Group, Inc. (CRG) and the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) will develop light-activated composite materials technology. This development effort will enable the next generation of military vehicles to quickly and efficiently undergo dramatic reconfigurations as necessary to respond optimally to unpredictable warfare scenarios. Light-activated composite materials technology will provide significant enhancements over existing morphing materials approaches enabling higher performance capability for future morphing vehicle systems. The advanced functionality of these materials will include faster activation times, lower energy consumption, and bi-stable state performance. The primary light-activated material sought under this effort is light-activated shape memory polymer (LASMP). When applied as a direct replacement for thermally-activated shape memory polymers, LASMP will significantly reduce the time required for reconfiguration, reduce the overall energy consumption to switch and hold, and increase mechanical performance during shape change by allowing rapid on-off (digital) modulus switching at only discrete locations otherwise.

ECLIPTIC ENTERPRISES CORP.
398 W. Washington Blvd.
Pasadena, CA 91103
(626) 798-2436

PI: Mr. Rex Ridenoure
(626) 798-2436
Contract #: W31P4Q-07-C-0106
CAL POLY SAN LUIS OBISPO
Aerospace Engr. Department Cal Poly Stat
San Luis Obispo, CA 93401
(805) 756-6479

ID#: 06ST1-0097
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 06-011       Awarded: 20DEC06
Title: P-POD and RocketPod on Steroids
Abstract:   Ecliptic Enterprises Corporation (Pasadena, CA) and California State Polytechnic University (San Luis Obispo, CA) will conduct exploratory and advanced development of a family of concepts enabling cost-effective, recurring opportunities for launching very small (<20 kg) `microsat' to `nanosat' to `picosat' secondary payloads on existing and emerging U.S. launch vehicles and spacecraft while also allowing for deployment and capable proximity operations of such systems around their host platforms once in space. The proposed effort starts with elements of the proven "P-POD" launch system for CubeSat-class (10 cm x 10 cm x 10 cm; ~2 kg) space systems overseen at Cal Poly and elements of the novel RocketPodT CubeSat-class launch system invented (and now patented) by Ecliptic. RocketPod is derived from Ecliptic's very successful RocketCamT family of onboard video and imaging systems for use with rockets and spacecraft. We start with these concepts, refine them, and also scale up a bit, like "P-POD and RocketPod on steroids."

FREYTAG & CO. LLC
1647 Sierra Woods Drive
Reston, VA 20194
(703) 593-6543

PI: Mr. Richard Freytag
(703) 579-5377
Contract #: W31P4Q-06-C-0416
UNIV. OF MINNESOTA
Sponsored Projects Administrat 200 Oak S
Minneapolis, MN 55455
(612) 624-5599

ID#: 06ST1-0042
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 06-004       Awarded: 10OCT06
Title: Robust Self-Forming Human Networks: Making Organizations Work
Abstract:   This proposed work researches, designs, and prototypes a lightweight knowledge management tool supporting legacy communication protocols to assist organizations in automatically restructure themselves to meet new challenges and tasks. This tool promotes virtual reorganizations that connect individuals with common interests and functions irrespective of the official "organization chart" by displaying the real "wiring diagram."

GALOIS CONNECTIONS, INC.
12725 SW Millikan Way
Beaverton, OR 97005
(503) 626-6616

PI: Dr. John Launchbury
(503) 626-6616
Contract #: W31P4Q-06-C-0393
YALE UNIV.
Department of Computer Science P.O. Box
New Haven, CT 06520
(203) 432-4715

ID#: 06ST1-0016
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 06-002       Awarded: 15AUG06
Title: Automated Wide-Area Network Configuration from High-Level Specifications
Abstract:   We propose to design and implement a domain-specific language (DSL) called Nettle that will eliminate a large class of network misconfiguration errors, together with a verification tool that will be used to establish the correctness of other network configuration specifications. Advantages of our approach include: - It can be deployed gracefully and incrementally. The use of Nettle will guarantee many local behavioral properties, as well as certain more global ones, and as more organizations use the framework, greater degrees of correcness can be ensured. - Nettle will be expressive. We will not excessively limit the range of routing decisions that can be expressed. - Nettle will be efficient and platform independent. It will be possible to compile programs written in the DSL on a variety of router platforms and configurations.

HOTSPOT DYNAMICS
2950 Harvey Court
Marina, CA 93933
(703) 868-7247

PI: Mr. Steven Huntsman
(703) 868-7247
Contract #: W31P4Q-06-C-0388
NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL
Physics Department 833 Dyer Rd
Monterey, CA 93943
(831) 238-4444

ID#: 06ST1-0005
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 06-001       Awarded: 26JUL06
Title: Scalable Information Assurance Through Thermodynamical Traffic Analysis
Abstract:   The objective of this joint proposal between Hotspot Dynamics and the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) is to design and evaluate a large-network deployable computer network defense (CND) system based on thermodynamical traffic analysis (TTA). The system has linear scalability with increased network size (number of hosts and traffic level) that is superior to the exponential scalability of conventional approaches (signature- and heuristic-based) that will not be applicable to future network sizes. In addition to improved performance, TTA also represents the only known scientific approach for describing computer networks with the potential to provide significant improvements in false alarm rates for larger scale networks. It is applicable to the detection of novel ("0-day") attacks, covert channels, encryption-based techniques, and the increased traffic diversity anticipated in future large-scale networks. The Phase I effort will result in a clearly articulated architecture capable of faithfully taking TTA into the mainstream. By allowing the now fully-developed underlying principles to be incorporated into a carefully planned architecture, the foundation will be laid for freeing CND from its present reliance on ad hoc methods. In short, the Phase I work will provide a blueprint for the subsequent development of a production system beginning in Phase II.

LYNNTECH, INC.
7607 Eastmark Drive, Suite 102
College Station, TX 77840
(979) 693-0017

PI: Dr. Alan Cisar
(979) 693-0017
Contract #: W31P4Q-06-C-0419
UNIVERISTY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
Dept. of Materials Science Viterbi Schoo
Los Angeles, CA 90098
(213) 740-3016

ID#: 06ST1-0087
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 06-010       Awarded: 31AUG06
Title: Safe, Backpackable Method For Field Neutralization of Small Arms
Abstract:   This Phase I STTR effort involves harnessing the power of accelerated corrosion for the purpose of safely neutralizing small arms caches. A key part of the fight against irregular forces is finding their hidden small arms caches and either removing or destroying them. When removal is not possible or practical, destruction in place is the alternative. During Phase I, Lynntech, in collaboration with Professor Florian Mansfeld at the University of Southern California, proposes to develop a safe, non-toxic powdered formulation to rapidly neutralize small arms discovered by our combatants in place. This formulation will be packaged into sealed pouches which can be easily opened and the contents dispersed over the weapons to rapidly corrode them and damage them beyond use. Absorbing water even from dry air, our powdered formulation will render small arms non-operational within a few minutes and completely non-salvageable within a few hours of contact. We will develop the necessary packaging to enhance the shelf life and usability of the formulation. During Phase II, Lynntech will optimize the formulation and team up with chemical manufacturers and packaging companies to enable commercialization for mass procurement by our armed forces in the future.

MICROSAT SYSTEMS
8130 Shaffer Parkway
Littleton, CO 80127
(303) 285-1833

PI: Mr. Timothy Sayer
(303) 285-5136
Contract #: W31P4Q-06-C-0405
MONTANA STATE UNIV.
Space Science and Engineering P.O. Box 1
Bozeman, MT 59717
(406) 994-6169

ID#: 06ST1-0099
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 06-011       Awarded: 08AUG06
Title: Responsive Secondary Payload Launch
Abstract:   This effort will develop the power, communication and launch vehicle (LV) interface systems of a parasitic "drone" satellite to be used in close proximity with a host satellite. The power system will harvest energy from the side lobes of the host satellite's microwave transmissions. The communication system will transfer data with the host through that same microwave frequency, negating the need for a second communication system on the host spacecraft. The launch vehicle interface will be a responsive and non-intrusive separation system that requires no electrical connections with the LV and bonds on to the structure late in the integration cycle. The interface accommodates both controlled separation as well as redocking maneuvers; it also has the capability to transfer power to the drone if the choice is made to run power lines to it. The interface can bonded to either the LV or the host spacecraft as the individual mission requires.

NEXT WAVE SYSTEMS, LLC
12261 E. Casey Hollow Road
Pekin, IN 47165
(812) 961-3543

PI: Mr. Richard Samuelson
(219) 644-3684
Contract #: W31P4Q-06-C-0407
PURDUE UNIV.
School of ECE, Purdue 465 Northwestern A
West Lafayette, IN 47907
(765) 494-3538

ID#: 06ST1-0025
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 06-003       Awarded: 18AUG06
Title: Rosetta Phone
Abstract:   Most DoD missions occur in areas of the world where the native language is not English. The warfighters find themselves in situations where a quick, real-time translation of signs, placards, and documents could lead them out of dangerous situations or provide important clues and information relative to the mission at hand. In places such as Afghanistan or North Korea, this turns out to be a particularly difficult problem, since the languages commonly used in these countries are written with characters that cannot be typed into a translation device or even searched for in a dictionary (unless the user has a significant knowledge of the given language.) A valuable tool would be a handheld device (e.g., a mobile telephone or PDA) that would be capable of translating the text found in natural scenes into spoken English and text. The device should also possess the ability to transmit the captured image and text information to other warfighters in the area or to the warfighter's command and control organization or intelligence agencies that may assist in understanding the image as it applies to the larger overall mission. The Rosetta Phone takes the form of a handheld mobile device (HMD) such as a mobile telephone or a PDA. The HMD is assumed to be equipped with a color camera and, at least part of the time, wireless network capabilities. In order to be able to provide a translation of text found in natural images, the HMD needs to be programmed to perform the following sequence of tasks: . Natural Scene Image Acquisition . Text Segmentation (TS) . Optical Character Recognition (OCR) . Text Translation (TT) . Audio Output Once these tasks have been performed, several output items are available for display/listening, including the original image, the segmented text image, the optical character text, the English text translation, and the audio file (MP3) of the translation. The user will be able to choose to transmit any of these to a server, or to other users' HMDs supporting the mission. Each of the five tasks needs to be accomplished by the HMD in real-time and autonomously to ensure operation without the help of a remote server.

NEXTGEN AERONAUTICS
2780 Skypark Drive
Torrance, CA 90505
(310) 626-8384

PI: Mr. Jeff Rodrian
(310) 626-8364
Contract #: W31P4Q-06-C-0263
UNIV. OF PITTSBURGH
350 Thackeray Hall Office of Research
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
(412) 624-7400

ID#: 06ST1-0071
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 06-007       Awarded: 11JUL06
Title: Fiber Reinforced Shape Changing Polymer Composites
Abstract:   With the recent development of structures that enable morphing aircraft, there is a need for a skin material capable of high in-plane strains while resisting aerodynamic loads. NextGen Aeronautics has partnered with the University of Pittsburgh to develop a fiber reinforced shape memory (SMP) matrix composite material for morphing wing skins. By pairing a fiber with an SMP matrix a composite is created that will withstand high out-of-plane surface pressures yet once activated the SMP will facilitate actuation with low external energy requirements. NextGen Aeronautics will combine its knowledge from the development of FlexSkin, a skin capable of large in-plane shearing, with University of Pittsburgh expertise in the area of developing smart and morphing materials. The objective of the Phase I research is to demonstrate a fiber reinforced composite with an SMP matrix that is capable of 60 degrees in-plane shearing. The ability to undergo large shearing shape changes and the out-of-plane stiffness will be demonstrated experimentally. Phase II will focus on improving the activation mechanism of the SMP and the response time of the shape change. The team will demonstrate the integration of the skin onto large morphing aircraft structures.

NLIGHT PHOTONICS
5408 NE 88th Street, Bldg E
Vancouver, WA 98665
(360) 566-4471

PI: Dr. Paul Crump
(360) 713-5161
Contract #: W31P4Q-06-C-0421
UNIV. OF ILLINOIS

Urbana, IL 61801
(217) 265-0563

ID#: 06ST1-0081
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 06-009       Awarded: 27JUL06
Title: Built-In Filament Control for Long Lifetime in Broad Area Diode Lasers
Abstract:   The elimination or suppression of filaments through the use of photonic crystal structures is proposed in this STTR. Filament formation is a well-known problem in high-power, broad area semiconductor diode lasers, often leading to catastrophic failure of the diodes. The diode failure also normally results in a system failure in the systems in which the diodes are employed. By using a bi-directional periodic structure, milled into the laser using a Focused Ion Beam, it is shown that mode control can be exercised over the optical mode of the high-power, broad area diode laser. Mode control serves to eliminate or suppress filament formation in the diode laser, thereby eliminating or suppressing this pernicious failure mode.

PERCEPTRONICS SOLUTIONS, INC.
3527 Beverly Glen Blvd.
Sherman Oaks, CA 91423
(818) 788-1025

PI: Dr. Amos Freedy
(818) 460-9150
Contract #: W31P4Q-06-C-0410
UNIV. OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
Computer Science Department 941 West 37t
Los Angeles, CA 90089
(213) 740-4496

ID#: 06ST1-0051
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 06-004       Awarded: 31AUG06
Title: Rapid Formation of Virtual Organizations Using Modeling and Multi Agent System Technology
Abstract:   Perceptronics Solutions, Inc. and the USC Computer Science Department present this proposal to develop an adaptive software system that will automatically form 'virtual' human networks. Our objective is to develop an automated system capable of: (1) identifying groups of people who should be in contact with each other by virtue of their parent organization's basic mission, that is, the long term problems it intends to solve; (2) organizing ad hoc groups of people to solve a specific problem encountered by the organization, taking into account organizational structures and individuals' positions in that structure; or (3) identifying new areas of organizational capability, or problem solving ability, based on the observed interests of the organization's members. Specifically, we will focus our Phase I efforts on automatically forming a problem-oriented virtual network in a dynamic military organization. The advantage of this approach is: (1) it directly addresses the military application, which has top priority; and (2) the solution will hold for less demanding applications as well, such as more static military and non-military organizations including civil agencies, companies, universities, and so forth.

SCIENCE RESEARCH LABORATORY, INC.
15 Ward Street
Somerville, MA 02143
(617) 547-1122

PI: Dr. MICHAEL BOOTH
(617) 547-1122
Contract #: W31P4Q-06-C-0425
PENNSTATE
ELECTRO-OPTICS CENTER W. HILLS IND. PK,
KITTANNING, PA 16201
(724) 295-7019

ID#: 06ST1-0082
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 06-009       Awarded: 27JUL06
Title: INTELLIGENT DRIVERS USING OPTICAL SENSING
Abstract:   Science Research Laboratory (SRL) and the Penn State Electro-Optics Center (PSU) propose to develop intelligent laser diode driver technology, incorporating optical diagnostics, that extends the operating lifetime of laser diode arrays by an order of magnitude. Random perturbations of temperature or current density during operation of a laser diode array can lead to thermal runaway and the formation of current filaments; the high local temperature, current, and optical power associated with these filaments damages the emitters and eventually leads to array failure. SRL and PSU have demonstrated that the formation of current filaments can result in irreversible damage. As part of this SBIR, SRL and PSU propose to use rapid real-time optical diagnostics to protect laser diodes from irreversible damage, significantly increasing their lifetime and reliability. By improving the lifetime of laser diodes, this technology will dramatically lower the cost of ownership of laser diode arrays, allowing them to be successfully integrated into a wide range of military laser hardware.

SECURE COMMAND, LLC
4972 Marshall Crown Road
Centreville, VA 20120
(703) 340-6569

PI: Dr. Anup Ghosh
(703) 340-6569
Contract #: W31P4Q-06-C-0387
GEORGE MASON UNIV.
CSIS 4400 University Drive, MS 5B5
Fairfax, VA 22030
(703) 993-3767

ID#: 06ST1-0011
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 06-001       Awarded: 31JUL06
Title: Building an Internet Cleanroom from Virtual Machines
Abstract:   In this proposal, we present an approach for building the Internet Cleanroom (IC) that represents a radical departure from prior and current Internet security tools and practices. Where today's information security tools and practices focus either on building better software, filtering mechanisms such as firewalls to prevent remote exploitation, or building tools to detect compromises, the proposed technology described here creates a safe environment for running Internet-enabled software. The system provides an environment in which intrusions or compromises present no threat to the host system or other software and data. This approach effectively eliminates all external threats from Internet-connected machines. It does not address the insider threat where users are given keyboard access to machines.

SHARED SPECTRUM CO.
1595 Spring Hill Road
Vienna, VA 22182
(703) 761-2818

PI: Dr. Filip Perich
(703) 761-2818
Contract #: W31P4Q-06-C-0395
UNIV. OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE

Baltimore, MD 21250
(410) 455-3187

ID#: 06ST1-0019
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 06-002       Awarded: 19JUL06
Title: Policy-based Automated WAN Configuration and Management
Abstract:   Our project aims at developing a description language allowing network administrators to specify policies for desired configuration and operation of their networks, networked devices, and applications at a high abstraction level. We ground the language ontologies and rules in the W3C Web Ontology Language and the W3C Semantic Web Rule Language. We formally prove that our language is sound and complete. We employ incremental tests to build acceptance within user community and demonstrate through use cases and concepts of operations of DoD and commercial enterprise networks that the language is perfect for capturing and expressing cross-layer configuration policies. Our project also aims at designing a cognitive, agent-based system capable of maintaining, verifying, and diagnosing network configurations based on policies defined in our language and responding to aberrant behavior. We develop a secure, distributed knowledge base, advanced expert reasoning technologies, and distributed validation, verification, and enforcement models enabling cognitive agents to collaboratively configure and manage networks. We investigate the feasibility and system benefits for transitioning the system to DoD and commercial customers.

TM TECH
Park Center Office Building
Pasadena, CA 91101
(323) 702-4750

PI: Mr. John Burns
(310) 291-3624
Contract #: W31P4Q-06-C-0440
UNIV. OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
837 W. Downey Way STO 308
Los Angeles, CA 90089
(213) 740-6058

ID#: 06ST1-0078
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 06-008       Awarded: 28SEP06
Title: Modification of Wireless Fidelity Communication Devices to Support the Urban Warrior
Abstract:   TM Tech has identified an opportunity to leverage commercially available WIFI technology to support squad leader and foot soldiers in the urban warfare environment. The objective of this Phase I proposal is to determine the feasibility of modifying commercial WIFI components together with a single-chip SiGe BiCMOS ASIC to create ultra compact, portable, extended range communication devices in a USB form factor. Our initial focus is the implementation of a single-chip SiGe front-end module that increases the operational range of commercially available WIFI components. The ruggedized module is power efficient, lightweight, small and attaches to a UMPC, laptop, or PDA-type host device. At a minimum the module will be compliant with any 802.11b/g device operating in the 2.4 GHz ISM band. Line-of-sight range will be greater than 1 km at 1 Mb/s digital data rates. The module will also operate outside of the ISM band over an extended tuning range of at least 2.30 GHz to 2.50 GHz. Enhanced versions of the device could include operation in frequency bands from 900 MHz up to 5.9 GHz.

VENTANA RESEARCH
2702 South Fourth Avenue
Tucson, AZ 85713
(520) 882-8772

PI: Dr. John Lombardi
(520) 882-8772
Contract #: W31P4Q-06-C-0417
UNIV. OF ARIZONA
Dept. of Materials Sci. & Eng. 1309 E. U
Tucson, AZ 85722
(520) 621-6072

ID#: 06ST1-0092
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 06-010       Awarded: 06JUL06
Title: Non-Toxic Chemical Formulation for Incapacitation and Destruction of Small Arms and Light Weapons
Abstract:   In an attempt to deal with a growing number of weapon caches, Ventana Research will team-up with the University of Arizona to develop a non-toxic, cost-efficient resins formulation which will immediately incapacitate small arms and light weaponry. In addition this resin will also cause significant corrosion of ordinance steel over a prolonged time period.

---------- MDA ----------

AERODYNE RESEARCH, INC.
45 Manning Road
Billerica, MA 01821-3976
(978) 663-9500

PI: Mr. Frank J. Iannarilli
(978) 663-9500
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7503
UNIV. OF NOTRE DAME
Office of Research 511 Main Bu
Notre Dame, IN 46556
(574) 631-8710

ID#: B064-006-0046
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-006       Awarded: 18AUG06
Title: ABL (Airborne Laser) Detection Sensor Improvements
Abstract:   The first sentinel of ABL's present target acquisition suite is a passive infrared search and track sensor of 1970s vintage, which we propose replacing with HyPAWS. HyPAWS is a low-cost passive wide-field of view staring sensor. Several such units suffice to provide full 360-degree view coverage. Leveraging revolutionary sensing techniques in ongoing development, HyPAWS offers advanced detection capabilities. In Phase 1, we will complete preliminary design of the HyPAWS sensor, flowing-down ABL operating, detection, and passive-to-active handover performance requirements. We will determine the most feasible Image-Stabilization-in-Silicon (ISiS) architecture to support HyPAWS processing. ISiS will implement the equivalent of 1000 COTS CPUs executing a specialized algorithm, on a small silicon chip. Our ISiS approach will trade principally between Cellular Nonlinear Network (CNN) chip, digital processing onboard a customized VLSI chip (e.g. "structured ASIC"), or digital processing onboard a customized read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) in concert with an FPA vendor. For full-scale Phase 2 fabrication of ISiS, we will employ our research institute partner (University of Notre Dame) nanofabrication facilities or MOSIS, or otherwise secure an industry partner to exploit envisioned synergistic technology combinations. In Phase 2, we will implement and field demonstrate a brassboard prototype HyPAWS sensor, employing our full-scale ISiS.

ANDRO COMPUTATIONAL SOLUTIONS, LLC
Beeches Technical Campus Bldg. 2/Suite 1, 7902 Tur
Rome, NY 13440-2067
(315) 334-1163

PI: Mr. Andrew Drozd
(315) 334-1163
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7504
SYRACUSE UNIV.
Office of Sponsored Programs 1
Syracuse, NY 13244-1200
(315) 443-2807

ID#: B064-003-0150
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-003       Awarded: 18AUG06
Title: Advanced Radar Data Fusion - Multiple Input Multiple Output Sensor Acquisition (MIMOSA) System
Abstract:   Radar targets provide a rich scattering environment that produces from 5 to 25 dB target fluctuations. The spatial dependence of target scattering has been understood for some time and it has been shown that targets produce essentially independent scattering returns when radiated from sufficiently different directions. Thus, if receivers are distributed over a wide enough area, which is the premise of MIMO radar, we can exploit the angular spread of the scattering to obtain improved performance by combining these independent looks at the target. This is essentially what is known as diversity gain in MIMO communications and it is exploited extensively in space-time coding and related MIMO techniques. Effectively, we exploit what is normally considered to be a deficiency, target fluctuations, to improve performance. In fact, other effects that are also normally considered to hurt performance, such as reflections of the returns off the ground or other objects, can also be exploited to improve performance in a similar way. The proposed MIMOSA concept will exploit MIMO technologies leading to the development of a new capability to autonomously collect, process, and fuse information from a variety of radars (either at the same or different frequencies and multiple perspectives) and from other sensors to form a single integrated picture of the battlespace. The solution will exploit MIMO technologies originally designed for RF communications applications. This approach will be used to more accurately and reliably support acquisition, track, discrimination, and engagement objectives of threatening objects across a spectrum of threat classes and environments. This novel and synergistic MIMO-based approach shows promise of providing a more accurate picture of the adversary threat cloud than any single sensor or group of sensors operating independently can offer. In order to achieve this, the fusion of data at several levels will be necessary. This will include methods for fusing multi-sensor data for 3-D imaging to discriminate targets based on multiple radar returns as well as data collected by airborne or space borne IR sensors and active LADAR devices. Further fusion of data with other radar or a-priori data will also be supported. Software algorithms and hardware that enable this synergistic fusion and interpretation of data from disparate ground-based and overhead sensors (air or space-based IR and LADAR) are expected to enhance system acquisition, tracking and discrimination of threat objects in a cluttered environment and provide enhanced situational awareness. The proposed R&D will investigate: (i) the deployment of MIMO-based radars that take advantage of antenna/spatial/frequency diversity for target detection/tracking and feature exploitation, (ii) use of robust feature aided tracking (FAT) algorithms; (iii) application of multi-modality sensor data registration/fusion schemes to support real-time performance; (iv) (vi) spatio-temporal sensor calibration to reduce bias errors; and (v) the development of 3-D imaging techniques for visualizing multiple targets and fused target track data.

AQUILA LABORATORY
5385 Hollister Avenue, MB205
Santa Barbara, CA 93111-2389
(805) 692-2341

PI: Dr. William F. Adler
(805) 692-2341
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7505
JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV.
Applied Physics Laboratory 111
Laurel, MD 20723-6099
(240) 228-6538

ID#: B064-013-0018
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-013       Awarded: 16AUG06
Title: Physics Based Modeling of Hydrometeor/ Aerodynamic Interactions due to Ballistic Missiles Radomes
Abstract:   Hydrometeor impact/erosion qualification evaluations of aerospace vehicle components have to relate testing carried out in ground test facilities to what the components experience in the flight environment. The size distribution and condition of the hydrometeors that impact the surface of a radome can differ substantially from what they are in the natural environment before encountering a missile's bow shock. The resulting transformed conditions of the hydrometeors have a strong influence on the magnitude and extent of any damage that results from their collision with a radome's surface. Previous analyses have concentrated on spherical raindrops, however falling raindrops greater that 1 mm are not spherical but develop a flattened shape that becomes more severe with increasing diameter. Rain is present up to roughly 5 km and can be anywhere from a small to moderate fraction of the hydrometeor population in the prevailing adverse weather. Other types of hydrometeors comprising adverse weather are present at higher altitudes where the missile's velocity is increasing. Methods will be developed to calculate what happens to the falling raindrop geometries, the prevalent geometries of irregular shaped ice particles, and additional hydrometeor types when they pass through the missile's bow shock to impact the radome.

DECIBEL RESEARCH, INC.
PO Box 5368
Huntsville, AL 35814
(256) 489-6125

PI: Dr. Bassem Mahafza
(256) 489-6161
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7507
ALABAM A&M UNIV. RESEARCH INST
P.O. Box 313
Normal, AL 35762-0313
(256) 372-8713

ID#: B064-002-0120
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-002       Awarded: 23AUG06
Title: Advanced Signal Processing to Enhance Target Detection & Discrimination In High Countermeasure Environment
Abstract:   ABSTRACT: Missile defense radars use wideband waveforms along with coherent processing to extract detailed target features and perform high range /Doppler resolution functions. Reduced RCS targets embedded in high clutter (chaff, or chaff-like fuel debris, etc.) environments present significant challenges. Closely spaced objects and decoys accompanying targets of interest inherently increase the complexity of the problem. Additionally, other forms of electronic countermeasures can also reduce the defense ability to detect, track, and discriminate such reduced RCS threat. These factors place demanding signal and data processing requirements on the sensor and may require advanced algorithms and architectures. To counter this problem, dB Research proposes an advanced signal process¬ing technique to perform high resolution detection and imaging. This technique is based on utilizing a three-dimen¬sional signal model that utilizes a third order Taylor series expansion about incremental, time, azimuth angle, and elevation angle. In this case, once a location of interest (where potential targets embedded in high clutter environ¬ment) has been identified by the radar, a burst of wideband waveform is used. The required signal processing includes heterodyning with respect to a fictitious scatters located at the center of the wideband cell of interest. Then spatial FFTs are used to extract target angular information. This way the problem of wideband target detection is transformed into a spectral analysis problem. The resultant angular (azimuth and elevation) resolution cells for a given range cell (time) is proportional to the spectral resolution of the spatial FFTs and is typically order of magnitude smaller that when using typical wideband waveforms and processing techniques. For example, an area of about 2x2 meter can be spectrally divided into a 128x128 cells. This way, much less clutter RCS would compete with the reduced target RCS, thus facilitating detection. Additionally, if coherent integration is used, then Doppler imaging can be accom¬plished where target's scatterer centers coherently integrate while other closely spaced objects would decorrelate.

DECIBEL RESEARCH, INC.
PO Box 5368
Huntsville, AL 35814
(256) 489-6125

PI: Dr. Enrico C. Poggio
(256) 489-6124
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7506
ALABAMA A&M UNIV.
P.O. Box 313
Huntsville, AL 35762-0313
(256) 372-8713

ID#: B064-003-0054
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-003       Awarded: 23AUG06
Title: Advanced Multisensor Fused Track and Discrimination Architecture
Abstract:   This effort proposes to design and demonstrate the concept of an innovative, Advanced BMDS Multisensor Fused Track and Discrimination Architecture that will enhance the generation of a Single Integrated Picture of the Battlespace. This Architecture permits enhancement of sensor-to-sensor track correlation handover of objects while characterizing their lethality for later target designation purposes. This Architecture generates a "Fused Object Dossier" of estimated "true" physical attributes, such as size, shape, and motion parameters. The "true" physical attributes from the Dossier can combined with multisensor state vector data to create a "Super State Vector (SSV)" resulting in enhanced object correlations. The significant innovation permitting the generation of the Dossier and the SSV is an object angular momentum vector direction (AMVD) estimation algorithm, the focus of this Phase I effort. Knowledge of the AMVD permits calculation of the momentum aspect angle at any time during the mission resulting in the conversion of features, such as apparent length, into a true length estimates. This enables the correlation of multiple sensor tracks on the same object being associated with the same "true" physical attributes, resulting in more robust correlations. This will be demonstrated using simulated, high fidelity radar returns generated using deciBel Research "dB_Tools".

DIRECTED ENERGY SOLUTIONS
890 Elkton Dr Suite 101
Colorado Springs, CO 90907
(719) 593-7848

PI: Dr. Thomas L Henshaw
(719) 594-6191
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7508
UNIV. OF DENVER
2050 E. Iliff Avenue
Denver, CO 80208
(303) 871-2835

ID#: B064-005-0117
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-005       Awarded: 25AUG06
Title: Close Coupling of Excited Oxygen with Iodine Injection in COIL Lasers
Abstract:   Directed Energy Solutions (DES) and the University of Denver Research Institute propose a program aimed at revolutionary advancement of the current technology used in powering high-energy chemical iodine lasers. Our approach is to use a unique generator with a high specific surface area to produce high yields of singlet delta oxygen and transport the flow quickly to the laser nozzle. The laser nozzle is a unique concept utilizing a rapid mixing section. In this Phase I effort we will utilize a unique generator laboratory to experimentally validate this concept. The goal for this generator is to reduce transit time from the generator to the laser nozzle at flow rates >20 mmol/s SDO production which will substantially increase the power output from COIL lasers. We will also test novel mixing nozzles to determine mixing efficiency using a planar laser induced fluorescence technique to measure the I2 mixing efficiency under cold flow conditions.

EM PHOTONICS, INC.
51 East Main Street Suite 203
Newark, DE 19711
(302) 456-9003

PI: Dr. James Durbano
(302) 456-9003
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7509
LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABS
7000 East Ave., L-795 P.O. Box
Livermore, CA 94550
(925) 422-4211

ID#: B064-006-0148
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-006       Awarded: 23AUG06
Title: Real-time Atmospheric Disturbance Compensation Using Hardware-Accelerated Speckle Imaging
Abstract:   Atmospheric disturbances are a major performance-limiting factor in long-range optical systems. In particular, for the Airborne Laser (ABL) the ability of distinguish targets from a long distance is crucial for mission success. Despite the progress in optics and sensor technology, blurring in long-range imaging caused by atmospheric movements and density changes will remain an issue. Digital signal processing techniques can be used to compensate for these atmospheric effects, using algorithms like the bispectrum speckle method developed by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Unfortunately, these algorithms are computationally intensive and require several seconds to process a single frame in high-end workstations, making them unsuitable for real-time video surveillance applications. We propose the development of a custom hardware processor, based on FPGA technology, which is able to implement the speckle algorithm two orders of magnitude faster than current PCs, thereby enabling real-time video feed processing. To this end, we plan to collaborate with the creators of the speckle algorithm at LLNL. Furthermore, FPGAs are uniquely suited for airborne platforms given their footprint and power consumption. For this project, we will develop a real-time atmospheric compensation solver that occupies less than 120 cubic inches and consumes less than 25 W of power.

EPITAXIAL TECHNOLOGIES, LLC
1450 South Rolling Road
Baltimore, MD 21227
(410) 455-5594

PI: Dr. Ayub Fathimulla
(410) 455-5830
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7510
UNIV. OF DELAWARE
Dept of Electrical & Computer
Newark, DE 19716
(302) 831-1164

ID#: B064-011-0126
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-011       Awarded: 23AUG06
Title: Development of Dilute Nitride SL Technology for VLWIR Detectors
Abstract:   Epitaxial Technologies' overall objective is to develop innovative detector technologies that can be used to produce enhanced quantum efficiency and high detectivity VLWIR sensors that can operate at high temperatures. The goal of Phase I will be to investigate dilute nitride strain layer superlattice material structures that are capable of enhanced gain and detectivity and then grow and fabricate them to achieve detectivity in excess of 1E10 Jones to establish feasibility of the detector concept. We will accomplish this by designing and growing dilute nitride-based strained layer superlattice detector structures and by fabricating and testing the detectors. During Phase II, we will finalize the material structure, growth process, and fabrication process of the detectors. Further in Phase II, we will design, fabricate, and test 64 x 64 FPAs and demonstrate high operating temperatures as well as high pixel uniformity and improved resolution with reduced noise.

EXOTHERMICS, INC.
60 Route 101A
Amherst, NH 03031-0303
(603) 732-0077

PI: Mr. Steve DiPIetro
(603) 732-0077
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7511
SOUTHERN RESEARCH INSTITUTE (SORI)
757 Tom Martin Drive
Birmingham, NH 35255-5305
(205) 581-2323

ID#: B064-007-0159
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-007       Awarded: 28AUG06
Title: High Strength Ta2C-Based Compounds for UHT Boost Nozzle Applications
Abstract:   Future generation propellants earmarked for DoD and MDA boost vehicles will create increasingly severe conditions (temperature, pressure and particle impingement) in the nozzle region that will prevent state of the art materials and designs from achieving the performance levels and costs being targeted for next-generation solid rocket motors. The demonstration of zero or near-zero erosion in the throat area is a much sought after goal for boost propulsion systems, since it offers direct payoff potential with respect to increased motor performance, reduced nozzle weight and lowered cost relative to current-generation of high performance rocket motors. For this Phase 1 STTR effort, the materials we propose for examination are based on high strength, high purity di-tantalum carbide (Ta2C) compositions and variants thereof. These ultrahigh temperature Ta2C-based materials will be fabricated by novel isostatic densification methods Exothermics has developed over the past few years. Due to their extremely high melting points, unique microstructures, and predicted stability against aluminized propellant exposure, we anticipate that such Ta2C-based compositions will be able to withstand 3000 - 3500°C propellant flame temperatures. The principal markets that would benefit from the availability of such ultrahigh temperature materials are in the MDA and DoD boost nozzle realm.

GROUP4 LABS, LLC
1600 Adams Drive Suite 112
Menlo Park, CA 94025-1449
(650) 688-5760

PI: Dr. Felix Ejeckam
(650) 688-5760
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7512
CORNELL UNIV.
425 Philips Hall, Cornell Univ
Ithaca, NY 14853
(607) 255-4369

ID#: B064-012-0063
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-012       Awarded: 24AUG06
Title: Innovative Technologies Supporting Affordable Increases in Power, Efficiency, and Bandwidth for Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS) X-Band Radars
Abstract:   This Phase-I STTR MDA Proposal proposes the use of a new class of diamond-seeded solid-state material system for the manufacture of virtually all heat-generating solid-state electronics in X-band and Ballistic Missile Defense radar components and systems. In this proposal wherein much preliminary (DARPA- and MDA-funded) work has been demonstrated hitherto by the authors, all or most of the basic semiconductor devices in an electronic RF unit (e.g. GaN HEMTs, Power Amplifiers, etc.) are replaced with Semiconductor-on-Diamond based devices to enable nearly total and immediate heat extraction from the device's active region. A 4" Gallium Nitride-on-Diamond will be demonstrated for the first time here. Polycrystalline free standing CVD diamond - nature's most efficient thermal conductor - enables nearly perfect heat extraction from a "hot" device, owing to the extreme thermal conductivity of diamond (GaAs, Si, and SiC are 35W/m/K, 150W/m/K and 390W/m/K respectively; diamond ranges from 1200-2000 W/m/K depending on quality). In the proposed scheme, the device's active epitaxial layers are removed from their original host substrate and transferred to a specially treated low-cost CVD diamond substrate using a proprietary low-cost manufacturable scheme. The semiconductor-on-diamond technology proposed here may be applied to Si, GaAs, GaN, SiC, SiGe, etc. at up to 8" in wafer diameter.

IN SPACE, L.L.C.
1220 Potter Drive Suite 100
West Lafayette, IN 47906-1334
(765) 775-2107

PI: Mr. Benjamin Austin
(765) 775-2107
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7513
PURDUE UNIV.
School of Aero and Astro Eng.
West Lafayette, IN 47907-2023
(765) 494-5126

ID#: B064-004-0008
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-004       Awarded: 11SEP06
Title: Novel Binder Materials for IM-compliant Solid Rocket Motors
Abstract:   The need for munitions insensitive to stimuli possible to occur in the logistical and operational life cycle of the munition is paramount for safeguarding life and property. Research to produce IM-compliant solid propulsion systems has primarily focused in two areas: advanced case materials/designs and new propellant formulations. The energetic, low toxicity, and high fracture toughness material dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) has the potential to meet IM-compliance criteria when used as a solid propellant binder. DCPD has also been shown in 1-D chemical equilibrium codes to maintain the same specific impulse levels as HTPB when used in ammonium perchlorate/aluminum formulations. IN Space and Purdue University propose to investigate the technical merit and commercial feasibility of this promising solid propellant ingredient. The Phase I study will consist of selecting DCPD-based formulations, mixing and casting candidate formulations in various forms, analyzing their combustion characteristics including performance and ignition through hot fire testing of 3.0 in diameter motors, determining their mechanical properties, and assessing their ability to improve IM compliance through modeling and subscale sensitivity experiments. Portions of this extensive Phase I effort will be funded by State of Indiana STTR matching funds.

JOHNSON RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT CO., INC.
263 Decatur Street
Atlanta, GA 30312
(404) 584-2475

PI: Mr. James Muller
(404) 584-2475
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7514
TUSKEGEE UNIV.
Tuskegee University
Tuskegee, AL 36088
(334) 727-8857

ID#: B064-011-0038
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-011       Awarded: 29AUG06
Title: Advanced Infrared (IR) Sensor Components for Missile Defense
Abstract:   The DoD STTR solicitation is seeking to identify innovative technology to provide a quantum leap in performance for cryocooler systems. Successful development of such an innovative technology will result in lowering the cost and risk of cryocoolers while increasing reliability and lifetime, which will lead to increased producibility of cryocooler systems. Johnson Research & Development Co., Inc. (JRD), in conjunction with Raytheon and Tuskegee University (TU), is working on the development of two, staged solid-state cryocooler designs, one using two pulse tube (PT) based cryocoolers and the other staging a PT and a Joule Thompson (JT) system, to achieve the 0.5W @ 35K goal. These designs are inherently extremely low in vibration, which is critical for image jitter minimization, and structurally robust, essential for launch survivability. Furthermore, initial analyses predict that efficiency potential of these concepts is competitive with present day cryocooler technology.

