DoD STTR Program Phase I Selections for FY08.A

Army Selections

Navy Selections

Air Force Selections

DARPA Selections

OSD Selections


---------- AF ----------

21ST CENTURY SYSTEMS, INC.
6825 Pine Street, Suite 141,
Omaha, NE 68106
(402) 505-7887

PI: Dr. Robert Woodley
(573) 329-8526
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0007
WRIGHT STATE UNIV.
3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, 201J University Hall
Dayton, OH 45435
(937) 775-2425

ID#: F08A-002-0009
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T002       Awarded: 7/1/2008
Title: CoolAID
Abstract:  &nbs Providing commanders with accurate, on-the-spot, clear, concise, usable information wins battles and saves lives. With incoming information from many heterogeneous sources, the focus has been primarily on determining what information to present, and visual ways of communicating the information. There has been less research on what makes information actionable, or on what additional communication concepts might allow commanders to assimilate actionable information. Focusing on these areas will allow more effective communication and a better understanding of the information. The team of 21st Century Systems, Incorporated and Wright State University are excited to apply our expertise and experience for this effort we call, C2-Tool for Actionable Information Display (CoolAID). CoolAID will leverage our considerable experience in situational awareness tools, melded with research related to visualizations and humans in complex systems through WSU. The prototype CoolAID framework will be created with multi-modal display technologies as well as Bayesian and evidential reasoning for data analysis. The developmental process will help isolate what makes information actionable within the sample domain and provide a variety of information presentation techniques which can be used in concert. Phase I concludes with development of a testing plan which will measure the effectiveness of multi-modal information presentation.

21st Century Systems, Incorporated
6825 Pine Street, Suite 141,
Omaha, NE 68106
(402) 505-7887

PI: Robert Woodley
(573) 329-8526
Contract #: FA9550-08-C-0058
Brigham Young University
A-376 ASB Campus Drive,
Provo, UT 84602
(801) 422-5995

ID#: F08A-017-0010
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T017       Awarded: 6/1/2008
Title: Concurrent Agent-enabled Feature Extraction (CAFÉ)
Abstract:  &nbs High fidelity, large scale simulations of complex systems pose a very difficult situation to the scientist trying to understand the physical domain and characteristics of their system. Often, it is impossible to manually search through the data that can come out of these simulations, which may range from Gigabytes to Terabytes. Furthermore, it may be impossible to visualize the multi-dimensional interactions that are occurring in the data. A tool is needed that will concurrently data-mine the vast data sets that are produced and alert the scientist of significant events (either planned or unplanned). 21st Century Systems, Incorporated and Brigham Young University introduce our Concurrent Agent-enabled Feature Extraction (CAFÉ) concept to answer this challenge. CAFÉ features state- of-the-art data-mining and analysis leveraging BYU’s expertise. An innovative intelligent agent structure from 21CSI will allow concurrent data-mining utilizing information sharing that will make it possible for multiple analysis methods to work together to improve the data-mining performance. The agent design, specifically the evidential inference engine, also allows direct collaboration with the data-mining algorithms by the scientist. In this way, CAFÉ allows the scientist to observe and correct the data-mining of high-fidelity fluid dynamic simulations maximizing valuable research time. BENEFIT: Searching for physics-related events in complex large scale simulations will be enhanced by a tool that extracts and displays accurate, near real-time patterns from massively large data sets. With CAFÉ, the potential exists to go even further through the interaction of concurrent, on-the-fly, queries and responses among the CAFÉ agents as well as with the human operator within a single social network. During Phase I, with the approval of the AFOSR TPOC, 21CSI will contact the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Information Directorate at Rome Labs to acquire end user requirements for CAFÉ. The 21CSI team fully intends to build and transition key technological elements such as the collaborative agent concept and information inferencing products using the collaborative environment derived from 21CSI’s Evidential Reasoning NetworkTM (ERN) technology – to suitable USAF and DoD development centers for concurrent data mining. Furthermore, military command & control (C2) operations involved with blast and fragmentation effects in urban areas will benefit from this technology. Urban combat damage to structures could inhibit troop movements or induce sniper stands. The Battle Command Battle Lab - Ft. Huachuca is interested in the technology for a new training simulator for artillery planners and commanders. CAFÉ will expand the capabilities already developed for Ft. Huachuca by allowing us better insight into blast events

ADVANCED CERAMICS MANUFACTURING
7800-A South Nogales Highway,
Tucson, AZ 85706
(520) 547-0855

PI: Dr. Zachary Wing
(520) 547-0861
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0039
UNIV. OF MICHIGAN
MSE Dept., 2300 Hayward St
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
(734) 763-1051

ID#: F08A-004-0283
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T004       Awarded: 9/22/2008
Title: Non-Contact Tabletop Mechanical Testing of Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics
Abstract:  &nbs New methods and technology to rapidly characterize UHTC creep are necessary to fully understand and exploit their high temperature properties for hypersonic vehicles and rocket nozzles. Recently, the University of Michigan has developed a rapid, table top apparatus for characterizing the oxidation behavior of UHTC’s. A team comprised of Advanced Ceramics Manufacturing (ACM) and the University of Michigan propose adapting the rapid oxidation system to characterize high temperature creep behavior. The objective of this proposal is to develop rapid, non- contact test methods for characterizing UHTC creep at temperatures >2200°C. The proposed method is based on Lorentz forces acting upon electrically conductive UHTC’s. Creep data may be obtained continuously in-situ on small samples 3 x 4 x 50 mm in size. Ultimately, a fully developed system could provide creep data as well as ultra high temperature elastic, fracture, and fatigue properties.

Advanced Powder Solutions, Inc
10010 Cucklebur,
Houston, TX 77095
(240) 351-9505

PI: Asit Biswas
(713) 939-0778
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0025
UC Davis Engineering
One Shield Avenue,
Davis, CA 95611
(530) 232-3442

ID#: F08A-031-0246
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T031       Awarded: 8/15/2008
Title: Engineered Nanostructured Magnetic Alloy
Abstract:  &nbs In this Phase I STTR program teaming with magnetic and materials experts Advanced Powder Solutions will develop a low cost high strength, high tensile, nano-structured soft magnetic alloy and rapid fabrication of magnetic component for actuators using innovative consolidation process. Teaming with system integrators and university experts Phase II will continue the characterization of these high temperature magnetic materials and will fabricate more specific components for the Air Force use BENEFIT: If successful the high strength, high temperature magnetic material will fill the need for high strength, high curie temperature, high permeability, low hysteresis , large saturation and remnant magnetizations and very low coercivity magnet. In addition making component by this netshape powder metallurgy process will replace current costly high temperature melting/casting/hot rolling/cold rolling/machining/ annealing route for making electromechanical and electro-hydrostatic actuators for flight control surfaces. Other uses are magnetic bearing, rotor, transformer, Power, Control, and Monitor Electronics (PCME), Interface Box (IBOX), Power Conversion Unit (PCU), automotive short-stroke actuators, for applications such as high-speed diesel fuel injector control valves; active and passive magnetic bearing actuation systems for electric vehicle flywheel energy storage units

APTIMA, INC.
12 Gill Street, Suite 1400
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 496-2415

PI: Dr. Cullen Jackson
(781) 496-2408
Contract #: FA9550-08-C-0057
WRIGHT STATE UNIV.
3640 Colonel Glenn Highway,
Dayton, OH 45435
(937) 775-2391

ID#: F08A-002-0244
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T002       Awarded: 7/1/2008
Title: System for Information and Meta-information Portrayal of Lessons-learned (SIMPL)
Abstract:  &nbs A key challenge for net-centric warfare in the age of information is: How do we know that our actions are having the desired effects? This deceptively simple question often goes unanswered despite the increasingly massive amounts of information available. In the Air and Space Operations Center (AOC), the Operational Assessment Team is responsible for answering this question for the Joint Forces Air Component Commander (JFACC). One method for conveying the right information in a timely manner to answer this question is to use meta-information to appropriately qualify and characterize the information needed to make an assessment of mission performance. Aptima proposes to develop the System for Information and Meta-information Portrayal of Lessons-learned (SIMPL) to enable faster, more effective operational assessment and decision-making. The keys to our proposed effort are: (1) defining the taxonomy of information and meta-information required for Operational Assessment; (2) designing visualizations to enable Operational Assessment; and (3) evaluating the efficacy of the visualization designs to convey actionable information in a timely manner for Operational Assessment in real-world and training environments. The Phase I efforts will include the initial design, development, and evaluation of SIMPL, which we will fully develop and evaluate in Phase II.

AURORA FLIGHT SCIENCES CORP.
9950 Wakeman Drive,
Manassas, MA 20110
(703) 396-6329

PI: Dr. Richard Wilson
(617) 500-4836
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0090
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF
77 Massachusetts Avenue, Building E19-750
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-3906

ID#: F08A-014-0165
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T014       Awarded: 9/1/2008
Title: SkyCowboy
Abstract:  &nbs Aurora Flight Sciences and MIT are teaming to bring their mutual experiences with autonomous aircraft systems together to examine the feasibility of an innovative system for the recovery of Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) by larger Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS). The system proposed by Aurora and MIT exploits the use of an innovative tether system to facilitate MAV capture and retrieval. The Aurora/MIT team will study the dynamics of the tether recovery method and create simulation models to refine the technique. The simulation models will then be supported by a flight demonstration using scaled vehicle models and an instrumented indoor flying range. These demonstrations will not only show the feasibility of the overall concept, but also provide data to refine the simulation models. By the conclusion of the effort, the Aurora/MIT team will have outlined system requirements and CONOPS, demonstrated system feasibility, and identified critical technologies for further development. The results of the Phase I effort will thus ensure a smooth transition to a Phase II effort where the key technologies can be developed and demonstrated in a realistic flight environment.