MICROELECTRONICS RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT CORP.
4775 Centennial Avenue Suite 130
Colorado Springs, CO 80919
(505) 507-4844

PI: Mr. Paul H. Eaton
(505) 507-1390
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7515
ARIZONA STATE UNIV.
Research & Sponsored Projects
Tempe, AZ 85287-3503
(480) 727-0295

ID#: B064-008-0076
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-008       Awarded: 25AUG06
Title: Advanced Encryption Techniques for the Prevention of Reverse Engineering of the Programming Code in Military and Space Custom ICs and FPGAs
Abstract:   We propose the development of advanced encryption techniques to make integrated circuits more secure against unauthorized intrusion, specifically the use of innovative embedded techniques to make reprogramming of high performance deep sub-micron or nano-scale FPGA or custom ASIC systems by other than the intended recipient essentially impossible. The specific concerns addressed in this proposal regard the use of ICs having strategic importance, e.g., radiation hardened FPGAs, gate arrays, and other devices, being used by potential aggressors. As discussed in this overview, we are developing a methodology that is algorithmically robust since we make the worst-case assumption that the algorithm used to protect the device will be known or discovered by an attacker (e.g., through methodical reverse engineering). Such "deconstruction" has become common in the IC industry to the point where it is a routine part of competitive analysis at large IC manufacturers. Services are commercially available and deconstruction reports are available online for a fee. This makes the logic of any device available to any potential aggressor with sufficient resources. Consequently, a level of security that makes use of the devices themselves more expensive than fabricating copies is sufficient.

MILLENNIUM ENGINEERING & INTEGRATION CO.
2231 Crystal Dr. Suite 711
Arlington, VA 22202
(703) 413-7765

PI: Mr. M. Michael Briggs
(650) 948-3534
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7516
OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LAB
P.O. Box 2008
Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6196
(865) 574-0008

ID#: B064-011-0108
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-011       Awarded: 29SEP06
Title: Advanced Infrared (IR) Sensor Components for Missile Defense
Abstract:   Millennium Engineering and Integration Company and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have teamed to propose development of an entirely new type of infrared detector that has the potential for providing significantly higher Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) detectivity for detector temperatures in the 180-300K temperature range than is presently available. This new detector exploits means of enhancing field emission from Carbon nanotubes, thereby enabling modulation of the field emission current by electrons excited in the Carbon nanotubes by absorption of IR thermal energy. This arrangement results in a thermal detector that has some characteristics of a photovoltaic detector because the rate at which electrons are emitted from the CCNTs is proportional to incident photon flux. Based upon this innovative new concept, we hope to achieve significant performance advantages over currently available thermoelectrically cooled or stabilized LWIR detectors.

MILSYS TECHNOLOGIES, LLC
408 E. Fourth Street Suite 204
Bridgeport, PA 19405
(610) 272-5050

PI: Mr. M. Wilson
(610) 272-5050
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7502
UNIV. OF DELAWARE
201 Composites Manufacturing
Newark, DE 19716-3144
(302) 831-8702

ID#: B064-013-0115
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-013       Awarded: 17AUG06
Title: Physics Based Modeling of Supersonic Rain Erosion and Material Response of Missile Radomes
Abstract:   The development of missile technology and systems will benefit greatly from a capability to simulate the dynamic particulate impact event(s) about the surface of the radome/shroud under aerodynamic flight conditions. An effort to develop a material response and erosion model for radomes/shrouds is proposed. The effort will identify gaps in the existing technology and database and will focus on the polyimide composite AFRPE4. This is advantageous since it is a material that performs well at elevated temperatures and loads in flight and is being considered for many different applications by MDA as an integral structural as well as an electromagnetic transparency component. The approach described will demonstrate the viability of the concept to incorporate continuum damage mechanics theory into an FEA code to model, simulate, and analyze the behaviour of the material while being impacted at supersonic velocities. Currently this capability does not exist. This effort will leverage ongoing development efforts to model composites and brittle ceramics subject to impact from raindrops and projectile. The effort will ultimately demonstrate and develop an erosion code for any composite radome/shroud material that will be directly interfaceable with the existing ATAC-3D code.

MP TECHNOLOGIES, LLC
1801 Maple Avenue
Evanston, IL 60201-3135
(847) 491-7208

PI: Dr. Erick Michel
(847) 491-7208
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7517
NORTHWESTERN UNIV.
633 Clark St Room 2-502
Evanston, IL 60208-1110
(847) 491-1967

ID#: B064-011-0002
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-011       Awarded: 29AUG06
Title: Passivation of Type II Superlattices for VLWIR Sensors
Abstract:   Very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) detectors are highly needed for midcourse phase missile defense. Blocked impurity band detectors are capable of sensing at these wavelengths but require extremely low temperatures, in the 10K or less range. The InAs/GaSb Type II heterostructure system offers unique design flexibility for new innovative detectors. By incorporating dark current reduction techniques, we can provide the basis for 77K detection in the 15-25 micrometer spectral range. Several tasks are required to address the application of Type II superlattices for VLWIR sensors: (i) Design of a suitable structure with cutoff wavelength in the VLWIR at the desired operating temperature (ii) Optimization of the epitaxial growth conditions for VLWIR superlattice material with the goal of minimizing recombination centers, and (iii) Development of processes for uniform and reproducible sidewall passivation.

NANOLIGHT, INC.
4625 Timberidge Circle
Norman, OK 73072
(405) 579-5662

PI: Dr. Zhisheng Shi
(405) 579-5662
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7518
UNIV. OF OKLAHOMA
202 W Boyd, CEC Rm 219
Norman, OK 73019-1023
(405) 325-4292

ID#: B064-011-0081
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-011       Awarded: 28AUG06
Title: Advanced Infrared (IR) Sensor Components for Missile Defense
Abstract:   The objective of this proposal is to further explore PbSnSe detector array on Si substrate. Two approaches are proposed. One is a zero-risk incremental advance that employs a new growth condition to reduce the dislocation density. Another approach is a novel fabrication technique with high-risk but it could enable revolutionary rather than evolutionary advances. IV-VI semiconductors such as Pb1-xSnxSe can be grown epitaxially on Si substrate with a fluoride buffer layer. Monolithic mid-IR detector arrays have been fabricated on Si substrate with read-out integrated circuit and shown promising performance. The main advantages of IV-VI Pb-salt semiconductors include: (1) the large dielectric constant helps screen and localize the defect related effects. (2) The uniformity of the epitaxial material and thus the cutoff wavelength is high. This reduces the demand for powerful signal processing ROIC. (3) The low growth temperature allows direct growth of Pb-salt detector structure on Si with ROIC. Therefore, a cost-effective, monolithic FPA can be fabricated on Si substrate. Two-color simultaneous waveband operation and large formats of FPA can also be fabricated.

NITRONEX CORP.
628 Hutton Street - Suite 106
Raleigh, NC 27606
(919) 424-5167

PI: Dr. Edwin L. Piner
(919) 424-5167
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7519
UNIV. OF FLORIDA
343 Nuclear Science P.O. Box 1
Gainesville, FL 32611
(352) 846-1086

ID#: B064-012-0172
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-012       Awarded: 28AUG06
Title: AlGaN/GaN HFETs on Silicon for BMDS X-Band Radars
Abstract:   In this program, we will combine commercially available AlGaN/GaN on Si FETs with short gates such that the high frequency performance (X-band and higher) can be significantly increased. The AlGaN/GaN material system has significant advantages over the incumbent technology for X-band applications; specifically, AlGaN/GaN FETs have much higher power density which translates into broader bandwidth. This bandwidth may be traded to increase PAE in the power amplifier design. Affordable and reliable AlGaN/GaN FETs that operate in L and S bands have been commercialized by Nitronex. This has been made possible largely through the use of high quality and scalable Si substrates. Nitronex is highly experienced in GaN epitaxy, fabrication, device and RF design. By working with the University of Florida and their short gate lithography capability combined with Georgia Institute of Technology and their physical simulation expertise, we will demonstrate high performance X-band discrete devices. In Phase II, we will work with systems level military contractors to develop the insertion strategy for X-band capable AlGaN/GaN FETs on Si. Based on such a strategy, the conceived solution will be implemented through the development of a MMIC solution that meets all program requirements.

NVE CORP. (FORMERLY NONVOLATILE ELECTRONICS, INC.
11409 Valley View Road
Eden Prairie, MN 55344
(952) 996-1602

PI: Dr. James Deak
(952) 996-1636
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7520
OREGON STATE UNIV.
School of EE and CS Rm. 1148 K
Corvallis, OR 97331-5507
(541) 737-2974

ID#: B064-008-0077
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-008       Awarded: 28AUG06
Title: Securely configurable gate arrays utilizing anti-tamper memory
Abstract:   This Small Business Technology Transfer Phase I project proposal describes a program to develop secure FPGA architectures and configuration algorithms that exploit the unique capabilities of a new anti-tamper memory technology called AT-MRAM, that provides strong protection against invasive attacks used to recover the intellectual property stored in the FPGA configuration. AT-MRAM provides protective layers, that when breached cause the data stored in the memory to be erased with no remanence. The erasure mechanism does not require applied power. The AT-MRAM protective layers also function as electromagnetic shielding, providing immunity to EM-based side-channel attacks. In addition, AT-MRAM is intrinsically radiation hard. There is not a single secure FPGA available today with an unpowered zero-remanence erasure feature that is triggered by removal of shielding layers. This unique capability will greatly enhance FPGA security.

PHASE IV SYSTEMS, INC.
3405 Triana Boulevard
Huntsville, AL 35805
(256) 535-2100

PI: Dr. Daniel Lawrence
(256) 535-2100
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7521
AUBURN UNIV.
Dept. of Electrical and Comput
Auburn University, AL 36849
(334) 844-1800

ID#: B064-012-0009
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-012       Awarded: 16AUG06
Title: Innovative Technologies Supporting Affordable Increases in Power, Efficiency, and Bandwidth for Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS) X-Band Radars
Abstract:   Under this STTR effort, the Phase IV Systems/Auburn University team will leverage Auburn University's knowledge in applied genetic algorithm optimization algorithms for RF design problems to develop an X-band radiating element with improved mutual coupling and bandwidth compared with conventional printed circuit radiating elements. The design constraints for the genetic algorithm are increased bandwidth and decreased inter-element mutual coupling, while maintaining peak directivity broadside to the element. The genetic algorithm will start with a SAR-RSW antenna due to the low mutual coupling inherent to the structure. A fitness function will be used to evaluate the output after each iteration of the GA. The fitness function will separately weight the closeness of the bandwidth, mutual coupling, and directivity measurements with respect to the objective values. The directivity fitness is required to make sure the antenna produced by the GA radiates properly. The anticipated output of the GA will be a unique antenna element design that meets the full FOV requirements with low mutual coupling characteristics of the SAR-RSW and bandwidth significantly greater than typical resonant printed circuit antenna elements. The output design from the GA will be simulated with a full-wave solver and an engineering model will be fabricated and tested.

PHYSICAL SCIENCES, INC.
20 New England Business Center
Andover, MA 01810-1077
(978) 689-0003

PI: Dr. Allan Dokhan
(978) 689-0003
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7522
UNIV. OF ILLINOIS URBANA-CHAMPAIGN
Simulation of Advanced Rockets
Springfield, IL 61801
(217) 333-2187

ID#: B064-004-0089
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-004       Awarded: 29AUG06
Title: Innovative Solid Rocket Motor Design for Insensitive Munitions
Abstract:   It is proposed to investigate an innovative mitigation technique for insensitive munitions through a new rocket motor case design. The proposed study will focus upon developing a motor case with sympathetic responses to unplanned thermal stimuli. This particular motor case design will be according to current operating mission parameters for a specific MDA rocket booster.

PLASMA PROCESSES, INC.
4914 Moores Mill Road
Huntsville, AL 35811
(256) 851-7653

PI: Dr. Daniel Butts
(256) 851-7653
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7523
SOUTHERN RESEARCH INSTITUTE
2000 Ninth Avenue South P.O. B
Birmingham, AL 35205-5305
(205) 581-2323

ID#: B064-007-0057
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-007       Awarded: 23AUG06
Title: Tantalum-Hafnium-Carbide and Tantalum-Hafnium-Carbonitride Materials for Boost Propulsion Nozzles
Abstract:   Advanced missile defense interceptors will provide our nation with the capability of defeating threats to our homeland and our deployed troops. However, the fielding of these advanced interceptors is strongly dependent upon technologies that enable production of interceptor boost nozzles capable of surviving extreme temperatures and corrosive environments with minimal erosion. Plasma Processes, Inc. (PPI) has already produced high quality vacuum plasma sprayed tantalum carbide (TaC) material. Analytical models predict that PPI's TaC will survive subscale hot fire testing. In the proposed effort, the knowledge learned during the TaC studies will be applied to the development and characterization of materials superior to TaC, such as tantalum-hafnium-carbide (Ta4HfC5) and tantalum-hafnium-carbonitride (Ta4HfC3N2). Ta4HfC5 has a melting temperature up to 265°C higher than TaC, and Ta4HfC3N2 is less susceptible to thermal shock due to its expected higher thermal conductivity than TaC. Development, characterization, and testing of Ta4HfC5 and Ta4HfC3N2 is proposed to 1) increase the fundamental scientific knowledge of these ultrahigh temperature materials; 2) produce material property data to be utilized in existing performance models; and 3) determine if these materials are superior to TaC for employment as boost nozzle components. The proposed material development and low cost fabrication techniques will ultimately lead to improved performance and reduced costs for advanced missile defense interceptors.

SCIENTIFIC SYSTEMS CO., INC.
500 West Cummings Park - Ste 3000
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 933-5355

PI: Dr. Dr. Joao B. D. Cabrera
(781) 933-5355
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7524
GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
505 Tenth Street, NW
Atlanta, GA 30332
(404) 385-2879

ID#: B064-009-0096
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-009       Awarded: 13SEP06
Title: A lightweight infrastructure for detection and mitigation of insider threats in distributed environments
Abstract:   The insider threat remains one of the most difficult to detect -- left alone to mitigate -- threats against information systems. The overall objective of the effort (Phase I and Phase II) is to produce and prototype a Distributed Insider Threat Detection System (DITDS) for distributed environments, capable of identifying and quantifying emerging insider threats against the network, allowing for timely mitigation. Instead of relying on large centralized databases for tracking the evolution of the multi-stage attacks, we propose an interactive methodology, with sensor data being fetched from the hosts as needed in the evaluation process. Our solution includes: (1) A heterogeneous, distributed sensor suite, which, under request from the DITDS manager, gather information from multiple nodes; (2) Given the readings from the multiple sensors, continuous evaluation of the network with respect to known multi-stage attack scenarios, and continuous search for new attack scenarios; (3) mechanisms centered on mobile agents for inoculating the various components of the network against a detected attack, and (4) mechanisms for integrating behavioral information about the users into the decision making process. The College of Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology will serve as the University partner. Lockheed Martin Information Assurance (LMIA) will serve as a subcontractor, providing data sets representative of insider attacks. These data sets will be collected using LMIA's DAIWatch(TM) system.

SCITEC, INC.
100 Wall Street
Princeton, NJ 08540
(609) 921-3892

PI: Mr. Joseph Caldwell
(937) 874-7991
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7525
JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV.
11100 Johns Hopkins Road
Laurel, MD 20723-6099
(443) 778-5336

ID#: B064-010-0021
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-010       Awarded: 29SEP06
Title: Weapons Typing Assessment via Spectrally Diverse Sensors and Air Sample
Abstract:   This proposal will develop methods to determine the weapons type associated with Ballistic Missile Defense engagements. This development will use impact and debris track observations from active RF and passive EO/IR sensors. The goal is to increase efficacy and accuracy for which individual objects within the debris field can be tracked and characterized, when sensor fusion is employed. This information is useful to fulfill multiple MDA missions, including weapons typing and consequence management. For example the observation of a population of uniformly sized debris may suggest submunitions were present in the target, and/or the spectral observations of the debris cloud may indicate the presence of a chemical weapon. Threatening debris state vectors can be propagated to the ground for recovery or air sampling, and hazard zones for orbital platforms can be identified. The Phase 1 focus will be on the recent Aegis BMD intercept collections in order to develop the necessary track fusion, metric extraction, and data visualization tools on a recent collection with a wide variety of debris tracks. Later phases will extend this result to all MDA mission regimes, where multiple target types have been intercepted, in order to assess the utility of fusion for post-engagement weapons typing.

TECHNOLOGY SERVICE CORP.
1900 S. Sepulveda Blvd Suite 300
Los Angeles, CA 90025-5659
(203) 268-1249

PI: Dr. Paul D Mountcastle
(203) 268-1249
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7526
THE UNIV. OF ARIZONA
ECE Department PO BOX 210104
Tucson, AZ 85721-0104
(520) 621-4462

ID#: B064-003-0012
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-003       Awarded: 06SEP06
Title: Advanced Radar Data Fusion
Abstract:   The TSC team proposes to develop a new generalized Space-Time Adaptive Processing (Generalized STAP) algorithm that discriminates among classes of scatterers. The new generalized formalism is applied to the problem of 3D ISAR imaging of the reentry vehicle (RV) or another object in the ballistic missile threat complex that suppresses radar dipole clutter, using multiple ground-based radars operating at the same or different frequencies. The generalized STAP algorithm is a novel synthesis of ideas from TSC's successful 3D radar imaging programs with the techniques of adaptive signal processing. TSC and the Sensor and Array Processing Laboratory of the University of Arizona will demonstrate the new Generalized STAP signal processing technique for two important cases: The first is an ultrawideband scenario involving S- and X-band radars that operate coherently to synthesize an ultra-wideband 3D image via Sparse Band Processing (SBP) technology. The second is a geographically distributed coherent constellation of next-generation ground based X-band radars. In Phase I, TSC will simulate ultra-wideband and multisensor radar data and develop prototype radar signal processing algorithms for these two cases.

TRIDENT SYSTEMS, INC.
10201 Lee Highway Suite 300
Fairfax, VA 22030-2222
(703) 691-7794

PI: Mr. Mike Stoddard
(703) 691-7781
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7527
AUBURN UNIV.
Samuel Ginn College of Enginee
Auburn University, VA 36849
(334) 844-6343

ID#: B064-001-0072
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-001       Awarded: 29SEP06
Title: Test-Ready Model for Flexible Systems of Systems
Abstract:   Complex, dynamically reconfigurable, distributed systems are common in today's component-based mission-critical systems. Conventional testing tools used for certifying such systems are less likely to succeed in such less-predictable and evolving domains where underlying assumptions with respect to the structure of the system are constantly being violated. Furthermore, given the vast complexity of such systems and impracticality of exhaustive testing of the overall multidimensional state space, new methodologies and computational infrastructures are necessary to deal with dynamically reconfigurable systems. We propose a computational framework that could facilitate scalable and sound reasoning approach by localizing the detection of faults that occur at run-time. The premises of the proposed approach are (1) local certification of components with respect to their contractual specifications, (2) packaging of the contracts, test cases, and built-in self test mechanisms with the component using a metadata wrapper technology, and (3) use of associated run-time interface violation detector mechanisms to detect deviations from acceptable behavior as components reconfigure and interact at run-time. By embodying the behavioral interface models with semi-automatically generated wrappers, the proposed technology will support services for run-time contract violation checking and built-in-self testing even when the underlying component technology does not provide built-in introspective reflection capabilities.

UES, INC.
4401 Dayton-Xenia Road
Dayton, OH 45432-1894
(937) 426-6900

PI: Dr. HeeDong Lee
(937) 255-6535
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7528
UNIV. OF DAYTON
Research Institute 300 College
Dayton, OH 45469-0104
(937) 229-2919

ID#: B064-007-0006
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-007       Awarded: 24AUG06
Title: Fabrication of Strong and Tough TaC-composites for Advanced Rocket Nozzles via a "Top-Down Process"
Abstract:   This Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Phase I program seeks a new fabrication method to produce stronger (>100 kpsi) and tougher (>10 MPa,cm) TaC-based composites for use as zero-eroding rocket nozzle throat components for high performance, reduced-cost boost propulsion systems. UES will apply a novel "Top-Down Process" to control the microstructures of the composites. This approach will produce a very unique grain structure that can offer high strength as well as fracture toughness. Thus, a high thermal shock resistant material is anticipated. Hot-pressing will be used as the means for densification during the Phase I feasibility study. In the Phase II study, a sinter/HIP process will be developed for near-net shape fabrication. During Phase I, UES will collaborate with the University of Dayton Research Institute to conduct hot-pressing, mechanical evaluations, and microstructural characterization. UES will process the powders and also evaluate the high temperature properties.

VECTRAXX
12131 Howards Mill Road
Glen Allen, VA 23059-1542
(804) 749-8750

PI: Mr. Darin Dunham
(804) 749-8750
Contract #: HQ0006-06-C-7501
UNIV. OF CONNECTICUT
371 Fairfield Rd, U-2157
Storrs, CT 06269-2157
(860) 486-2195

ID#: B064-003-0033
Agency: MDA
Topic#: 06-003       Awarded: 17AUG06
Title: Advanced Data Fusion Using Bayesian Track-Before-Detect
Abstract:   Dispersed sensors offer more information to tracking systems than a single sensor and this additional information should improve the performance. Typical approaches only use information from a single sensor to initialize tracks and then use measurements from other sensors to improve the track estimate. In a new approach, the PMHT will be enhanced to not only identify new track starts, but also should yield better tracking performance by determining if a new track is realistic. With this enhancement to the PMHT, this emerging tracking algorithm will then be able to utilize its excellent clutter rejection to track targets in dense clutter environments. We also believe we have a solution to the optimistic covariance of the PMHT, and we will explore the feasibility of this solution during this effort. Therefore, we are proposing using the enhanced PMHT as a composite tracker on several platforms utilizing simulated sensor data. We think that the enhanced PMHT will improve the single integrated picture across the composite trackers; reduce or eliminate redundant, spurious, and broken tracks; better maintain tracks throughout the missile flight; and deal with out-of-sequence measurements. In addition, the PMHT will demonstrate its superior processing speed.

---------- NAVY ----------

21ST CENTURY SYSTEMS, INC.
12152 Windsor Hall Way
Herndon, VA 20170
(402) 505-7887

PI: Mr. Mike Luginbuhl
(719) 457-4244
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0223
COLORADO STATE UNIV.
Sponsored Programs 2002 601 So
Ft Collins, CO 80523-2002
(970) 491-1550

ID#: N064-025-0266
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-025       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: C-RAM: Cognitively-Based Rapid Assessment Methodology
Abstract:   The essence of information assessment is the process of distinguishing signals from noise. In the military, intelligence analysts are constantly searching for signals that might suggest an adversary's intentions. In each case the analyst must search through a quantity of data, searching for meaningful patterns within the preponderance of noise. In many contexts, the volume of data available is too much for an individual analyst to consider. In these cases, it becomes necessary to divide the work among a team of collaborators. The team of 21st Century Systems, Incorporated and Colorado State University is pleased to propose to research and develop the C-RAM concept, Cognitively-Based Rapid Assessment Methodology. C-RAM manages multiple users interacting with multiple information sources, and provides both textual and visual methods for viewing these data. The C-RAM system allows the analysts to organize the information using different presentation modalities. These separate presentations are used to collect and fuse information. Our goal is to develop a set of tools and agents for collaborative information assessment that will improve group performance by reducing the cognitive effort required to perform these assessment tasks. Intelligent software agents assist the user in visually decluttering their information and directing their attention.BENEFITS: Our goal is to develop a set of tools and agents for collaborative information assessment that will improve group performance by reducing the cognitive effort required to perform these assessment tasks. The first planned product is a decision support software program that allows for subjective input, from multiple sources in determining the outcome of mission critical and time sensitive planning where dispassionate evaluation of unlimited quantities of disparate information is necessary. It will provide an innovative solution that will guarantee the integrity and authenticity of automated collaborative information assessment and data uncertainty analysis functionality in a GIG-NCES (Global Information Grid - Net-Centric Enterprise Services) framework. Initial targeted customers outside of the military services would be Federal government agencies and commercial agencies (C2 Centers, Mission Commanders, Medical Industry BOD, and Airline Industry Executives to name a few) who deal with fast paced, dynamic information management and decision-making environments. These environments are typically characterized by complex and uncertain data, high stakes decision, and decentralized command structures.

21ST CENTURY SYSTEMS, INC.
12152 Windsor Hall Way
Herndon, VA 20170
(402) 505-7887

PI: Mr. Ramon Montelongo
(619) 222-2046
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0264
UNIV. OF MISSOURI - ROLLA
202 University Center 1870 Min
Rolla, MO 65409
(573) 341-6129

ID#: N064-033-0306
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-033       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Proactive Predictive Machine Maintenance (P2M2)
Abstract:   Complex relationships between power system components and utilization equipment require large amounts of measurement points along the service train and estimation of service capability. In the past, false alarms, missed failures, mishandled preventive maintenance scheduling, and underutilized resources have resulted in poor operational performance. Recent advances in information systems technology allow intelligent monitoring of these many measurement points. Emerging capabilities are partial recovery, forecast of impending problems, and increased operational use during abnormal operations. What is needed is an automated health monitoring capability for electric machinery and systems that have high fault detection, and low false alarm. Additionally, the capability performs "self-healing" functions to reduce down time of electrical machinery. The team of 21st Century Systems Incorporated and the University of Missouri is pleased to propose the development of a tool that will provide the automated health monitoring and self-healing capability and decision support necessary to improve the survivability of our Naval vessels. We call our Phase I concept Proactive Predictive Machine Maintenance (P2M2). We will be leveraging existing work in health monitoring and embedded systems techniques combined with cutting edge research into advanced sensor design and intelligent computing to design a Fault Diagnostics, Prognostics, and Self-Healing Control system.BENEFITS: The list of potential military applications for these capabilities is quite long. The 21CSI team fully intends to build and transition key technological elements; embedded systems, machine learning, CBM technology, etc.; to suitable Navy and DoD large electrical machine systems. 21CSI will build the distributed software, with agents, tailored to the specific applications. Once the prototype agent-based system is reasonably developed (likely, midway through Phase II), we will commence transition. The Navy will be the potential government customer, the P2M2 system will be placed in-line between the sensor and the ship's monitoring system (ICAS or similar) to monitor, diagnose, predict, and ultimately control Navy electrical machinery. $1.2 M - $1.5M and ~18 months will be required to complete the P2M2 Model development. The majority of the funding is required for investigating P2M2 user requirements, for building a P2M2 model, and to build a prototype. A modest portion of the necessary funding (~$100K) will come from 21CSI IR&D. The vast majority will come from Phase II, Phase II Options, and Phase III SBIRs. 21CSI has strong DoD application marketing capabilities due to its market penetration for more than ten years with good contacts and a strong reputation with most SETAs. In addition, 21CSI has informally spoken with potential customers regarding P2M2 for electrical machinery and learned that the planned capabilities and pricing are very attractive to those potential customers. Once the system is accredited, 21CSI will launch a campaign to educate DoD, other government agencies, and commercial customers on the capabilities and applications of the P2M2 Prediction Software for electrical machinery. If this technology is proven to be feasible after Phase I and meets requirements at the end of Phase II, it will be transitioned to ONR's Advanced Integrated Power System (AIPS) program under the Enterprise and Platform Enablers Future Naval Capability (FNC). The technology will be demonstrated 1) in simulation on ONR's Virtual Test Bed (VTB) and 2) in a full scale medium voltage demonstrator together with global power system management capabilities currently being developed. The commercial customer will be primarily airlines and cruise ship companies. The P2M2 system will help the airlines reduce operating costs and provide timely and required maintenance upon landing. There are currently numerous vendors of each of the key technology components required for developing the Fault Diagnostics, Prognostics, and Self-Healing Control Proactive Predictive Machine Maintenance (P2M2); however, no one is offering a platform independent, COTS-based integrated solution. 21CSI has several dimensions of sustainable competitive advantage for the P2M2 system once development is completed and the system is accredited.

3 PHOENIX, INC.
13135 Lee Jackson Hwy Suite 330
Fairfax, VA 22033
(703) 956-6480

PI: Mr. John Jamieson
(919) 562-5333
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0288
NORTH CAROLINA A&T STATE UNIV.
Dept. Electrical/Computer Eng
Greensboro, NC 27411
(336) 334-7760

ID#: N064-020-0156
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-020       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Power Harvesting for Encrypted Wireless Sensor Clusters
Abstract:   Among the Navy's goals for new ship construction are to achieve cost savings in ship installation, to increase survivability of the vital communications infrastructure, and to enable manning reductions through highly automated ship operations. The rapid advancements and proliferation of wireless technology makes it a primary candidate for adaptation to machinery health monitoring, condition based maintenance (CBM), and machinery control in support of these objectives. The particular challenges that must be addressed to enable integrated wireless sensing to meet these objectives are communications through and around steel ship compartments, secure wireless communications, and most importantly minimizing power requirements enabling the application of emerging parasitic or energy scavenging power technologies. The Navy's Phase I STTR topic N06-T020, "Power Harvesting for Encrypted Wireless Sensor Clusters" presents the opportunity to address these challenges through the development of energy scavenging electronics adapted to shipboard environments and innovative low power wireless sensing elements.BENEFITS: The results of this STTR are applicable to wide variety of sensor monitoring systems. By developing a wireless energy scavenging sensor node, the solution presented in Phase I will enable tunneling a wireless network through walls where wire based communication and power distribution simply isn't a viable option. In the Phase I, 3 Phoenix, Inc (3Pi) teamed with North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University (NCA&T), and Ferro Solutions, Inc (FSi) will develop a robust self powered energy harvesting scalable wireless architecture that will significantly reduce the network installation cost, provide a highly survivable control system, and enable technology insertion of the new system onto existing platforms. The team will focus not only on the energy harvesting and storage but will also address the problem at the source and investigate ultra low power electronics solutions and approaches for efficient energy management.

3TEX, INC.
109 MacKenan Drive
Cary, NC 27511
(919) 481-2500

PI: Dr. Keith Sharp
(919) 481-2500
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0277
UNIV. OF DELAWARE - CCM
201 Composites Manufacturing S
Newark, DE 19716-3144
(302) 831-8149

ID#: N064-013-0374
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-013       Awarded: 21AUG06
Title: 3-D Fiber Reinforced, Thermally Conductive Rotor Sheaths
Abstract:   Military helicopters rotors contend with rain, ice, sand, and flying debris. To prevent damage to the expensive blade protective sheaths or coatings are applied to the leading edge of the rotor blades. A 3-D woven composite sheath with high thermal conductivity fibers running through the thickness can offer the best qualities of both metal sheaths and elastomer coatings. Infused with an elastomer matrix, it will achieve excellent sand erosion resistance. Based on a 3-D fiber architecture, it will provide excellent resistance to both impact damage and rain erosion. High conductivity graphite fibers running through the thickness of the composite will mimic the thermal conductivity of the metal sheaths. In this Phase I effort, 3TEX and its partner CCM-UD will produce a 3-D fiber architecture composite rotor sheath prototype. 3TEX will design a 3-D woven preform that incorporates several functions, including impact resistance, local stiffening, and through thickness thermal conductivity. CCM-UD will infuse the preform using VARTM infusion techniques that can include local tailoring of the resin for impact or strength or high temperature. Prototype sheaths will demonstrate the production processes while material coupon testing will determine rain erosion, sand erosion, and impact resistance, as well as thermal conductivity.BENEFITS: Composite rotor sheathes based on 3-D fiber architecture should offer the best performance attributes of both elastomer coatings and metal sheathes. While maintaining the anti-icing functionality of metal sheaths, the 3-D composite rotor sheathes will provide longer component life. The longer component life should not come at a high component cost. The 3-D fiber performing process is sufficiently economical to compete in the E-glass boat hull market, while the VARTM infusion processes reduce tooling costs and speed the part production, so the part prices themselves should be competitive with existing sheaths. However, increasing the time between replacement of the sheaths immediately translates to reduced maintenance costs and higher helicopter readiness levels for the Navy. The payload and range of Vertical Take-off and Landing (VTOL) aircraft, such as helicopters, are highly sensitive to aircraft weight. The 3-D composite rotor sheathes will weigh significantly less than the current metal sheathes. Thus, this new technology sheath will increase the range and payload of every fleet helicopter currently using metal sheaths, such as the V-22. The proposed effort then will offer reduced maintenance costs and increased VTOL range and payload.

ACTA, INC.
2790 Skypark Drive, Suite 310
Torrance, CA 90505
(310) 530-1008

PI: Dr. Timothy K. Hasselman
(310) 530-1008
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0266
SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES
Systems Reliability Mail Stop
Albuquerque, NM 87185-1176
(505) 844-8368

ID#: N064-033-0136
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-033       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Fault Diagnostics, Prognostics, and Self-Healing Control of Navy Electric Machinery
Abstract:   ACTA Incorporated and the Center for Systems Reliability (CSR) at Sandia National Laboratories propose a seven month STTR Phase I Project to demonstrate the feasibility of developing Fault Diagnostics, Prognostics, and Self-Healing Control of Navy Electric Machinery. The new generation of Navy high power electric ships and electro-mechanical machinery challenge the predictive maintenance of ships' combat effectiveness, survivability, crew safety, and operational cost. A data driven real-time prognostic health management (PHM) system is proposed to meet these challenges by providing continuous health monitoring for fault tolerant systems using prognostic data. The PHM System will track the likelihood of future system or subsystem failure and initiate appropriate actions in real time to maintain system performance.BENEFITS: The proposed work will provide an advanced fault diagnostics, prognostics, and self-healing control capability, ensuring cost effective and highly reliable electrical machinery systems to improve warfighting effectiveness and ensure a "limp home" capability. Systems currently exist in the navy that assesses the condition of engineering plant machinery. The linkage of diagnostic information like the Integrate Performance Analysis Report (IPAR) now mandated by the Fleet and the evolving Enterprise Performance Analysis Report (EPAR) lack direct linkage to repair and maintenance actions the associated impact on mission capability and ship sustainment. The proposed Evidence and Consequence Engine technology is ideally suited to provide solve this elusive need and to provide a near real-time solution to support the genesis of true self-healing control technology in shipboard systems.

ADHERENT TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
9621 Camino del Sol NE
Albuquerque, NM 87111
(999) 999-9999

PI: Dr. Andrea E. Hoyt Haight
(999) 999-9999
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0213
UNIV. OF DAYTON RESEARCH INSTITUTE
300 College Park
Dayton, OH 45469-0160
(937) 229-3079

ID#: N064-017-0479
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-017       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Phosphorous-Containing Epoxy Resins for Room Temperature VARTM
Abstract:   The Navy intends to start using a significant quantity of composite structures in surface ship construction in an effort to decrease costs as well as to reduce the visibility of the ships to radar. The large size of the target structures necessitates the use of low temperature, non-autoclave processing techniques such as Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM). In the recent past, most marine composites were based on glass fibers, but due to the mechanical property requirements of the newer applications, carbon fibers will be required as reinforcements for future structures. Currently, the matrix material of choice is a vinyl ester resin based on its superior mechanical properties. Vinyl ester resins work well with glass fiber reinforcements, but do not adhere well to carbon fibers, leading to lower overall composite performance due to the poor fiber-matrix interface. This Phase I program proposes the development of a phosphorus-containing epoxy resin that would not only improve the quality of the fiber-matrix interface in VARTM-processed composites for shipboard applications while meeting the Tg requirements, but would also offer enhanced fire retardance relative to current resin systems. BENEFITS: The phosphorus-containing epoxy resins for room temperature VARTM processing will find immediate application in military applications both in Naval vessels as well as in aircraft. Transitions to the civilian marine and aircraft industries are expected.

ADVANCED CERAMICS RESEARCH, INC.
3292 E. Hemisphere Loop
Tucson, AZ 85706
(520) 573-6300

PI: Dr. Ranji Vaidyanathan
(520) 434-6392
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0267
UNIV. OF DELAWARE
Office of the Vice Provost for
Newark, DE 19716
(302) 831-8001

ID#: N064-021-0568
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-021       Awarded: 24AUG06
Title: Development of Lightweight and Low Cost Advanced Structural Materials for Off-board Surface Vessels (OBVs)
Abstract:   The ACR led team proposes an affordable manufacturing technique for complex-geometry composite components to be used as stiffened curvilinear structural panels and variable shaped fuel and ballast tanks for Off-board surface vehicles. Through the use of its AquapourT and AquacoreT water-soluble tooling materials, ACR has previously demonstrated that different composite material systems based on epoxy and BMI types of matrix systems could be fabricated including sandwich composites, while Dr. Jack Gillespie at UD-CCM has successfully performed design and testing of complex composite structures. The Aqua tooling materials are capable of creating composite geometries that could not be fabricated any other way. BENEFITS: By demonstrating the fabrication of vinyl ester/carbon composites (VE/carbon) using its washable tooling materials, complex geometry parts can be made and inserted into Off-board surface vehicles.

AEROTONOMY, INC.
117 Herron Street
Fort Oglethorpe, GA 30742
(706) 413-1582

PI: Dr. James Neidhoefer
(706) 413-1582
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0225
GEORGIA TECH RESEARCH INSTITUTE
505 Tenth Street
Atlanta, GA 30332-0420
(770) 528-7160

ID#: N064-032-0551
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-032       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Development and Optimization of Innovative 3D "Confetti" Miniature Antennas for HF Communications
Abstract:   Aerotonomy, Incorporated, and our research institution partner Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) propose to Design and optimize a miniature 3D fragmented "Confetti" antenna for application to broadband voice communications over the frequency range of 2 to 30 MHz. The Confetti antenna is an arrangement of partially interconnected wires on a three-dimensional grid. The concept is similar to the Fragmented Aperture Antenna (US Patent 6,323,809), but the Confetti antenna is 3-dimensional, whereas the Fragmented Aperture is two-dimensional. The antenna is designed using automated optimization to meet specifications that depend on the intended application of the antenna. The method and generality of this class of antennas promise to provide performance that approaches the best that is theoretically possible for a wide range of applications. The goal for this research is to design an antenna of only 500 cm3 volume and only 30 cm in any dimension that can be tuned to operate efficiently over 2 to 30 MHz with up to 150 W transmission power, while achieving 3 KHz instantaneous bandwidth. While this combination of goals is ambitious, we believe this innovative antenna can offer performance that will move the state-of-the-art significantly closer to these ideals.BENEFITS: There are many obvious opportunities for commercialization of this technology in the DoD. HF communications systems are used extensively by all branches of the U.S. armed forces, as well as Homeland Defense, intelligence agencies, civilian law enforcement organizations, and resource management organizations (i.e. Forest Service), as well as private industry and amateur radio operators. The optimized, extremely compact multi-modal Confetti antenna technology that will be developed during this project represents a revolutionary step in broadband antenna system performance while meeting the goals of minimal size. The small size of these antennas will allow increased distribution of effective communications capabilities to users in the field, thereby benefiting a large group of potential users. In the private sector, there are a number of companies engaged in the development and deployment of advanced, small scale communications systems that could benefit from the integration of antennas based on Confetti technology to their product lines.