AURORA FLIGHT SCIENCES CORP.
9950 Wakeman Drive,
Manassas, VA 20110
(703) 396-6329

PI: Dr. James Paduano
(617) 500-4807
Contract #: FA9550-08-C-0061
GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF
505 Tenth St. NW,
Atlanta, GA 30332
(404) 894-6929

ID#: F08A-026-0162
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T026       Awarded: 8/1/2008
Title: Distributed Adaptive Control of Engine Systems
Abstract:  &nbs Aurora and Georgia Tech are bringing together a team of experienced control theory, engine design, engine control experts to perform research on next-generation distributed control architectures for turbine engines. The program combines new results in adaptive and distributed control of heterogeneous systems, unsteady modeling of engines, and advanced component control concepts, with the goal of creating system architectures and tools to enable distributed control to be practical and valuable in engines.

BOSTON APPLIED TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
6F Gill Street,
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 935-2800

PI: Dr. jingwen Wayne Zhang
(781) 935-2800
Contract #: FA9550-08-C-0054
BOSTON COLLEGE
Office for Sponsored Program, 140 Commonwealth Ave.
Chestnut Hill, MA 02467
(617) 552-3061

ID#: F08A-001-0336
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T001       Awarded: 9/2/2008
Title: A Large Size 3D Holographic Display with PR Polymers
Abstract:  &nbs In this STTR project, Boston Applied Technologies, Inc. (BATi), teaming up with Prof. Di Bartolo’s group at Boston College, aims at developing a large size (300 mm x 300 mm) updatable 3D display with photorefractive polymers for battlefield and command and control applications. The proposed 3D display system features fast response (feasible to video-rate), high diffraction efficiency, and relatively low voltage operation. Utilizing a conventional polymeric photorefractive system with an innovative fabrication methodology, the response rate of writing holograms with continuous wave can be raised two orders of magnitude with the diffraction efficiency over 60% to 70 %. Because only one ITO glass plate is used, the total manufacture cost can be lowered, the same for the reflection loss. If pulse writing and erasing beams are chosen, real-timely updating display system is feasible. In Phase I work, we will concentrate on feasibility study of a monochrome 3D display. A prototype of a monochrome 3D display will be implemented in our Phase II efforts.

BUCKMASTER RESEARCH
2014 Boudreau Drive,
Urbana, IL 61801
(217) 621-9786

PI: Dr. John Buckmaster
(217) 621-9786
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0078
UNIV. OF ILLINOIS
4324 Siebel Center, 201 N. Goodwin Ave
Urbana, IL 61801
(217) 244-7235

ID#: F08A-003-0019
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T003       Awarded: 11/1/2008
Title: Solid Propellant Shock to Detonation Modeling and Formulation
Abstract:  &nbs Determining the hazard classification of new propellant formulations is important for transportation safety and storage concerns. To avoid costly grain redesign and additional testing, a model that adequately predicts the shock sensitivity, including the outcome of the Naval Ordnance Laboratory Large Scale Gap Test, of modern solid propellants is required. The goals of this proposal are to develop and validate computational tools that predict the shock sensitivity of solid propellant formulations. In particular, we plan to (i) use our packing code, Rocpack, to generate morphologies of interest for shock sensitivity assessments, (ii) modify our CFD code to include appropriate chemistry models, (iii) modify our CFD code to propagate shocks of various strengths through the pack to predict the onset of detonation. We also plan to carry out an experimental program to validate the numerical solvers.

CASCADE TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
1330 Charleston Road,
Mountain View, CA 94043
(650) 224-4882

PI: Dr. Shoreh Hajiloo
(650) 691-6967
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0055
STANFORD UNIV.
Building 520, Mechanical Engineering Dept.
Stanford, CA 94305
(650) 725-2020

ID#: F08A-019-0067
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T019       Awarded: 9/1/2008
Title: Efficient Kinetic/Continuum Simulations of Hypervelocity Gas Flows in Nonequilibrium Dissociation and Ionization for Earth Atmospheres
Abstract:  &nbs In this project, we propose an original method to simulate dissociated and ionized hypersonic air flows from continuum to rarefied regimes for a wide range of scales inherent in Air Force applications. We will introduce the most consistent physical model currently available in kinetic theory. The applicability range of fluid dynamical descriptions used for continuum flows can be extended to the transition regime by taking a finite sequence of moments of the Boltzmann equation together with a closure assumption. The resulting Boltzmann moment systems, solved by CFD methods, are computationally more efficient than statistical methods such as DSMC in the continuum and transition regimes. Therefore, we propose to develop a numerical scheme by blending the Boltzmann moment systems with Levermore closure and the DSMC technique, as opposed to traditional schemes based on the Navier- Stokes equations and DSMC. The coupling will be based on the concept of physics hybridization currently used to couple two vastly different representations of turbulent flows. In Phase I of this project, we will focus on the extension of the Boltzmann moment systems with Levermore closure to dissociating and ionizing hypersonic flows and the development of the computational strategy for the kinetic/continuum algorithm.

CFD RESEARCH CORP.
215 Wynn Dr., 5th Floor,
Huntsville, AL 35805
(256) 726-4884

PI: Dr. Vladimir Kolobov
(256) 726-4800
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0104
GEORGIA TECH RESEARCH CORP.
Georgia Institute of Technolog, 505 Tenth Street NW
Atlanta, GA 30332
(404) 894-6929

ID#: F08A-019-0071
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T019       Awarded: 9/1/2008
Title: Unified Kinetic/Continuum Flow Solver with Adaptive Cartesian Mesh for Hypersonic Flows in the Earth Atmosphere
Abstract:  &nbs The design of future hypersonic vehicles requires detailed understanding of flow regimes ranging from rarefied to continuum. Moreover, hypervelocity flows are characterized by high temperatures, excitation of vibrational level of molecules, nonequilibrium dissociation, and ionization. The goal of this project is to develop unified kinetic/continuum solution methods with proper domain decomposition for a wide range of Air Force Applications. The Unified Flow Solver (UFS) with Adaptive Mesh and Algorithm Refinement, developed by CFDRC, will be enhanced by the advanced capabilities of the NASCART-GT viscous flow solver from Georgia Tech, and demonstrated for viscous/inviscid problems covering rarefied and continuum flow regimes. The octree based Cartesian mesh methods will be improved to better resolve viscous boundary layers and heat transfer simulations near surfaces. Phase I work will demonstrate the feasibility of kinetic/continuum algorithms with Cartesian mesh to compute heat transfer for dissociating and ionizing hypersonic flows. During Phase II, the advanced numerical techniques will be incorporated into a user-friendly code, and a general-purpose chemistry module and turbulence models will be added to the continuum solvers. The code will be validated for heat transfer simulations with Cartesian mesh and demonstrated for several benchmark cases including heat transfer prediction on a Mach 16 flow over bi-conic body.

CFD RESEARCH CORP.
215 Wynn Dr., 5th Floor,
Huntsville, AL 35805
(256) 726-4884

PI: Dr. Sarma Rani
(256) 726-4850
Contract #: FA9550-08-C-0069
OHIO STATE UNIV.
Department of Mechanical Engin, 201 West 19th Avenue
Columbus, OH 43210
(614) 247-8099

ID#: F08A-020-0064
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T020       Awarded: 9/26/2008
Title: Hybrid Approach for Multi-Scale Modeling of Radiation Transfer in Three-Dimensional Non-Gray Media
Abstract:  &nbs In this STTR project, an efficient and high-fidelity computational module to predict non-gray radiative transfer will be developed and validated. The proposed hybrid approach to solve the radiative transport equation (RTE) is a combination of the spherical harmonics (PN) method and the Monte-Carlo method. Non-gray gases will be treated using the full spectrum correlated k-distribution (FSCK) method. The proposed approach is unique and innovative for: (1) its ability to efficiently handle orders of magnitude variation in the medium optical thickness, and (2) its ability to solve the non-gray RTE at a small fraction of the computational cost of line-by-line calculations. CFDRC has teamed with Ohio State University (Prof. Sandip Mazumder) to develop the proposed module. In Phase I, the modified differential approximation (MDA) approach, along with the non-gray FSCK method, will be implemented and validated for simple 2-D geometries. MDA combines the lower-order spherical harmonics (i.e., P1) method for the diffusive component with a simplified view-factor based method for the ballistic component of radiative intensity. In Phase II, the view-factor method will be replaced with the more accurate and general Monte-Carlo method. The hybrid approach will be extended to three-dimensional geometry with arbitrary unstructured mesh topology. The radiation module will also be parallelized and demonstrated for practical cases to be determined in consultation with AFOSR.

CFD RESEARCH CORP.
215 Wynn Dr., 5th Floor,
Huntsville, AL 35805
(256) 726-4884

PI: Dr. Debasis Sengupta
(256) 726-4944
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0034
UNIV. OF IDAHO
Office of Sponsored Research, PO Box 443020
Moscow, ID 83844
(208) 885-6651

ID#: F08A-022-0065
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T022       Awarded: 9/1/2008
Title: Development of Novel Polynitrogen-based High–performance Solid Propellants
Abstract:  &nbs In this STTR program, CFDRC, in collaboration with the University of Idaho, proposes to develop some novel high- performance polynitrogen energetic materials for propellant applications. The proposed materials contain amine substituted tetrazole-based heterocyclic cations. In order to enhance the energy content and stability further, they are combined with energetic anions. These anions will have the flexibility to control oxygen balance. These energetic compounds will overcome the severe drawbacks (such as low density, extreme shock and impact sensitivity, very low oxygen balance and likely hydrolytic instability) associated with polyazide compounds. The proposed salts will be thoroughly investigated for their properties via well-established high-fidelity molecular and thermodynamic modeling prior to their synthesis. Such modeling-guided design, as opposed to conventional “experiment only” procedure, will reduce the time and cost of development, and risk of failure. The two most promising compounds, as suggested via modeling, will be synthesized and characterized for crystal structures, densities, melting points, thermal stabilities and impact sensitivities. In Phase II, these compounds will be formulated, and undergo a rigorous set of tests, such as burn rate, compatibility, mechanical strength, to evaluate their performance in practical situations. Finally the most promising compound will be scaled up for synthesis and test fired to measure thrust.