AGILTRON CORP.
15 Cabot Road
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 935-1200

PI: Dr. Jack Salerno
(781) 935-1200
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0251
TUFTS UNIV.
4 Colby Street
Medford, MA 02155
(617) 627-3417

ID#: N064-014-0511
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-014       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Delamination Resistant Coating System for Zinc Sulfide Domes and Windows, Utilizing a Compliant Layer.
Abstract:   Zinc Sulfide (ZnS) is the most practical material for infrared transparent domes and windows operating at long wave infrared wavelength. Hard outer coatings have been applied to ZnS to protect it from rain and sand erosion. Theoretical analysis of multi-layer coatings suggests that a compliant layer between the hard outer coating and the ZnS surface may improve resistance to rain impact damage. In this program, a bonded ZnS window is proposed and an innovative nano-composite polymer material is developed as the compliant layer in addition to index matching for the hard coating. This novel compliant layer will absorb the energy created by the impact of rain and sand, and subsequent crack propagation, thereby protecting the ZnS dome from damage and preventing delamination of the coating system. Once the hard outer coating is severely damaged, it can be removed and replaced leading to life-cycle cost savings. The nano-composite polymer material itself has strong adhesion ability and can be used from - 70 oC to + 100 oC. It has high transparency (>90%) to long wave and mid wave infrared radiation. It is even transparent in the 0.6 - 2 micron region when its thickness is about 100 microns. In Phase I, we will develop the nano-composite polymer and bonded ZnS windows for the Whirling Arm Rain Rig test.BENEFITS: Delamination of hard outer coatings on ZnS domes and windows may be damaged by the impact of rain and sand. This degrades performance and may lead to excessive replacement of windows. For missile domes, the possibility of catastrophic failure is a serious concern. The proposed novel nano-composite polymer materials can bond hard protective coatings to infrared domes and windows to improve their resistance to rain impact damage. There are numerous commercial applications for the material. The proposed nano-composite polymer can also be used to bond zinc selenide domes and windows. It can be used as an immersion materials and glue to bond infrared optics and fibers in infrared imaging for the applications of fire fighting, industrial control, driver's aids, traffic monitoring, biomedical imaging, pollution detection, and security systems.

AGILTRON CORP.
15 Cabot Road
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 935-1200

PI: Dr. Jing Zhao
(781) 935-1200
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0230
TUFTS UNIV.
4 Colby Street
Medford, MA 02155
(617) 627-3417

ID#: N064-039-0469
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-039       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: High-Power and Low Loss Mid-Wave IR Fiber-Optical Switch
Abstract:   Agiltron, in collaboration with Tufts University, proposes to realize MWIR fiberoptic switches that meet all the required performance specifications for the new type of compact airborne IRCM applications. The approach is based on our extensive experience in volume production of fiberoptic switches of industrial leading performance as well as in-house chalcogenide glass fabrication capability. This program also leverages Agiltron's sole supplier position in producing high power (>5W) fiberoptic switches to the commercial market. The proposed designs have the desirable attributes of ultra-low loss, insensitivity to vibration/shock and temperature variation, long operational life, high power handling capability, and scalability to a large number of fiber ports, as well as low fabrication cost. We have successfully demonstrated a MWIR fiberoptic switch based on this design. The Phase I will further optimize the design as well as the fabrication processes to reach the state-of-the-art performances that have not yet been obtained.BENEFITS: Fiber-optic switches are increasingly being used in telecommunications, bio-sensing, laser marking, laser machining, laser micromachining, and in the forensic sciences. Mid-wave infrared radiation is a valuable tool for spectroscopic investigations of organic compounds associated with oil exploration as well as chemical analysis.

ALL OPTRONICS, INC.
Arizona Center for Innovation, UA Sci &
Tucson, AZ 85747
(520) 229-1324

PI: Dr. Alan Kost
(520) 626-7596
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0231
UNIV. OF ARIZONA
888 N. Euclid Ave.
Tucson, AZ 85721
(520) 626-6000

ID#: N064-039-0222
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-039       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: High-Power Fiber-Optical Switch for Infrared Countermeasure (IRCM) Laser Applications
Abstract:   We propose to develop a new fiber optic switch for IRCM applications. The purpose of the phase I program is to demonstrate the feasibility of a high power 1xN (N=2-6) fiber optic switch operating in the mid IR region. By carefully optimizing each individual optical component, the optical switch will have a minimum net insertion loss of less than ~0.25dB at given laser wavelengths in the mid IR region. A pathway to develop a highly ruggedized optical switch for military applications is outlined and will be vigorously pursued during the tenure of the phase I program. The technical goals of the phase I program are to (a) experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of the key performance parameters and (b) to conduct preliminary packaging design of a ruggedized switch. BENEFITS: The Navy has interest in infrared counter measure systems that use lasers to protect aircraft from infrared-guided threats. Among the counter measure architectures under consideration is a centrally located laser with distribution by optical fiber to multiple tracker-pointer output assemblies. This approach reduces volume, weight, and cost. An enabling technology for this architecture is a robust fiber-optic switch. This program would provide the Navy with a high performance switch with low insertion loss and the capability to handle high power. The switch will also be important for civilian applications such as laser marking, laser machining, laser micromachining, and forensic science.

ANACAPA SCIENCES, INC.
301 East Carrillo Street 2FL P. O. Box 5
Santa Barbara, CA 93102
(805) 966-6157

PI: Dr. Tricia Mautone
(805) 966-6157
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0241
ARIZONA STATE UNIV.
Polytechnic Campus 7442 E. Til
Mesa, AZ 85212
(480) 727-1873

ID#: N064-006-0403
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-006       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Conventional Training Versus Game-Based Training
Abstract:   Game-based training (GBT) has been touted as a promising medium for achieving improved training objective performance outcomes and increasing learner motivation, particularly in military training environments. However, there is little empirical research upon which to make informed decisions about when, where, or even if applying particular game elements to training is effective. The primary objective of Phase I is to investigate the feasibility of successfully integrating GBT into training curriculums. Formal empirical evaluation of the effectiveness of applying specific gaming elements to achieve specific training objectives will be conducted in Phase II. The first objective of Phase I will be to identify core training objectives that are likely to benefit from the introduction of GBT, and to begin development of a taxonomy that links game elements, training objectives, and training environments. The second objective will be to develop a plan for implementing selected game elements in an actual training environment and assessing the effect on learning outcomes. Storyboards of the plan will be created to allow evaluators to assess the feasibility of incorporating the plan into an existing training program. If Phase II is approved, a functional prototype of a segment of the GBT plan will be created and tested.BENEFITS: There is much interest in developing and incorporating innovative and effective instructional methods such as game-based training into current training curriculum; however, there are few guidelines on how to best implement this approach. The development of a theoretically-driven and empirically-supported decision-aiding tool that specifies when and how specific gaming elements should be integrated into training and instruction would allow instructional designers in a variety of domains to make informed decisions about to best use game-based training to enhance learning and performance outcomes. The decision tool could ultimately be applied to training and instructional development in a wide range of organizations from the military to K-12 classrooms to private companies wishing to design more effective training curriculum for their employees. Any industry that must provide rapid training to individuals on hard-to-learn equipment, where practice is helpful, would be aided by GBT. Likewise, many team-based industries, such as process control, emergency medical response, and transportation, as well as many business-oriented companies could benefit from a tool that provides guidance on how to maximize the effectiveness of GBT.

APECOR
3259 Progress Drive, Ste. A
Orlando, FL 32826
(407) 275-1174

PI: Mr. Khalid Rustom
(407) 275-1174
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0308
UNIV. OF CENTRAL FLORIDA
4000 Central Florida Blvd
Orlando, FL 32816
(407) 882-0189

ID#: N064-026-0387
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-026       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Power Generating Backpack
Abstract:   The purpose of the Power Generating Backpack is to allow soldiers to generate electricity while walking. This backpack represents an alternative to bulky battery systems soldiers often carry on the battlefield. The adoption of this backpack will result in a lighter load, thus improved comfort and mobility for combat units. The design APECOR is proposing will be transparent and of minimal impact to the user, so as to not disrupt the normal use of a backpack. Current state-of-the art employs a one dimensional technique to translate human motion to vertical load motion to generate electricity. APECOR is proposing to investigate the feasibility of a two or multi-dimensional approach to power generation. In the two-dimensional approach, the load will be suspended inside the backpack by vertical and horizontal axes, while in the multidimensional approach we will take advantage of the load's mass (50Ibs) to implement a pneumatic (pressurized cushions) system. During the walking process, the load will bounce against pressurized cushions strategically placed inside the backpack to produce enough displacement for a linear or motor generator to induce electricity. BENEFITS: The power generating backpack will find applications in military and recreational markets. This backpack will essentially be useful not only to soldiers, but also to climbers and hikers, who venture in remote locations. To date, most power generating backpacks take advantage of small solar cells. The introduction of the motion based power generating backpack will add versatility to existing backpacks since they could be used in any conditions, not just on sunny days. The added benefit is that the system will reduce the stresses of walking with a load on the user.

APPLIED PHYSICAL SCIENCES CORP.
2 State Street Suite 300
New London, CT 06320
(860) 440-3253

PI: Dr. Ann Stokes
(781) 861-2039
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0272
UMASS LOWELL
One University Avenue
Lowell, MA 01854
(978) 934-2992

ID#: N064-021-0408
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-021       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Development of Lightweight and Low Cost Advanced Structural Materials for Off-board Surface Vessels (OBVs)
Abstract:   Off-board vehicles deployed in littoral environments are subjected to severe operational loads, including wave slamming, high-speed collision with debris, and underwater explosions. They additionally serve as sensor platforms, and would benefit from reduced self- and radiated noise for towed array performance and mine defense. Consequently, we propose to exploit the flexibility of design offered by modern composites to achieve a novel OBV hull design integrating beneficial structural, shock, and stealth characteristics. Novel design features are threefold. First, the composite hull cross-section contains a compliant viscoelastic core material offering isolation from low-level transient events and acoustic isolation and damping, in addition to its structural function. Second, we propose a novel composite stiffener design that integrates structural function with large shock protection, by minimizing stress concentrations at structural discontinuities. Third, to address the occurrence of stress concentrations at geometric discontinuities state-of-the-art forming techniques are proposed that allow for the fabrication of highly curved junctions without appreciable loss of strength. Our proposed Phase I effort includes concept performance predictions (Applied Physical Sciences, Inc), static and dynamic validation tests (University of Massachusetts- Advanced Composite Materials and Textiles Research Laboratory), and a benefit trade-off analysis against weight and cost (Marine Applied Physics Corporation.) BENEFITS: The successful completion of the proposed effort will yield a composite hull design that significantly improves the shock and impact survivability and sensor related mission performance of the Navy's OBV or similar marine vehicles. Certain of our novel hull design features may be patentable and have application to small commercial or pleasure boats, e.g. our composite forming technique or integrated stiffener-mount design.

APTIMA, INC.
12 Gill Street Suite 1400
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 496-2415

PI: Dr. Kara Orvis
(781) 496-2417
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0243
UNIV. OF CENTRAL FLORIDA
4000 Central Florida Blvd
Orlando, FL 32816
(407) 832-3062

ID#: N064-006-0461
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-006       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Impact of Gaming Attributes om Measures training Effectiveness (IGAME)
Abstract:   Traditional military training is becoming increasingly constrained by logistical challenges, geographic distribution of personnel, and limited resources, leading to an increased interest in game-based training approaches. However, training developers need to better understand how to develop game-based training that is motivating and engaging, but still pedagogically sound. The IGAME effort proposes to develop a predictive model-based tool, and associated metrics, to assess the impact of gaming attributes on training outcomes, IGAME will inform training designers, prior to investment, of the tradeoffs in training effectiveness associated with varying gaming attributes. Aptima will base the IGAME on a theoretical framework that links gaming attributes to Navy-relevant training outcomes. Aptima will also identify trainee characteristics and training context variables that may influence the relationship between gaming attributes and training outcomes. In Phase I, pilot tests will expand the theoretical framework and validate the functions and algorithms that drive the IGAME tool. In Phase II, Aptima will conduct additional experimentation to further expand the theoretical framework, validate the model, and compare game variants to define when and how to use games for training. To ensure success, the Aptima team will apply their knowledge of game-based training, predictive modeling, model based experimentation, and experimental design.BENEFITS: The IGAME tool will provide training designers the ability to anticipate the impact of gaming attributes on training outcomes. The IGAME tool will aid training designers in determining what knowledge and skills can effectively be trained within games having of varying attributes. In addition, the PERFORM tool will allow training designers to understand, prior to investment, the tradeoffs in training effectiveness associated with varying gaming attributes. The framework that constitutes the IGAME tool will allow a transparent view of the current state of research on game-based approaches to training. This transparency will provide researchers with a sound understanding of what previous research has addressed and where further experimentation is required.

APTIMA, INC.
12 Gill Street Suite 1400
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 496-2415

PI: Dr. Rebecca Grier
(202) 842-1548
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0314
IOWA STATE UNIV.
Jessup Hall
Iowa City, IA 52242
(515) 294-5535

ID#: N064-019-0359
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-019       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Guidelines and Rules Instrument for Displays in 3D (GRID 3D)
Abstract:   Technology continues to advance at faster and faster rates. Often new technology is created with little regard for the impact to the humans who must use this technology. One new technology the Navy is considering using is autostereographic displays, which permit users to see a true 3D image without wearing cumbersome glasses. Aptima and its partner, Dr. Dirk Reiners of Iowa State University, will conduct a meta-analysis of the HSI research in 3D displays to show where 3D technology improves total system performance without HSI impacts. After completing this analysis, we will draft research based guidelines for the use and screen design of autostereographic displays. These guidelines will serve as the framework for a toolkit (GRID 3D: Guidelines and Rules Instrument for Displays in 3D) to be built in Phase II. GRID 3D will allow developers to quickly and easily follow guidelines and will provide the code for appropriately designed screen components. GRID 3D will save time and money by putting process knowledge into use. The guidelines will ensure that displays are in line with best practice research, and the toolkit will ensure that these best practices are followed.BENEFITS: The anticipated benefits are as follows. The GRID 3D will enable the display designer and/or systems design team to: . Design ergonomically correct 3D displays based on researched guidelines for 3D interface designs. . Reduce the display design life cycle by providing 3D display components. . Determine which components are more effective for a task and the potential technological impacts on operator performance. . Ensure that best practices/standards are followed, producing a consistent operator experience across 3D display tools. . Provide evidence that 3D displays will improve operator performance.

APTIMA, INC.
12 Gill Street Suite 1400
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 496-2415

PI: Dr. Kari Kelton
(202) 842-1548
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0222
NAVAL POST GRADUATE SCHOOL
1 University Circle
Monterey, CA 93943
(831) 656-2099

ID#: N064-025-0361
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-025       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Decision Making Constructs for a Distributed Environment (DCODE)
Abstract:   Modern information technology enables decision makers to access and filter large volumes of information; however, this technology does not necessarily translate into improved decisions. While much technology has been created to deliver information, relatively little has been developed to help decision makers organize, assess, and systematically apply that information to evaluate decision options. While some strides have been taken to address this situation (e.g., MIT's EWall provides a virtual space for information organization; DCODE allows decision makers to record and share judgments) additional steps are needed to help translate increased information into improved decisions. Specifically, this technology must be (1) extended to rate or recommend decisions between courses of action (COAs); (2) validated empirically; and (3) transitioned to the operational community where it is greatly needed. Aptima, Pacific Science & Engineering, and the Naval Postgraduate School will address this problem by developing a real-time COA assessment tool: the COA Assessor in Real Time (CART). This tool will build on existing, ONR-sponsored technologies - EWall and DCODE - enabling the project team to draft algorithms, user interface concepts, implementation plans, validation plans, and transition partnerships in Phase I that will be the basis for a real-time COA assessment tool developed in Phase II. BENEFITS: Current tools available for decision makers focus more on information knowledge building; very little is available to actually facilitate the difficult decision making process. The COA Assessor in Real Time (CART) will allow decision makers to take advantage of existing technology for collecting, organizing, and making judgments on information; CART will use this information to make real-time recommendations about the best COAs.

ARCHANGEL SYSTEMS, INC.
1635 Pumphrey Ave.
Auburn, AL 36832
(334) 826-8008

PI: Dr. Dake He
(334) 826-8008
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0311
AUBURN UNIV.
Textile Engineering 232 Textil
Auburn University, AL 36849
(334) 559-4735

ID#: N064-026-0416
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-026       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Intelligent ILBE Generator & Energy Management (I2GEM)
Abstract:   The work proposed here augments the increasing body of research on capturing energy from walking. It focuses on the aspects associated with converting the captured energy, in the form of physical displacement, into an electrical form. The proposed Power Generator Back Pack is based on a Vernier Hybrid Machine (VHM) and magnetic gearing. The Vernier hybrid machine is a member of the family of variable-reluctance permanent magnet machines. Magnetic gearing converts the slow physical velocity to a higher frequency flux. This leads to a reduction in the size and weight of the backpack. Three-phase ac power from the linear generator is converted to desired dc output by the Intelligent Energy Controller (IEC). The IEC contains the power converter (a digitally controlled rectifier followed by dc-dc converter), battery recharger, sensor suites for monitoring battery state of charge and a processor that supervises all activities. The IEC uses adaptive control and optimum battery recharge routines to maximize efficiency as load levels and generator output vary. Additional features include data logging for post-mission maintenance, real-time diagnostics and displays. BENEFITS: Mobile power sources such as batteries often add great additional weight to a backpacker's load. As a result, there is great interest in harvesting electrical power from the energy expended during walking in a variety of situations. Investments made under this proposed STTR will increase Archangel's market potential in power sources. A number of markets have been identified for application of this developed technology. Power Generator Back Pack, once available to the commercial market, will help consumers to use their electronic equipment in remote location, where no other source of energy is available. Different versions of this backpack could allow disaster relief workers, explorers or soldiers to go out into the field with fewer heavy replacement batteries for cell phones, GPS instruments, night vision goggles and many other portable electronics. Refinements of the design could also lead to backpacks that are more comfortable and perhaps better for the back.

ATMOSPHERIC & ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH, INC.
131 Hartwell Avenue
Lexington, MA 02421
(781) 761-2288

PI: Mr. Steve Lowe
(781) 761-2288
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0248
THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF SUNY
Office of Sponsored Programs S
Stony Brook, NY 11794-3362
(631) 632-4402

ID#: N064-037-0048
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-037       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Maximizing the utility of high-resolution ensemble meteorological forecasts for planning and responding to hazardous releases
Abstract:   The two primary motivations for this work are: First, to provide forecasts of dispersion of a hazardous release and associated uncertainty (or "error bars") based on the available ensemble MET data. Second, to provide an efficient and user-friendly tool for decision makers supporting both deterministic and ensemble forecast MET data as well as resulting dispersion model forecasts. To achieve added value the ensemble forecasts will be downscaled to high resolution, bias corrected, and weighted as part of this process. During Phase 1 AER will demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed methodology by assembling a prototype system that leverages existing technology. This will allow multiple schemes for displaying probabilistic information from the ensemble and for evaluating, ranking, and weighting individual ensemble members to be studied and demonstrated. To satisfy these requirements, a toolkit based on a framework to support both data processing and visualization will be developed. By providing for a common representation scheme for both MET and ATD data sets, the toolkit will allow for intermediate data sets to be visualized and to diagnose how processing assumptions and choices propagate through the methodology. Additional tools and/or processes can be readily applied within this framework to extend its capabilities as needed.BENEFITS: The methodology developed will improve planning and forecasting hazardous releases and will be valuable to government agencies and to industry, especially to those agencies or companies that might be targets of terrorism and/or must handle hazardous substances as part of their function or business. These include elements of DOD, DHS, DOE, oil production facilities, ports and transportation hubs, chemical plants, and others.

BLADE DIAGNOSTICS CORP.
6688 Kinsman Road
Pittsburgh, PA 15217
(412) 398-0643

PI: Dr. Drew Feiner
(412) 901-3467
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0203
DUKE UNIV.
Mechanical Engineering & Mater
Durham, NC 27708-0300
(919) 660-5327

ID#: N064-015-0018
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-015       Selected for Award
Title: Aerodynamic/Structural Mistuning Technologies for Assessing IBR/Blisk Repairs
Abstract:   New technologies for assessing how blending affects structural and aerodynamic mistuning will be developed using the combined strengths of Blade Diagnostics Corporation and Duke University. BDC has developed an approach for identifying aerodynamic mistuning from engine data that will be further developed under this STTR. Duke will develop new methods for computing the effect of blending on the aerodynamic damping and excitation forces that act on blended blades. The accuracy of Duke's method will be assessed using the BDC aerodynamic mistuning identification software and benchmark data provided by GE Aircraft Engines. Consequently, at the end of this STTR we will have demonstrated that we can use the BDC software to process NSMS data and extract information about the excitation forces and damping that act on individual blades, and that we can use the new Duke University CFD codes to predict how changes in the blades geometry from blending affects the aerodynamic forces and damping that acts on the blade. These tools will be integrated into a mistuning inspection machine (MIM) that BDC is developing for the Air Force. The MIM can then assess how blending a blade affects the likelihood of HCF failure when the Blisk is in the engine. BENEFITS: Blade Diagnostics Corporation will integrate the aerodynamic mistuning capability, developed in this STTR with their Mistuning Inspection Machine (MIM) being developed for the Air Force) so that the effect of aerodynamic mistuning as well as structural mistuning will be taken into account when calculating how blending a particular blade will affect the vibratory response of the IBR/Blisk when it is put back into service. In effect, the added aerodynamic capability developed in this STTR will transform BDC's MIM into a virtual engine test for blended blades. Consequently, at the end of this effort a validated technology will be in place that will allow the DoD to use relatively low cost blending operations to repair a larger number of IBRs/Blisks while reducing the likelihood of HCF failure from mistuning. This capability fits directly with the R&D goals of the DoD's VAATE program (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) as well as the more recently launched Propulsion Safety and Affordable Readiness (P-SAR) initiative. Looking at the future from the opposite viewpoint, an IBR/Blisk-laden world without the described capability would mean a large number of damaged components ($100K to $500K each) that can't be returned to service or that need to be repaired using alternative processes that are much more expensive, e.g. blade replacement. Clearly, fleet readiness would be adversely affected. The proposed effort thus offers a capability that is both timely and appropriate. With GE Aircraft Engines as an active participant in the program, there is every expectation that the capability developed in the STTR will be promptly transitioned to manufacturing and operational service to meet what are already important Air Force and Navy needs. In addition to meeting important DoD needs for cost effective repairs, it should also be noted that the latest models of commercial aircraft engines are also using IBRs/Blisks. As a result, the proposed new technology has dual use application to commercial as well as military engines.

CARBON SOLUTIONS, INC.
5094 Victoria Hill Drive
Riverside, CA 92506
(909) 234-2738

PI: Dr. Elena Bekyarova
(909) 234-2738
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0315
UCLA / UNIV. OF DELAWARE
Mechanical&Aerospace Eng.-UCLA
Los Angeles/ Newark, CA 90095
(310) 794-9117

ID#: N064-031-0075
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-031       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Functionalized Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for High Performance Composites
Abstract:   The objective of the proposed research is to use chemistry to modify single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and engineer the interfacial interaction with polymers to synthesize composite materials with enhanced mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. We will conduct research on the synthesis and properties characterization of SWNT-reinforced composites based on epoxies and vinyl esters. Our approach is to engineer the interface between SWNTs and the polymer matrix by tailored chemical modification of SWNTs, which is designed to impart processability and chemical compatibility of the nanotubes with the matrix and to allow controlled cross-linking with the polymer chain. The proposed effort will build on our expertise in chemically modified SWNTs and achievements in the development and characterization of advanced SWNT-reinforced nanocomposites. We have assembled a multi-disciplinary research team that includes renowned experts in the fields of nanoscience, nanoengineering, carbon nanotubes and composite materials, which together possesses the necessary expertise to accomplish this ambitious project which has the potential to significantly advance the nanocomposites utilized in naval, defense, aerospace and commercial industries.BENEFITS: The developments in this project will lead to single-walled carbon nanotube reinforced epoxy and vinyl ester composites with enhanced performance. Markets for such advanced composites are widely available in the naval, defense and aerospace industries. Additionally, the developed composites are promising candidates for structural components in civil transportation and can find applications in automobile parts, fascia for buildings, reinforcement of bridges, and ducts. Other applications include coatings, adhesives and electronics.

CHESAPEAKE MARINE TECHNOLOGY LLC
7614 Thanksgiving Road
Easton, MD 21601
(410) 763-8379

PI: Mr. Frank DeBord
(410) 763-8379
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0250
GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
School of Aerospace Engineerin
Atlanta, GA 30332-0150
(404) 894-1557

ID#: N064-016-0070
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-016       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Advanced System of Systems Design Capability
Abstract:   Chesapeake Marine Technology, with suncontractors Anteon Proteus Engineering and the Georgia Institute of Technology, is proposing to demonstrate the feasibility of a ship-centric design tool that can be used to evaluate design trade-offs and optimize ship characteristics, with the ship considered to be one "System" in a System of Systems (SoS)environment. The proposed work is based on modifying the existing Anteon ETC FlagShip Designer software package and its Smart Product Model environment and framework to analyze and optimize ship design features in a broader, System of Systems context. The Phase I work will: (1) identify the software modifications and additions required to transition to the SoS framework; (2) determine the feasibility of completing this transition and define the corresponding Phase II work plan; and (3) demonstrate the operation of the planned system using the example of a CG(X) vessel design trade-offs as they relate to operating in joint air defense scenario.BENEFITS: The proposed project would provide the Navy with a tool that could be used to evaluate and optimize designs for future ships, ship systems, and groups of ships for operations in a wide variety of mission scenarios. This tool would permit these evaluation and optimization exercises to be completed with the ship considered to be one level in a multi-level system of systems, and would permit propogation of sub-system capabilities and limitations throughout the scenarios. It would also permit inclusion of the characteristics of external systems such as threats into the process. Using such a tool, would permit the Navy to evaluate and optimize design features for any system within the system of systems with respect to ultimate capabilities to satisfy multiple operational requirements.

CONNECTICUT ANALYTICAL CORP.
696 Amity Road Route 63
Bethany, CT 06524
(203) 393-9666

PI: Mr. Joseph J. Bango
(203) 393-9666
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0298
VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIV.
Dept. of Sponsored Programs 73
Richmond, VA 23284-3039
(804) 828-7511

ID#: N064-010-0003
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-010       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Miniature Electronic Sniffer for Navy Vertical Take off Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (VTUAVs)
Abstract:   The use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in warfare, reconnaissance, and surveillance activities has increased dramatically over the past decade and, for the first time, offers cost effective, intelligence-gathering capabilities without placing soldiers and sailors at unnecessary risk. Current UAV platforms have already been equipped with a limited range of sensors such as miniature audiovisual equipment and global positioning systems for battlefield surveillance activities. The next generation of battlefield UAV will require new and advanced on-board sensors for detection of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) based on specific Biological, Chemical, or Radiological materials. We propose to employ revolutionary new air sampling technology based on electrospray ionization that was developed by Nobel prize winning Chemist Dr. John Fenn, VP Research at our firm, in collaboration with our group of scientists. The ESI sampler offers unprecedented performance parameters including low power, light weight and high sampling efficiency over an enormous range of particle sizes ranging from molecules to microscale particulates. We propose to apply Dr. Fenn's miniature vapor sampler as the key enabling technology for UAV's equipped with detection based on Laser Induced Florescence of select trace species for the identification of explosives, chemical toxins, and other hazardous materials on board ship.BENEFITS: Portable Chem/Bio Detector for Coast Guard, DoD, Port Facilities

CPU TECHNOLOGY, INC.
5731 W. Las Positas Boulevard
Pleasanton, CA 94588
(954) 568-2425

PI: Mr. Mark Scheitrum
(925) 224-9920
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0207
UNIV. OF MARYLAND
Inst. for Systems Research 135
College Park, MD 20742
(301) 405-6629

ID#: N064-005-0422
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-005       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Navy Applications of 4th Generation Deeply Coupled Computing Architectures
Abstract:   Warfare is changing; there is a need for airborne and space-based sensor systems to detect small, highly maneuverable targets against a strong clutter background in the presence of jamming. Space-Time Adaptive Processing (STAP) is a new signal processing technique for advanced radar systems that allows for performance enhancements over conventional approaches. Current power, weight, and size constraints make the real-time implementation of full degrees-of-freedom STAP techniques on airborne/spaceborne platforms impractical. CPU Technology and University of Maryland Institute for Systems Research propose to investigate and demonstrate the advantages of applying 4th generation deeply coupled programmable SOC technology, called the QX4, and other adaptive hardware elements to provide airborne platforms with the computing capacity required to perform real-time STAP techniques. It provides 8.5 GFlops of 64-bit performance at only 8 watts of power. The adaptive hardware will utilize floating gate technology to accelerate STAP radar processing. We will code a STAP algorithm and execute the software on a single x86 microprocessor, a QX4 array, and a QX4 array with adaptive hardware to measure their relative performance. Other metrics will include size, weight, power and accuracy. We will also investigate adding STAP cost-effectively to existing radar processors. BENEFITS: Space-Time Adaptive Processing (STAP) enhances the ability of radars to detect targets that might otherwise be obscured by clutter or by jamming using a two-dimensional filtering technique. This capability enables a radar to see items under vegetation and provides much improved information in urban scenarios where clutter is extremely high and the targets are small. Our goal is to make a high speed real-time STAP radar processor small enough and with minimal power so that STAP can be used by traditional airborne sensor platforms such as the E-2C as well as smaller aircraft such as fighters, helicopters and UAVs. It could potentially be used for the larger missiles as well. Multidimensional processing such as found with STAP is used in many applications including mobile communications, video processing, medical imaging and radar processing. Sensor fusion and autonomous operation could also potentially benefit from the compact performance throughput of QX4 and adaptive hardware techniques.

CREARE, INC.
P.O. Box 71
Hanover, NH 03755
(603) 643-3800

PI: Mr. Jay C. Rozzi, Ph.D.
(603) 643-3800
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0295
PURDUE UNIV.
302 Wood Street Young-Room 723
West Lafayette, IN 47907-2108
(765) 494-4728

ID#: N064-012-0262
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-012       Awarded: 21AUG06
Title: Novel Tooling for High Speed, Precision Machining of CMCs
Abstract:   Advanced propulsion systems for the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) aircraft require the use of advanced materials for longer life, reduced weight, and increased performance. Ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials have the potential to realize these benefits; however, the high cost of finished CMC components make wide implementation impractical. To reduce these costs, new, innovative fabrication technologies are required that enable substantial processing speed increases to drive down the expense of machining and the cycle time of implementation for advanced materials. Creare proposes to develop an advanced machining system (AMS) that will increase the processing speed 100% or more for the machining of CMCs and other aerospace materials by leveraging existing programs with novel tooling approaches. Such an increase in the processing speed will dramatically reduce both overall cost and cycle time. Because our solution prolongs tool life, the resultant use of sharper tools will reduce the induced residual stresses in the machined part, improving fatigue life. Our innovation is readily integrated with existing machine tools, minimizing initial capital costs. Thus, our solution is effective, affordable, flexible, and easily integrated with current manufacturing operations.BENEFITS: Aircraft engine manufacturers will be able to significantly reduce the cost of machining advanced materials for military and commercial systems. The increased affordability of these advanced materials parts will expand the market for these materials into automotive, heavy equipment, construction, and consumer products.

CREARE, INC.
P.O. Box 71
Hanover, NH 03755
(603) 643-3800

PI: Dr. Bruce Pilvelait
(603) 643-3800
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0221
U. OF DAYTON RESEARCH INSTITUTE
300 College Park
Dayton, OH 45469-0104
(937) 229-2919

ID#: N064-023-0009
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-023       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: A Portable Swaging Machine for Aircraft Carrier Purchase Cable Terminals
Abstract:   The Navy is interested in a swaging tool that can be used to attach arresting gear purchase cable terminals on ship. Swaging is a well understood process, and there are many suppliers of adequately powerful machines. In fact, a large swaging machine is used at Lakehurst NAS to attach terminals to the cross deck pendants. However, these machines are too large and cumbersome to be used in the shipboard environment. Creare proposes to develop a high power density swaging machine that is lightweight, portable, and used by shipboard personnel with modest training. In Phase I, we will develop a conceptual design for the portable swaging machine based on a technology previously developed by Creare for precision metal forming. During Phase I, we will also conduct proof-of-principle tests which demonstrate that the new process and equipment will provide comparable quality to existing methods. Our preliminary design indicates that the machine footprint could be as small as seven by four feet with a height of five feet and could weigh as little as 3,700 lbs. During Phase II, we will build a prototype and demonstrate performance with appropriate pull-tests and non-destructive evaluations. BENEFITS: This portable swaging machine technology will eliminate the labor intensive and inconsistent speltering process currently used to attach wire rope terminals on Navy aircraft carriers. The portable swaging machines will allow usage in cramped pouring rooms as well as movement throughout the ship. In addition, we are teamed with Felss GmbH, a worldwide leading supplier of custom swaging machines, to provide these machines to the Navy and commercialize our results.

CSS (COMPUTATIONAL SIMULATION SOFTWARE, LLC)
17 Merchant Street
American Fork, UT 84003
(801) 756-1972

PI: Dr. Karl G. Merkley
(801) 756-1972
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0215
UNIV. OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN
ICES 1 University Station C020
Austin, TX 78712-0027
(512) 471-3312

ID#: N064-018-0022
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-018       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Automation of Analysis Model Creation
Abstract:   Traditional finite element methods require conversion of a CAD model into an alternate geometric representation called the finite element mesh. Tools like Cubit, developed at Sandia National Laboratories, have greatly reduced the time to mesh. However, it is still expensive to produce a complete analysis and difficult to have that analysis affect the design cycle in a timely manner. Our studies have shown that 80% of the modeling effort is spent modifying the geometry so that it can be meshed. In this proposal, we present a method called isogeometric analysis that eliminates the need for the traditional meshing portion of the model preparation. It utilizes the mathematical representation of the CAD model to create the analysis model. This proposal will specifically examine the modeling issues surrounding isogeometric analysis and the tools that are required to make this new analytical method usable in production design and analysis settings.BENEFITS: The size of the Computer Aided Design (CAD) industry is estimated at $5 - $10 billion, compared to $1 - $2 billion for the Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) industry. Only the best funded organizations can afford the time required to use CAE to its fullest extent because of the problems inherent in the current Design to Analysis (D2A) process. We believe the current D2A process is a growth inhibitor to the CAE industry. The approach outlined in this proposal would effectively eliminate the current problem and bottleneck inherent in today's process, that is, producing a usable mesh from an existing geometry in a timely manner. This is a potentially disruptive technology that could both displace current technologies and open new markets for the tools described in this proposal.

DYNAFLOW, INC.
10621-J Iron Bridge Rd.
Jessup, MD 20794
(301) 604-3688

PI: Dr. Georges Chahine
(301) 604-3688
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0218
ARL PEN STATE
ARL Pen State U PO Box 30
State College, PA 16804-0030
(814) 863-3991

ID#: N064-022-0187
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-022       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Waterjet Wake Characterization Suite
Abstract:   Bubble generation and entrainment in the transom region of a surface ship, along its hull, and in breaking waves are major ship signature contributors. For advanced ships such as the LCS, another source of air entrainment is added with the propulsion waterjets interacting with the free surface in the transom region. While significant research on breaking waves bubble generation exists, little is known about waterjet propulsion impact on bubbly wakes. Such wakes provide an excellent opportunity to wake homing torpedoes because of bubbles large acoustic cross section. Therefore, it is imperative to develop computational tools capable of predictive analysis for design optimization of bubbly wakes of waterjet driven ships. DYNAFLOW and ARL at the Pennsylvania State University propose to develop a suite of tools for modeling the waterjet driven ships bubbly wakes, conducting acoustic analysis relevant to wake homing threats, assessing threat performance in engagement simulations and conducting experiments to validate and refine the models. A suite of CFD codes known to reproduce conventional ship wakes properly will be used and modified by adding physical models of the waterjet free surface bubble entrainment mechanisms, which will be developed through experimental observation and modeling. BENEFITS: The proposed tool suite can be used for design evaluation of waterjet propelled surface ships. The developed models for bubble generation, propagation, and acoustics can be also combined with other CFD methods and could benefit commercial sectors such as fast ship industry, food manufacturing, oil and gas industry, chemical industry, etc.

ELTRON RESEARCH, INC.
4600 Nautilus Court South
Boulder, CO 80301
(303) 530-0263

PI: Dr. Richard A. Bley
(303) 530-0263
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0317
TEXAS TECH UNIV.
203 Holden Hall
Lubbock, TX 79409-1035
(806) 742-3884

ID#: N064-031-0506
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-031       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: A Non-Invasive Method to Functionalize Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes
Abstract:   This Phase I STTR project will further develop our technique for uniformly dispersing single walled carbon nanotubes into polymeric resins. This project will specifically aim to provide them with a mechanism for anchoring themselves to an epoxy matrix during curing in such a way that they are able to accept and absorb an applied load. The successful development of this technology will result in new, light weight, thermoset composites that have extraordinarily high flexural, tensile and impact strengths and can be easily molded into any shape desired. They will also be useful for reinforcing the weak link in interlaminate composites, the delamination at the interface between the thermoset matrix and reinforcing fibers. The ability of poly(m-phenylenevinylene-co-2,5-dioctoxy-p-phenyle nevinylene (PmPV) to separate large ropes of SWNT into smaller ropes and individual nanotubes by first encasing them, also promotes the solvation of long carbon nanotubes in thermoset resins. By modifying the side chains attached to the PmPV polymer's backbone via addition of reactive groups, we will be able to both increase the amount of SWNT uptake in the resins and make the load transfer from the thermoset matrix to the SWNT more effective.BENEFITS: High strength thermoset composite materials made using this technology will have considerable applications in the military because of their unique combination of properties including exceptionally high strength, light weight and stealth capability. The aerospace industry will also be interested in this technology because of its potential for use in fabricating airplanes, retrievable satellite launch vehicles, reusable space craft etc., which will be both exceptionally light in weight as well as extremely durable. This new technology will eventually be applicable to many other industries, including: the recreational and sports industries, for use in such things as snowboards, skies, light weight racing bikes, tennis rackets, golf club shafts, fishing rods, etc.; and the electronics industry, because it will provide a material that will be easily molded to any shape that has the ability to be to readily dissipate both electromagnetic interference and heat.

EPITAXIAL TECHNOLOGIES, LLC
1450 South Rolling Road
Baltimore, MD 21227
(410) 455-5594

PI: Dr. Ayub Fathimulla
(410) 455-5830
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0258
OHIO STATE UNIV.
Dept of Elect. & Comp. Eng 20
Columbus, OH 43210
(614) 292-0998

ID#: N064-009-0418
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-009       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Ultra-Linear High Efficiency GaN based microwave integrated Circuits
Abstract:   The goal of this program is to develop high linearity and high efficiency power amplifiers through innovative ultra linear transistors and digital signal processing (DSP) circuit linearization techniques for airborne or UAV applications. Specifically, we will demonstrate average output power, PAE, and inter-modulation distortion (IMD) of 150 Watts, 50% and -50 dBc respectively for the L- band monolithic microwave power integrated circuits. The proposed L-band monolithic microwave power integrated circuits will be based on a combination of novel semiconductor device and circuit design to achieve high linearity, high efficiency and output power. In Phase I, we will design, fabricate and test the ultra-linear GaN FETs and demonstrate 10 dB power gain, and 10 watt output power and minimum power added efficiency of 45% as well as third order intercept point (IP3) greater than 25 dB above the 1 dB compression point (P1dB) at L-band frequencies. In Phase II, we will develop prototype high linearity-high efficiency power amplifier architectures and demonstrate 150 watt average output power with peak-to-average power ratio between 8 to 12 dB, 50% PAE, 30 MHz instantaneous bandwidth and -50 dBc IMD.BENEFITS: This proposed project would result in the commercialization of ultralinear, power efficient, high power amplifier modules which will be used to produce the next generation of airborne communication systems. The power amplifiers that can be developed using this technology will benefit the US Navy's E-2 Advanced Hawkeye program and naval shipborne communication systems where antennas in close proximity place a premium on linearity and efficiency. In addition, it will benefit a variety of DoD tactical missile defense programs, where power efficient phased arrays are critical. Commercial applications include components for wireless and satellite communications.