CFD Research Corporation
215 Wynn Dr., 5th Floor,
Huntsville, AL 35805
(256) 726-4884

PI: Sai Marella
(256) 726-4800
Contract #: FA9550-08-C-0062
University of Illinois at Urbana-Ch
201 N. Goodwin Avenue ,
Urbana, IL 61801
(217) 333-6903

ID#: F08A-017-0072
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T017       Awarded: 6/1/2008
Title: Advanced data mining tool for feature detection in turbulent flow simulations
Abstract:  &nbs While DNS of complex flow phenomena is a routine practice nowadays, the analysis tools lack the sophistication to utilize the abundance of data generated, for they are devoid of physics-based data extraction and feature-detection protocols. The current effort proposes an automated and intelligent co-processing data-mining framework, in the form of an API, that detects and tracks flow features of significance in DNS calculations. The salient features of the proposed framework are a) wavelet based multi-resolution data compression algorithm for extracting regions of interest b) intelligent data-accumulation and monitoring methods for assessing specific terms in the governing equations of turbulent and aero-acoustic applications c) efficient feature-detection algorithms for coherent structures. The advantages of the proposed framework are a) co-processing of the data allows access to transient correlations that are unavailable for post-processing tools b) the physics-based choice of the mined-data addresses the deficiencies of the turbulent and aero-acoustic modeling c) the feature detection and data extraction are efficient due to scalable algorithms combining wavelet-filters and Fourier-transforms. The Phase I work demonstrates the applicability of this tool to representative flow fields in turbulence and aero-acoustic applications. Enhancing the framework’s features and algorithm fine-tuning will comprise the tasks for Phase II work. BENEFIT: The proposed technology will provide a fast and efficient means to mine data from unsteady DNS calculation. The generic design of the API will enable easy integration with a large range of commercial and research codes. The feature-detection algorithms are adaptable to any of the existing Visualization packages. A potential integration into CFDRC’s MDICE, which is part of many government and industry codes, will greatly help in eventual commercialization.

CHARLES RIVER ANALYTICS, INC.
625 Mount Auburn Street,
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 491-3474

PI: Jonathan D. Pfautz, PhD
(617) 491-3474
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0011
UNIV. OF BUFFALO
402 Crofts Hall,
Buffalo, NY 14260
(716) 645-5000

ID#: F08A-002-0046
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T002       Awarded: 7/1/2008
Title: Enabling Representation of Meta-Information in Net-Centric Environments (ERMINE)
Abstract:  &nbs The modern military environment is shifting towards the paradigm of network-centric warfare (NCW). NCW harnesses the power of multiple information systems operating concurrently and makes a wealth of information available to the Warfighter, but can result in information overload. As a result, there is a need to identify and represent actionable information to the Warfighter along with the associated qualifiers, or meta-information (e.g., pedigree, authenticity), contributing to its actionability. To address the need to communicate both information and its associated meta-information to the Warfighter in net-centric environments, we propose to design, demonstrate, and evaluate techniques for Enabling Representation of Meta-Information in Net-Centric Environments (ERMINE). Four core components characterize our approach. First, we will perform a Work Domain Analysis to develop a structured categorization of the Warfighter’s information and meta-information requirements within a specific domain. Second, we will design and demonstrate a rapid prototyping environment to rapidly generate and refine new meta- information representation techniques. Third, we will develop an evaluation methodology and perform pilot studies to assess the developed techniques, and identify underlying perceptual and cognitive mechanisms. Fourth, we will create and maintain a conceptual framework to catalog and characterize effective meta-information representation techniques developed within the visualization research community.

COMET TECHNOLOGY CORP.
3830 Packard, Suite 110,
Ann Arbor, MI 48108
(734) 973-1600

PI: Dr. Satha T. Raveendra
(734) 973-1600
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0096
UNIV. OF MICHIGAN
3003 South State Street,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
(734) 936-1289

ID#: F08A-025-0133
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T025       Awarded: 8/1/2008
Title: Failure Initiation Predictors for Reliability-Based Design of Hybrid Composite Materials
Abstract:  &nbs This proposal is concerned with the development of a novel failure initiation and progressive failure analysis (PFA) modeling method for advanced composite structures. The laminate is modeled as a collection of degrading lamina within the framework of lamination theory and executed using user defined subroutines through a commercial finite element software package. In the proposed approach, designated as “progressive failure analysis tool”, (PFAT), computations will be simultaneously carried out in parallel at three length scales, as needed (the laminate level (LAM), the lamina level (LL) and at the level of a fiber/matrix (FM) unit cell representation of the lamina), with strong coupling between the three scales. The results to be obtained will provide the necessary guidance in selecting the most robust methodology to achieve the desired goal of combining initial design with reliability based tools to re- design a composite structure. The proposal utilizes a fundamental physics based approach that is devoid of empirical formulas that have dominated failure prediction tools in composites.