FRICTION STIR LINK, INC.
W227 N546 Westmound Drive
Waukesha, WI 53186
(262) 251-1600

PI: Mr. Christopher Smith
(262) 522-6680
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0184
UNIV. OF MISSOURI-ROLLA
1870 Miner Circle 202 Univers
Rolla, MO 65409
(573) 341-4134

ID#: N064-038-0514
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-038       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: STTR Friction Stir Processing for Superplastic Forming
Abstract:   Friction Stir Processing (FSP) is an emerging technology that can be used to pre or post-process a range of materials, including aluminum, to locally modify material properties. It is known that FSP can be used to enhance material properties for improved superplastic forming (SPF) behavior of aluminum. This can potentially allow for dramatic cost reductions of SPF and aluminum fabrications, allowing the combination to be viable in applications where previously they were not viable. To-date, many fabricated components have excluded use of aluminum for several reasons, including poor formability, difficulty joining, and significant distortion, increasing cost and complexity in applications where aluminum might be considered. This technology combination can eliminate these problems. The project discussed in this proposal aims to determine feasibility of FSP in combination with SPF in Naval applications. Both commercial and technical feasibility will be determined, with the objective of obtaining knowledge of when and which applications this technology is feasible. The commercial feasibility will involve investigations of potential applications to determine the characteristics that allow for commercial feasibility. An application will then be selected for which technical feasibility will be determined. This will involve a coupon level investigation which will demonstrate technical feasibility for the application. BENEFITS: It is anticipated that there will be a significant number of benefits related to the implementation of friction stir processing in combination with superplastic forming. These would include but not be limited to 1) Allowing aluminum to be used in a cost-effective manner where it has been previously deemed uncompetitive 2) Allowing for weight reduction. 3) Allowing for more complex shapes to be formed in aluminum, subsequently causing a a) Reduction in number of components b) Reduction of amount of joining, specifically welding and riveting c) Reduction in distortion d) Improved quality e) Ability to fabricate shapes not previously manufacturable. f) And ultimately lowering cost. There are numerous potential commercial applications for friction stir processing in combination with superplastic forming. These applications would typically benefit from aluminum's lightweight properties, but aluminum has not been used due to the limitations and cost of implementing aluminum into a fabrication. There are applications throughout the transportation industry and the military. In the Navy, doors, hatches, pallets, carts, and complex superstructure sub-assemblies could be considered. In land transportation, doors, frames, and body panels are applications of interest. In addition, general industry could also have applications. Multi-sided aluminum enclosures would be of specific interest, where these fabrications are currently made of numerous parts and part consolidation could be achieved with this technology.

GLOBAL STRATEGIC SOLUTIONS LLC
12801 Worldgate Drive Suite 500
Herndon, VA 20170
(703) 871-3925

PI: Mr. Luis Hernandez
(703) 871-3925
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0280
UNIV. OF IOWA
2 Gilmore Hall
Iowa City, IA 52242-1320
(319) 335-2123

ID#: N064-007-0057
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-007       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Aircraft Electrical Power System Diagnostics and Health Management
Abstract:   Prognostics and health management is a critical technology for accurately predicting impending failures and providing a decision process for replacing components before actual failures occur. This is particularly critical in aircraft Electrical Power Systems. Significant gains in maintenance decision making, safety, system availability, productivity, and cost savings, could be realized by the Navy with a capability that predicts impending failures in these systems. This effort investigates the feasibility of exploiting advances in monitoring and prognostics technologies to develop a comprehensive health and usage monitoring system capability for aircraft electrical power systems. Considerations include the application of a real-time, sensory- updated, residual life based prognostics methodology to provide the current and predicted degradation states of critical components such as generators, converters and batteries. The effort researches and characterizes the faults and physical phenomena of the degradation process, researches condition monitoring technology options, characterizes the patterns in the sensory information to develop an appropriate degradation model , and identifies the modeling approach required to model the evolution of the component degradation and predict its residual life based on identified failure thresholds. A system definition, capability implementation plan, and a basic proof-of-concept validation of the technical approach are part of this effort. BENEFITS: The prognostics technology developed under this effort can be easily applied in other domains such as sea, space and ground vehicle platforms, to advance the implementation of Condition Based Maintenance (CBM) principles. In addition, there is a big potential for commercialization. For example, the prognostics technology resulting from this effort can be applied in other industries including, commercial aviation, power utilities, automotive and any commercial plants where failures in large scale manufacturing systems have a great economic impact.

GLOBAL TECHNOLOGY CONNECTION, INC.
2839 Paces Ferry Rd. Suite 1160
Atlanta, GA 30339
(770) 803-3001

PI: Dr. Freeman Rufus
(770) 803-3001
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0275
OAKRIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY
P.O. Box 2008
Oakridge, TN 37831-6196
(865) 574-0008

ID#: N064-007-0144
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-007       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Aircraft Electrical Power System Diagnostics and Health Management
Abstract:   Global Technology Connection with our partners (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Innovative Power Solutions and Boeing Phantom Works) propose the development and integration of diagnostic / prognostic technologies into an overall vehicle health management for P-3 aircraft's electrical power systems. Phase I effort will concentrate on the P-3 generators: 1) conceptualization of diagnostic / prognostic architecture and its deployment; 2) identify key parameters to measure to differentiate between various failure modes and normal aircraft operational modes / environments; 3) use QFD to select appropriate sensors according to weight, size, ease of integration, etc.; 4) develop and prototype data-driven algorithms for generator diagnostics and prognostics based upon electrical signature analysis feature extraction; and 5) feasibility of deploying diagnostics / prognostics for P-3 generators based upon an assessment of accuracy, memory and computation requirements, scalability and cost of system. The outline of a technology roadmap and Phase II development approach / schedule that contains discrete milestones for product development for P-3 generators and extension plans to converters and batteries will be provided. Phase II will capitalize upon the findings of Phase I research and will proceed to finalize the design and demonstrate a proof of concept diagnostic / prognostic technology for P-3 generators. The design will be finalized and a prototype system based on the design concept(s) proposed in Phase I will be fabricated. Through laboratory testing and characterization experiments, the viability of the system's ability to diagnose failure modes and predict remaining life for the P-3 generator will be demonstrated. A detailed plan for software / hardware certification, validation, and method of implementation will be provided. Phase III encompass final optimization of the prototype system and user interface for the Navy P-3 aircraft and other Navy / DoD aircraft systems.BENEFITS: The results of this project will assist the U.S. Navy initially and other government or industry sectors to eventually deploy a diagnostic and health management technology for the P-3 aircraft's electrical power system. When integrated into an overall vehicle health management system, such practices will reduce substantially the risk of false ID of faults while achieving accurate fault detection, reduce maintenance costs, increase the availability of aircraft systems and improve their reliability in the execution of critical missions. The commercial aircraft, electric power generation and automotive industry will also benefit from the integration of the technology.

H. C. MATERIALS CORP.
2004 South Wright Street
Urbana, IL 61802
(217) 333-2937

PI: Dr. Pengdi Han
(217) 244-8369
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0227
UNIV. OF ILLINOIS
Dept. of Materials Sci &Eng. 1
Urbana, IL 61801
(217) 333-2937

ID#: N064-034-0223
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-034       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: New Material Compositions that Expand the Operating Domain of Piezoelectric Single Crystals
Abstract:   At the present time, large-sized PMN-PT piezoelectric crystals, 3" diameter by 8" long, of high quality, can be grown directly from the melt and are commercially available. The objective of this proposal is to demonstrate the feasibility of expanding the operating domain of the PMN-PT based piezoelectric crystals by chemical doping and compositional refinements. Although the piezoelectric properties of PMN-PT crystal products are qualified to the military, and are commercially used in medical ultrasound imaging (and a variety of acoustic transducers), the coercive electric-field strengths and thermal stability need to be improved particularly for large signal/high energy applications. This is very important for Navy sonar transducers. For acoustic sensors, such as hydrophones and vector accelerometers, that require high signal/noise ratios, lowering of the dissipation factor is a key parameter while maintaining the giant-piezoelectric response characteristics. Radiation with high energy particles (e.g., neutrons) can localize "defects" that pin domain wall mobility. It expected that selected radiation damage will enhance coercivity. It is well known that the PMN-PT solid-solution system is the only one that is near congruent solidification, thus enabling the direct growth from the stoichiometric melt in a most cost-effective manner. This proposal focuses on new compositions that must be near congruent melting. Thus, the proposed work for new compositional refinement to PMN-PT based crystals will be of immediate applicability to the growth of large crystals, thus expanding the operating domain of piezoelectric single crystals.BENEFITS: The proposed work will enhance the piezoelectric performance of PMN-PT based crystals by chemical doping and compositional refinement using our proprietary and cost-effective Bridgman growth method. The proposed work is targeted for high-drive applications for single crystals in Navy sonar, torpedo guidance, torpedo counter measures, sensors, vibration control, shape control, position control, and also for commercial applications such as medical ultrasound imaging, nondestructive testing, etc. We anticipate domain-engineering will increase the properties of the final transduction devices.

HI-TECH WELDING & FORMING, INC.
1990 Friendship Dr.
El Cajon, CA 92020
(619) 562-5929

PI: Mr. Don Nelepovitz
(619) 562-5929
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0187
CONCURRENT TECHNOLOGIES CORP.
100 CTC Drive
Johnstown, PA 15904
(814) 269-2783

ID#: N064-038-0294
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-038       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: STTR Friction Stir Processing for Superplastic Forming
Abstract:   Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state joining process with unique characteristics that offer opportunities for cost savings, new fabrication methods, and new structural designs. FSW eliminates many of the problems associated with fusion welding techniques. In addition, FSW generates a "stir zone" microstructure that consists of very fine, equiaxed grains that are ideal for post-weld forming operations such as superplastic forming. Superplastic forming (SPF) with diffusion bonding (DB) has been used in titanium alloys in the past to create low-cost, integrally stiffened components with significant geometric complexity. This powerful combination of processes offers considerable design flexibility and low production costs for high-performance applications, especially in the aerospace industry. Multi-sheet SPF/DB structures with complex external geometries with integrally constructed internal stiffening elements are used in numerous aerospace applications. By replacing DB with FSW in aluminum then using SPF for panel structures, a new technology emerges that will have a vast number of applications in commercial and government aerospace and land based transportation systems. The effort defined here will develop and demonstrate processing methods for combining FSW and SPF. FSW/SPF panels will be built and tested to validate the overall process, as well as examining material properties. BENEFITS: The lightweight yet structurally strong panels using FSW/SPF will reduce weight and cost in military applications: navy ships, ground based vehicles and aircraft. The same benefit will apply for commercial transport aircraft. The potential applications are vast and will revolutionize an entire segment of manufacturing for the light, strong panels that comprise the backbone of these applications. Eventually, with the development of rapid manufacturing methods, this technology will be an important component in automotive manufacturing.

HONTEK CORP.
161 South Satellite Road
South Windsor, CT 06074
(860) 282-1776

PI: Mr. Shek C. Hong
(860) 282-1776
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0274
THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.
Applied Research Laboratory P.
State College, PA 16804
(814) 865-5879

ID#: N064-013-0542
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-013       Awarded: 21AUG06
Title: Polymer Based, Thermally Conductive and Erosion Resistant Boot Materials/Concepts for Rotor Blade Leading Edge Protection
Abstract:   The leading edge of the V-22 rotor blade is made of titanium and nickel abrasion strips bonded to the composite substrate. Although effective for rain erosion protection, nickel and titanium show poor sand erosion resistance. In addition, this metal and composite hybrid configuration limits working strain and fatigue life. This hybrid concept also hampers field serviceability and increases the operating and support cost of the rotor blade by inhibiting removal and replacement of the leading edge. It also necessitates frequent inspection to detect incipient fatigue cracks in the metal to ensure flight safety. The Navy is interested in removing the metallic leading edge strip and replacing it with a polymer based, field serviceable and thermally conductive erosion resistant boot materials/concepts directly over the existing composite substrate of the rotor blade. In this proposal, heat conductive fillers, fibers and fabrics will be combined with Hontek erosion resistant molding resins to form molded boot. Finite element analysis techniques will be used to determine the effect of fiber architecture and orientation on the conductivity of candidate molding resins. BENEFITS: It is anticipated that this effort will provide a light weight and conformable erosion protection system for the composite leading edge on current and emerging VTOL/STOL aircraft such as V-22 Osprey. This effort will eliminate the need for frequent inspection to detect incipient fatigue cracks in the metal leading edge, reduce acquisition and operating costs, enhance blade fatigue life, improve mission safety, reduce need for spares, simplify field serviceability and reduce total ownership cost (TOC). The molded erosion protection systems have universal applications to the entire fleet of helicopters and rotorcraft operated by the Navy and the Army.

HYBRID PLASTICS
55 WL Runnels Ind. Dr.
Hattiesburg, MS 39401
(601) 544-3466

PI: Dr. joseph D. Lichtenhan
(601) 544-3466
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0341
UNIV. OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI
School of Polymers and High Pe
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001
(601) 266-4869

ID#: N064-040-0487
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-040       Awarded: 11SEP06
Title: Alternative Room Temperature Cure and VARTMable High Temperature Resin Systems for Large Scale Composite Ship Component Manufacturing
Abstract:   This Phase I STTR proposal is to designed to utilize the fundamental properties of POSSr nanotechnology to provide a new higher Tg and fracture toughness ambient cure epoxy matrix for use in Vacuum Assist Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) manufacturing. Nanostructured ambient cure epoxy matrices based upon Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (POSSr) will be reinforced with carbon-fiber and glass-fiber reinforcement packages using VARTM processing with no post curing to determine physical properties. The technical approaches proposed in this work focus on the synthesis and formulation of epoxy resins with nanostructured entities in order to provide elevated glass-transition, mechanical performance, reduced viscosity, and VARTM processability, relative to existing commercial ambient cure epoxy systems. POSSr type nanocomposite reinforcements increase the Tg of polymeric resins by reducing chain motions through increased chain rigidity. POSS will be utilized in this research through two primary mechanisms: (i) POSS cages that contain catalytic metals and functional groups that enhance the extent of curing for epoxy resins beyond that normally realized at ambient conditions and (ii) replacement of specific portions of epoxy monomers with POSS functional epoxides.BENEFITS: The proposed formulations will present the opportunity to study the effects that nanoreinforcement has on the glass transition and key physical properties of epoxy-type nanocomposites. The result enable an ambient cure low-viscosity epoxy that has high Tg, high fracture toughness, excellent fiber adhesion, improved flame resistance and that can be manufactured using conventional wet lay-up processing technology including VARTM. The resin will have direct commercial us by the Naval fleet, and as solid rocket motor case, and as encapsulants and underfill resins for commercial electronics.

HYPRES., INC.
175 Clearbrook Road
Elmsford, NY 10523
(914) 592-1190

PI: Dr. Oleg Mukhanov
(914) 592-1190
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0197
UNIV. OF MARYLAND
Center for Supercond. Research
College Park, MD 20742-4111
(301) 405-6130

ID#: N064-029-0480
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-029       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: RF Waveform Library Reader
Abstract:   Digital cross correlation represents the ideal method of realizing the optimal (matched) filtering of the wide variety of time dependent waveforms used by the DoD and thereby the maximum probability reception in high EMI/dense signal environments. Direct from RF, direct reception is increasingly feasible as fast clocking digital technologies such as SiGe, III-V semiconductors, and superconducting electronics became mature. Combining direct reception and digital cross-correlation on RF waveform seems the ideal performance path to software define radios. The digital reference waveform must, however, be delivered high clock speed if the subtleties of the waveform are to be reproducible. Unfortunately, the speed of cheap mass memory seems destined to behind high speed logic by at least 10X. Thus a new, affordable arbitrary bit stream generator box that muxes large COTS memories to high output speed is needed.BENEFITS: a

IMPACT TECHNOLOGIES, LLC
200 Canal View Blvd
Rochester, NY 14623
(585) 424-1990

PI: Mr. Gregory J. Kacprzynski
(585) 424-1990
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0192
GEORGIA TECH RESEARCH CORP.
Industry Contracting Office 50
Atlanta, GA 30318
(404) 385-6697

ID#: N064-001-0151
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-001       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: A Charge Prediction Tool for HSU-based Suspension Systems
Abstract:   Impact Technologies and Georgia Institute of Technology, with the support of L-3 Communications, propose development of a prototype software tool that promises to significantly reduce the maintenance burden associated with EFV suspension system setup & calibration required for different mission mixes and/or in the event of HSU replacement. While the current procedure requires vehicle track removal and the use of jack stands to determine the proper amount of HSU gas charge, the proposed solution would quickly and accurately estimate required gas charge for a given mission mix and vehicle configuration (gross weight, CG, etc.) in the EFV's fully operational state. Given a concise set of user inputs, a constrained multi-objective optimization routine will solve a hybrid suspension model consisting of both a physics-based response surface model and a data-driven Neural Network. The aggregate of these two modeling approaches is designed to capture the complex interdependencies between suspension system parameters while still enabling efficient optimization of HSU gas charge settings. Using a Matlab/Simulink based development environment, USMC and L-3 provided data/software and in-house development tools, the Impact/GA Tech team will be able to develop requisite technologies and demonstrate the ability to generate a deployable charge prediction module. When this module is integrated with an intuitive Graphical User Interface (GUI) and other standard utilities on a maintenance laptop or the EFV's on-board computer, significant increases in EFV operational availability (Ao) will be attainable and remote, in-field, repair capability can be realized for the first time. Furthermore, the development team will design this software system with multi-platform applicability in mind such that recurring development costs for similar FCS vehicles can be minimized. BENEFITS: In the event that this program extends through Phase II development, it is highly anticipated that a validated and DO-178B Level C/D certified software for in-situ HSU charge prediction will yield reduced maintenance man hours (MMH) and increased operational availability (Ao) for the EFV and as well as for any future FCS/MEFFV platforms with similar suspension designs. Consequently, the return on investment (ROI) potential for this program is very high for the DoD. Impact Technologies has an excellent SBIR commercialization track record and as an engineering consulting and custom s/w development firm, is well suited to see the proposed system through to deployment and beyond.

IMPACT TECHNOLOGIES, LLC
200 Canal View Blvd
Rochester, NY 14623
(585) 424-1990

PI: Dr. Michael J Romer
(585) 424-1990
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0265
GEORGIA TECH RESEARCH CORP.
Industry Contracting Office 50
Atlanta, GA 30318
(404) 385-6697

ID#: N064-033-0281
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-033       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Fault Diagnostics, Prognostics and Self Healing Control of Navy Electric Machinery
Abstract:   Impact Technologies, collaborating with the Georgia Institute of Technology and Northrop Grumman Ship Systems, propose to develop and demonstrate a real-time diagnostic and prognostic system for assessing, predicting and accommodating for faults/failures of critical electric power system components including power converters and electro-mechanical drives. The innovation of integrating advanced diagnostics and prognostics with a self-healing capability to improve system reliability and mission readiness for the Navy's next generation electric machines is the focus of this effort. Implementation of this concept requires incipient fault detection techniques to provide longer predicted horizons prior to failures, operational history, and fault progression models in order to make accurate and repeatable decisions regarding the remaining life predictions. The Impact/GA-Tech/NGC team's approach uses innovative electronic fault detection and reasoning algorithms to analyze data from several sources including electrical and environmental sensor measurements, model estimates, and usage conditions. Up-to-date assessments of the electrical system health and remaining useful life of critical components will be made possible via an on-board embedded processing system, which continuously updates prognostic models with sensed data, assesses fault severity, and predicts the best fault accommodation strategy to meet mission objectives. The proposed electrical system fault detection, isolation and accommodation approach will be demonstrated with a Motor/Generator/Drive test bench adapted for use in this program and with data from the DD(X) Advanced Induction Motor (AIM) supplied by NGC. Additional plans have been discussed with NGC to demonstrate the technologies on their full-scale AIM system and ONR sponsored virtual test bench VTB during Phase II, if awarded.BENEFITS: The development and integration of embedded diagnostics, prognostics and self healing control for Navy electric systems will provide many benefits including: Improved safety and readiness associated with system operations; reduced life cycle or total ownership costs; optimized maintenance intervals and prioritized task performance. Furthermore, the work will contain many generic elements that can be transitioned to a broad range of other commercial applications. The integrated diagnostics and prognostics approaches, techniques, and specific algorithms could also be implemented in a wide range of civilian hybrid power applications as well as in power plants, utilities, transportation, and telecommunication industries where reliable backup power is essential to sustain critical services.

INFORMATION IN PLACE, INC.
501 North Morton Street Suite 206
Bloomington, IN 47404
(812) 856-4202

PI: Dr. Sonny E. Kirkley
(812) 856-4202
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0242
INDIANA UNIV.
530 E. Kirkwood Avenue Carmich
Bloomington, IN 47408-4003
(812) 855-0516

ID#: N064-006-0086
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-006       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Conventional Training Versus Game-Based Training
Abstract:   This proposal outlines a plan to create a toolkit consisting of: 1. A methodology derived from theory and research on human performance training (HPT), research on learning, and instructional design; 2. A 3D taxonomy/matrix that maps training objectives and learning processes with game characteristics, in order to guide decision-making processes for choosing and using specific game-based training approaches; 3. Guidelines for using the methodology and taxonomy/matrix to choose game-based training solutions, or to design new games and/or approaches; and 4. A prototype tool that provides guidance for developing game-based training solutions and calculating return on investment. BENEFITS: The primary benefits of our development path are that the Navy and the Department of Defense will be provided with means to evaluate and select appropriate training modes among conventional and game-based approaches that will find application in all the Services. Commercialization within the Navy and other components of DoD will be driven by the need to select training modalities appropriate to learning objectives, cost- benefit, and other factors. On the commercial side, there is high demand for flexible training products that have been proven in the military domain, and we will target this market based on opportunities identified during Phase I.

INFOSCITEX CORP.
303 Bear Hill Road
Waltham, MA 02451
(781) 890-1338

PI: Dr. Anna Galea
(781) 890-1338
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0209
MAYO CLINIC
13400 East Shea Blvd.
Scottsdale, AZ 85259
(480) 301-4481

ID#: N064-008-0253
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-008       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Enhanced Flight Simulator
Abstract:   Modern flight simulators utilize combinations of motion, visual stimulation, and occasionally tactile body stimulation. Despite advances in these fields, simulators remain limited in the amount and type of motion simulation they can impart to a pilot. Direct vestibular stimulation can generate continuous sensed motions, and therefore holds promise for improving flight simulators by incorporating vestibular cueing with more traditional stimulations. Our solution is based on combining a small, lightweight motion base and a high-end visual display with a vestibular stimulation device. Incorporating vestibular cueing into a flight simulator will allow us to leverage the motion simulation generated by the vestibular system to design a motion platform that is smaller and lighter than conventional platforms, while still providing the full system with far increased capabilities over traditional flight simulators. The team assembled for this work is ideally suited to carry out the research and development of the proposed system. The clinical team from the Mayo Clinic includes expertise in military flight physiology as well as decades of experience in vestibular studies. The Infoscitex team is similarly equipped to tackle the system designs and move the project towards a commercial product.BENEFITS: Incorporating vestibular cueing into a flight simulator will allow us to design a motion platform that is smaller and lighter than conventional platforms, while still providing far increased capabilities over traditional flight simulators. This will be of great interest both to the military and to the entertainment industry. In addition, the results obtained will be the first necessary steps to developing an artificial vestibular system. Such a device has the promise of a considerable market in a patient population suffering the after-effects of disease or traumatic injury that has affected their native vestibular system.

INFOSCITEX CORP.
303 Bear Hill Road
Waltham, MA 02451
(781) 890-1338

PI: Dr. Robert F. Kovar
(781) 890-1338
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0278
TEXAS STATE UNIV.
601 University Drive
San Marcos, TX 78666-4606
(512) 245-2156

ID#: N064-013-0068
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-013       Awarded: 21AUG06
Title: Thermally-Conductive Nanocomposite Elastomer Boot System (TCNEBS) for V-22 Rotor Blade Leading Edges
Abstract:   The metal sheath used to protect the V-22 aircraft rotor blade leading edge against sand, rain and ice erosion, and provide heating to prevent ice buildup, is heavy, rigid and expensive. An elastomeric boot can offer lower weight, flexibility, abrasion-resistance and field repairability. However, elastomeric boots have exhibited delamination and creep failure caused by high centrifugal loads and sand and rain droplet impact damage. These elastomeric boots also have poor deicing characteristics. Infoscitex and Texas State University propose to develop a thermally-conductive, nanocomposite elastomer boot system, called TCNEBS, that provides sand and rain erosion-resistance, reinforcement against centrifugal shear forces and protection against rain droplet impact damage. The TCNEBS will exhibit high thermal conductivity through the thickness, enabling rapid thermal deicing and can be adhesively bonded to the leading edge in the field as a premolded boot applique to replace a damaged or worn boot. In Phase I, we will select TCNEBS candidate materials, produce test specimens and evaluate TCNEBS adhesion, sand and rain erosion-resistance and creep-resistance at a recognized test facility. Deicing capability will be demonstrated. The TCNEBS enables unique, in-flight blade flexing not possible with the metal sheath. The Infoscitex team includes experts in z-oriented nanofiber reinforced elastomers, a helicopter manufacturer and an elastomer supplier. BENEFITS: Successful development of the TCNEBS will increase the reliability, survivability and mission lifetime of military rotary wing aircraft, such as the V-22 Osprey, in severe sand, rain and ice environments. The added flexibility of a TCNEBS-equipped composite blade will enable complex twisting and flexing maneuvers in-flight that are not possible with metal protective sheaths.

INTELLIGENT AUTOMATION, INC.
15400 Calhoun Drive Suite 400
Rockville, MD 20855
(301) 294-5221

PI: Dr. Eric van Doorn
(301) 294-5229
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0196
UNIV. OF CENTRAL FLORIDA
3100 Technology Parkway
Orlando, FL 32826
(407) 882-1300

ID#: N064-029-0440
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-029       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: High Speed RF Waveform Reader-Writer
Abstract:   Intelligent Automation, Inc. (IAI), proposes a reliable integrated COTS-based reader/writer that can deliver RF waveforms to a cross-correlation based RF receiver at high speeds of 40 Gbps. We have already identified key COTS hardware that offers following advantages (1) input/ Output blocks of the FPGA can handle various input/ output standards like LVDS, LVCMOS, PCI-X, GTL and GTLP. Hence external COTS hardware delivering any of these voltage formats can be easily integrated (2) Options for reconfigurable logic and signal processing blocks (3) High speed expansion slots, 16 bit TX-RX interfaces with default LVDS support and number of prototyping interfaces, and (4) Low power consumption. The key innovations which we propose are (1) assembly of COTS hardware such as 1: 16 De-serializer and 16:1 Serializer, external memory blocks for data management (2) ability to perform test simulations on the FPGA itself, by creating HDL blocks (3) ability to read 10 Gword/s and store the data using FPGA control and (4) a clear transition plan to output 40 Gbps data per line using 4: 1 Multiplexing. The proposed system can be rapidly deployed for testing within the phase I base period. BENEFITS: The market for a IEEE compliant 40 Gbps per line circuit and accept 10 Gbps per line at data input and rewrite the data in the RAM units is quite large in fiber optic telecommunication network where digital data are be compressed in time and transmitted as bursts rather than time interleaved bit with other traffic. Such networks are also used on military platforms and bursted data may be significantly easier to handle than interleaved in multi-level security and priority networks such as during battle and high speed communication processing.

INTELLIGENT AUTOMATION, INC.
15400 Calhoun Drive Suite 400
Rockville, MD 20855
(301) 294-5221

PI: Dr. Leonard Haynes
(301) 294-5250
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0201
UNIV. OF WASHINGTON
1013 NE 40th Street Box 355640
Seattle, WA 98105-6698
(206) 543-1300

ID#: N064-036-0443
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-036       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: A Novel Acoustic Pattern Recognition System for Wireless Sensor Networks
Abstract:   Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) have demonstrated their effectiveness in threat detection and localization. However, there are two critical issues related to signal processing in WSNs. First, energy-efficiency, memory-consumption, bandwidth-utilization, and computation-complexity are of main concern. Second, the application environments contain highly colored noise, multi-path echoes, and simultaneous emission sources. To address these issues, Intelligent Automation, Inc. (IAI) and its subcontractor, the University of Washington, propose a novel acoustic threat recognition system. The proposed system architecture is distributed and hierarchical. The functions of threat detection, classification and source localization are organized in multiple levels. At each level, the information processing task is performed in a distributed manner. On the other hand, the proposed system architecture allows cooperation among sensing nodes to collaboratively detect target signatures, reduce false alarms, classify target types, and estimate the acoustic source location. The system combines recent advances in Wavelet Analysis, intelligent learning and sensor fusion. In particular, the proposed Discrete Wavelet Packet Transform-based power-law detection algorithm is robust to environmental noise, yet computationally efficient. The advantages of the proposed threat recognition system include energy efficiency, reliable detection and classification, low detection and classification latency, reduced false alarms, efficient bandwidth utilization, and accurate source location estimation. BENEFITS: In addition to acoustic threat recognition, the proposed system along with the wireless sensor network architecture can be used in a widely range of other applications, such as moving vehicle tracking, speaker identification, firefighter/military personnel tracking, etc. The resulting technology can be readily used in law enforcement, border protection, etc. Moreover, the proposed classification and data fusion algorithms can also find other applications such as health monitoring of electro-mechanical systems, and intrusion detection in computer networks.

IONFINITY, LLC
2400 Lincoln Ave.
Altadena, CA 91001
(818) 354-5420

PI: Frank Hartley
(626) 447-2404
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0297
JPL
4800 Oak Grove Drive
Pasadena, CA 91109
(818) 354-8360

ID#: N064-010-0063
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-010       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Miniature Electronic Sniffer for Navy Vertical Take off Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (VTUAVs)
Abstract:   We propose to jointly develop a miniaturized novel chemical sensor system through a collaborative effort between IonFinity, LLC, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Imaginative Technologies, LLC. This field portable chemical sensor system consists of 1) a new and powerful detector called a Differential Mobility Spectrometer (DMS) developed by Imaginative Technologies, and 2) a novel "soft-ionization" membrane (SIM) that does not fragment or multiply-ionize sampled species developed at JPL in collaboration with IonFinity. Our goal is to design and prototype an inexpensive miniature ~900 gram, field qualified, easy-to-use, ruggard, battery-operated, non-contact TRL 6 chemical sensor system that is capable of detecting chemicals, explosives, and illegal drug residues in the holds and storage bays of suspect vessels. The device will detect chemicals at low ppb levels after 10 seconds. Detection levels are similar to those of mass spectrometry but without the complicated, bulky vacuum system that enables packaging in a smaller and quicker instrument. BENEFITS: Ionfinity intends to partner with and licensing to Companies with a demonstrated ability to fabricate, market, distribute and support products in the field of mass spectroscopy and analysis. Ionfinity has 5 issued and 6 pending patents. In order to achieve the greatest gains it wishes to license a basket of related technologies that simultaneously address issues related to the development and delivery of low cost, highly efficient, portable instruments for trace sample detection, environmental monitoring, medical diagnostics, and industrial process control operating both in air and water based on an approach involving soft ionization and mass spectroscopy that is not limited in sensitivity or mass range and that does not fragment samples of interest. In order to assure that our intellectual property performs well in the application environment, Ionfinity has outlined how it would like to interact with any company acquiring the technology: 1. Royalty based license for incorporation of technologies into partner's instrument or system. 2. Work with licensee to develop, integrate, test and validate licensed technology resident in their system before it is taken to the market. 3. Provide tech support to licensee after release. 4. Become ion production and analysis provider tailoring where needed or advancing if desired. With a significant body of intellectual property in hand, Ionfinity is interested in licensing a select portfolio exclusively to an industry leader in the mass spectrometry market that will exploit its capabilities to the fullest. Terms of the license are negotiable but include consulting, milestone payments based on performance, and grant-backs if the licensee cannot take full advantage of the technology within the timeframe to which both parties agree. The attached resumes represent what we consider to be not only the most well rounded team for the Differential Ion Mobility development activity and SIM ionization technique but also this team represents collectively what can be proved to be, by virtue of their accomplishments, entirely capable of addressing the most challenging advanced trace element/compound detection technology projects. The thin film/ and trace element/compound detection requirement does not represent a significant challenge to this team Individuals in this group have decades of experience in developing remote and in-situ instruments for both military and civilian space flight applications. The preceding narration and its relation to the fabrication of a small, light (less than 1.5 lbs.), and sensitive electronic sniffer sensor that is capable of detecting Chemical, explosive, and illegal drug residue are essentially within the realm of the skill sets possessed by the Imaginative Technologies, JPL and Ionfinity team.

IRFLEX CORP.
12019 Heather Down Dr.
Herndon, VA 20170
(418) 655-4228

PI: Dr. Francois Chenard
(418) 655-4228
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0229
VIRGINIA TECH UNIV.
460 Turner Street Suite 306
Blacksburg, VA 24060-0170
(540) 231-5281

ID#: N064-039-0026
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-039       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Mid-Infrared Fiber-Optic Switch for IRCM Laser Applications
Abstract:   Current laser-based infrared countermeasure (IRCM) system integrates a mid-infrared laser with a pointer-tracker (P/T) as a mated pair. The full protection of tactical aircrafts requires six IRCM systems to cover all fields of attack. Today each mid-infrared laser for IRCM costs several hundreds of thousands of dollars, measures about 9 inches x 8 inches x 3 inches, and weighs approximately 10 lbs. The electric power supply for each laser has about the same size and weight, and each laser needs a separate cooling subsystem. The overall cost, volume and weight of current IRCM systems required for full aircraft protection are excessively large. The proposed work will demonstrate a fiber-optic switch device which permits a single centrally-located mid-infrared laser to be selectively routed to different P/T located around the aircraft via fiber-optic cables. This novel approach is consistent with achieving the required low insertion loss and high power capacity needed for typical IRCM applications. A unique solution is proposed to couple high power mid-infrared laser in chalcogenide glass fiber with minimum insertion loss.BENEFITS: The proposed work is targeted primarily for military applications and supports directly the advancement of the critical DoD IRCM laser systems to be used for both fixed- and rotary-wing platforms. The fiber-optic switch will permit a single centrally-located mid-infrared laser to be selectively routed to different P/T located around the aircraft via fiber-optic cables. This will enable significant cost, volume and weight reductions compared to current IRCM laser systems. Also the fiber-optic switch will be useful in chemical sensors and spectroscopic applications where measurements are made through mid-infrared fiber in remote and multiple locations. Furthermore the fiber-optic switch technology should find other applications in routing industrial mid-infrared lasers for marking, machining and welding.

ITRI CORP.
7208 Hadlow Drive
Springfield, VA 22152
(703) 912-9330

PI: Mr. Gregory Smith
(717) 254-1257
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0247
NAVAL RESEARCH LAB
Naval Research Laboratory 7 G
Monterey, CA 93943-5502
(831) 656-4721

ID#: N064-037-0017
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-037       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Solution for High Resolution Micro-Meteorological Tools for Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) Contaminant Transport and Dispersal Predictions
Abstract:   Federal, State, and Local Government Agencies, and Industry first responders in any scenario involving hazardous materials require easy to obtain, interpret, and visualize characterizations of the environment that they are about to operate in. The applications that generate and make the characterizations available must be must be technically sound with respect to the influence of the terrain and the natural environmental conditions on the transport and diffusion of the hazardous materials and provide guidance in a probabilistic form so as to help reduce the risks of uncertainty in responding. They also require timely updates so that they can be constantly aware of the environment and the expected changes in that environment as their operations continue. In this Phase I STTR Itri Corporation and the Naval Research Lab, Monterey CA will demonstrate the feasibility of: accessing foundation geographic data and various central sites' meteorological data fields via the internet, using this data to initialize higher fidelity meteorological and dispersion models, collect and fuse ensembles of the high fidelity models, and visualize the results in a small mobile device such as a tablet or PDA or cell phone for planners and first responders.BENEFITS: Leverage the enormous investment and infrastructure/capability already in place by the US and State Governments, the IT Industry, and the Communications Industry to provide an affordable Response Information and Guidance System available to Planners and First Responders delivering them actionable information. Some of the other market segments that we think may be able to affordably apply this technology are crop disease forecasting and mitigation, point source pollution (extant, diffusion, and monitoring), and in support of the production of Environmental Impact Statements or general area characterizations.

JXT APPLICATIONS, INC.
2673 Commons Blvd, Suite 20
Beavercreek, OH 45431
(937) 306-5003

PI: Mr. William Walsh
(830) 981-4203
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0244
FLORIDA STATE UNIV.
C 4622 University Center
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2540
(850) 645-1777

ID#: N064-006-0025
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-006       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Conventional Training Versus Game-Based Training
Abstract:   There is little doubt that games are becoming pervasive in the military. The increasing numbers of military games are a reflection of the attitude that games work, so let's have more of them. It also reflects a propensity for games by current military personnel who have "grown up digital," for them, games are a natural way of passing time. If there is an added benefit that games help them do their jobs well, so much the better. For many games enthusiasm of users in combat environments is testimony enough. However, before the military spends additional scarce funds developing games for various skills from piloting ships to filling in forms, it would be beneficial for the Government to have some empirical evidence directing the development and fielding of such training and quantifying when the effort is worth the time and resources being spent. The output of this research effort will be a tool for evaluating and recommending specific functional characteristics of games that are appropriate for specific types of training objectives. This research will enable training managers to quantify when a game development effort is worth the time and resources being spent.BENEFITS: This research will provide the tools for Navy (and other services and civilian) training managers to quantify when a game development effort is worth the time and resources being spent. The tool will not only be able to inform trainers about when and how games may be used for training, but it will indicate what characteristics of games best suit specific curriculum objectives, and how to include these features in the development of a game for learning.

KALSCOTT ENGINEERING, INC.
3226 SW Timberlake Ln.
Topeka, KS 66614
(785) 979-1113

PI: Mr. Tom Sherwood
(785) 979-1113
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0299
UNIV. OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
Powell Hall of Engineering PHE
Los Angeles, CA 90089
(213) 740-4697

ID#: N064-010-0321
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-010       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Miniature Chem/Bio Sniffer for Vertical Take off Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (VTUAVs)
Abstract:   The need for an miniature sensor for chemical and biological materials of interest is discussed. Such sensors can be deployed on small sonochute-launched unmanned air vehicles to interrogate sea-borne vehicles. The design for a miniature UAV-borne sensor is proposed and discussed in detail. In Phase I, hardware will be built and flight tested. In the Phase I option, the design will be refined for full prototyping and test in Phase II. BENEFITS: Better chem/bio sensors for homeland security, military and medical applications.

KAZAK COMPOSITES, INC.
10F GIll Street
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 932-5667

PI: Dr. Pavel Bystricky
(781) 932-5667
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0212
U-MASS LOWELL RESEARCH FOUNDATION
883 Broadway Street Second Flo
Lowell, MA 01854
(978) 934-4723

ID#: N064-017-0561
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-017       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Advanced Composite Sandwich Panel Architecture for Improved Performance at Reduced Weight and Cost
Abstract:   The Navy is currently developing advanced surface combatants like DD(X), LPD-17, LCS and CVX to meet challenges of the 21st century. The desire to reduce maintenance cost and weight makes the use of composite structures very attractive, but cost of manufacturing large composite structures remains a significant technology barrier. KaZaK and UMass Lowell propose to develop pultrusion technology of balsa cored carbon fiber epoxy composite panels with unique reinforcement architecture with the goal of significantly reducing weight and cost of ship composite structures. Composites manufactured from carbon fiber preforms similar to the ones proposed here have been shown to exhibit surprising improvements in mechanical properties over conventional composites, including 30% increase in tensile strength, greater than an order of magnitude improvement in fatigue life, increase in stiffness, and reduction in delamination damage. A revolutionary feature of the proposed technology is the ability to manufacture thin wall composite parts with mechanical properties equivalent to regular thickness conventional composites, leading to super lightweight structural components. Significant cost savings are anticipated from material property improvements. An ancillary advantage will be the ability to pultrude epoxy matrix composites instead of being limited to vinyl ester resin as is the case with current VARTM techniques.BENEFITS: The primary anticipated benefits of the proposed novel carbon fiber epoxy balsa core pultruded panels are significant improvements in mechanical properties leading to direct weight and cost savings. These savings will stem from performance improvements due to novel carbon fiber reinforcement geometry and the use of epoxy matrix combined with pultrusion, by far the lowest cost composite manufacturing technology. The NGSS DD(X) design is the targeted beneficiary of the proposed technology development effort, although the technology will be generically applicable to all future composite ship structure. The same basic technology can be applied to the production of composite piers, bridge decks and other large civil engineering structures. Other potential Navy applications include LCS, LPD, CV(x) and other future combatants. The simplicity and versatility of the proposed technology will allow cost-effective implementation into new lightweight composite systems and easy retrofit into many existing ones. The high strength to weight properties will make these materials excellent candidates for metal replacement applications.

KAZAK COMPOSITES, INC.
10F GIll Street
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 932-5667

PI: Mr. Michael McAleenan
(207) 371-2568
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0269
U-MAINE
Dept. of Mechanical Engineerin
Orono, ME 04469-5711
(207) 581-2131

ID#: N064-021-0338
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-021       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Large, Low Cost Composite Pultruded Panels with Integrated Joint Edge Details Tailored for CHARC
Abstract:   KaZaK Composites and U-Maine propose to work with Lockheed Martin to develop and test state of the art composite materials, configurations and manufacturing methods meeting difficult structural, impact, weight and low cost objectives for application to Lockheed Martin's CHARC LCS off-board vehicle. This proposal addresses technology development complementing and extending KaZaK's current Ship-to-Shore and DD(X)-focused SBIR programs, specifically leveraging these current activities to maximize benefits for the CHARC design while minimizing CHARC development cost and risk. Material systems in our Phase I study will focus on impact-resistant off-board vehicle needs. Pultrusion processing will be emphasized for low cost composite manufacturing and its ability to cost-effectively integrate joining features into panel edge details for rapid assembly. During Phase I extensive material testing will be conducted by U-Maine to validate pultruded composite laminate design properties. In addition, pultruded composite panels will be joined for full scale joint testing. Laminate and joint test results will validate analytical and FEA models in support of future off-board vehicle design and material selection. If awarded a Phase II, our team will apply Phase I materials, configuration and manufacturing technology to the fabrication of hardware for a scale model prototype of the CHARC high speed vessel.BENEFITS: The proposed program will demonstrate the use of new materials and manufacturing systems as a viable alternative to traditional naval shipbuilding materials. In addition to obvious benefits to the military, these innovative lightweight and low cost composite material systems have the capability for rapid assembly, reducing acquisition cost. As the use of composites increases in construction, aero and marine industries processes that permit low cost manufacturing and significantly reduced composite structure assembly labor have the capability of meeting strict cost reduction requirements by the Navy. This ability to fabricate and assemble low cost composite structures has the potential to provide Navy and commercial ships better performance, less maintenance and significantly reduced lifecycle costs. Similar technology can be applied to a wide range of structures including piers, bridge decks, buildings, runways, and transportable shelters.

KCF TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
112 W. Foster Ave Suite 1
State College, PA 16801
(814) 867-4097

PI: Dr. Jeremy E Frank
(814) 867-4097
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0286
PENN STATE UNIV.
213 Hammond Building
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 863-7229

ID#: N064-020-0567
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-020       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Broadband Vibration Power Harvesting for Encrypted Wireless Sensor Systems
Abstract:   KCF Technologies will develop compact Broadband Vibration Power Harvesting devices to enable Navy distributed wireless sensor systems. Building on KCF's ongoing work in low-cost vibration power harvesting for industrial wireless sensors, a primary technical advance is to develop a harvester with "broadband" performance over unknown or changing vibration sources. The power harvester will be developed as an enabling component in RLW Inc.'s S5NAPTM wireless sensor, expanding its applicability. The target application, in collaboration with York International / Johnson Controls, is Thermal Management of distributed HVAC heat exchanger components. Follow-on applications will expand the deployment of wireless sensors on Navy shipboard systems for health monitoring, advanced detection, manpower reduction and more. In Phase I, KCF will fabricate a prototype broadband vibration power harvester and demonstrate sufficient output to power a FIPS 140.2 compatible sensor node (future version of the S5NAPTM by RLW). In Phase II, KCF will partner with RLW, Penn State, and York Johnson Controls for a system demonstration of self-powered wireless shipboard sensors.BENEFITS: On Navy shipboard systems, cost restrictions are at odds with the desire to measure as many components as possible for manpower reduction, improved Thermal Management, health monitoring and other FNC goals. A broadband self-charging power supply (vibration power harvesting) is the way to deploy shipboard wireless sensors with minimum lifecycle cost and manpower requirements. The technology could greatly expand the use of wireless sensors, in turn enabling a revolution in health monitoring and detection capabilities for Navy ships. Applications for S5NAPT wireless sensor networks under development include monitoring machinery onboard ships, airplanes, land vehicles, and helicopters, and in factories, refineries, power plants, and water treatment facilities. Candidate machinery includes gearboxes, motors, pumps, rotating shafts, and rotors. All of this equipment produces, through normal operation, sinusoidal vibrations that can be utilized for energy harvesting. Current development is targeting naval shipboard machinery applications and industrial installations such as pumps and motors.

LIGHTNING PACKS LLC
401 School House Lane
Strafford, PA 19087
(610) 995-2728

PI: Mr. Louis Flynn
(215) 898-6801
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0309
THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.
112 Electrical Engineering E.
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 865-1266

ID#: N064-026-0008
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-026       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Harvesting Electric Power from Walking
Abstract:   Over the past three years, Lightning Packs LLC has invented, developed, tested, and patented the innovative Suspended-load Backpack which extracts mechanical energy from the vertical movement of carried loads and converts it to unprecedented levels of electricity during normal human walking (up to 7.4 W, about ~300-fold greater than the previously published attempts of only 20 mW). Our human testing has shown that the additional metabolic cost associated with electricity generation is kept very low due to a compensatory change in gait which reduces the metabolic power required for walking. Further, a consequence of the backpack's design is that peak dynamic forces are reduced by ~20%, making it more comfortable than normal backpacks. Initial development has begun on power electronic circuitry capable of providing the electrical power required by portable electronic devices and energy storage devices, while providing sufficient damping of the backpack mechanical dynamics for optimal ergonomics. In Phase I, we will finish the development of our innovative circuitry through the development of a custom power electronic controller which provides optimal energy harvesting from the backpack system while determining the appropriate allocation of harvested energy to the energy storage devices and portable electronic devices. BENEFITS: Commercialization Lightning Packs LLC is in an unique position to commercialize the electricity-generating backpack and provide power to the Marines and soldiers while on the move. The Suspended-load backpack was invented 2003 by Dr. Larry Rome, a Biology Professor at the University of Pennsylvania, in response to a request from the Office of Naval Research to develop a way to capture mechanical energy from human movement and convert it to electrical energy, thereby reducing the heavy loads of extra batteries carried by the Marines and soldiers. Lightning Packs was formed in 2004 by Dr. Rome specifically to commercialize the Suspended-load Backpack. The Suspended-load Backpack is a completely novel and innovative device. Accordingly, Lightning Packs received one patent with 25 claims for the electricity-generating backpack (US #6,982,497, issued on Jan 3, 2006), and has two US patents and Canadian and European patents pending for electricity-generating and ergonomic backpacks. The Lightning Packs team has also carried out extensive research over the past 2 years on the biomechanics and physiology of humans carrying loads and generating electricity with the Suspended load Backpack. Some of the results of these studies have been published in Science, while others represent proprietary intellectual property which enables Lightning Packs to predict the ergonomic effects of alterations to the design of the pack. This is a unique and crucial capability for successful commercialization. In addition, over the past 3 years, Lightning Packs has forged a close collaboration with Dr. Heath Hofmann at the Pennsylvanian State University (Penn State), who is one of the top experts in the country on energy harvesting and power electronics. His past and continuing efforts enable Lightning Packs to produce a backpack with state-of the art electronic control system which not only efficiently conditions the electricity, but controls damping of the mechanical load as well; a necessity for this device. Recognizing that solving this problem was crucial for further commercialization, Dr. Hofmann and Lighting Packs started working in advance of the solicitation and found a functional solution. Hence, we now have a clear road to commercialization as well as a demonstrable track record of our teams working effectively together. Finally, Lightning Packs has also had several groups from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania analyze the market and produce a business plan. The plan presents a favorable future for commercialization. In Phase I, we will finish the development of this novel electronic circuitry, so at the beginning of Phase II we will have a good prototype for testing. In Phase II, we will pursue additional innovations and proceed to improve the ergonomics and electricity generation while reducing the weight. Improved energy harvesting will be accomplished by using more efficient generators, gearing and electronic circuitry. Reduction in weight will involve a Finite Element Analysis-driven removal of material as well as switching to lighter-weight material. We will also examine reconfiguring the components of the backpack to reduce redundant structures. Our goal will be to reduce the weight to a level which is about 2-3 lbs more than a normal backpack. As this will save carrying 15-20 lbs of batteries, and will also be more ergonomic, this presents a very attractive option to troops. Anticipated Benefits Humans have become increasingly dependent on technology, particularly electronic devices. In the past decade, electronic devices have become more mobile, enabling us to use medical, communication, computation and GPS devices, as well as sophisticated weapons systems as we move around cities, wilderness or the battlefield. At present, all of these devices run off of batteries which have limited lifetimes and add considerable weight to the device. The combination of the limited lifetimes and the large weight of batteries is particularly crucial in military applications. Soldiers must carry heavy packs (> 80 lbs), and as much as 25% of this weight is replacement batteries. Millions of dollars have gone into developing a portable and renewable energy source, however the devices currently available commercially or described in peer-reviewed journals are in the tens of milliwatt range, which is too low to be a significant solution. To solve this problem, we developed a passive device, the Suspended-Load Backpack, which extracts mechanical energy during walking and then converts up to 7.5 W of electricity. Following publication of the paper in Science, Lightning Packs received hundreds of requests for information about the backpack. In addition to military applications, the electricity generation, combined with efficient electricity storage devices, can help provide disaster-relief workers, fire fighters, forest fire fighters as well recreational hikers freedom from the heavy weight of replacement batteries, and thereby extend their abilities to operate in remote areas. This was a significant problem following the Asian Tsunami. Interestingly, field-scientists can not only use the backpack to power their GPS and instrumentation, but they can modify the mechanism to be worn by large animals, thereby permitting the animals to generate their own power, enabling radio collars to transmit physiological information indefinitely. Further, Lightning Packs has been asked to collaborate on a US Navy Project installing the mechanism on ocean reconnaissance buoys to power their instrumentation. In addition to providing people in first-world counties power while they are working off the electric grid, the energy levels generated by the backpack can have dramatic benefits for people living in developing nations. A large proportion of the population in developing countries live off the electric grid. A UN report forwarded to us by its author, spells out how major health and societal problems in remote villages can solved by small electrical sources such as from our backpack. For instance, a major health problem is contaminated drinking water-living off the grid prevents filtration. However, devices have been developed to kill bacteria with UV light which require very little electrical power (5 W for 30s (1500 J) per litre of water). Hence a small amount of electricity can provide healthful drinking water, can help provide energy for routine medical tests, and provide abilities to communicate in times of natural disaster and medical emergency. In short, finding a solution to such a universal problem as electricity generation in remote areas coupled with technological advances in low power devices, will likely solve problems that are not even anticipated today. Ergonomic Backpacks Although the driving force for the original design was to produce electrical energy, we have shown that the Suspended-load Backpack can be "retuned" to help humans with another problem, carrying around heavy loads. Based on our results, wearing the Suspended-load Backpack will reduce peak ground forces and more importantly reduce forces on the shoulder. This in turn should lead to a reduction in fatigue and orthopedic problems and may permit the carriage of greater loads. In addition, the reduction in body forces permits much faster movements, thereby making running with loads possible, a potentially important capability for rapidly responding troops. This obviously has civilian applications too. Beside recreational backpackers and runners, the extra agility is very important to first responders (e.g. firemen) and disaster relief workers who may have to travel quickly with heavy loads. In addition, it will permit endurance training of military and civilians with reduced injury. Finally, it may solve a significant public health problem of "book bag syndrome" in children, caused by young students carrying 25-40 lb backpack filled with books. By reducing dynamic loads, we predict the Suspended-load Backpack will significantly reduce orthopedic and musculoskeletal injuries. Because of having multiple markets, we are presently planning a multiprong approach. The main focus will be providing the electricity generating backpack to the military. The Marine Corps will be our initial market. We also believe that our ergonomic backpacks may also represent a valuable system to the military. In the civilian sector, we will target large hiking ergonomic backpacks (and a smaller market for electricity-generating backpacks.) We will also develop a small ergonomic backpack to carry books and school supplies in what is a very large market (70 million elementary through college students).

LUNA INNOVATIONS, INC.
2851 Commerce Street
Blacksburg, VA 24060
(540) 552-5128

PI: Dr. Joseph Heyman
(540) 552-5128
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0291
VIRGINIA TECH
460 Turner Street, Suite 306
Blacksburg, VA 24060
(540) 231-5281

ID#: N064-011-0271
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-011       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Non-Destructive Evaluation / Inspection (NDE/NDI) for Aero Turbine Hot Section Castings and Coatings
Abstract:   Luna Innovations Incorporated will conduct a feasibility study of a non-linear, ultrasonic, non-destructive method of evaluating heat transfer and structural characterization of gas turbine engine hot section parts. The proposed concept is a novel ultrasonic measurement which will be used to determine change in heat flux for determining heat transfer. An ultrasonic transducer will be used for the materials characterization as well as the NDI for flaws and structural characteristics. The measurement system will be able to scan a turbine airfoil or hot section component and provide digital indications of heat transfer and internal defects in the parts. The system would be able to scan each part completely for defects as well as blockages in cooling lines while also determining heat transfer characteristics. Current methods are labor intensive, complex, expensive, and provide limited resolution. Luna's concept provides detailed flaw detection and performance evaluation with limited user interaction.BENEFITS: Blockages of cooling lines in turbine airfoils and hot section components can cause severe damage to aircraft components and can lead to failures. The turbines often operate in extreme environmental conditions which can bring the air around parts to temperatures above their melting points so it becomes extremely important to ensure that all of the intricate cooling lines are unblocked and defect free, to ensure proper heat transfer. The proposed method could be applied to commercial aircraft as well as other engine parts that are exposed to extreme thermal and pressurized environments. The technique has the potential to be extended to the field for tests in place.

LUNA INNOVATIONS, INC.
2851 Commerce Street
Blacksburg, VA 24060
(540) 552-5128

PI: Mr. Jeffrey Grant
(540) 552-5128
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0284
RESEARCH TRIANGLE INSTITUTE INT'L.
3040 Cornwallis Road
Research Triangle Pa, NC 27709-2194
(919) 541-6000

ID#: N064-020-0287
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-020       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Power Harvesting for Encrypted Wireless Sensor Clusters
Abstract:   There is a great need to decrease the dependence upon traditional batteries in modern miniature devices. Not only do batteries increase the size of ever shrinking components, they also do not provide the operational lifetime that is being demanded of newer components. Alternative power sources need to be able to scavenge ambient power from the environment to be able to provide power for newer expected lifetimes. Luna Innovations and RTI propose to develop a high efficiency energy harvester which scavenges energy from ambient thermal gradients. RTI's expertise in thermoelectric conversion and Luna's state of the art wireless sensors will provide a robust solution capable of operating unattended for several years. BENEFITS: This research will have many different commercial applications. Consumer electronics are becoming more pervasive in modern life, and the ability to power them without continuously changing or recharging batteries will further their usefulness. There are also many industrial applications where wireless sensors, like the ones manufactured by Luna Innovations, could significantly reduce costs, and providing a long term power solution without having to continually replace the power supply would further reduce maintenance costs.

MAINSTREAM ENGINEERING CORP.
200 Yellow Place Pines Industrial Center
Rockledge, FL 32955
(321) 631-3550

PI: Dr. Michael Curbirth
(321) 631-3550
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0194
STANFORD UNIV.
Thermoscience Group Bldg. 520
Stanford, CA 94305-3032
(656) 725-2019

ID#: N064-024-0459
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-024       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Demonstration of Drag Reduction Using Nanotube Coated Hydrophobic Surfaces
Abstract:   With higher fuel costs and desire for ehanced performance, new techniques for improving efficiencies in marine propulsion are required. The reduction of the viscous drag is one such technique. Various active and passive measures have been extensively researched with mixed results for total energy savings. However, recent research in microfluidics has indicated significant drag reduction using super-hydrophobic surfaces. To achieve this, a low free energy surface with micro-scale roughness is required. One promising technique uses chemically treated nanotubes as the super-hydrophobic surface which results in high contact angles with low hysteresis. However, previous methods for creating these nanotube coated surfaces are not feasible for manufacturing large-scale structures due to cost and complexity. Mainstream will rely on its expertise in innovative fabrication processes for nanotubes to demonstrate super-hydrophobic surfaces using chemically treated nanotubes that are feasible for large-scale surfaces. The Phase I effort will characterize the optimum properties of the nanotube coated hydrophobic surface and demonstrate the feasibility of this surface for macro-scale drag reduction using small-scale test surfaces in a fully turbulent flow through computational and experimental methods. Phase II will fabricate and test nanotube coated hydrophobic surfaces of model size with Reynolds numbers typical of marine vessels. BENEFITS: The drag reduction capability using nanotube coatings will have application for a variety of commercial marine vessels used within the private and military sectors to improve fuel efficiency and/or allowing for increased maximum velocity. This technology has a potential to be used with an anticorrosive or anti-fouling coating for long life within wetted conditions thereby reducing maintenance costs.

MAKEL ENGINEERING, INC.
1585 Marauder St.
Chico, CA 95973
(530) 895-2771

PI: Dr. Benjamin Ward
(216) 587-4750
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0300
UNIVERISITIES SPACE RESEARCH ASSOC.
10211 Wincopin Circle Suite 50
Columbia, MD 21044
(410) 730-2656

ID#: N064-010-0231
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-010       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Miniature Electronic Sniffer for Navy Vertical Take off Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (VTUAVs)
Abstract:   Makel Engineering Inc. and Universities Space Research Institute propose to develop a reliable, low false alarm system for use with VTUAVs to provide standoff detection capabilities for surface vessels during encounters with potentially explosive-laden vessels. The proposed glow-discharge based detection system would be extremely compact (<1 lb.) and provide highly sensitive detection of explosives and the potential to detect a broad range of chemical and biological agents. Mass detection limits of ppm to ppb are anticipated.BENEFITS: In addition to use in VTUAVs, potential markets include explosive detection systems for federal, state, and municipal government agencies, as well as the private sector. The proposed work involves the development of a highly sensitive, but generally applicable detection system that can detect a variety of species in addition to explosive, such as chemical weapons, biological agents, toxic industrial compounds, and drug processing lab chemicals.

MATERIALS & ELECTROCHEMICAL RESEARCH (MER) CORP.
7960 S. Kolb Road
Tucson, AZ 85706
(520) 574-1980

PI: Dr. James C. Withers
(520) 574-1980
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0268
REGENTS OF UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA
c/o Sponsored Projects Office
Berkeley, CA 94720-5940
(510) 642-0120

ID#: N064-021-0150
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-021       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: The Application of Titanium as a Low Cost Structural and Armor Material for Off-Board Surface Vessels (OBVs)
Abstract:   Titanium is a near ideal material for operating in harsh marine environments, but has not been widely utilized due to cost. A breakthrough has been demonstrated for producing titanium structural net shapes and composite armor at a cost of only a few dollars per pound above the cost of primary titanium sponge. Such processing can be utilized to produce cost effective net shape titanium components, the entire off board surface vessel (OBVs) in titanium, as well as a composite titanium armor for any OBV. The composite titanium armor can be integrated in one piece into titanium OBV components. Cost, weight and performance trade off analysis will be performed for application of the low cost titanium/titanium armor to OBVs and a demonstration structural and/or armor prototype(s) will be fabricated and delivered in Phase I.BENEFITS: Low cost titanium has applications throughout off shore oil exploration, commercial surface vessels, water desalinization throughout defense including armor and all marine applications.

MATERIALS & ELECTROCHEMICAL RESEARCH (MER) CORP.
7960 S. Kolb Rd.
Tucson, AZ 85706
(520) 574-1980

PI: Dr. R.O.Loutfy
(520) 574-1980
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0316
NEW MEXICO INSTITUTE OF MINING &
801 Leroy Place
Socorro, NM 87801
(505) 835-5152

ID#: N064-031-0515
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-031       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Functionalized Double-Walled Nanotubes for High Performance Composites
Abstract:   It is proposed to incorporate functionalized double-walled carbon nanotube fillers into high-performance epoxy and vinyl ester resins as a means of substantially improving mechanical properties of the resulting nanocomposite materials. Covalent functionalization of only outer tube wall will leave the inner tube intact, thus preserving the exceptionally high mechanical properties of a DWNT to a maximum possible degree. Functionalization strategy is directed towards finding functional groups that provide the best compatibility and bonding with the structural resins of interest. This would eventually result in perfect dispersion of DWNTs in the resin and much improved load transfer between the tube and the matrix. These parameters will be characterized with electron microscopy and various spectroscopy techniques, which provide a better insight into the structure and functioning of the interface layer and lay grounds for an understanding the effects that the functional groups have on the mechanical properties of nanocomposites. By measuring the mechanical properties of the DWNT composites on the macro- and micro-level, and correlating them to the type and degree of functionalization, the optimum functional group and manufacturing procedure for resins of interest will be selected for in-depth exploration during Phase II. Comparative studies of functionalization of DWNTs and SWNTs and of mechanical performance of corresponding nanocomposites will be performed to analyze the feasibility of the proposed approach. BENEFITS: If the project is successful and is carried out into Phases II and III, the greatest benefits are expected for the NAVY PMS 500 Destroyer Class Program where exceptionally strong and marine environment stable epoxy and vinyl ester composites are needed. This need presents new challenges and opportunities to the research and technology development efforts, one of which is in designing the advanced composite materials based on nanotube fillers and should be successful in the present project by means of functionalized DWNT incorporation in resins of interest. This anticipation is based, in part, on very promising results in terms of mechanical properties obtained recently at MER Corporation with polyethylene DWNT composites. Due to very large market for polymer composite materials and growing demand for their high performance in the military and civil sector, the significant improvement in mechanical properties expected from functionalized DWNT involvement would have easily find a niche in various applications, including commercial shipbuilding, construction, automobile, aviation and space, and sporting goods industries. Thus, this program could have significant technical, economical and social benefits to the Nation.

MATERIALS SCIENCES CORP.
181 Gibraltar Road
Horsham, PA 19044
(215) 542-8400

PI: Ms. Carol Stager
(215) 542-8400
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0211
UNIV. OF DELAWARE
Delaware and Academy Streets
Newark, DE 19716
(302) 831-8898

ID#: N064-017-0367
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-017       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Advanced Composites Research to Reduce Cost (MSC P6016)
Abstract:   The high manufacturing success rate achieved in the fabrication of glass fabric laminates and sandwich constructions using the Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer molding (VARTM) process has not been duplicated for carbon fabric parts due to the slower, more complex flow processes that occur in carbon fabrics. Part reject rates have been high due to the presence of significant void concentrations and/or balsa to laminate interface disbonds. The goal of the STTR program outlined in this proposal is to demonstrate that intelligent infusion methods utilizing infusion modeling and infusion flow sensor technologies will result in consistently produced, high quality carbon laminates and sandwich structures. This STTR program is focused on determining and demonstrating advancements to existing flow modeling capabilities and resin sensor technologies to enable their utilization in large parts, with (conductive) carbon fabrics, and in humid, temperature-variable infusion environments; and transitioning these capabilities and technologies for routine use on the shop floor. BENEFITS: Development and implementation of the proposed technology will significantly reduce scrap rates of large, resin-infused carbon fabric parts resulting in significant labor and materials cost savings. The developed technology has application to commercial shipbuilding, recreational marine craft, wind turbine blades, sports equipment, and other commercial applications of carbon fabric.

MATHEMATICAL SYSTEMS & SOLUTIONS, INC.
685 Busch Garden Dr.
Pasadena, CA 91105
(626) 395-4532

PI: Dr. Christophe Geuzaine
(216) 368-2909
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0214
CASE WESTERN RESEARCH UNIV.
10900 Euclid Ave
Cleveland, OH 44106-7015
(216) 368-4510

ID#: N064-018-0184
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-018       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Automation of Analysis Model Creation
Abstract:   The present text proposes the development of a computational infrastructure to enable rapid creation of high-quality conforming finite-element computational models---compatible with all existing finite-element simulation tools. The specific proofs-of-concept to be pursued in the Phase I will revolve around generation of tetrahedral meshes, but extensions to other types of finite-element types (e.g. hexahedral meshes) will be developed fully as part of the Phase II work. The proposed infrastructure will be built upon a novel surface-representation methodology based on Fourier analysis and a certain continuation method for the resolution of the Gibbs phenomenon. The resulting software will be able to produce both 1) High-quality, large-patch parametrizations of general surfaces, and, from these, 2) Conforming surface and volume finite element representations for complex three-dimensional structures. We expect that, in view of the ability of the continuation method to parametrize large portions of a given surface starting a CAD representation - while, at the same time, repairing, abstracting and completing surface features, the resulting infrastructure will allow for creation of finite-element models of high quality in human-operator times of the order of a small fraction of those required by procedures in use at present.BENEFITS: We expect that, in view of the ability of the proposed software to develop three dimensional meshes starting from a point cloud arising, e.g, from a CAD representations while, at the same time, repairing, abstracting and completing surface features, the resulting infrastructure will allow for creation of finite-element models of high quality, addressing issues concerning element quality, surface repair, and coarsening/refinement around boundaries and geometric singularities, in human-operator times of the order of a small fraction of those required by procedures in use at present. There is a well recognized need for a computational capability of the type proposed in this text within the multi-billion dollar Computer Aided Design and graphics world. One of the goals of the proposed work is to produce software that interfaces transparently with the substantial CAD infrastructure already in place within the Navy, DoD and commercial concerns, to facilitate design and virtual testing of products, vehicles, weapon systems, etc.

MAXENTRIC TECHNOLOGIES LLC
2071 Lemoine Avenue Suite 302
Fort Lee, NJ 07024
(201) 242-9805

PI: Mr. Houman Ghajari
(858) 272-8800
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0206
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO
9500 Gilman Drive
La Jolla, CA 92093
(858) 822-4391

ID#: N064-004-0272
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-004       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Command and Control for Embedded Systems
Abstract:   MaXentric's NAVAIR Embedded Assessment System (NEAS) offers a command and control methodology for embedded sensors. NEAS is designed to operate in challenging scenarios, such as weapons effect damage assessment of hard and deeply buried targets. NEAS corrects for deficiencies that are inherent with embedded sensory systems, such as limited communication links, low computational power, small processor memory sizes, noisy sensors, and sensor failure. NEAS enables advanced methods of exploiting embedded sensor networks through two innovations: a novel embedded processing architecture, and an artificial intelligence approach to network behavior. These two features enable dynamic command and control of event reporting, data filtering, collaboration, and data fusion. Phase I efforts focus on evaluation of the feasibility of the sensor network formation, its operation and viability of the sensor data collection, and its data exploitation methodology. BENEFITS: MaXentric's NAVAIR Embedded Assessment System (NEAS) lays a dependable foundation for effective deployment and operation of embedded sensors, and is thus well positioned to capitalize on this critical demand from both government and commercial markets. Embedded sensors are envisioned to be the "eyes" and "ears" of a modernized U.S. military. MaXentric's NEAS enables U.S. forces to use embedded sensors to increase precision, lethality, and efficiency. Some prime examples are battle damage assessment, combat power estimation, and portside security. In the long term, embedded networked sensing systems will be found almost everywhere, from the car to the hospital operating room and to the home. MaXentric's NEAS Command and Control interface for these "smart" embedded sensor networks will enable revolutionary technologies, including Mass Transit Automation, Autonomous Building Management, and Smart Cars.

MAXENTRIC TECHNOLOGIES LLC
2071 Lemoine Avenue Suite 302
Fort Lee, NJ 07024
(201) 242-8805

PI: Mr. Houman Ghajari
(858) 272-8800
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0257
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO
9500 Gilman Drive
La Jolla, CA 92093-0405
(858) 822-2128

ID#: N064-009-0273
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-009       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: High Linearity-High Efficiency Power Amplifiers Based on Digital Signal Processing Techniques and Wide Bandgap Devices
Abstract:   The goal of this project is the development of effective signal processing and circuits for high power amplifiers and transmitter modules for DoD wireless communication airborne and ground systems. Future base stations require wide bandwidth, high power, high voltage, wide dynamic range, excellent linearity, and high power efficiency. This research is critical to airborne and ground base station applications used for both mobile voice communication links and higher data rate multi-media mobile data communication links. Such systems have high bandwidth efficiency stemming from complex modulation and wide spreading bandwidth, but as a consequence must employ high dynamic range, high bandwidth amplifiers. The amplifiers must also have low power consumption, which dictates operation in saturation for peak efficiency. These requirements oppose each other, and require advanced approaches to realize improved performance.BENEFITS: This research has strategic relevance for today's wireless communication industry. In order to insure electromagnetic compatibility of the shared radio spectrum, the DoD must enforce strict limitations on both RF power and RF bandwidth. The military is then forced to make maximum use of the permitted power and spectrum for capacity, coverage, and quality of service. Hence, high linearity with complex modulation schemes must be employed at the power amplifier. Both high linearity requirements and next generation modulation schemes yield high power RF amplifiers with only 8% to 16% power efficiency using today's technology. One of the goals of this research is to improve high power RF amplifier efficiency to over 50% in next generation system. A multi-band frequency and multi-sector ground based Naval radio base station consumes 4000W to 5000W of power from its -48V DC power input. More than half of this power is consumed by the RF high power amplifiers. The RF power amplifiers are also the least reliable component in the base station due to the high operating temperatures created by their high heat dissipation. Another 4000 to 5000W is consumed by the AC to DC power system and air conditioning system. Furthermore, large banks of lead-acid batteries are used to back up the system. The proposed research could result in greater 50% reduction in heat produced by the base station. Consequently, focusing on the power amplifier will reduce power consumption, improve reliability, reduce system cost, reduce battery count, and reduce size and weight for the entire radio base station. The goal of this program - developing breakthrough performance improvement in high power amplifiers for the wireless communication systems - will benefit the E2 Advanced Hawkeye - and more generally the NAVAIR telecommunication sector.

MECHMATH LLC
14530 Bluebird Trail
Prior Lake, MN 55372
(952) 402-9642

PI: Dr. Svetlana Kovinskaya
(952) 402-9642
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0217
UNIV. OF MINNESOTA
3rd SE Avenue at Mississippi
Minneapolis, MN 55414
(612) 625-2883

ID#: N064-022-0190
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-022       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Waterjet Wake Characterization Suite
Abstract:   The US Navy is interested in analytical methods and tools to predict ship bubbly wake acoustic signatures for waterjet propelled surface ships with underwater waterjet outlet such as the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS). Wake features of propeller-driven ships are well studied, but the ability to perform predictive analysis and wakes from waterjet driven advanced hull forms do not currently exist. The methods suggested by the firm are assigned to analyze (1) cavitation inception and growth in the mixing region of the jet and the surrounding hull wake, (2) the bubble evolution in the turbulent flow to the far wake and (3) sound propagation in the bubbly far wake and reflection coefficients for the ship wakes. The suggested tools suite will be composed from elements preliminary proven on simplified problems and manifested the ability to predict scale effects. Their following validation by Phase I and Option 1 experiments on measurements of bubble distributions in the model wake will be performed in the water tunnel of the Saint Anthony Fall Laboratory at the University of Minnesota. BENEFITS: Commercialization will include a large variety of ships, from fast ferries to recreation boats.

MICHIGAN ENGINEERING SERVICES, LLC
2890 Carpenter Road, Suite 1900
Ann Arbor, MI 48108
(734) 358-0777

PI: Dr. Nick Vlahopoulos
(734) 358-0792
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0249
UNIV. OF MICHIGAN
NA&ME Dept. 2600 Draper Road
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
(734) 763-6644

ID#: N064-016-0389
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-016       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Advanced System of Systems Design Capability
Abstract:   Successful advanced Naval ship design must be based on integrating multiple cross-functional systems. Future Naval systems will require innovation and a systematic integration in order to achieve increasingly demanding mission profiles in a cost effective manner. Since a large amount of the design cost (up to 80%) is locked during the conceptual phase, it is important to include both the traditional Naval Architecture concerns and the specialized war fighting operational objectives within the conceptual design. Accurate assessment of proper specifications and design objectives using a system of systems cost conscious design environment will eliminate situations where cost becomes prohibiting because performance expectations were set at each system level without coordination and without a parallel interaction among systems' performance and objectives. The proposing firm (MES) has been developing a system for Multi-Disciplinary Optimization under Uncertainty (MDO-U) and has applied it successfully to space vehicle design. MES has also developed Fast Running Model (FRM) technology for performing high fidelity simulations rapidly within an iterative environment (i.e. optimization, model update, error estimation). Both capabilities will be employed for developing a flexible and modular Tree-MDO-U (T-MDO-U) tool for system of systems design. If desired, T-MDO-U will allow including established Naval design tools (i.e. ASSET-LEAPS) within the design process. In collaboration with the Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Department at the University of Michigan, MES will validate the T-MDO-U in a ship design environment and will demonstrate the value of a systematic probabilistic design in achieving cost savings.BENEFITS: The T-MDO-U development will allow performing system of systems design in a systematic manner that considers the interaction among systems. It will include uncertainty in the optimization process and will bring high fidelity analyses into the early design stage. The T-MDO-U will be validated within a ship design environment and upon completion it will allow rapid evaluation of alternative ship designs for Naval warfare scenarios. Beyond the Naval field and the shipbuilding industry, the T-MDO-U product will be valuable in aerospace, automotive, military ground vehicle, heavy construction equipment, and bioengineering industries for designing complex and cost conscious products.

MICROLUTION, INC.
2010 W. Fulton St Suite C-318
Chicago, IL 60612
(312) 637-9759

PI: Mr. Andrew Phillip
(312) 637-9759
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0306
UNIV. OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CH
Office of Sponsored Programs 1
Champaign, IL 61820-7450
(217) 333-6323

ID#: N064-030-0388
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-030       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Micro-factory for Miniaturization, Portability and Remote Production
Abstract:   The authors developed an automated microfactory prototype at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2005 as part of a grant from the US Army Aviation and Missile Command. The prototype provided proof-of-concept for important microfactory technologies, and revealed gaps between the state-of-the-art and the Navy microfactory requirements listed in the solicitation. The proposed innovations address the technical challenges in modularity, mass-production, micro-assembly, in-situ metrology, portability and ruggedness. A distributed control scheme, a modularized material conveyance system and a uniform mechanical and electrical interface system will be developed to address modularity requirements. New systems for automated processing of incoming material and automated micro-assembly of Navy devices will be designed. Generalized micro/meso-scale metrology capabilities will be provided through alternative sensor technologies and a new data collection and processing algorithm. An analysis of microfactory performance and capability metrics versus the specification level for portability and ruggedness will be created. Special focus will be given to the microfactory environmental control system. Phase I will provide the top-level designs for the phase II production of a microfactory system that is both deployable for on-site, rapid-response production of high-value defense applications and commercially viable for a broad range of non-defense applications.BENEFITS: The microfactory product resulting from the proposed development will provide both DoD and commercial vendors with micro-scale production capabilities that deliver lowered capital and operating costs and improved performance compared with traditional technologies. These capabilities will improve existing DoD and commercial micro-manufacturing applications and enable new, advanced applications. The proposed innovations will also have commercial benefits through improved micro-machining process capabilities (for immediate use at Microlution) in the areas of metrology and micro-assembly. Additional benefits will be gained through improved micro/meso-scale machine tool (mMT) design from the modularity, portability and ruggedness development work included in the proposal.

NANOHMICS, INC.
6201 East Oltorf St. Suite 400
Austin, TX 78741
(512) 389-9990

PI: Dr. Mike Durrett
(512) 389-9990
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0296
PURDUE UNIV.
302 Wood St Young-Rm723
West Lafayette, IN 47907-2108
(765) 494-4728

ID#: N064-012-0108
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-012       Awarded: 21AUG06
Title: Picosecond Laser Drilling of Ceramic Matrix Composites
Abstract:   In collaboration with Dr. Y. Shin of Purdue University Nanohmics Inc. proposes to develop picosecond laser drilling technology for SiC continuous fiber ceramic matrix composites (CMC). The application of this new technology will significantly reduce the cost of machining CMC components for new applications in advanced engines such as the F135, an engine under development by Pratt & Whitney. The very recent advent of rugged and cost effective lasers operating in the picosecond regime supplies a means to drill holes and slots that are essentially free of burrs and with a very minimal amount of substrate damage. In this effort, achievable aspect ratio's will be increased, optimal machining parameters will be developed and a plan to integrate the technology into Pratt & Whitney operations will be devised. BENEFITS: The utility of a methodology to rapidly micro-drill a range of materials with the absence of substrate damage or recast/melt splash is large. A range of CMC applications as well as other material including turbine blades with micro-drilled cooling holes, ink jet cartridge nozzles, fuel injector nozzles and the ability to microstructure metal surfaces - such as the honed cylinder walls of engines to create lubricant retaining surfaces - are all examples. The extremely high pulse repetition frequency of these tools make them viable alternatives to nanosecond lasers.