Crystal IS, Inc.
70 Cohoes Avenue,
Green Island, NY 12183
(518) 271-7375

PI: Joseph Smart
(518) 271-7375
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0097
RPI
CII 7111, 110 Eighth Street
Troy, NY 12180
(218) 276-8072

ID#: F08A-006-0113
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T006       Awarded: 9/15/2008
Title: GaN/AlGaN/AlInN Based THz Focal Plane Array Detectors, Ultraviolet (UV) Lasers, and HEMT High Power RF Devices on Low-Dislocation AlN and GaN Substra
Abstract:  &nbs This STTR Phase I project will demonstrate the feasibility of making deep ultraviolet laser diodes (UV LDs) based on very low defect AlN substrates cut from bulk crystals. The target wavelength will be 280nm or shorter which requires high aluminum content AlxGa1-xN semiconductor alloy layers. During the Phase I, the effort will demonstrate an n-type AlxGa1 xN layer with low resistivity and low threading dislocation density as a result of growing a pseudomorphic (i.e., coherently strained to match the substrate lattice parameter) AlxGa1-xN layers on a very low defect, single-crystal AlN substrate. Also, design approaches for improving the IQE at high current densities will be developed. These results will be used to enable the demonstration of a 280nm laser diode in a Phase II effort. BENEFIT: The project is targeted at developing deep ultraviolet (ƒÜ<280nm) laser diodes. These laser diodes will have DoD application for compact, rugged bioagent sensors as well as application in covert communication. Commercial applications are anticipated in the areas analytical instrumentation and high density data storage. While the project is focused on laser diode development, the technology is also expected to lead to dramatic improvements in the efficiency and brightness of deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV LEDs) which will have broad application in water, air, and surface disinfection as well as commercial applications in manufacturing processes such as epoxy curing. Cost-effective, large diameter, single-crystal aluminum nitride (AlN) substrates are poised to make possible these dramatic improvements in deep UV emitter technology.

DOLCE Technologies, LLC
90 Nassau Street, 4th Floor
Princeton, NJ 08542
(609) 497-7319

PI: J. Christopher Dries
(609) 497-7319
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0067
Princeton University
Fourth Floor, New South Bldg., PO Box 36
Princeton, NJ 08544
(609) 258-2813

ID#: F08A-009-0174
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T009       Awarded: 11/14/2008
Title: A Tunable, High Power, Solid State Terahertz Source for Imaging and Spectroscopy
Abstract:  &nbs DOLCE Technologies, LLC, in collaboration with Professor Claire Gmachl’s research group at Princeton University, will develop and deliver an all solid-state, milliwatt-class Terahertz laser source. Upon completion of Phase II, devices will be available for distribution and use by the Terahertz imaging and spectroscopy communities where there is currently a lack of high-power, low-cost sources. Access to the frequency band is made possible through photonic down-conversion using difference frequency generation (DFG) in a Quantum Cascade (QC) laser with monolithically integrated resonant optical nonlinearities. During Phase I, both the QC lasers and the nonlinear media will be designed, fabricated and tested. In addition, we will demonstrate tunability of the Terahertz radiation in the 0.5 – 5 THz frequency band at room temperature. During Phase II, we will optimize the device design, improve the frequency agility of the source, and achieve the room temperature goal of > 10 mW of output power using an arrayed source if necessary. Phase II will also include the development of commercial grade packaging, and initial reliability testing results and the delivery of 10 milliwatt Terahertz sources. BENEFIT: The Terahertz frequency band is relatively underutilized for imaging and spectroscopy applications due to the scarcity of inexpensive, high power sources and sensitive detectors. DOLCE Technologies’ will fill this niche of nascent applications in the standoff sensing, chemical detection, and homeland security areas. Biomedical imaging, astronomical as well as terrestrial spectroscopy, and pharmaceutical manufacturing are just a few of the many technical arenas that will benefit from a stable, high power, low-cost, highly reliable source of Terahertz radiation. Finally, it is likely that no group of corporate founders possesses as solid a track record of commercializing SBIR/STTR products as the former Sensors Unlimited management team that makes up the DOLCE Technologies partnership. astronomical as well as terrestrial spectroscopy, and pharmaceutical manufacturing are just a few of the many technical arenas that will benefit from a stable, high power, low-cost, highly reliable source of Terahertz radiation. Finally, it is likely that no group of corporate founders possesses as solid a track record of commercializing SBIR/STTR products as the former Sensors Unlimited management team presented here.