NANOLAB, INC.
55 Chapel St
Newton, MA 02458
(617) 581-6747

PI: Mr. David L. Carnahan
(617) 581-6747
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0319
NORTHWESTERN UNIV.
2145 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL 60208-3111
(847) 467-0343

ID#: N064-031-0033
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-031       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Functionalized Nanotubes for High Performance Composites
Abstract:   Carbon nanotubes, have extraordinary mechanical properties, but these properties are difficult to manifest in composites, due to their limited interfacial bonding, and therefore the inability to transfer loads from a polymer matrix. Chemical functionalization of the nanotube surface is required to improve the interfacial load transfer, but functionalization may degrade the tensile properties of the nanotubes. NanoLab will investigate, together with Dr. Ruoff of Northwestern University, functionalization methods that provide improved bonding with common structural resins, while leaving the nanotube structures as intact as possible. Together, we will learn a great deal about the effects that functionalization will have upon the mechanical and physical properties of CNTs. During the Phase I effort, NanoLab and Northwestern will: 1. Functionalize single wall and multiwall carbon nanotubes. 2. Determine their functional group concentrations. 3. Perform mechanical tests on INDIVIDUAL functionalized carbon nanotubes. Next, using the functionalization protocols that are least injurious to the nanotubes properties, we will employ vacuum assisted resin transfer molding to form epoxy-nanotube composites. Finally, Northwestern will document the mechanical properties of the infiltrated composites. BENEFITS: The potential commercial application area for carbon nanotube based composites is huge. Carbon nanotubes are rapidly becoming affordable and available in large quantities, and will soon take their place on the composite designer's shelf. Nanotubes have impressive strength, toughness, and low density, making them exceptionally valuable for composites such as wings, fuselages, panels, etc.

NANORIDGE MATERIALS, INC.
2315 Schlumberger St.
Houston, TX 77023
(713) 928-6180

PI: Dr. Jiang Zhu
(713) 928-6180
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0318
RICE UNIV.
6100 Main Street
Houston, TX 77005
(713) 348-6016

ID#: N064-031-0546
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-031       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Functionalized Nanotubes for High Performance Composites
Abstract:   This STTR proposal seeks to investigate the chemical functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes and their use as reinforcing agents for high performance polymer composites (epoxy and vinyl ester). Rice University has been very successful in research on nanotube functionalization and incorporation into polymer composites. Significant mechanical property improvements have been demonstrated using small amounts of functionalized nanotubes. NanoRidge Materials Inc. intends to transfer these proprietary technologies into large scale commercial applications through further research and development efforts to achieve additional property enhancements with cost effective and scalable processes. The objective of this Proposal is to identify the optimal functionalized nanotube for epoxy and to integrate into epoxy composites for significant mechanical property enhancement. Major technical tasks of Phase I are: (1) develop nanotube functionalization routines to attach functional groups compatible with structural epoxy resins and obtain improved dispersion and bonding in matrix; (2) determine the optimum degree of functionalization such that nanotube mechanical properties are not deteriorated, while nanotubes are maximally utilized as reinforcement. This will involve characterization of the effect of functionalization on the mechanical properties of nanotubes; (3) Develop processing technology to incorporate such functionalized SWNT into epoxy and/or vinyl ester composites and achieve significant mechanical property enhancements. BENEFITS: Successful completion of the Phase I and Phase I Option will provide the technical basis for understanding the degree of functionalization of SWNTs, and the effective influence on mechanical properties of epoxy and vinyl ester resin nanocomposites. Initial process conditions for both the functionalization steps and the subsequent dispersion procedures into the resin will be developed. The technical advancements from Phase I and the anticipated follow-on Phase II efforts will be applicable to a variety of industrial products and systems as well as to the Navy's interests. Potential commercial applications in such diverse areas as aerospace, industrial (including oil & gas), municipal piping infrastructure, and transportation infrastructure such as bridges and guards, will benefit from the direct translation of this technology into product development efforts.

NANOSONIC, INC.
P.O. Box 618
Christiansburg, VA 24068
(540) 953-1785

PI: Mrs. M. Berg
(540) 953-1785
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0252
UNIV. OF DAYTON
300 College Park
Dayton, OH 45469
(937) 229-1000

ID#: N064-014-0196
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-014       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Nanostructured Erosion Resistant Coatings for Zinc Sulfide Windows and Domes
Abstract:   Forward looking infrared (FLIR) systems are imaging devices that use two basic ranges of the infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum: 3-5 Šm (MWIR) and 8-12 Šm (LWIR). These systems have applications in naval vessels, helicopters, armored fighting vehicles and fixed-wing aircraft. The goal of this proposed STTR Phase I project is to apply AR and compliant, erosion-resistant coatings to multispectral zinc sulfide, using NanoSonic's patented Electrostatic Self-Assembly method. This coating system will dramatically increase the infrared transmission of zinc sulfide (> 90%) and maintain the integrity of the substrate through strong adhesion over a useful temperature range under adverse weather conditions. BENEFITS: Delamination Resistant Coating Systems for FLIR have applications for virtually every ground-based operation including force protection, surveillance, border patrol, perimeter security and special operations. Benefits for commercial aviation systems and camera and video devices are also anticipated.

NANOSONIC, INC.
P.O. Box 618
Christiansburg, VA 24068
(540) 953-1785

PI: Dr. Kevin Farinholt
(540) 953-1785
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0312
MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UN.
815 R.L. Smith ME-EM Building
Houghton, MI 49931-1295
(906) 487-2709

ID#: N064-026-0368
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-026       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Harvesting Electric Power through an Instrumented PVDF Backpack Harness
Abstract:   The proposed research is to model, design and develop a prototype backpack harness that is capable of generating electricity due to the differential forces between the wearer and a backpack that occur during walking while minimizing the weight and effect on the soldier. The design will replace the traditional harness system with a prototype harness that incorporates piezoelectric polymer PVDF. Piezoelectric materials will allow the applied load to be directly converted to electrical energy, making them well suited for this application. The design will utilized piezoelectric polymer PVDF due to its high strength, flexibility and the ease with which it can be designed to replace current harnesses. Additionally, an advanced nanostructured electrode will be assembled on the material such that it can withstand the high cycle strain that would damage traditional electrodes. The foremost goal and novel aspect of the proposed effort is to generate a usable amount of electrical energy while maintaining the functionality of the harness. A system of energy storage electronics will be integrated with the PVDF harness to provide a functional prototype of the power harvesting backpack, which will be subjected to a series of experimental characterizations. BENEFITS: The proposed research offers significant potential in many military and civilian applications. The proposed energy harvesting backpack harness will be designed to integrate into the traditional backpack systems used by the military, providing power for communications, navigation and sensing electronics. In addition to the direct military application, this technology has significant potential in civilian markets as well. The overabundance of personal electronics in everyday life makes the system extremely viable for the commercial market. The technology could easily be transitioned to hiking backpacks, school backpack or travel luggage provide means for recharging handheld GPS systems, cellular phones, PDAs, or any other low power personal electronics device.

NAVATEK LTD.
Suite 1880 841 Bishop Street
Honolulu, HI 96813
(808) 531-7001

PI: Mr. Jeffrey E. Kline
(410) 544-0210
Contract #: N00014-07-M-0021
UNIV. OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI
118 College Drive #10037
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001
(601) 266-4781

ID#: N064-021-0417
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-021       Selected for Award
Title: Development of Lightweight and Low Cost Advanced Structural Materials for Off-board Surface Vessels (OBVs)
Abstract:   The Navatek, Ltd. Team will successfully demonstrate the feasibility of using Fiber Reinforced Composites (FRC) materials to significantly reduce the weight of the (hull) structure of the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) Unmanned Surface Vehicle (USV). We will use as a baseline for comparison our entrapment tunnel monohull (ETM) hullform. This hullform was selected by the Navy to satisfy the LCS (Flight 0) Spiral Alpha ASW Unmanned Surface Vehicle (USV) Mission System. This program is in support of Program Executive Officer, Littoral and Mine Warfare Littoral Combat Ship Mission Modules Program Office (PMS 420). For this STTR program we will directly compare the performance and cost benefits of an FRC composite hull system to that of the current Friction Stir Welding (FSW) aluminum hull USV. The composite hull will afford an increase in payload capacity of the USV while still fitting in the allocated footprint of the LCS stowage cradle. This additional payload will support either an: (1) increase in propulsion system horsepower and towing capacity across the speed regime; or an (2) increase in fuel load to support longer endurance missions. Additionally, the use of advanced composite materials will be evaluated for: 1. ballistic protection of mission critical subsystems; 2. improved shock and fatigue characteristics; and 3. reduction in recurring unit production cost (UPC). With these goals in mind, we have structured the Navatek Composite USV Team, with an emphasis on relevant experience and successful performance on major DoD maritime platform programs where a similar application of composites was introduced. Our team is comprised exclusively of small businesses and universities through Phase II execution. Navatek serves as Prime Contractor and provides the Navy's LCS Flight 0 USV platform hull design. Navatek will also provide system integration efforts to ensure LCS USV mission interface requirements are satisfied. Material Sciences Corporation (MSC) will provide composites engineering design and testing services to transition our baseline aluminum hull design to one of composite. The primary consideration will involve designing the hull structure to meet the current LCS USV performance specifications. The School for Polymers and High Performance Materials at the University of Southern Mississippi (USM) will conduct research and development to improve the performance and durability of composite materials for USVs. Furthermore, USM will investigate material systems critical to shock damping of mission critical equipment on board the USV. Seemann Composites Incorporated (SCI) will focus on developing an advanced manufacturing approach utilizing the SCRIMP Process and CNC technology to greatly improve manufacturing efficiency and quality of finished products. Our commercialization plan includes General Dynamics Robotic Systems (GD RS) to ensure the successful development of a full-scale prototype USV capable of operating on the Littoral Combat Ship. General Dynamics Robotic Systems (GD RS) serves as the Prime Contractor for the Navy's SPAWAR ASW USV Mission Program. BENEFITS: A spiral upgrade from aluminum to a Fiber Reinforced Composites (FRC) hull structure will offer significant benefits to the LCS Mission Modules Program Office. Specifically, reducing the current hull structure weight affords a larger weight fraction for propulsion, fuel or payload. The increased towing capability will facilitate a common USV platform to support all planned ASW and MIW towing missions. The added fuel load will extend the USV mission availability by offering greater reach (faster speeds and longer ranges). Additionally, by incorporating ballistic protection into the composite hull structure for mission critical components (engine, command and control, navigation) the USV would be more survivable in support of USV SUW missions where there is high probability of disabling small arms fire. The combined effect of these additional capabilities will provide a common USV platform for all three missions (ASW, MIW, SUW) and therein increase mission effectiveness and affordability for both the USV and the LCS.

NEXT CENTURY CORP.
8101 Sandy Spring Road
Laurel, MD 20707
(240) 790-3106

PI: Mr. Hyam Singer
(240) 790-3103
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0246
UNIV. OF WASHINGTON
Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences
Seattle, WA 98195
(206) 685-0910

ID#: N064-037-0318
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-037       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: High Resolution Micro-meteorological Tools for Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) Contaminant Transport and Dispersal Predictions
Abstract:   Next Century Corporation and the University of Washington's Department of Atmospheric Sciences propose development of the Micro-Meteorological Modeling (M3) system with the goal of rapidly performing high-resolution atmospheric dispersion modeling, ideally down to the microscale level, with a high degree of accuracy and confidence. Our M3 graphical user interface will provide the user with a highly intuitive display of the often complex results of these dispersion models, including risk assessment and confidence information. The M3 dispersion modeling capabilities will exploit the probabilistic forecast output of the Joint Ensemble Forecast System (JEFS). Our key innovations for designing and building the M3 solution proposed herein are primarily focused on: (1) innovative visualization, portrayal and decision support paradigms, (2) advanced algorithms and techniques for high resolution atmospheric modeling, and (3) a modular, component-based, open architecture for interoperability and extensibility. Our Phase I Base Period activities will focus on (a) rapid prototyping of user interface paradigms and visualization techniques and (b) preliminary algorithm development, refinement and selection. In addition to a Final Report, our Phase 1 deliverables will include a proof-of-concept prototype.BENEFITS: Our M3 solution's innovative and effective techniques for employing probabilistic forecasts to help improve the accuracy and precision of dispersion model output, coupled with our intuitive visualization paradigms for displaying model output based on risk and uncertainty, are expected to elicit strong interest from a wide range of homeland security, DoD and commercial users. In the DoD market, for example, the criticality of accurate weather forecasts to the success of U.S. military operations is driving a number of significant DoD-funded initiatives that are attempting to provide our military forces with an ever-improved rapid and accurate assessment of anticipated weather conditions. In addition to the leading edge research and development being performed by the team at the University of Washington's Department of Atmospheric Sciences, the Center for Geosciences/Atmospheric Research at Colorado State University, Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Lab (APL) and the University of Alaska's Geophysical Institute are just a few additional examples of research institutions that are under multi-million dollar contracts, often jointly sponsored by multiple branches of the military, to address known challenges and issues in this domain. Similarly, major development efforts such as the Joint Ensemble Forecast System (JEFS) are being heavily funded due to the expectation that such tools will yield tremendous benefits for their users. The value of such decision aids to DoD users is of equal importance to users in the commercial marketplace. For agricultural and energy commodity traders, food processing businesses, utilities and transportation companies, individual success and competitive advantage is highly dependent upon rapid access to accurate weather forecast and dispersion model information. Similarly, civilian agencies such as NOAA could benefit from a probabilistic forecast risk-based decision aid for determining when, for example, to evacuate populated areas due to the probability of contaminant dispersion. Probability forecasts are also expected to have significant economic benefits for the nation. Since a substantial portion of the economy is weather sensitive, a new economic sector of weather risk management has emerged. This management industry provides a "hedging tool," allowing companies to even out their weather sensitive costs. Better management by these companies, through effective tools such as probability forecasts, therefore benefits the general public in the form of lower cost for commodities, such as power. The energy industry already spends more than $50 million per year on private forecasts or hiring their own internal meteorologists. For the travel industry, the M3 tool could potentially aid in avoiding poor or unsafe travel conditions. Risk-based dispersion model analysis would be a vital asset for managing travel risk to determine the best route or time window of travel. The leisure, commercial trucking, and private air travel industry spends $5-10MM per year for basic weather information. A decision support system that combines travel risk tolerance with uncertainty in weather forecasts and dispersion modeling could itself be a several million dollar per year market. We anticipate three M3-related revenue streams; namely, software licenses, software maintenance services, and custom application development. Although pricing details for the product remain to-be-determined, the significant size of the market gives us substantial confidence that further investment in development of the M3 product is warranted and likely to yield a high return.

NITRONEX CORP.
628 Hutton Street - Suite 106
Raleigh, NC 27606
(919) 807-9100

PI: Mr. Walter Nagy
(919) 807-9100
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0259
NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV.
Monteith Engr Res.Ctr 444 Box
Raleigh, NC 27695
(919) 513-7366

ID#: N064-009-0127
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-009       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: High Linearity-High Efficiency Power Amplifiers Based on Digital Signal Processing Techniques and Wide Bandgap Devices
Abstract:   Nitronex Corporation proposes to demonstrate the feasibility of building a DPD system implementing adaptive gate bias control and signal insensitive correction for enhancing the power added efficiency of a 150W GaN based amplifier under OFDM signaling.BENEFITS: Work will result in a high power, broad band, highly linear, light-weight power amplifier.

OMAX CORP.
21409 72nd Avenue South
Kent, WA 98032
(253) 872-2300

PI: Dr. Peter H. Liu
(253) 872-2300
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0293
CARNEGIE INSTITUTION OF WASHINGTON
Geophysical Laboratory 5251 Br
Washington, DC, DC 20015
(202) 939-1118

ID#: N064-012-0284
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-012       Awarded: 21AUG06
Title: Next-Generation Waterjet Technology for High-Speed Precision Machining of SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites
Abstract:   A next-generation wataerjet technology will be developed for low-cost, high-speed, and precision machining of silicon carbide ceramic matrix composites (SiC CMCs). The new process will have cutting power equivalent to that of a conventional abrasive-waterjet (AWJ) operating at 1500 MPa while possessing all the inherent advantages of AWJs over other fielded machine tools; at such a super-high pressure, no affordable materials could survive. The overall improvement by combining advantages of AWJs and the superior cutting power of the non-contact new process would allow a 10-fold or more reduction in time and costs to machine CMCs, a significant reduction in part rejection/rework, and decreased maintenance costs of machining tools. The new nozzle made of super-hard CVD diamond and the abrasive jet will be miniaturized to fit into tight spaces, cut thin kerfs, and turn sharp corners. In particular, the miniaturized abrasive jet could be readily applied for micromachining. The new abrasive jet will be adapted to OMAXşŢs existing JetMachining Center (JMC) with minimum engineering efforts for automated machining. A versatile JMC with a dual-jet option will be subsequently offered for pseudo and true 3D machining common and hard-to-cut materials with low-cost AWJs and high-speed new abrasive jets, respectively. BENEFITS: We anticipate that the proposed development would offer a cost effective, high-speed, precision tool for automated machining of silicon carbide ceramic matrix composites (SiC CMCs). The key advantages of the development are considerable boost in the cutting power and efficiency, non-contact machining, and miniaturization of nozzle and jet. The new process will have the cutting power equivalent to that of a 1500-MPa abrasive-waterjet (AWJ) while possessing all the advantages of AWJs over currently fielded tools. Miniaturization of the new nozzle and abrasive jet will facilitate micromachining that cannot be achieved with conventional AWJs. The new process will leverage the proven PC-based robotic platform, OMAX JetMachining Center or JMC (http://www.omax.com/machines.php), for automated machining. Long-life wear resistant parts will be fabricated with fast-grown super-hard CVD diamond made with a patented process. With the new process incorporated into the JMC, OMAX will extend its technological lead as a premier manufacturer of ultrahigh-pressure waterjet machining equipment and continue the extraordinary growth path in the recent years (30% in 2004 and 40% in 2005). For versatility, we will develop a dual-jet JMC so that users will have the choice of using the low-cost AWJ and the high-speed new abrasive jet for machining common and hard-to-cut materials. With the improved cutting power and efficiency and the added micromachining capability, we will add in Phase II a rotating part holder to facilitate pseudo 3D machining (multi-machining is one of the unique features of waterjet technology). True 3D machining will be accomplished by adding a second rotating axis to the part holder. We are confident that the above sequence of events spurred by the proposed development will lead to a state-of-the-art veratile tool capable of machining virtually any materials cost and time effectively.

OXAZOGEN, INC.
1910 West St. Andrews Road
Midland, MI 48640
(989) 832-5590

PI: Dr. Jin Hu
(989) 832-5590
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0195
UNIV. OF MICHIGAN
208 NAME Bldg. 2600 Draper Roa
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2145
(734) 763-4754

ID#: N064-024-0473
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-024       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Skin-Friction Drag Reduction from Superhydrophobic Coatings of Textured Hyperbranched Polymers
Abstract:   Previous studies have shown that superhydrophobic surfaces have skin-friction drag reducing properties in the laminar flow region, but not in the turbulent flow region. The drag reducing properties of superhydrophobic surfaces are recognized to result from air voids trapped in the surface, and the apparent lack of effectiveness in the turbulent flow region could result from: (1) lack of robust air voids in the textured hydrophobic surface, (2) failure of the nano- or micro-textures, and (3) inadequate air void areas. Correction of these properties is believed to be a key to retaining drag reducing properties in the turbulent flow region. We propose to optimize our current superhydrophobic hyperbranched polymer surfaces with hierarchic nano/micro textures to satisfy these requirements. The obtained superhydrophobic surfaces will be tested for drag reduction in a water tunnel. In addition, numerical simulations will also be conducted to find the fraction of air voids in a textured superhydrophobic surface to achieve greater than 20% drag reduction in a fully-developed turbulent flow region. Our superhydrophobic hyperbranched polymer coatings will be easy to apply on large surfaces. If this technology is successful, it will be a lightweight and low-cost technology for drag reduction applications.BENEFITS: If superhydrophobic technology for drag reduction is successful, the technology would greatly reduce the cost of the fuel for marine vessel operation, increase the range and the speed, and the lesser amount of fuel required would increase the payload capacity. In addition, the increased efficiency would reduce the dependence on foreign oil. It could also significantly improve the performance (speed) of military vessels and find application in underwater weapons such as torpedoes and other missiles. It would be a lightweight and low-cost means to achieve drag reduction in comparison with other technologies that have been investigated, e.g., polymer or bubble injection. The superhydrophobic materials could also have applications in other areas, and potential applications are envisioned in the following fields: 1. Protecting clothing from water and from dirt. This is an especially desirable property for army combat uniforms where clothing readily gets wet and dirty. 2. Reducing surface contamination by pathogenic organisms. A superhydrophobic coating also having biocidal properties would provide protection by reducing surface contamination. 3. Anti-fouling marine coatings. The super non-stick properties of the superhydrophobic surfaces will provide an even better ability to prevent the build-up of marine organisms on ships' hulls compared to the silicone-based coatings that are effective as anti-fouling marine coatings. 4. Inhibiting metal surface corrosion. The corrosion of metals typically requires the presence of water on the metal surface. A superhydrophobic coating will minimize the presence of water at the metal surface and hence will minimize corrosion. This enhanced corrosion resistance will be useful for both military and civil aircraft, for ground vehicles and for the superstructure of ships. 5. Water-repellent windshields. A superhydrophobic clear coating on a windshield surface will allow rain droplets to be easily blown off the windshield surface and hence improve visibility during rain storms. 6. Microfluidic devices. Flow in the micro-channels is a problem and can be improved by drag-reducing coatings. The value of these unique materials as superhydrophobic coatings could be in the multi-millions of dollars in products and license fees.

P.C. KRAUSE & ASSOC., INC.
3016 Covington Street
West Lafayette, IN 47906
(765) 464-8997

PI: Dr. Eric A. Walters
(765) 464-8997
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0281
PURDUE UNIV.
302 Wood Street Young Hall
West Lafayette, IN 47907-2108
(765) 494-1047

ID#: N064-007-0525
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-007       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: A Noninvasive Sensor/Control Suite for Health Monitoring and Extended Life of Aircraft Generation Systems
Abstract:   Catastrophic failures in aircraft electrical power systems can compromise the readiness, safety, and capabilities of the war-fighter. In this effort, a suite of tools will be developed to provide a comprehensive prognostics and health management system (PHM) for aircraft generators and associated electrical systems. The PHM will be based upon a set of recently developed tools that include a novel sensor to measure torque-ripple-induced vibration created by electric machinery, a thermal condition monitor that can predict the temperatures within an electric machine under healthy and damaged operation, and numerical simulation tools that enable rapid development and solution of component and system-level models of electric machinery and power electronic systems operated in fault conditions. Validation of the PHM concepts and the computer simulations used will be performed with hardware using an F-18 generator as the test platform.BENEFITS: Development and implementation of a comprehensive prognostics and health management (PHM) system for aircraft generators and associated electrical systems for the F-18. To include prediction of pending failures. Provide feedback-based control strategies to mitigate component degradation or failures. This could result in reduced maintenance cost and mean time between failures. PHM system can be extended fleet-wide and to automotive electrical systems, commercial aircraft, ships, and submarines.

PERCEPTRONICS SOLUTIONS, INC.
3527 Beverly Glen Blvd.
Sherman Oaks, CA 91423
(818) 788-1025

PI: Dr. Amos Freedy
(818) 460-9150
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0228
MIT
Aeronautics & Astronautics Dep
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 252-1512

ID#: N064-025-0021
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-025       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Integration of Naturalistic Decision Making and Subjective Information Assessment with Quantitative Decision Analysis
Abstract:   Perceptronics Solutions and the MIT Humans & Automation Laboratory propose to develop a decision support system that creates cognitive bridges among subjective information assessment, naturalistic decision-making, and a collaborative net-centric decision analysis infrastructure. The objective is to provide an improved method by which a distributed group of decision makers can evaluate, share, and integrate decision-relevant information for the purpose of evaluating options by decision analytical methods. Our proposed system is based on two innovative technology products contributed by our team members; these are: (1) MIT's Decision Making Constructs in the Distributed Environment (DCODE) concept for knowledge elicitation, which originated at SPAWAR, San Diego; and (2) Perceptronics Solutions' Tactical Group Decision Analysis System (TGDAS), the product of a DARPA-sponsored SBIR Phase II project, oriented toward SOCOM and other tactical users. We will direct our R&D work toward immediate insertion of a prototype system into the distributed decision making C2 environment of the Special Operations Command (SOCOM). Emphasis will be given to the user interface and enhancement of the usability of the integrated system. Toward this goal we will conduct human factors and usability analysis of the iconic representation schema and the user interface. BENEFITS: Both DCODE and TGDAS have shown strong promise as a means of enhancing the performance of teams and individuals in distributed decisions. Our effort will focus on the integration of the two systems and the establishment of a cognitively efficient workflow. Our proposed system will provide a unique collaborative environment by integrating an improved DCODE system functionality with the TGDA infrastructure, resulting in a system fully capable of rapid transition to operational users. Both DCODE and TGDAS have shown strong promise as a means of enhancing the performance of teams and individuals in distributed decisions. Our effort will focus on the integration of the two systems and the establishment of a cognitively efficient workflow.

PHARAD LLC
797 Cromwell Park Drive, Suite V
Glen Burnie, MD 21061
(410) 590-3333

PI: Dr. Rod Waterhouse
(410) 590-3333
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0224
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA, LA
Office of Contract Admin 10920
Los Angeles, CA 90024-1406
(310) 794-0135

ID#: N064-032-0465
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-032       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Compact High-Frequency Antennas
Abstract:   In this Phase I project Pharad and UCLA propose to create new physically small, electrically large HF antennas for vehicle-mount and man-portable applications. We will utilize a combination of antenna size reduction techniques: volumetric engineering; fractal structures; and slow-wave structures to realize novel small, efficient 2 - 30 MHz radiators that meet the size requirements of 500 cubic centimeters. We will design the printed radiator on light-weight, highly flexible, low loss material to ensure the resulting antenna meets the weight requirements of 500 grams. We will also ensure the antenna is compatible with commercially available HF antenna couplers. Throughout this project we will use rigorous, full-wave electromagnetic simulation tools to study each size reduction approach in detail and ensure we achieve the optimal performance for the resulting small HF antenna. As part of Phase I, we will also fabricate and test the performance of a proof-of-principle prototype of our proposed small HF solution. We will also conduct a preliminary investigation into the health related aspects of the man-portable version of the antenna and ensure the class of radiators is compliant with ANSI/IEEE standards. The new small antenna technologies created here will greatly decrease the size of military tactical HF antennas.BENEFITS: The antenna assemblies that result from this STTR program will eliminate the issues with the current whip antennas used for HF communications. These whip antennas are extremely long and hinder the ability of US Marines to accomplish their mission. We envision that the ultimate form of the antennas that are developed as part of this program will be mounted on US Marine tactical vehicles and on US Marine combat personnel. In addition to the Marine Corp, the US Army should benefit from this HF antenna technology.

PHYSICAL SCIENCES, INC.
20 New England Business Center
Andover, MA 01810
(978) 689-0003

PI: Dr. John W. Steinbeck
(978) 689-0003
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0294
THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.
Electro-Optics Center 222 Nort
Freeport, PA 16229
(724) 295-7019

ID#: N064-012-0282
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-012       Awarded: 21AUG06
Title: High Speed CMC Laser Machining
Abstract:   Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) proposes to develop a high speed laser machining process for ceramic matrix composites. The recent development of high rate, high pulse power lasers and the non-contact nature of the PSI process minimize the damage typical of other laser machining processes. It also enables precise placement of through holes, trenches and identification markings. The goal of the Phase I SBIR is to demonstrate the feasibility of a high speed, low cost laser machining process for ceramic matrix composites that . 1) Can machine features in CMCs with high precision. 2) Leaves a machined surface with a surface roughness less than 5 microns. 3) Increases finishing tool life by 100 times. 4) Does not degrade the mechanical strength of the machined part. 5) Can be scaled-up to cut component machining in half. During the Phase I project we will demonstrate the feasibility of the laser machining process by machining holes, countersunk holes and grooves in ceramic matrix composite panels. We will show that the minimal damage induced in the CMC enables the mechanical strength of the material in the machined component to be the same as that of the as fabricated composite. BENEFITS: The development of a high speed laser machining process for ceramic matrix composites will accelerate the use of CMCs in aerospace systems. The low cost, high speed laser machining process will reduce the overall cost of complex CMC components and make CMCs competitive with nickel superalloys in turbine engine systems.

PICOMETRIX LLC
2925 Boardwalk
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
(734) 864-5605

PI: Dr. David Zimdars
(734) 864-5639
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0292
UNIV. OF MICHIGAN
Division of Research Dev. 3003
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1274
(734) 764-7250

ID#: N064-011-0411
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-011       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Time Domain Terahertz Non-Destructive Evaluation of Aero Turbines
Abstract:   We propose to prove the feasibility of using time domain terahertz (THz) non destructive evaluation (NDE) to inspect turbine blade thermal barrier coatings (TBC). High speed, non contact THz inspection will be useful both during the manufacturing process, during maintaince, and during recoating. Low thermal conductivity ceramic coatings that are deposited on Ni-alloy turbine-engine blades to prevent the extreme thermal conditions in the engine from adversely affecting the blade. These coatings must be applied with proper thickness tolerance, be free of defects, and the air passages must be free of TBC plugs. As the engine experiences thermal cycling and environmental degradation various defects and wear in the TBC will appear. The ceramic layer may decrease in thickness, thermally grown aluminum oxides will appear at the ceramic to bond-coat interface, and voids, coating delaminations, and other effects may occur. In this phase I project, we will investigate quantitatively measuring coating quality parameters by THz NDE. THz is an ideal non contact, non-ionizing, safe, inspection technology for TBC's, providing high spatial resolution and three dimensional structure. THz NDE can reduce the expense of blade coating manufacturing and enhance safety by detecting issues associated with a blade failure.BENEFITS: A successful Phase II will result in a high speed non contact THz NDE inspection system for turbine blade TBC coatings. This system can be used in the manufacturing process and/or during the inspection of aging engines. During manufacturing, the system can potentially give feedback during the coating process, reducing rework. During inspection, those blades which meet tolerances need not be recoated, while ensuring those blades with defects are recoated. This reduces maintenance costs and enhances safety.

PITTSBURGH MATERIALS TECHNOLOGY, INC.
1801 Route 51 Building 10
Jefferson Hills, PA 15025
(412) 382-7150

PI: Mr. Timothy M. Delahanty
(412) 382-7150
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0185
UNIV. OF CA, DAVIS
One Shields Avenue
Davis, CA 95616
(530) 752-6933

ID#: N064-035-0041
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-035       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Cryogenic Processing of Nano-Aluminum Powder and Consolidation of Armor Nano-Aluminum Composite Plates
Abstract:   The Team will demonstrate a continuous cryomilling system for Aluminum powder processing that promises cost effectiveness. ˙ The continuous attriting system will use a series of connected attritors, so loading and unloading of each machine is accomplished sequentially on-line, with a minimum of downtime for unloading, cleaning, and loading. With all machines at the Liquid Nitrogen temperature, the potential for yield improvement increases and the reduction in the potential for contamination decreases - economies of scale are improved. ˙ Powder processing will apply what has worked well in the Marine Corps SSM program. Innovations include maintaining a Nitrogen cover for all processing, using vacuum level as the controlling variable in degassing, and applying a tamping process to pack the powder to 65%. ˙ For powder consolidation, we will demonstrate two processes, both of which have performed well. ˙ Commercial extrusion and rolling will use available technology. Our university partner is the leading entity in cryomilling research, the UC-Davis. BENEFITS: Commercial applications for the technology to make large plates include their use in the bimodal form for structural materials where high strength and low weight are significant advantages. These include aerospace applications and high performance automotive applications.

POWDERMET, INC.
24112 Rockwell drive
Euclid, OH 44117
(216) 404-0053

PI: Dr. Jun Nable
(216) 404-0053
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0183
CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIV.
10900 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, OH 44106
(216) 368-2009

ID#: N064-035-0580
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-035       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Production Scale-up of NanoAluminum Armor
Abstract:   In this Phase I SBIR, Powdermet will demoonstrate a scalable, safe, and economic process for producing bulk nanoscale aluminum-magnesium alloy powders. This process is more scalable and much lower cost and safer than current LN2 cryomilling processes. Powdermet will team with case Western Reserve University, to develop a direct powder rolling process enabling armor plate to be produced, and powder-temperature-time-deformation maps will be developed to determine suitable rolling conditions leading to duplex nano- microscale aluminum composites. BENEFITS: Duplex nano-microscale aluminum composites have demonstrated sim,ulanteuous high strength and ductility needed for next generation lightweight armor. These materials show promise for equaling the performance of RHA steel, at 1/3rd the weight, enabling performance of a 70 ton tank in a mobile 30 ton package. Powdermet's process would enable tonnoage quantity production of nanocrsyatlline aluminum powder needed to support vehcile demonstration and production.

PRECISION MAGNETIC BEARING SYSTEMS, INC.
25 Walker Way Sec. 2A
Albany, NY 12205
(518) 218-0477

PI: Dr. Dantam K. Rao
(518) 218-0477
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0177
RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE
110 8th Str
Troy, NY 12180
(518) 276-6388

ID#: N064-003-0581
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-003       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Torque-Dense Geared Motor Development
Abstract:   The goal of this project is to develop a torque-dense geared motor for actuating flaps of an aircraft. We propose to increase the torque density by using a novel configuration which seamlessly integrates a torque-dense motor with a torque-dense gear train. Such arrangement produce more torque in a smaller space as it fully utilizes the available space. In addition, the motor will be configured to produce high torque density by using recently developed soft and hard electromagnetic materials in an unique configuration to achieve high energy density. The scalability will be established by sizing a larger motor and conducting torque density analysis. In Phase I we propose to design the torque-dense motor, integrated gear train and controller and define their performance. Detailed design of all electromagnetic parts such as rotor, stator and housing will also be undertaken . Thermal management system that keeps the operating temperatures within the limits will also be designed using multiple paths, extended surfaces and low thermal resistance materials. The efficiency of the motor will be improved by applying recently developed ac loss reduction technology. A preliminary layout of the geared motor is the end result of this effort.BENEFITS: The torque dense motors will find immediate application in railway traction motors, hybrid vehicles, aircraft generators, helicopter generators, motion control products, warehouse and construction vehicles, military and commercial aircraft and ship propulsion system.

PRODUCT CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT, INC.
410 Private Road 8315
Palestine, TX 75803
(903) 549-2056

PI: Mr. Sean B. Blackmon
(903) 549-2056
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0220
THE UNIV. OF TEXAS AT TYLER
3900 University Blvd
Tyler, TX 75799
(903) 566-7362

ID#: N064-023-0289
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-023       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: High Power Density Swaging Device
Abstract:   The wire cables used in the arresting gear system onboard Naval Aircraft Carriers are a critical safety item. Failure in these components could result in the loss of life, aircraft, or both. The main issue in their reliability lies with the end terminals that connect one cable to another. The current process for attaching an end terminal to the wire cable uses molten zinc which is poured into the terminal socket. This process requires specialized equipment, a considerable amount of time, and is inherently dangerous. A system that would allow for the end terminals to be attached to the wire cable quickly and with no physical risk to the technicians would be ideal. The system proposed here is similar to equipment used to recover pipelines from the ocean floor. It would require a redesign to the end terminal, but would allow a connection to be made with only a torque or impact wrench, thus removing the risks involved in pouring zinc and eliminating the need for large and expensive equipment required for swaging. With Product Concept Development's unique knowledge and experience, we believe that the solution proposed will be the most viable option.BENEFITS: The proposed mechanism has a great flexibility in terms of size, modification, and application. Since the system can be used wherever light to heavy rigging is needed, the device envisioned can make significant inroads to the commercial market. The simplicity of the design and concept translates to an extremely wide range of possible applications. Therefore, it is exceedingly difficult to quantify the market or products this device may impact since it is not known what the range of manifestations and capabilities of the device are. For instance, scaling down the device can make it appropriate for commercial fishing lines, scaling up can make it useful for offshore oil platform and ship mooring. With modifications, it could be used for controlled tension devices for rock climbing, manageable grip clamps, etc. The size of the market, we believe, clearly justifies the effort, though the reduction of necessary equipment, expertise, and time required to terminal a wire cable.

PROGENY SYSTEMS CORP.
9500 Innovation Drive
Manassas, VA 20110
(703) 368-6107

PI: Mr. Michael Redden
(703) 368-6107
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0313
NORTH CAROLINA A&T
1601 East Market Street
Greensboro, NC 27411-0000
(336) 334-7995

ID#: N064-019-0385
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-019       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Research 3-D Screen Technology Utilizing Autostereographics and the impacts on Tactical Operartors in the Command and Control Center.
Abstract:   In recent years computer displays have underwent a revolution of sorts from the old Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) based displays to more modern LCD and Plasma based flat panel technologies. Additionally, several manufacturers are now offering displays known as Autostereographic, that are capable of displaying true 3-D images without the requirement for special equipment such as operator eyeware. Use of this technology onboard US Navy submarines for tactical applications and operator training has the potential for enhancing situational understanding, ownship navigation and crew readiness. However, an understanding must be gained related to the potential impacts on operator performance when using these displays as the onboard applications that could best benefit from the technology. The purpose of the research conducted under this STTR will be to gain an understanding of these impacts within a submarine command and control center environment, as well as examine potential submarine command and control applications that potentially could benefit from the use of 3-D technologies.BENEFITS: Software Based Drivers/Translators that modify existing and planned applications to be used with 3-D Displays. Naval and Airspace Navigational Tools that utilize 3-D Technology.

PURITAN RESEARCH CORP.
9711 Brookstone Lane
Vienna, VA 22182
(703) 938-1100

PI: Ms. Kathleen Griggs
(703) 938-1100
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0205
VANDERBILT UNIV.
Dr. Akos Ledeczi Box 1829, Sta
Nashville, VA 37235-2218
(615) 343-8307

ID#: N064-004-0204
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-004       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Command and Control for Embedded Systems
Abstract:   Puritan Research proposes GRIDCAM Technology. GRIDCAM adapts networked embedded sensors to enhance conventional cameras so that they exchange explicit information about entities in their field of view and are common in the field of view of other cameras at the same moment in time. This allows ordinary cameras to include 3D information in the images they collect. GRIDCAM technology will create a ubiquitous, highly discriminate, persistent ISR capability that can exist over a large volume of 3D space. GRIDCAM imagers will be trained on the scene over a period of time, and track and locate transient events through embedded, cooperative networked synchronization. BENEFITS: Key benefits of GRIDCAM are enhanced sensing capabilities, the ability to extract 4D information from 2D imagers that can assist targeting, autonomous air vehicles and mobile robots to work in complex, unconstrained environments.

QORTEK, INC.
1965 Lycoming Creek Road Suite 205
Williamsport, PA 17701
(570) 322-2700

PI: Dr. Gareth J. Knowles
(570) 322-2700
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0307
PENN STATE UNIV.
203 MRL Building Hastings Road
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 865-3422

ID#: N064-030-0241
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-030       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Micro-factory for Miniaturization, Portability and Remote Production
Abstract:   The Micro-Factory/Nano-Factory will employ piezoelectric devices to realize a high precision, controllable micro/nano-manipulation fabrication/assembly unit that is self-contained and portable. The low cost unit will incorporate adaptable multipurpose Micro-Piezoelectric Microfabrication Tools, or tools, that can provide the miniaturization and efficiency needed as to meet the needs of commercial micro- and meso- scale systems. The piezoelectric Micro-Factory/Nano-Factory will provide scientists and engineers low cost manipulation tools to align, grab and machine nanometer-sized devices such as transistors, sensors and spindles. Importantly, the agile multipurpose Š-tools will enable micro-inspection and repair of defense critical systems such as UAV/UUV equipment. The result will enable the fabrication of more complex micro products (or subassemblies) with real 3D functionality, enlarging the set of 3D micro structuring and assembly technologies.BENEFITS: Leveraging strong industry ties to both the medical, electronics and defense industry, Phase II/III will focus on customizing versions of the prototype Micro-Factory/Nano-Factory system for key products and services in consumer electronics (transistors fabrication, display repair); medical devices (3-D manufacture of subscale catheters, valves and sensors, bio-sciences (controlled infusion); highly dimensional accuracy UAV/UUV inspection equipment and low cost manipulation in (FIB, SEM, TEM) instrument fabrication/assembly environments.

QUALTECH SYSTEMS, INC.
100 Great Meadow Rd., Suite 603
Wethersfield, CT 06109
(860) 257-8014

PI: Dr. Sudipto Ghoshal
(860) 257-8014
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0273
VANDERBILT UNIV.
Division of Sponsored Research
Nashville, TN 37203-2641
(615) 322-3979

ID#: N064-007-0103
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-007       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Aircraft Electrical Power System Diagnostics and Health Management
Abstract:   This proposal is a joint effort between Qualtech Systems, Incorporated (QSI), the Institute for Software Integrated Systems at Vanderbilt University (VU), and Hamilton Sundstrand (HS) in Rockford, IL. QSI and VU have the combined knowledge and experience in successful development of a novel solution to aircraft system and subsystem prognostics and maintenance tools and have developed state-of-the-art technology and mature deployed products in the field. Hamilton Sundstrand is among the largest global suppliers of technologically advanced aerospace products and is the manufacturer of the Integrated Drive Generators (IDG) that are being deployed on the Multi-mission Maritime Aircraft (MMA). For the proposed study, we will focus specifically on the IDG of the MMA as our target system. We propose to develop integrated on-line diagnostic and prognostic technologies for aircraft electrical power systems that feed into the overall vehicle health management system. The primary goal is to improve vehicle readiness and safety while reducing operations and maintenance costs. We propose to adopt a comprehensive model-based solution with fault detection and isolation (FDI) algorithms that work in conjunction with prognostic methods to estimate the health of degrading components and schedule maintenance operations to avoid downtime without compromising safety and mission success.BENEFITS: The technology proposed for development in this Phase I proposal will support physical model-based prognosis through a best-of-breed information fusion approach. This technology is expected to be implemented as a new module of QSI's TEAMS product suite. TEAMS is currently used for early design decisions related to testability and maintainability, as well as for developing solutions for diagnostics, fault isolation and guided maintenance of fielded systems. This effort will result in the development of new commercializable product that can address the needs of industries interested in generator diagnostics and prognostics. These would include the manufacturers of all systems and infrastructure that have power generation and converter units being used in environments where a failure in power generation components has serious consequences.

QUALTECH SYSTEMS, INC.
100 Great Meadow Rd., Suite 603
Wethersfield, CT 06109
(860) 257-8014

PI: Dr. Sudipto Ghoshal
(860) 257-8014
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0263
VANDERBILT UNIV.
Division of Sponsored Research
Nashville, TN 37203-2641
(615) 322-3979

ID#: N064-033-0105
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-033       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Fault Diagnostics, Prognostics, and Self-Healing Control of Navy Electric Machinery
Abstract:   The objective of this project is to develop an integrated condition monitoring, fault diagnostics and prognostics scheme for power electronic converters and electromechanical devices, e.g., advanced induction motors, specifically targeting the DD(X) platform and subsequently expanding the scope for addressing the needs of other defense-related and commercial applications. An additional goal of this project is to explore "self healing" strategies for critical electrical systems to improve system reliability, availability, and "limp-home" capability. Increased use of electric power to run communication, navigation, and even the prime movers is an ongoing trend in military and commercial engineering systems. Safe and reliable operation of these systems largely depends on the uninterrupted functioning of the underlying power generators, converters and electromechanical systems. Intelligent fault diagnostic and prognostic schemes with low false alarm rates and smart reconfiguration schemes play a key role in ensuring outage-free operation of these systems.BENEFITS: The technology proposed for development in this Phase I proposal will support model-based and data-driven fault diagnosis and physical model-based prognosis through a best-of-breed information fusion approach. This technology is expected to be implemented as a new module of QSI's TEAMS product suite. TEAMS Test Designer will host the feature extraction and testing techniques developed for this project. Sensor allocation and reconfiguration algorithms will be augmented into the existing optimization techniques suite of TEAMS. TEAMS is currently used for early design decisions related to testability and maintainability, as well as for developing solutions for diagnostics, fault isolation and guided maintenance of fielded systems. The industries interested in integrated diagnostics and material-based prognostics would include the manufacturers and end users of such supplies that are used in environments where a failure has serious consequences. DD(X) program primes are the initial target, while luxury cruise ship and fast ocean liner builders, their customers and similar industry segments are also of interest and, if appropriately marketed, will provide possible venues for commercial applications. In addition, similar prognostics and diagnostics technology developed through this effort will also have significant commercial potential in the aviation industry as well.

RADIATION MONITORING DEVICES, INC.
44 Hunt Street
Watertown, MA 02472
(617) 668-6801

PI: Mr. Timothy Tiernan
(617) 668-6801
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0289
NORTHEASTERN UNIV.
409 Dana Research Center NEU,
Boston, MA 02115-5000
(617) 373-4159

ID#: N064-011-0276
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-011       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Portable High Resolution Imaging for NDI of Hot Section Aero Turbine Components
Abstract:   New technology is needed for the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of defects in gas turbine engines. While these defects adversely affect hot-section performance and reduce component life, they are difficult to detect and characterize without destructive inspection. The lack of detailed flaw detection and characterization raises safety concerns, hampers fleet readiness and negatively impacts the life of hot section components. RMD, in collaboration with the Electrical Engineering Department at Northeastern University, proposes a new NDE technology based on high resolution, 3-D imaging of eddy currents induced in coated metallic jet engine components to characterize microscopic cracks, coating degradation, cooling hole blockage and other defects. A portable high resolution camera for magnetic fields will be developed based on a 2-D array of densely packed, micron-wide, tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) sensors combined with a proprietary flux to field converter. With sensitivity nearly 1 billion times better than the coils now used as eddy current sensors, the NDE camera will be used to detect and map the dimensions and positions of microscopic defects in the metal. RMD and NEU have broad experience in TMR sensor development, flux to field converter design, model based design and NDE system development and manufacture. BENEFITS: The result of a successful Phase I/Phase II program will be an affordable new NDE/NDI imaging technology for characterizing defects in jet engine components. A simple test procedure that requires little operator training will yield images of defects such as small cracks, casting defects and coating properties that can be analyzed in a rapid and intuitive manner. The system will be highly portable, low power and readily repairable. DOD markets include NDE for jet engines; space vehicles; transport vehicles and infrastructure. Other applications include battlefield applications, covert perimeter sensors and active feedback of electro-mechanical systems. Commercial applications range from biomedical sensors, to machine vision systems for manufacturing process control and quality assurance.

ROCKFORD ENGINEERING ASSOC., LLC
605 Fulton Ave.
Rockford, IL 61103
(815) 222-9783

PI: Mr. Kanwar J. Singh
(815) 975-0971
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0305
NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIV.
605 Fulton Ave
Rockford, IL 61103
(815) 753-8938

ID#: N064-030-0220
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-030       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Micro-factory for Miniaturization, Portability and Remote Production
Abstract:   The overall goal of the proposed program is the development of a conceptual design for a self contained, portable Micro Factory to machine prismatic parts in remote locations. The portable Micro Factory is specifically designed to support the needs of the U.S. Navy to produce micro scale parts in remote locations without supporting services. The conceptual design will build on the existing body of research in micro machines and Micro Factories. It will select the best ideas from the research for machining, metrology, component holding, material transfer, cleaning/de-burring and system control. A key focus of the conceptual design will be the modular workstation concept. Each workstation will be designed to easily "plug and play" with the factory. A primary goal will be the ability of the user to quickly reconfigure the factory with new workstation arrangements and new workstation capabilities to meet the changing needs of production. A related goal is the portability of the entire factory. The design will create a factory that is fully portable and capable of operating in remote locations without any supporting services, i.e. "diesel in and parts out" BENEFITS: The need for micro/meso machining technology is becoming increasingly clear as the development of many new products is focused on significantly smaller product envelopes. Some countries are already moving rapidly to embrace this new technology. Japan in particular has been a leader in micro/meso manufacturing research and is believed to have approximately 20 companies working on commercialization of various aspects of the technology. Currently there exists a window of opportunity for the U.S. to play a leading role in the development of this new technology. Micro/meso machining and the Micro Factory are clearly keys to the future competitiveness of U.S. industry. The technology is particularly important to the U.S. Navy as it moves toward miniature weapons systems and unmanned vehicles. The Micro Factory program can be a significant impetus toward commercialization of the existing U.S. micro/meso machining research and development programs.

ROTORDYNAMICS-SEAL RESEARCH
3302 Swetzer Road
Loomis, CA 95650
(916) 660-0444

PI: Dr. Charles Wu
(916) 660-0444
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0204
OLD DOMINION UNIV.
Eng. and Comp. Sci. Bldg 4700
Norfolk, VA 23529
(757) 683-5295

ID#: N064-015-0023
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-015       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: High Cycle Fatigue Analysis of Integrally Rotors
Abstract:   A new approach is proposed for high fidelity analysis of aeroelastic characteristics of integrally bladed rotors. This new multiscale approach for nonequilibrium flow path analysis will yield high fidelity solutions including all turbulence scales at a fraction of the computational cost of RANS. Integration of this advanced capability within an existing multidisciplinary, multifidelity, transient modeling and simulation environment will provide the most accurate solution for critical inputs for fatigue life calculations. The proposed effort also includes substantial experimental validation of the analysis results using an existing high speed, high frequency dynamic test facility.BENEFITS: Faster and more accurate solution of fluid structure interaction problems.

SAFETY DYNAMICS
701 Harger Road Suite 100
Oak Brook, IL 60523
(303) 666-8480

PI: Mr. Bryan Baker
(630) 575-5145
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0200
USC VITERBI SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
142 Downey Way DRB 166
Los Angeles, CA 90089-1111
(213) 740-9360

ID#: N064-036-0292
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-036       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Acoustic Pattern Recognition for Security Breaching Noise Detection
Abstract:   We propose the development of an acoustic recognition platform that can identify and locate specific sounds in high noise environments, and that can act as a foundation for non-line-of site detection and proactive alerts for other technologies such as cameras and UAVs. The proposed system is based on fundamental principles of neurobiological systems, i.e., it incorporates mathematical models and system architectures designed to mimic how the brain recognizes sounds from the outside world. The proposed system also will precisely localize the source of sounds of interest, and direct secondary response devices toward that source. The proposed system is an extension of a recently commercialized gunshot recognition and localization system, called SENTRI I, currently being sold in Chicago, Illinois, Tijuana, Mexico, and other US cities. The SENTRI I, however, is designed only to detect and recognize short-duration gunshots, and is not capable of analyzing and recognizing other security breaching noises such as RPGs and mortars, vehicle engines, human voices, etc. Re-design of this proven system are proposed to extend applicability to recognition and localization of a wider range of security-relevant noises, add new microphone technology to substantially extend the "listening range", and reduce the system footprint to a field-deployable size.BENEFITS: Development of adaptive, intelligent acoustic recognition/alert systems for security breaching noise detection, threat identification and perimeter protection using Safety Dynamics' core technology, the Dynamic Synapse Neural Network (DSNN). The DSNN technology has been optimized and is currently commercialized for gunshot recognition as the SENTRI (Smart Sensor Enabled Neural Threat Recognition and Identification), a system that recognizes gunshots sends range and bearing details to cameras which can then rotate and pan in on the source of the incident. The SENTRI is integrated with wireless communications, and a weather resistant box mounted on telephone or power poles for urban crime prevention. This STTR will extend Safety Dynamics' acoustic recognition technology to non-gunshot events critical to security breaching noises.

SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS & RESEARCH ASSOC., INC.
6300 Gateway Dr.
Cypress, CA 90630
(714) 224-4410

PI: Mr. Marvin Velazquez
(714) 224-4410
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0199
DUKE UNIV.
ECE Department Duke University
Durham, NC 27708
(919) 660-5260

ID#: N064-036-0171
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-036       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Acoustic Pattern Recognition for Security Breaching Noise Detection
Abstract:   A proposed acoustic pattern recognition system will be based around an array of acoustic sensors to allow localization of sound events and cancellation of background noise. The number of sensors could be adjusted to vary the coverage area depending on the site. The measured signals will provide the input to a sophisticated signal processing algorithm that will separate the acoustic signals into constituent sound sources in order to detect, characterize, localize, and identify security breaching sounds, all amongst a high background noise environment. Following source separation, an adaptive classifier will be utilized to discriminate between nuisance and background sounds and security breaching sounds. A novel attribute of this classifier is its feature extraction approach, which leverages the images produced by auditory models and thus tightly couples the classifier to the mechanisms potentially used by the biological systems we propose to mimic.BENEFITS: lotsDevelopment of this sensor capability will provide a major step in developing a sensor recognition system that can detect the sounds of break-on and gunfire. It will support a number of military applications besides the facility security mission, such as monitoring trail use and protecting troops from infiltrators and ambush. Commercially, the increased need for a border, plant, and perimeter security sensor that can reduce the need for extensive manpower would be welcomed.

SEASHELL TECHNOLOGY LLC
3252 Holiday Court Suite 115
La Jolla, CA 92037
(858) 638-0315

PI: Dr. Sheldon Schultz
(858) 638-0315
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0193
BROWN UNIV.
184 Hope St
Providence, RI 02912
(401) 863-2870

ID#: N064-024-0034
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-024       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Viscous Drag Reduction Using Hydrophobic Surface
Abstract:   It has been shown that hydrophobic surfaces can reduce skin-friction drag in micro-fluidic devices. During Phase I research, we will fabricate and test a high performance durable hydrophobic surface coating created by a simple, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly method. This coating could have significant effects on skin-friction drag reduction and/or transition delay in boundary layers. This surface modification on Navy vessels and underwater munitions would enable significantly reduced cost of operation and increased performance. We will estimate and characterize the required properties, such as the slip length, of the hydrophobic surfaces in these preliminary analyses and demonstrate the desired effect using numerical simulations and small-scale laboratory experiments. Based on the coatings fabrication design developed in Phase I, during Phase II we will fabricate a hydrophobic surface large enough to cover a substantial part of the model vessel (surface ships or submersibles) and directly test drag reduction in tow tank and/or water-tunnel experiments.BENEFITS: The major goal of this research plan is to develop hydrophobic surface coatings that reduce the transition to turbulence, turbulent skin friction and turbulent pressure fluctuations that occur at the ship-water interface during motion. These coatings would be widely applicable for use on surface ships, underwater transport vehicles and munitions and have considerable benefit by increasing vehicular performance. Reduction of the turbulent skin friction would enable increases in overall top speeds as well as enhancing effective range. The ability to delay the onset of transition to turbulence would also have similar effects by reducing the total vehicle drag. Reduction of turbulent skin friction would have major economic implications, particularly for cargo transport. Drag reduction would result in significantly reduced fuel consumption, thus leading to lower shipping costs, and providing tremendous benefit both to military and commercial water transport systems.

SENTIENT CORP.
850 Energy Drive
Idaho Falls, ID 83401
(208) 522-8560

PI: Mr. Sean Marble
(208) 522-8560
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0279
PENN STATE APPLIED RESEARCH LAB
3075 Research Drive
State College, PA 16801
(814) 863-3859

ID#: N064-007-0164
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-007       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Aircraft Electrical Power System Diagnostics and Health Management
Abstract:   The military is actively implementing diagnostics, prognostics, and health management technologies across platforms in an effort to reduce maintenance costs, increase readiness and availability, and improve safety. In aircraft electric power systems, the largest maintenance driver is the generator, followed by the batteries. Common faults include winding shorts, pitting and spalling in bearings, and battery degradation. This effort will focus on developing and transitioning effective, robust diagnostics and prognostics that cover the major failure modes of these components. Sentient Corporation has partnered with the Pennsylvania State University Applied Research Laboratory (Penn State ARL) to create a team with world-leading expertise in nearly every aspect of this problem. Sentient will develop prognostics for generator bearings, while Penn State ARL will address battery health monitoring. Both partners will also address generator winding faults, and both have substantial facilities for testing and data collection to support development and validation of the prognostic algorithms. Phase I will include demonstration of the basic sensing requirements and algorithms used to detect faults. Phases II and III will include development of a complete diagnostic/prognostic system and integration with an existing health management system such as the IMD-HUMS. A major rotorcraft OEM has agreed to actively support both development and integration.BENEFITS: Aircraft electrical power systems are a significant maintenance driver. The resulting prognostic capabilities for aircraft electric power systems will enable condition-based maintenance for these systems, resulting in reduced costs and higher readiness.

SPRUNG-BRETT RDI, INC.
4623 Bronx Blvd.
Bronx, NY 10470
(718) 725-7026

PI: Mr. Michael K. Brewster
(301) 960-4321
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0188
UNIV. OF MARYLAND EASTERN SHOR
11868 Academic Oval
Pricess Anne, MD 21853
(410) 651-6489

ID#: N064-003-0071
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-003       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: High Torque High Efficiency WARP Motor Design for use in Leading Edge Flap Systems
Abstract:   A motor drive actuation system with integrated transmission has been proposed for study and application to electric flap actuation and other high torque low rpm range applications. A new technology is introduced in this proposal with technical and scientific discourse expanding on the fundamental physics of the technology and the extensibility of the subject technology to systems with power densities > than 35KW/L. A solution for F-18 flap actuation is offered for study with a detailed conceptual approach addressing function, challenges and risk mitigation strategies.BENEFITS: The technology proposed and developed will have the ability to replace hydraulics and pneumatics in a range of aerospace, maritime, land vehicle and process control applications. The technology will provide eclectic actuation at a torque density with a form factors previous unavailable. These benefits will affect future systems design and electrification efforts.

STREAMLINE AUTOMATION, LLC
1109 Chesterfield Road
Huntsville, AL 35803
(256) 694-5063

PI: Mr. Alton J. Reich
(256) 694-5063
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0191
UNIV. OF ALABAMA
Office for Sponsored Programs
Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0104
(205) 348-5152

ID#: N064-001-0036
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-001       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: HSU Charge Prediction and Optimization Software for the EFV
Abstract:   The Marine Corps Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle utilizes 14 hydropneumatic suspension units (HSU) that have variable stiffness controlled by the nitrogen charge (mass) in each. Each HSU consists of a primary spring that contains a nominally 50/50 mixture of nitrogen and oil, and secondary spring that contains nitrogen with a small amount of oil. The vehicle ride height is effected by ambient temperature changes causing the nitrogen to expand or contract. The ride height must be maintained within a 4" operating band in order to achieve acceptable ride quality. The procedure for charging the HSUs currently involves jacking the EFV up and breaking the track in order to put the HSUs in a configuration where the volume is known. The current procedures takes an experienced maintenance crew more than 4 hours to complete. Streamline Automation and the University of Alabama propose to develop an EFV charging procedure that does not require the EFV to be jacked up. This will require the development of a model that accounts for the compressible, polytropic thermodynamic behavior of the nitrogen within the HSU, and the load transfer that takes place between the HSUs as they are charged while supporting the EFV weight.BENEFITS: Streamline Automation will work with the HSU manufacturer and the vehicle integrator during the Phase 1 effort. This will allow the models developed to be validated against existing test data, and to obtain customer concurrence from an early point in the program. This will make it more likely that the HSU charge optimization software will be accepted by these organizations, and used for initial factory adjustments, as well as by Marine Corps maintenance personnel. The EFV is expected to be the first of several vehicles that will use similar HSUs. Other vehicles, such as FCS will need similar charge optimization software.

SYSTRAN FEDERAL CORP.
4027 Colonel Glenn Highway Suite 210
Dayton, OH 45431
(937) 429-9008

PI: Dr. Charles Browning
(937) 229-2113
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0320
UNIV. OF DAYTON RESEARCH INST.
300 College Park
Dayton, OH 45469-0104
(937) 229-2113

ID#: N064-031-0100
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-031       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: FN Composites
Abstract:   This research program will investigate new approaches to carbon nanotube functionalization and understand its effects on the mechanical properties of the Carbon Nanotubes CNTs themselves and of the final composite materials. Our research effort will demonstrate the ability to functionalize single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with functional groups that provide improved bonding with structural resins. We will characterize the degree of functionalization of the SWNTs and correlate this with the mechanical performance of small nanocomposites. Our goal is to find the best functional group compatible with structural resins (vinyl esters and epoxies) and the optimum degree of functionalization without deteriorating the mechanical characteristics of the SWNTs significantly. SFC has assembled a distinguished team to address this proposal. In conjunction with our university research partner, The University of Dayton, we are proposing a novel and innovative approach to meeting the demanding requirements listed in the solicitation. At the conclusion of Phase II, we plan to have a complete characterization of the mechanical properties of these composites and specific recommendations for how these might be best used in Navy applications.BENEFITS: The benefits of this new technology are many. If this research shows that these new composites indeed exhibit the potentially extreme gains in strength over steel, with a companion reduction in weight and density, and can be produced in large quantities at affordable cost-points, then these new composites could revolutionize the production of next-generation ships for the Navy and commercial applications. This technology has very broad application to both commercial and military systems. The military application to Navy ships could be pervasive with ship hulls and structures, replacing most metal parts. The commercial market would also have numerous applications, such as commercial shipbuilding, bridge construction, aircraft structures and wings.

TECHNO-SCIENCES, INC.
11785 Beltsville Drive 9th Floor
Beltsville, MD 20705
(240) 790-0609

PI: Dr. Peter Chen
(240) 790-0608
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0287
UNIV. OF MARYLAND
Dept of Aerospace Engineering
College Park, MD 20742
(301) 405-1927

ID#: N064-020-0311
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-020       Awarded: 07AUG06
Title: Power Harvesting for Encrypted Wireless Sensor Clusters
Abstract:   Techno-Sciences, Inc. (TSi) in collaboration with the Smart Structures Laboratory Laboratory at the University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP), proposes to develop an innovative energy harvesting device suitable for integration with electronics for data acquisition and wireless transmission used as a node. The energy harvester will be mounted to a substructure and use ambient vibrations for energy generation. A compact structure will be used with an active material which converts mechanical deformation into electrical energy and use appropriate circuitry to interface with a battery element. The energy harvester can be tuned to expected vibration spectrum of the substructure. Small vibrations can be amplified by proper tuning to get larger energy extraction. Data acquisition from proposed sensor elements will be gathered and transmitted back to a host system using a communication network based on established security standards. BENEFITS: The energy harvesting device can be tuned to the specific component on which it will be mounted. Myriad appliations such as turbine engines or transmissions, and other machinery can be monitored using the proposed technology. Besides application to naval vessels, this proposed package may be retrofitted to existing naval and aerospace systems as well as designed into the general structural health monitoring systems, both civillian and commercial, to enable condition-based maintence.

TECHNO-SCIENCES, INC.
11785 Beltsville Drive 9th Floor
Beltsville, MD 20705
(240) 790-0609

PI: Dr. Carole Teolis
(240) 790-0620
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0262
DREXEL UNIV.
3141 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 895-2218

ID#: N064-033-0244
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-033       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Fault Diagnostics, Prognostics, and Self-Healing Control of Navy Electric Machinery
Abstract:   The proposed work will provide highly reliable electrical machinery systems by developing fault diagnostics, prognostics, and self-healing control capability. In most power systems, individual components have their own fault protection controls built in. The fault protection is not controlled by the larger system power management controls. These component level controls are designed to protect the individual component from damage without regard to the consequence of such a shutdown on the larger power system. A component shutdown could happen in a mission critical system although the component could continue to operate in a reduced performance mode with a different control. In this project, we will develop and demonstrate a power system controller that is able to recognize the component fault conditions and compensate by modifying the component control allowing the component to continue to operate in a reduce performance mode. This type of reduced performance operation of faulted components, instead of full shut down, can provide the capability for the power system to gracefully degrade in the face of detected battle damage or other fault condition, so that power is able to be maintained to mission critical systems. This ability will improve warfighting effectiveness and ensure a "limp home" capability.BENEFITS: This technology has commercialization potential in the both the DOD and commercial settings for providing highly reliable electrical machinery. The ability to operate at reduced capacity despite a faulted condition will allow a system to be fielded without necessarily requiring the same amount of redundancy in the design. This will reduce both cost and size of fielded systems. Adjustable speed drives are found in all branches of DOD and have numerous industrial applications as well. Failure of drives or motors may have a significant economic impact on industrial applications. Industrial processing lines can have hundreds of thousands of dollars in lost revenue for every hour of down time.

TECHNOSOFT, INC.
11180 Reed Hartman Highway
Cincinnati, OH 45242
(513) 985-9877

PI: Mr. Adel Chemaly
(513) 985-9987
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0216
SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES
PO Box 5800
Albuquerque, NM 87185
(505) 845-3520

ID#: N064-018-0405
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-018       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Automation of Analysis Model Creation
Abstract:   Although numerical analysis applications have proven to be effective and reasonably accurate, the effort required to develop the associated analysis models remains a challenging and time consuming task. While many meshing tools are currently available, decomposing and manipulating the design geometry and enhancing the topology for mesh construction are manual processes and place the heaviest demands on time in the analysis process. The need to generate these models for different disciplines, each requiring different modeling abstraction and fidelity levels, further restricts the ability to use these analyses in the design process. Coupling these models across disciplines presents additional challenges since they often have different levels of abstraction and may not share the same geometry. This proposal focuses on the development of an environment for multidisciplinary analysis modeling and mesh generation. It employs an underlying object-oriented architecture with a common mesh infrastructure that facilitates rapid development of analysis model geometry. It integrates geometric reasoning, feature suppression, and dimension reduction methods to support automating the construction of analysis model geometry topology for mesh generation. Structured and unstructured meshes (1D/2D/3D) representing various levels of modeling fidelity for conceptual, preliminary, and detailed analyses and for different physical domains are supported. It enables the coupling of analysis models and design geometry and supports data interoperability among different analyses. The framework facilitates rapid development and automation of analysis modeling processes, facilitating rapid simulation for design validation and optimization of product performance at the earliest stage of the engineering process.BENEFITS: Substantial benefits would result for the DoD and DoE as a result of the development of the proposed environment. Successful development of this capability will reduce analysis modeling cycle time and impact engineering cost while enabling quick response to the fast-paced development of product designs and their analyses. Various government programs can benefit from a rapid analysis modeling framework to facilitate validation of conceptual designs through the use of high fidelity multidisciplinary analyses at the earliest stages of the engineering process. Such a system will have a great impact on various processes in the design-to-production automation of weapon systems, in addition to a number of applications in the marine, automotive, and aerospace industries. Based on TechnoSoft's experience with previous applications, it is projected that the adoption and deployment of this modeling framework will offer at least a 50% reduction in analysis model development time when starting a design from scratch, and more than 95% reduction when starting from a previous design where parametric studies are performed and only modest changes are made in the design intent. TechnoSoft plans to transition the proposed development into future releases of the AML framework for integrated design and analysis model process automation. This framework will support a collaborative design and analysis environment which will seamlessly integrate various tools and automate the analysis modeling and meshing processes from different disciplines.

TEXAS RESEARCH INSTITUTE AUSTIN, INC.
9063 Bee Caves Road
Austin, TX 78733
(512) 263-2101

PI: Mr. Chip Beebe
(512) 263-2101
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0261
SCRA/ARDI
91 Technology Drive Suite 200
Anderson, SC 29625
(864) 646-4520

ID#: N064-021-0457
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-021       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Development of Lightweight and Low Cost Advanced Structural Materials for Off-board Surface Vessels (OBVs)
Abstract:   During Phase I, Texas Research Institute Austin, Inc. (TRI/Austin) will develop new materials to reduce weight on Naval Off Board Vessels (OBVs). TRI/Austin will develop a new composite material for internal OBV applications that is lightweight, durable, fire resistant, and economical. The material system will be capable of withstanding appropriate operational loads and environmental exposures while meeting the fire, smoke, and toxic gas emissions, electromagnetic interference, and dynamic shock requirements at a significantly less weight than traditional alternatives such as aluminum and steel. Advanced resin systems and fiber reinforcements will be selected to meet OBV conceptual design requirements, and manufacturing processes will be developed. TRI/Austin will use the material properties to perform a structural analysis of a conceptual OBV structural component. Based on the resulting test data and analysis, the most appropriate material system will be selected. Material coupons and a demonstration conceptual prototype component will be manufactured and tested for strength, stiffness and fire resistance. An economic analysis will be performed to provide a cost comparison with legacy materials. TRI/Austin will team with the South Carolina Research Association (SCRA), ARL Penn State and Lockheed Martin Maritime and Ship Systems, who will perform systems integration and assist with transition.BENEFITS: In addition to U.S. Navy surface ship and submarine applications there are a number of immediate commercial applications for a cost effective fire resistant composite material in the private sector. Aircraft manufacturers, offshore oil and gas companies and the chemical process industry are potential commercial industries that could benefit from the development of a lightweight, low smoke, strong, flame retardant composite material. The fire resistance and low smoke behavior of composites developed for use in Navy Ships could be used for interior aircraft components such as overhead bins, wall structures, ceilings and floors. New fire resistant low smoke composites could save lives in aircraft fire situations. The off shore oil and gas and chemical process industries could use fire resistant low smoke composite materials in the construction of off shore platforms, and onshore plant buildings and processing structures.

THERMAL WAVE IMAGING, INC.
845 Livernois Street
Ferndale, MI 48220
(248) 414-3730

PI: Dr. Steven Shepard
(248) 414-3730
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0290
IOWA STATE UNIV.
Office of Sponsored Programs
Ames, IA 50011-3051
(515) 294-5225

ID#: N064-011-0495
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-011       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Comprehensive Inspection of Turbine Hot Section Blades and Vanes Using Active Thermography
Abstract:   At present, turbine NDE is typically a time consuming collection of inspections that includes manual testing of holes and channels for blockages, multiple flow tests and various inspection technologies such as ultrasound, eddy current and radiography. Thermography has also become a widely method used to perform various inspections. However, many of thermographic inspections require different equipment, set-up, procedures and training. In the proposed STTR program, we will determine whether it is feasible to consolidate the entire suite of thermographic inspections into a single inspection station that would perform a comprehensive assessment of the condition of a hot section blade or vane. The system would check for blockages, cracks, measure wall and TBC thickness, and check for core shift as well as TBC delamination. We anticipate that consolidation of some of the more widely implemented tasks such as detection of delamination or wall thickness will be relatively straightforward. However, novel approaches will be required to improve less robust thermographic methods, such as blockage or crack detection. BENEFITS: The proposed system will reduce inspection time and increase inspector efficiency for both manufacturers and end users of airborne turbine components. Time consuming manual inspections that are currently performed could be eliminated, and all critical inspections would be performed at a single inspection station, using a single procedure. A scaled-up version of the system could also be used for inspection of land-based turbines, with similar benefits to users.

TOYON RESEARCH CORP.
Suite A 75 Aero Camino
Goleta, CA 93117
(805) 968-6787

PI: Dr. Richard E. Cagley
(805) 968-6787
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0260
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA
Office of Research 3227 Cheadl
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-2050
(805) 893-4034

ID#: N064-004-0051
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-004       Awarded: 18AUG06
Title: Command and Control for Embedded Systems
Abstract:   For many military operational scenarios there is an extremely large geographical theater. Providing coverage requires 100s to 1000s of sensing devices. Command and control (C2) of such a large number of devices, to provide time sensitive targeting (TST), poses a difficult technical challenge. Our solution to this problem is to use a hierarchy of unattended ground sensors (UGS). Ultra low-cost trigger nodes provide indications that a possible event of interest is occurring in a local area. While only equipped with a limited sensor suite, they will still be able to fuse information from multiple co-located nodes to reduce false alarms. Trigger nodes will be responsible for tasking a much smaller number of video nodes at the next higher level of the sensor hierarchy. Once a video node is alerted by a field of trigger nodes it will task its image sensor in the direction of the event and begin relaying this imagery to a stand-off communications center. There is also the provision to utilize a local video tracker to further increase the autonomy of the hierarchical sensor network. We note that such a hierarchy dramatically reduces the C2 personnel requirements. Toyon has teamed with the University of California, Santa Barbara.BENEFITS: A key benefit of the proposed work is an effective means for managing 100s to 1000s of wireless sensors. While such problems have been addressed in the literature and experimental testbeds, their applicability to problems of interest to the military has been limited. Through our use of COTS equipment and structured architecture, we perceive that the proposed system has the potential be fielded at the completion of this effort. Meeting this goal, Toyon is leveraging technology developed from an array of other programs. A similar technology transition path can be used for the systems developed through this Navy STTR. Along with the proposed command and control philosophy and resulting software, there will be resulting innovations in wireless communications, image tracking, and sensor packaging.

TPL, INC.
3921 Academy Parkway North, NE
Albuquerque, NM 87109
(505) 342-4412

PI: Dr. Charles Lakeman
(505) 342-4427
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0285
WASHINGTON STATE UNIV.
PO Box 642920
Pullman, WA 99164-2920
(509) 335-8523

ID#: N064-020-0517
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-020       Awarded: 07AUG06
Title: A VIBRATION HARVESTING POWER SOURCE FOR WIRELESS SENSORS
Abstract:   The smaller warcraft envisioned by The Electric Warships and Combat Vehicles Future Naval Capability need to reduce the size and weight of all shipboard systems. Wireless sensors offer enormous potential for meeting these needs by eliminating heavy, costly and failure-prone wiring. Government wireless systems must include an effective security system to prevent attacks on sensitive data and the power source must not provide a means through which the sensor or network security may be compromised. Batteries are clearly not sufficient for powering these sensors due to their finite life its innate susceptibility to tampering. TPL and Washington State University (WSU) propose to develop a smart, secure, vibration energy-harvesting power system for wireless sensor clusters. The approach will combine a piezoelectric micropower generator developed at WSU with TPL's patented miniaturized energy storage devices. Ultra-low power electronic circuitry will provide both safe charging of the energy storage system as well as security features to protect against tampering or loss of power. Successful completion of the effort will demonstrate the feasibility of a power solution that enhances the security against tamper or loss of power conditions for Navy wireless sensors while meeting the desired small size and weight constraints. BENEFITS: By 2010 the global market for wireless sensor networks is predicted to be valued close to $10B, representing 200M units, up from $200M or 1.3M units in 2005. Such wireless sensor systems will be used to 1) control industrial processes for increased autonomy; 2) monitor the environment in domestic and commercial buildings, and military and homeland security installations; and 3) monitor the structural health of buildings, bridges and aircraft. Widespread use of wireless sensors in this manner will improve safety, increase security, lower heating, ventilation and cooling (HVAC) costs, and increase manufacturing efficiency. To be truly wireless, each sensor unit needs a self-contained power source. TPL's patent-pending EnerPakT products provide the solution to powering wireless sensors where it is costly, dangerous or impossible to change batteries on a regular basis.

TRANSITION45 TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
1963 North Main Street
Orange, CA 92865
(714) 283-2118

PI: Dr. Edward Chen
(714) 283-2118
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0271
NORTHWESTERN UNIV.
Dept Materials Science & Eng
Evanston, IL 60208-3108
(847) 491-5370

ID#: N064-021-0574
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-021       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Innovative Titanium Lattice Structures for Off-board Surface Vessels
Abstract:   Lattice Block Structures are innovative, periodic cellular materials whose combination of affordability, low relative density, and substantial strength represents a significant advance in the state-of-the-art of engineered structural materials. Lattice Block Structures in particular have superior kinetic energy absorbing ability that stems from the collapsibility of the internal cells. As a result, these materials in the form of titanium alloys are ideal for use in the construction and/or optimization of manned and unmanned surface vessels operating in harsh marine surface and sub-surface environments. This STTR Phase I effort proposes to evaluate the feasibility of an innovative cast titanium Lattice Block Structures technology for use as structures for Off-board Surface Vessels.BENEFITS: Titanium Lattice Block Structures are innovations that provide tremendous opportunities for producing lightweight, damage tolerant structures for aerospace and non-aerospace systems. Due to the high cost of the present forms of periodic cellular structures and composite materials, sea water-resistant titanium alloy lattices can be used to replace more expensive structures for naval applications. In addition to shipboard structures, immediate applications for these materials include military aircraft and missile systems, combat and land vehicles as well as commercial aircraft and civil structures.

TRIANGLE POLYMER TECHNOLOGIES
203 April Bloom Ln.
Cary, NC 27519
(919) 215-9829

PI: Mr. John Pacanovsky
(919) 345-9367
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0339
NORTH CAROLINA A&T STATE UNIV.
1601 East Market St. Fort IRC
Greensboro, NC 27411
(336) 256-2407

ID#: N064-040-0040
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-040       Awarded: 11SEP06
Title: Advanced Epoxy System for Large Scale Composite Ship Component Manufacturing Using the VARTM Process.
Abstract:   A major limitation of current high performance composites made from vinyl ester resins is their performance with carbon fiber reinforcements. Carbon fiber composites can possess much higher specific stiffness and strength than glass fiber composites, but the laminated composite properties depend on a good interface between the matrix resin and the fiber. Since vinyl ester resins typically do not exhibit good adhesion to the carbon fibers the resultant composite generally exhibits poor composite properties such as interlaminar shear properties and fatigue performance. There have been many attempts to address this low performance, but none has offered properties sufficient for commercial usage. The objective of this proposal is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a novel epoxy resin based system especially designed for high modulus, carbon fiber reinforced composites. Triangle Polymer Technologies will develop an advanced epoxy resin based system that will provide superior interfacial adhesion properties with carbon fibers, have a high glass transition temperature ( > 200 F) with room temperature cure, have improved mechanical properties including hot/wet and fracture toughness, and will have low viscosity and moderate open time so as to be manufactured using a Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) process.BENEFITS: The anticipated benefits of this resin and composite development are far reaching beyond the stated Navy programs associated with the AEM/S mast, LPD-17 masts, DD(X), Composite Advanced Sail, and the Composite High Speed Vessel. There are many space, military and commercial marine, aviation and land transportation applicatons in need of the performance advantages of carbon fiber composites that will require our advanced epoxy system to achieve maximum performance.