Drakontas LLC
200 Federal Street, ACIN Technology Ctr, Suite 300
Camden, NJ 08103
(267) 415-4758

PI: Stephen Weber
(215) 895-0254
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0014
Drexel Univesity
3141 Chestnut Street, Dept of ECE
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 895-0254

ID#: F08A-011-0295
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T011       Awarded: 7/1/2008
Title: Utility-based distributed heterogeneous network management
Abstract:  &nbs Typical military networks consist of many types of devices and network links. The objective of this proposal is to develop a theoretical approach for network management in heterogeneous wireless network environments. The technical approach focuses on using distributed utility optimization adapted for wireless networks. Particular challenges imposed by wireless networks are: user mobility and dynamic topology, channel interference and varying link capacities over time. Three classes of traffic have been selected to be studied under these network conditions: video, voice and tracking. Leveraging our prior work in military concept of operations research, this work will introduce role-based utility functions based on mission requirements. We will combine (previously separate) adaptations of system decomposition techniques to wireless networks and non-concave (and role- based) utility functions and develop a unified network management structure. Using a proprietary modeling, simulation and optimization tool, the proposed approach will be evaluated for feasibility and to determine metrics of performance. Key to the evaluation task is the use of real-world scenarios and mission requirements for approach validation under practical conditions. There is a clear path to the usefulness and commercialization of any resulting technology through Drakontas' expertise in law enforcement communication networks arena. BENEFIT: 1. Unified network management structure for heterogeneous wireless networks 2. Mission requirements-based approach to utility optimization 3. Modeling, simulation and optimization of networks using real-world scenario characteristics

Eden Park Illumination, Inc.
60 Hazelwood Drive,
Champaign, IL 61820
(848) 459-6454

PI: Sung-Jin Park
(217) 493-8477
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0023
University of Illinois
1406 W. Green Street,
Urbana, IL 61801
(217) 333-4157

ID#: F08A-012-0221
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T012       Awarded: 8/1/2008
Title: Large Arrays of Microcavity Plasmas for Lighting and Medical Applications
Abstract:  &nbs EDEN PARK ILLUMINATION, INC. and the University of Illinois have formed a team to pursue the demonstration and commercialization of large arrays of microcavity plasmas capable of producing visible emission with luminous efficacies above 20 lumens/W. Originally developed in the Laboratory for Optical Physics and Engineering at the University of Illinois, microplasma array technology has recently advanced to the point of yielding planar radiators having active areas of at least 100 cm2 and efficacies of ~15 lumens/W. This proposal describes a nine-month, Phase I program designed to increase the efficacy of these arrays by a minimum of 33%, to beyond 20 lumens/W. The focus of this program is the Al/Al2O3 microplasma device structure developed at Illinois with which we are now able to control precisely the shape of the microcavity walls, thereby opening the door to optimizing both the electric field within each microcavity as well as the efficiency for extracting photons from the device. Furthermore, a design for fully addressable arrays will be developed in Phase I. BENEFIT: This STTR program will yield visible and ultraviolet (UV)-emitting arrays that are extremely lightweight (being made literally from Al foil), thin (< 1.5 mm in thickness) and having a form factor and efficiency superior to those for incandescent lighting. This technology will provide mercury-free lighting for DOD and the commercial sector that is inexpensive and, when sealed between thin plastic sheets, flexible. Aside from its impact on lighting, this technology will be of enormous value to: 1) medicine by providing flexible light sources ideally-suited for phototherapeutics, 2) the sterilization of operating environments, and 3) water and air purification.

ELECTRODYNAMIC APPLICATIONS, INC.
P.O. Box 131460,
Ann Arbor, MI 48113
(734) 786-1434

PI: Dr. Timothy Smith
(734) 786-1434
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0109
PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.
101 Hammond Bldg.,
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 865-1804

ID#: F08A-010-0200
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T010       Awarded: 8/15/2008
Title: Characterizing the dynamic behavior of novel energetic materials for space propulsion.
Abstract:  &nbs The objective of this program is to build upon many decades of experience with magnetic flowmeters to develop a next-generation system to measure the burning surface admittance of high-energy-density solid propellants at high frequencies and pressures. Using the results of research on solid propellant rocket motor combustion instability from the past fifty years, one can directly measure the acoustic admittance of the atomization/vaporization/mixing/combustion processes associated with liquid propellant rocket engine injection. Such a measurement would provide a quantitative value for the acoustic sources or sinks caused by these processes. This would enable an a priori prediction of the combustion stability for a particular liquid rocket engine design, something that has not been possible to date.