TRS CERAMICS, INC.
2820 East College Avenue
State College, PA 16801
(814) 238-7485

PI: Dr. Paul W. Rehrig
(814) 238-7485
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0226
THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.
150 Materials Research Lab
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 865-1645

ID#: N064-034-0154
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-034       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Expanded Operating Domain Piezoelectric Single Crystals
Abstract:   For this Phase I STTR program, TRS proposes to investigate the synthesis of new single crystal piezoelectric compositions that will operate at higher temperature, higher electric field and/or higher stress than current state-of-the-art PMN-PT single crystals. PMN-PT single crystals are readily available for certain applications, however a broader operating range would allow for greater device design flexibility and therefore a wider range of potential applications. The base program will focus on establishing potential compositions with A and B site PMN-PT modifications and exploring ternary PMN-PT base compositions with novel end members. Proposed compositional modification arises from first principal calculations (ab initio) of crystal chemistry and local atomic structure of ferroelectric perovskites. The focus of the effort is to improve the stability of the PMN-PT system in order to expand the operating domain or establish new systems. The focus will be to increase the Curie temperature for increased temperature stability or coercive field for increased electrical stability. This effort has significant implications to high power transducer design and application, especially tonpilz transducers. Establishing new compositions with the potential of increased sensitivity, broader bandwidth, higher strains, and higher acoustic power may be enabling for a number of high drive applications.BENEFITS: At the conclusion of Phase I, we expect to have established the feasibility of growing novel compositions of expanded operating temperature range piezoelectric single crystals for broadband, high power Tonpilz transducers and acoustic sensors using the Bridgman or Flux-Bridgman growth technique. By the end of the Phase I Option, the best performance composition will be able to be down selected from the potential compositions. The growth of the chosen composition will be optimized in Phase II and to further scale up both diameter and total volume of grown crystal. Emphasis will be placed on ensuring high quality crystals by optimizing the growth conditions in parallel with scale-up efforts to minimize inclusions and other crystal defects. TRS' commercialization goal for this program is to develop high quality expanded operating range piezoelectric single crystals and apply them for high frequency transducer arrays constructed from assemblages of Tonpilz elements based on the single crystals. It is TRS' intention to develop the technology required to make transducer heads from single crystals and to sell these to sonar systems manufacturers such Northrop-Grumman for integration of the transducers with drive, control, and imaging electronics. To achieve this goal we will transfer technology developed by Penn State ARL on the Phase II program, hire a transducer engineer, and/or, collaborate with an established transducer company such as Blatek, Inc. At the conclusion of the Phase II program a pilot process will be developed to produce the single crystal material and the arrays for the targeted application to be determined specifically during Phase I and II. For Phase III follow-on funding TRS and its team members will seek development funds from the Navy for specific UUV or towed scanner device development. Successful commercialization of this technology will provide a source of broadband, high power, single crystal based, acoustic sensors.

ULTRA COMMUNICATIONS, INC.
310 Via Vera Cruz, Suite 105
San Marcos, CA 92078
(760) 420-3486

PI: Dr. Charlie Kuznia
(760) 420-3486
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0208
THE UNIVERISTY OF PITTSBURGH
Office of Research 350 Thacke
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
(412) 624-8839

ID#: N064-005-0369
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-005       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Next Generation Radar and Signal Processing Using the Cell Broadband Engine
Abstract:   The Cell processor architecture represents a significant shift in deeply coupled multi-core processor architecture. In the first implementation, the Cell Broadband Engine (CBE) has broken new ground in clock speed, density and power dissipation. By creating a design optimized for a specific class of algorithms, the CBE can deliver peak performance of over 250Gflops and has been measured with sustained performance of nearly 50X that of conventional processors on multiple benchmarks. Intended as the core processor for the upcoming PS-3 gaming console, the CBE design in optimized for the high computational demands of real time image and scene manipulation. In this project, we will leverage these capabilities to achieve similar performance improvements for selected Navy compute intensive algorithms. In our phase I program, we will identify, analyze and benchmark the performance of specific algorithms of Navy interest. In Phase II, we will deliver and extensible and parameterized library of pre-coded modules for use in CBE-based development environment for Navy systems. BENEFITS: Given the paradigms shift embodied in the Cell Processor architecture, there will a considerable market for an updated software base capable of exploiting the capabilities of this new generation of processors. Radar and signal processing applications on the current chip has significant military and civilian applications. Certain modeling and simulation applications are also like to be able to exploit this architecture. While the specific libraries developed in this project are likely to be limited to military applications, the system implementation strategy and development environment will be easily ported to additional application domains.

VOXTEL, INC.
12725 SW Millikan Way Suite 230
Beaverton, OR 97005
(971) 223-5646

PI: Dr. David M. Schut
(971) 223-5646
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0332
UNIV. OF OREGON
Dept. of Chemistry 1253 Univer
Eugene, OR 97403-1253
(541) 346-4228

ID#: N064-027-0329
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-027       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Binary Multi-Taggant System for Unique Target ID
Abstract:   To allow warfighters the ability to detect, classify, identify, geolocate and track entities buried in large amounts of urban clutter, an optical taggant technology, delivery system, and interrogation system, is proposed that not only is environmentally robust, but permits a very large number of unique, covert identifiers to aid target identification and tracking, even in crowded urban environments. The proposed tags are designed be read from significant standoff distances, and since the mechanisms of both excitation and emission are restricted to the solar-blind UV, NIR, and SWIR spectral bands, the taggant design is covert, yet readable with available military detector technologies. Building on the team's extensive experience with nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs), security ink chemistry, and military EO system design, in Phase I, a series of non-toxic NQDs functionalized with chromophores will be synthesized, and their well-defined spectral emission signatures on surfaces, including fabrics, will be demonstrated. The long-term stability of the taggants will also be investigated. These learnings will be applied to the Phase II program which will implement and characterize a functional, end-to-end system consisting of a set of taggants, a deposition system, and an interrogation unit.BENEFITS: Many billions of dollars a year are lost to counterfeit documents and consumer goods, in addition to the risks associated with counterfeit products such as foods, beverages, and medicines. The tags proposed herein are covert, and therefore give such items a covert but authenticable feature. Due to the encoding inherent in the particles, many billions of unique codes are possible, allowing brand owners to have unique identifiers for their products. For brand-protection and anti-counterfeiting, the proposed technology can be used as forensic taggants for packaging and labels.

WEBCORE TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
8821 Washington Church Road
Miamisburg, OH 45342
(937) 435-2200

PI: Dr. Rob Banerjee
(937) 435-2200
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0270
OLD DOMINION UNIV. RESEARCH FO
P.O. Box 6369
Norfolk, VA 23509
(757) 683-3728

ID#: N064-021-0522
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-021       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Durable Composites for Harsh Marine Environments
Abstract:   WebCore proposes to explore the incorporation of newer, tougher resins and nano-fibers into fiber reinforced composites (FRC) in order to provide highly durable, abrasion-resistant materials. WebCore's FRC, TYCOR, is a lightweight, high performance structural material that can be tailored to exacting requirements and complex shapes. Through the use of patented preforming processes and novel infusion processes, WebCore has the unique ability to incorporate normally difficult-to-use resins into TYCOR panels to improve impact properties and damage tolerance.BENEFITS: pleasure craft rigid inflatable boats high-performance marine vessels

ZEL TECHNOLOGIES, LLC
54 Old Hampton Lane
Hampton, VA 23669
(757) 722-5565

PI: Mr. Oleg Godin
(303) 497-6558
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0189
COOPERATIVE INSTITUTE FOR RESEARCH
University of Colorado Campus
Boulder, CO 80309-0572
(303) 492-8074

ID#: N064-002-0246
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-002       Awarded: 01AUG06
Title: Remote Detection of Ocean Surface Roughness Changes
Abstract:   Detection of weak oceanic currents by remote sensing means is an important task for many applications. Recent destructive Sumatra tsunami (2004) demonstrated a key role of the tsunami monitoring and early warning system for preventing numerous human losses and decreasing property damage. Complexity of the problem is explained by very weak current needed to be detected. Nevertheless there are some observations (tsunami shadow) and theoretical arguments indicating that even such small oceanic currents can result in measurable variations of the sea surface roughness. During Phase I we propose to conduct research directed to the development of the theory of roughness modulation due to interaction of surface currents with a turbulent wind and verification of theoretical prediction by studying available microwave radar/radiometric satellite data. Comparison of the satellite observation collocated in space and time with tsunami wave with theoretical modulation of surface roughness and resulting radar/radiometric signal will answer the question of detectability of weak current. In case of positive result of Phase I, the efforts of Phase I optional part and Phase II will be directed toward study of the effect of various environmental parameters on the signal strength, development of the robust detection algorithm, and optimal parameters of the airborne/spaceborne systems.BENEFITS: The proposed research will result in a sensor system and algorithm capable of real time detection of weak current disturbances from aircraft or/and satellites. Such a system would be of great value to the US Government for national security purposes and for warning and emergency management. Specific applications may include tsunami warning, bottom topography characterization in denied areas, and subsurface mine detection. A global, satellite-based system for early tsunami detection will be of exceptional societal value for this and other nations. Through early warning with a low probability of a false alarm, it will help to save lives and minimize economic impact in tsunami-affected areas.

ZELLCOMP, INC.
3020 Pickett Rd., Suite 327
Durham, NC 27705
(919) 401-4000

PI: Mr. Sean P. Walsh
(919) 401-4000
Contract #: N00014-06-M-0340
NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV.
2701 Sullivan Dr.
Raleigh, NC 27695
(919) 515-5226

ID#: N064-040-0065
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 06-040       Awarded: 11SEP06
Title: Epoxy and Epoxy-Hybrid Nano-Particle Resins for Carbon-Fiber Ship Structures By Ambient VARTM Process
Abstract:   The Navy has used vinyl ester resin as the matrix material for manufacturing large scale composite ship structures. However, the Navy is now using carbon fiber as the reinforcement, which means the use of vinyl ester as the matrix system is less appealing. When carbon fiber and vinyl ester resin are combined, lower interfacial properties occur. Also, vinyl ester systems have high-cure shrinkage. ZellComp proposes an epoxy resin that solves the problem of carbon fiber being able to achieve stiffness in the composite. Moreover, this epoxy resin overcomes inherent problems such as a high, as-cured glass transition temperature (Tg) and low viscosity. ZellComp will assess three technologies separately and in combination to achieve a tough, halogenated, fire-retardant epoxy.BENEFITS: ZellComp envisions great potential for FRP composites as an improvement over decks made with conventional materials such as steel and concrete. As part of our business strategy, ZellComp is exploring a subcategory of marine environment structures, where a design comprised of CFRP composites is a better solution. For these weight-critical applications, ZellComp proposes development of a resin suitable for low-cost composite fabrication processes such as VARTM that are capable of producing large structural decks efficiently. The goal is a tough, low-viscosity, ambient-cured epoxy resin that is fire-resistant and compatible with carbon fiber. Our vision of resin needs for ZellComp's target market for marine structures matches the Navy's needs as outlined in N06-T040. ZellComp is discussing collaborative efforts with major defense contractors. Outside ZellComp's market domain in FRP composite structural decking, we see other opportunities for the developed resin system. We plan to partner with a supplier to market this resin system under a license agreement to other composite applications outside of decking. Similar resin needs exist in composites for aerospace components.

---------- OSD ----------

ARIES DESIGN AUTOMATION, LLC
6157 N Sheridan Rd, Suite16M
Chicago, IL 60660-5818
(773) 856-6633

PI: Dr. Miroslav N. Velev
(773) 856-6633
Contract #: FA8650-06-M-8081
UNIV. OF ARIZONA
Department of Computer Science, University of Arizona
Tucson, AZ 85721
(520) 621-4527

ID#: O064-NC5-1006
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 06-NC5       Awarded: 27JUL06
Title: Formal-Verification-Based Tool for Deobfuscation of Tamper-Proofed Software
Abstract:   The rapid increase in the use of the Internet in many aspects of our lives has led to an explosive growth in the spread of malware such as computer worms, viruses, and trojans. Security tools typically examine software for the presence of malware either by looking for specific byte signatures, or (more recently) by analyzing the candidate binary's internal logic. However, it is surprisingly easy to use binary obfuscation to fool current binary analysis tools into making errors that can hide malicious content. Furthermore, tamper-proofing techniques can be used to hinder or prevent dynamic monitoring of such software. The combination of code obfuscation and tamper-proofing can, therefore, make software opaque to security analysis tools. This project aims to address this situation by developing sophisticated techniques for deobfuscating binaries as well as identifying and working around tamper-proofing and anti-monitoring code intended to prevent dynamic monitoring. In order to do this efficiently without affecting program semantics, we will extend and combine SAT-based formal verification procedures developed by one of the co-PIs (Velev) with low-level binary analysis and deobfuscation techniques developed by the other co-PI (Debray). We will leverage and extend existing binary manipulation software developed by Debray to achieve this.

ATC - NY
33 Thornwood Drive, Suite 500
Ithaca, NY 14850-1250
(607) 257-1975

PI: Dr. David Guaspari
(607) 257-1975
Contract #: W911QX-07-C-0069
UNIV. OF MINNESOTA
McNamara Alumni Center, Suite , 200 Oak Street SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455
(612) 624-5599

ID#: O064-SP3-2019
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 06-SP3       Awarded: 17MAY07
Title: Protoplasm: Automating checks for protocol compatibility
Abstract:   Pervasive networking provides ever-growing opportunities for collaboration among computer systems operating in different domains. These systems may "speak" in their own protocols and data formats; and determining whether two speak in compatible terms can be difficult. Since manual review is costly, time-consuming, and error-prone, the opportunities for cross-domain collaboration can be fully realized only if large parts of the problem of detecting and compensating for incompatibilities can be automated. Analysis and synthesis algorithms have been developed, but they can be applied only if all the relevant protocols have been formally specified-i.e., given precise mathematical descriptions. ATC-NY, Architecture Technology Corporation, and the University of Minnesota-with extensive experience in both networking and applied formal methods-will collaborate to develop Protoplasm, a tool suite for analyzing and ensuring the compatibility of cross-domain protocols that is centered on the key enabling technology: automated support for creating and validating protocol specifications. Protoplasm will use the Play-Engine to capture requirements by "scenario-based programming" and to explore and validate specifications. Protoplasm will analyze the compatibility of protocols and support conformance-checking by generating monitors that evaluate tests of implementations against protocol specifications and by generating input for BLAST, which can verify source code by static analysis.

ATC - NY
33 Thornwood Drive, Suite 500
Ithaca, NY 14850-1250
(607) 257-1975

PI: Ms. Carla Marceau
(607) 257-1975
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0098
CORNELL UNIV.
120 Day Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853
(607) 255-5337

ID#: O064-SP2-1007
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 06-SP2       Awarded: 09JUN06
Title: AppMon: Application Monitors for Not-Yet-Trusted Software
Abstract:   Full certification and testing of application programs provides a level of assurance that they will not harm host systems, but it takes a long time. For this reason, software users are often faced with a vexing dilemma: in order to obtain critical new functionality, they must use software that may damage their systems or render it vulnerable to attack. To address this problem, ATC-NY, Cornell University and Architecture Technology Corporation will develop AppMon to provide smart monitors for applications. A smart monitor acts like a security escort at a military installation: if the escorted application attempts a clearly dangerous action, the smart monitor will prevent it. Otherwise, the escort becomes familiar with the application and takes note if the application engages in unusual behavior. Human guards can do this because they are endowed with human intelligence. AppMon smart monitors enforce an interaction policy based on (a) site security policy and (2) the application's normal use of local resources and interactions with other systems.

ATLANTEC ENTERPRISE SOLUTIONS, INC.
175 Admiral Cochrane Drive, Suite 400
Annapolis, MD 21401
(410) 897-9910

PI: Ms. Allegra Treaster
(410) 897-9912
Contract #: W911QX-07-C-0068
UNIV. OF NEW ORLEANS
2000 Lakeshore Dr
New Orleans, LA 70148
(504) 280-7416

ID#: O064-SP3-2037
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 06-SP3       Awarded: 19JUL07
Title: General Interoperability Toolkit: Migrating Shipbuilding Interoperability Tools to Cross-Domain Functionality
Abstract:   One of the most significant challenges facing the Defense Industry today is the lack of interoperability between software applications. Weapons systems data is voluminous, complex, and distributed across many disparate applications. Typically, only a few of these applications are truly integrated and manual processes are required to synchronize data maintained across multiple systems. Users must manually "integrate" the data in these applications by generating separate reports from multiple sources, adding missing data, and manually verifying the results. The resulting system is an inefficient, uncontrollable, inflexible set of software tools, which neither meet the needs of the DoD or fulfill the needs of the programs and missions that they were designed to serve. This lack of system integration and interoperability is quite evident within the DoD legacy systems. There are hundreds of specialized systems for design, requirements, maintenance, maintenance planning, operation, logistics, technical manuals, drawings, training, personnel, supply, and analysis. Any planning or investigative activity necessarily involves interaction with several systems. Nevertheless, there is no interface to provide the user with an integrated view of this data. What is currently lacking is an open, adaptable interoperability solution which can integrate data across DoD legacy systems.

COGNITIVE CONCEPTS
458 E Jackson
Webster Groves, MO 63119
(314) 961-7454

PI: Mr. Peter Lakey
(314) 961-7454
Contract #: W911QX-07-C-0061
UNIV. OF MARYLAND
3112 Lee Building, Research Administration
College Park, MD 20742
(301) 405-7314

ID#: O064-SP4-2043
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 06-SP4       Awarded: 09APR07
Title: Software System Reliability Analysis
Abstract:   Establishing the reliability of embedded software-based systems is increasingly important as the DoD's dependency on software grows and the size and complexity of software systems increase. Currently, no theory is in general practice that adequately explains the behavior of software systems reliability in a consistent and repeatable way. Currently, we cannot point to a best practice (although John Musa and other experts would argue that operational profile testing is the SRE best practice). At the conclusion of Phase II of this STTR, the CC/UMD team is confident that we will not only have produced such a best practice, but that the practice will be publicized and widely known among DoD management and practitioners, and that these people will promote the best practice. The best practice will incorporate an advanced theory for explaining software systems reliability. The theory will be based on well understood principles of software operation. The software reliability theory is by nature fundamentally different from hardware reliability. Hardware reliability is characterized by physical changes in system parts which result in a breakdown in one or more components or sub-systems. Software does not fail in that manner. Software systems fail as a result of design flaws, design limitations, or simply unknown requirements.

GLOBAL INFOTEK, INC.
1920 Association Drive, Suite 200
Reston, VA 20191
(703) 652-1600

PI: Dr. Allan Chris Long
(703) 652-1600
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0050
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLO
E19-750, 77 Mass Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-3922

ID#: O064-SP2-1016
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 06-SP2       Awarded: 09JUN06
Title: SQUIRE: Security Escorts for Untrusted Software
Abstract:   Global InfoTek, Inc. and MIT intend to produce a new computer security environment, SQUIRE, that mitigates the ubiquitous, unavoidable risk of using untrusted applications by strengthening the weakest link: the interaction between the human and complex, unintuitive security mechanisms. Usability of security is critical, since without it systems are frequently too hard to understand or too cumbersome to use, and in either case insecure. Since computer systems are dynamic, this interaction is not one-time, but recurs. Our focus on usability begins with a "room" metaphor similar to the coarse-grained security model we use in our homes. Security in SQUIRE is based on partitioning data and applications into "rooms", so that every running instance of an application and every data file belong to exactly one room. SQUIRE will provide an interface simple enough for typical computer users to understand and convenient enough for them to actually use, using existing security technologies for enforcement. Our prior work with a similar system, Chameleon, provides us with starting points for both security model and user interface, both of which have been vetted with typical computer users. This springboard gives us a good head start in making SQUIRE a highly usable, and thus secure, system.

GRAMMATECH, INC.
317 N. Aurora Street
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 273-7340

PI: Dr. Colin Van Dyke
(607) 273-7340
Contract #: FA8650-06-M-8077
UNIV. OF WISCONSIN, COMP. SCI.
1210 West Dayton Street
Madison, WI 53706
(608) 262-2091

ID#: O064-NC4-1012
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 06-NC4       Awarded: 26JUL06
Title: Reverse Engineering Kernel Mode Rootkits
Abstract:   While the tools to combat malicious rootkits have evolved over the years, their effectiveness has paled before the increasing stealth of malware designed specifically for hiding from such tools. A next-generation reverse-engineering tool is needed to counter the growing threat of modern rootkits. This new forensics tool will utilize a powerful set of techniques to identify a broad class of malicious rootkit behavior.

GRAMMATECH, INC.
317 N. Aurora Street
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 273-7340

PI: Mr. Thomas Johnson
(607) 273-7340
Contract #: FA8650-06-M-8079
UNIV. OF WISCONSIN, COMP. SCI.
1210 West Dayton Street
Madison, WI 53706
(608) 262-2091

ID#: O064-NC5-1013
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 06-NC5       Awarded: 26JUL06
Title: Deobfuscating tools for the validation and verification of tamper-proofed software
Abstract:   We propose a deobfuscation tool that uses machine-code analysis to expose self-protecting malware for further analysis (e.g., by an automated malware detector, or a human analyst) using dynamic disassembly techniques. The proposed deobfuscator will also be capable of checking that the (self-protecting) program output from a tamper-proofing tool is indeed protected, and has the same behavior as the input program. Our approach combines the strengths of static analysis and dynamic analysis. This allows us to have the precision of dynamic analysis, but with much better coverage, thus recovering some of the completeness of static analysis.

GRAMMATECH, INC.
317 N. Aurora Street
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 273-7340

PI: Dr. Michael McDougall
(607) 273-7340
Contract #: N00014-07-C-0802
UNIV. OF WISCONSIN, COMP. SCI.
1210 West Dayton Street
Madison, WI 53706
(608) 262-2091

ID#: O064-SP1-4003
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 06-SP1       Awarded: 03MAY07
Title: Error-handling paths and policies analysis
Abstract:   Development of error-handling code and policies is often neglected. Error conditions are hard to anticipate in the design phase and difficult to simulate in the testing phase. However, poor error-handling can turn a minor error into a catastrophic one; in the Ariane 5 failure an uncaught exception in an unneeded module escalated to the point where the rocket self-destructed. Error-handling is a cross-cutting issue; error-handling is necessary when components interact through procedure calls and when components interact through stream and network channels. Error-handling policies that are reasonable in one context may be faulty or even dangerous in other. We propose a comprehensive survey of error-handling issues, from the low level of machine code to the high level policy specification and conflict. We will identify analyses to solve or mitigate the problems and prototype these analyses by leveraging our existing technology in machine code, source code and file format analysis.

GRAMMATECH, INC.
317 N. Aurora Street
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 273-7340

PI: Dr. Michael McDougall
(607) 273-7340
Contract #: W911QX-07-C-0060
UNIV. OF WEST VIRGINIA
Lane Department of Computer Sc, P.O. Box 6109
Morgantown, WV 26506-6109
(304) 293-0405

ID#: O064-SP4-2026
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 06-SP4       Awarded: 13APR07
Title: Software System Reliability Analysis
Abstract:   Reliability is a crucial characteristic in safety-critical systems, yet it can only be measured late in the software development process when changes are difficult and costly. We propose a framework for estimating the risk of software that can be applied early in the software development life-cycle. This framework will use 21st century source code metrics--derived from advanced static analysis and symbolic simulation--coupled with machine learning techniques to identify software modules that are likely to contain faults. It also uses static analysis techniques to estimate the severity of a fault in a module. This framework will enable engineers to predict and resolve costly reliability problems long before the software is subject to system tests or deployment, allowing risks to be mitigated or eliminated early in the software development life-cycle.

HBGARY, INC.
6900 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 706
Chevy Chase, MD 20815-6103
(301) 652-8885

PI: Mr. Greg Hoglund
(408) 529-4370
Contract #: FA8650-06-M-8078
NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL
1 University Circle
Monterey, CA 93943-5098
(831) 656-2378

ID#: O064-NC4-1009
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 06-NC4       Awarded: 27JUL06
Title: Kernel-mode Software Protection Vulnerability Assessment and Rootkit Reverse Engineering Tool Development
Abstract:   Software protections mechanisms are a means for preventing piracy, alteration, and reverse engineering of critical national security software and data. Kernel-mode software protection techniques utilize, in-part, rootkit-like methods that provide anti-piracy and anti-reverse engineering protection to critical software applications. The fundamental difficulty associated with rootkits and software protection mechanisms are that they each wish to hide some aspect of their operation from outside observation. In striving to remain unobserved both types of software may spend some amount of time "on the lookout" for tools that may be used to thwart their respective efforts. The goal of this work is to design and prototype a toolset that can be used for unobserved, dynamic reverse engineering of software programs even when those software programs employ tamper-proofing and anti-reverse engineering techniques. The target programs may exist within a lab or upon production machinery. As such, the technology must be in-field deployable into existing machine environments. HBGary offers kernel mode reverse engineering tools to assist in analysis rootkits and overcome tamper-proofing techniques.

HBGARY, INC.
6900 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 706
Chevy Chase, MD 20815-6103
(301) 652-8885

PI: Mr. Greg Hoglund
(408) 529-4370
Contract #: FA8650-06-M-8080
NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL
1 University Circle
Monterey, CA 93943-5098
(831) 656-2378

ID#: O064-NC5-1010
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 06-NC5       Awarded: 28JUL06
Title: Deobfuscating tools for the validation and verification of tamper-proofed software
Abstract:   Tamper-proofed software and malicious binaries, commonly referred to as "malware", often share similar technological features. Both good and bad guys wish to hinder static and dynamic reverse engineering of their software programs to thwart adversaries from gaining program understanding and to prevent the observation of code behavior. HBGary proposes the Virtual Machine for Analysis (VMA), a full-virtualization machine environment that completely subverts current and upcoming tamper-proofing technologies. Rather than being designed for "typical" virtual execution of applications and operating systems, VMA will be designed with invasive debugging and data collection capabilities specifically for evaluating tamper-proofed software. This proposal details the use of a high-fidelity, highly-controlled emulation environment to create an undetectable, dynamically reconfigurable VMA. The advantage, is that VMA will perform `undetectable' debugging; that is, the system being debugged cannot detect that it is being debugged. Traditional `native' debuggers have trouble debugging such structures because native debuggers rely upon some of these structures being untampered.

IRVINE SENSORS CORP.
3001 Red Hill Avenue, Building #4-108
Costa Mesa, CA 92626-4532
(714) 444-8760

PI: Mr. John Leon
(714) 435-8920
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0168
NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV.
EGRC 419, 2410 Campus Shore Dr
Raleigh, NC 27606
(919) 515-7351

ID#: O064-NC2-2032
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 06-NC2       Awarded: 15SEP06
Title: Automatic Generation of Robust Network Intrusion Detection Signatures
Abstract:   Irvine Sensors Corporation (ISC) together with North Carolina State University propose to develop a novel behavioral technique that is capable of detecting network based intrusions, and can then be used to identify signatures for an Intrusion Prevent Engine (IPE). The behavioral technique proposed detects attacks embedded in different network layers using assertions that can be dynamically updated in real time. The technique involves performing deep packet inspection and making access control decisions based on behavioral compliance. Network traffic behavior is modeled by using theories. Our Behavioral IDS use models of correct and incorrect behaviors, rather than search for signatures. Furthermore, most current approaches do not provide application layer defense. In our approach, the network transactions can be verified as being incorrect or correct, by comparing them against a written set of high-level assertions ("theories") as to proper behavior. This approach has the potential to detect and prevent network based attacks in real time and also permits theories to be updated in real time.

MIGMA SYSTEMS, INC.
1600 Providence Highway
Walpole, MA 02081
(508) 660-0328

PI: Dr. Michael Zeifman
(508) 660-0328
Contract #: W911QX-07-C-0076
UNIV. OF PENNSYLVANIA
Department of Computer and Inf, 3330 Walnut Street
Philadephia, PA 19104-6389
(215) 898-3532

ID#: O064-SP4-2034
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 06-SP4       Awarded: 13JUN07
Title: The Reliability of Embedded Software-Based Systems: Novel Ways to Enhance and Predict
Abstract:   Embedded systems have become increasingly popular over the past years, both in civil and military applications. The probability of an embedded system to perform the required operations during the specified period of time, i.e., the reliability, depends on both the underlying hardware reliability and software reliability. The traditional approach to predict the software reliability on the basis of the programmatic errors implies specially designed testing and predictive models. The main problem of this approach is that it usually considers a parametric model with the parameters to be estimated during the testing, whereas there is no physical or mathematical law underlying the parametric model itself. The proposed method originates from a Bayesian approach so that its dependence on the initial underlying parametric model is relatively weak. At the same time, it accounts for the previous/expert data in a most effective way. To enhance the reliability essential in safety-critical embedded systems, we will extend our method of conversion the informal design requirements into the reference specifications via the EFSM (Extended Finite State Machines).

PIKEWERKS CORP.
2308 Mount Vernon Avenue #212
Alexandria, VA 22301
(703) 969-6404

PI: Ms. Sandra Ring
(703) 969-6404
Contract #: FA8650-06-M-8076
PURDUE UNIV.
CERIAS, 656 Oval Drive
West Lafayette, IN 47907-2086
(765) 494-7841

ID#: O064-NC4-1011
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 06-NC4       Awarded: 25JUL06
Title: Software Protection Vulnerability Assessment through Kernel Analysis and Relationship Maps
Abstract:   Traditional development efforts leave software vulnerable to reverse engineering, tamper, and access by unauthorized individuals (insider threat). While these threats are not new, advancements in easily hidden removable media such as USB drives and memory cards make them more prevalent. One low-cost technique for software protection is to utilize a kernel module capable of securely decrypting and executing protected software without inhibiting the users' activity. To some extent, this approach mimics the concepts employed by kernel "rootkits," or toolkits used by attackers to conceal unauthorized access. Because this approach to software protection is relatively new, few capabilities exist to conduct comprehensive vulnerability analysis. We propose to demonstrate the use of relationship maps as a means of analyzing the strength of these protection capabilities. The maps generated will enable AT-SPI to gather detailed forensics data about the executing software (including the kernel functionality) in a visual form. In addition to beneficial red-team analysis, this technology can be utilized as a security tool to detect and reverse engineer sophisticated kernel rootkits. As our past research has demonstrated, these are highly efficient methods that can be incorporated into both Government and commercial applications with tremendous success.

QUALTECH SYSTEMS, INC.
100 Great Meadow Rd., Suite 603
Wethersfield, CT 06109
(860) 257-8014

PI: Dr. Sudipto Ghoshal
(860) 257-8014
Contract #: W911QX-07-C-0071
UNIV. OF CONNECTICUT
Office for Sponsored Programs, 438 Whitney Rd Ext, Unit 1133
Storrs, CT 06269-1133
(860) 486-8798

ID#: O064-SP4-2030
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 06-SP4       Awarded: 08MAY07
Title: Software System Reliability Analysis
Abstract:   Qualtech Systems, Inc., in cooperation with the University of Connecticut, proposes to develop a model-based system reliability and availability analysis methodology which considers the impact of different factors, including interactions between the hardware and software components, hardware and software architecture, failure severities, repair parameters, system architecture, and redundancy and fault tolerance in an integrated manner. The methodology consists of models at four tiers -- each successive tier incorporates additional detail and requires finer data than the tier above it. This approach will make it feasible to conduct analysis even using partial data - a significant advantage over existing techniques. The proposed methodology could also be applied to evaluate alternative system configurations, to determine availability "hot-spots" and to identify potential candidates for reuse.

RESERVOIR LABS., INC.
632 Broadway, Suite 803
New York, NY 10012-2614
(212) 780-0527

PI: Dr. Steven Reinhardt
(212) 780-0527
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0169
CARNEGIE MELLON UNIV.
Collaborative Innovation Cente, 4720 Forbes Avenue, Room 211
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 268-4912

ID#: O064-NC2-2006
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 06-NC2       Awarded: 18SEP06
Title: Automatic Generation of Robust Network Intrusion Detection Signatures
Abstract:   We propose to develop a system that autonomously and rapidly (1) directly detects exploitation of application software vulnerabilities (including previously unknown vulnerabilities) via dynamic taint analysis, and (2) generates vulnerability signatures identifying all traffic that exploits those vulnerabilities-even traffic with no other similarities to the observed exploit-via semantic analysis of program paths leading to each vulnerability. These signatures will be generated in a format suitable for deployment in a conventional network-based intrusion detection/prevention system. Compared to the current practice of manual signature generation, an automated signature generation system is a necessary step to combat rapidly spreading worms that target previously unknown ("zero-day") vulnerabilities. Compared to other proposed automated signature generation systems which use statistical or heuristic techniques, our approach (1) provides more accurate discrimination between malicious and benign traffic and more precise identification of exploited vulnerabilities at the detection stage, and (2) generates signatures that represent the fundamental characteristics of any exploit targeting a particular vulnerability as completely as possible within the constraints of the signature language. Both aspects contribute directly to reducing the number of false positives and false negatives when the signatures are deployed.

RETHER NETWORKS, INC.
99 Mark Tree Road, suite 301
Centereach, NY 11720
(631) 467-4381

PI: Dr. Lap-chung Lam
(631) 467-4381
Contract #: W911NF-06-C-0170
STONY BROOK UNIV.
Computer Science Department, Stony Brook University
Stony Brook, NY 11794-4400
(631) 632-8449

ID#: O064-NC2-2031
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 06-NC2       Awarded: 15SEP06
Title: Automatic Generation of Robust Network Intrusion Detection Signatures
Abstract:   A comprehensive cyber attack defense should include (1) an attack detection} component that can determine if a network application has been compromised and prevent the attack from further spreading, (2) an attack identification component that can identify the corresponding attack packets and generate the associated attack signatures so as to prevent such attacks from taking place in the future, and (3) an attack repair component that can restore the compromised application's state to that before the attack and allow it to continue normally, and if possible permanently eliminate the vulnerability being exploited. In this SBIR project, we propose to build a program transformation system called DIRA that can automatically embed into network applications an attack detection and identifcation capability against a particular type of attacks called control-hijacking attacks, which are the most common and thus most dangerous attack methods used today, and in fact are building blocks for many recent Internet worms. Control-hijacking attacks allow remote attackers to hijack a remote program and eventually its underlying system, and include such attacks as buffer overflow, integer overflow and format string attacks. Given a network application's source or binary code, DIRA can transform it in such a way that the resulting program can automatically detect any incoming control-hijacking attack, and identify the actual attack packet(s) and inform the front-end firewall and intrusion prevention system accordingly, all without requiring any modifications to the operating system or hardware.

SENTAR, INC.
4900 University Square, Suite 8
Huntsville, AL 35816-1829
(256) 430-0860

PI: Dr. Leigh Flagg
(256) 430-0860
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0048
UNIV. OF TULSA
600 S. College Avenue
Tulsa, OK 74104
(918) 631-2988

ID#: O064-SP2-1014
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 06-SP2       Awarded: 09JUN06
Title: Information Assurance Run-time Auditing (IARA)
Abstract:   Capabilities of large-scale software intensive systems such as those of interest to the Software Producibility Initiative are built incrementally within the overarching infrastructure. This requires frequent updates/extensions to integrate processes and to ensure expedient, fault tolerant, secure and robust operations. The potentially widespread impact made by incorporation of new capabilities coupled with the criticality of system operations may dictate incorporation of untrusted components without strict a prior verification. However, technologies to monitor, control, and verify discrete run-time software components are the subject of on-going research and development. They provide software monitoring at different granularities (i.e. network, operating system and application level) and sometimes for a distinct type of domain. While many of these technologies have gained a level of maturity and acceptance for host-level systems, there is currently limited research underway to substantiate their applicability to large scale software intensive systems on which there are unique quality constraints, and within which there is vast heterogeneity components, and interaction processes. To this end, Sentar and the University of Tulsa propose the Information Assurance Run-time Auditing (IARA) concept as a framework to promote the specification of software system monitoring, audit, analysis and threat mitigation capabilities in large scale software intensive systems.

SPACE MICRO, INC.
10401 Roselle Street, Ste. 400
San Diego, CA 92121-1526
(858) 332-0702

PI: Mr. David R. Czajkowski
(858) 332-0701
Contract #: W15P7T-07-C-M207
NEW MEXICO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
801 Leroy Place
Socorro, NM 87801-4796
(505) 835-5288

ID#: O064-NC3-2024
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 06-NC3       Awarded: 31JUL07
Title: Secure Database Using MotionSafe for Mobile Environments
Abstract:   The Army's Future Combat Systems rely on mobile ad-hoc networks for their success in tactical environments. There are a number of threats to deployed mobile assets used in ad-hoc networks. Space Micro and NMT's new solution, called MotionSafe, provides a very efficient means to protect stored and distributed databases, plus the means to securely communicate this information in the dynamically changing mobile environment. Information protection is provided without a reliable centralized network or security service, supports intermittent connectivity, and where address and physical location are indeterminant. Secure peer-to-peer communication is secured, along with security to forward nodes that are subject to capture. MotionSafe is a highly efficient system, incorporating standard symmetric encryption, an innovative encryption key management system and efficient data management protocols to minimize the ad-hoc network constraints of bandwidth, energy, processing and storage. Space Micro and NMT propose to develop and demonstrate an operational MotionSafe system during Phase I.

STOTTLER HENKE ASSOC., INC.
951 Mariner's Island Blvd., STE 360
San Mateo, CA 94404
(650) 931-2700

PI: Dr. Charles Earl
(650) 931-2700
Contract #: FA9550-06-C-0080
COLUMBIA UNIV.
518 CS Bldg, Computer Science , 1214 Amsterdam Ave MC0401
New York, NY 10027-7003
(212) 939-7160

ID#: O064-SP2-1001
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 06-SP2       Awarded: 09JUN06
Title: Security Escorts for Not-Yet-Trusted Software
Abstract:   With the rapid release of new software applications, builds and patches for existing applications, and increased mobility of software across networks, more of our systems will run software applications that may not have a full pedigree of evaluation and testing to ensure that they are free from exploits and malware. Additionally, any previous certifications are invalidated at the first update. However, it isn't practical to exclude critical functionality from our systems simply due to a lack of pedigree. One technique for allowing untrusted functions to run on a system is to establish a constrained environment, or sandbox, that monitors the activities of software and limits access to the rest of the system.

WW TECHNOLOGY GROUP
4519 Mustering Drum
Ellicott City, MD 21042-5949
(410) 418-4353

PI: Dr. Chris J. Walter
(410) 418-4353
Contract #: N00014-07-M-0477
UNIV. OF ILLINOIS
451 Coordinated Science Lab, 1308 West Main Street
Urbana, IL 61801-2307
(217) 333-0345

ID#: O064-SP1-4001
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 06-SP1       Awarded: 14JUN07
Title: Error-handling paths and policies analysis
Abstract:   Software-based systems, both distributed and embedded, have reached the point where overall complexities radically increase the chance of errors and jeopardize run-time goals of availability and dependability. As the number of operations escalates along with processor speed and the distribution of functions grow, the opportunities for errors to propagate through the system expand. When the scale of systems interactions is included in the considerations, the problem of ensuring effective error handling grows exponentially in complexity. Advancements in analysis and characterization techniques/tools are a necessary breakthrough in reducing the cognitive difficulties in resolving and assessing the systemic nature of error propagation and error handling. In this proposal, the WW Technology Group and the University of Illinois jointly leverage new research and tool results for characterizing error propagation effects and multi-modal stochastic modeling technologies to develop next-generation techniques/tools. Starting with this background, we will refine and extend the WWTG error propagation and analysis theory into an integrated framework that incorporates a combination of enhancements to the WWTG EDICT architectural analysis tool suite and the U-Illinois' Möbius modeling and simulation tool. The resulting tool will enable the assessment and refinement of system responses/policies for handling propagation of context specific error conditions.