ENVIRONMENTAL ROBOTS, INC.
909 Virginia Avenue, Suite 205,
Albuquerque, NM 87108
(505) 265-4479

PI: Dr. Beverley J. McKeon
(626) 395-4460
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0042
CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF
1200 E. California Blvd, MC 20, 795-4571
Pasadena, CA 91125
(626) 395-3339

ID#: F08A-007-0352
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T007       Awarded: 9/1/2008
Title: Distributed Conformal Actuation for Simultaneously Controlling Flow Separation and Transition
Abstract:  &nbs The objective of the proposed research is the demonstration of an optimized, planar-constrained Ionic Polymer-Metal Composite (IPMC) under the influence of a low, O(10V), voltage signal as a conformal surface capable of actuation of a laminar/transitional boundary layer for the goals of transition and/or separation control. The material will be modeled using standard techniques for analyzing a stiff compressed film on a soft substrate, with the particular strain characteristics of the actuated IPMC. We will investigate the feasibility of switching the surface boundary condition from rough to smooth on demand (with low power input) to enhance linear instability and/or transient growth mechanisms or use transient growth modes to alter the base flow sufficiently to suppress linear mechanisms (in potential Phase II work). The proposal has been assembled by a team capable of developing IPMC in the new configuration and demonstrating the characteristics that make it a feasible material for conformal actuation in Phase I research, and identifying and testing suitable fluid mechanisms and commercialization in future phases.

FBS, Inc.
143 Hawbaker Industrial Drive Suite ,
State College, PA 16803
(814) 234-3437

PI: Michael J. Avioli
(814) 234-3437
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0105
Penn State University
110 Technology Center Building,
Universit y Park, PA 16802
(814) 865-1804

ID#: F08A-016-0233
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T016       Awarded: 8/1/2008
Title: Dynamics-based Nondestructive Structural Health Monitoring Techniques
Abstract:  &nbs FBS, Inc. and The Pennsylvania State University propose the development of a novel ultrasonic structural health monitoring (SHM)/nondestructive testing (NDT) technology. The goal of our work is to bridge the gap from the short time transient ultrasonic guided wave analysis to the long time modal vibration analysis. This new technique will be sensitive to material properties, defect presence, and overall structural shape. Our hypothesis is that plate loading via comb or annular array loading to achieve optimal wave structures for best sensitivity to a certain defect will also produce different structural reflection characteristics and vibration modes and frequencies. Hence, physically based features from transient, reflection, and modal analysis will be used to characterize defects via pattern recognition analysis. BENEFIT: The resulting technology will enhance SHM/NDT technology by bridging the gap between transient wave ultrasonics and modal analysis. If successful, the proposed technology will increase aviation safety while minimizing inspection times by allowing large area screening of an entire component from only a few sensor positions.

FIREHOLE TECHNOLOGIES
1000 E University Ave, Dept. 3011
Laramie, WY 82071
(307) 766-3654

PI: Dr. Mark Garnich
(307) 766-2949
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0074
UNIV. OF WYOMING
Office of Research, Dept. 3355, 1000 E. University Ave
Laramie, WY 82071
(307) 766-5353

ID#: F08A-025-0080
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T025       Awarded: 8/1/2008
Title: Failure Initiation Prediction for Reliability-Based Design of Hybrid Composite Materials
Abstract:  &nbs The opportunity identified here is to expand the capabilities of Multicontinuum Technology (MCT) for prediction of failure initiation in complex (hybrid) composites. A successful Phase 1 project will demonstrate good correlation of MCT variables with initial failure in composites with complex multiscale reinforcement architectures. A Phase 2 project would refine the predictive capabilities, embody the capabilities in user friendly software, and construct an application analysis environment within a probabilistic framework. The specific opportunity is to develop and demonstrate theory and associate computational tools that will be highly effective for structural analysis and initial failure prediction for complex hybrid composite material systems. The MCT approach is a computationally inexpensive finite element based multiscale approach that decomposes the complex heterogeneous material response into fundamental variables that directly relate to actual physical damage/failure at the microstructural level. MCT failure predictions will be compared with experimental data found in the literature for a triaxial braid reinforced material.

GINER, INC.
89 Rumford Avenue,
Newton, MA 02466
(781) 529-0501

PI: Dr. Robert C. McDonald, Ph.D.
(781) 529-0530
Contract #: FA9550-08-C-0072
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA
San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive #0934
LaJolla, CA 92093
(858) 534-0247

ID#: F08A-015-0013
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T015       Awarded: 9/28/2008
Title: Composite Transistor Array Vapor Sensor
Abstract:  &nbs The Giner, Inc. Phase I program will examine the response to explosive and toxic gas simulants of sensor arrays using a combination of specifically doped metal oxides (DMO) developed at Giner, Inc. in conjunction with metallophthalocyanine (MPc) thin films developed at the University of California at San Diego (UCSD). Electronic controls developed for the MPc sensors will be evaluated also for the metal oxide sensors to enhance vapor discrimination, sensitivity and response time. The different response characteristics of these two classes of sensors for trace peroxides and other select stimulant vapors in the presence of typical atmospheric components will be used to design arrays having the required sensitivity and selectivity for Air Force needs.

Hybrid Photonics LLC
40 I.U. Willets Road, Queens College of CUNY
Albertson, NY 11507
(516) 747-9417

PI: Vinod Menon
(718) 997-3147
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0047
Queens College of CUNY
Physics Department,
Flushing, NY 11367
(718) 997-3367

ID#: F08A-024-0293
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T024       Awarded: 10/1/2008
Title: Reconfigurable Materials for Photonic Systems
Abstract:  &nbs In this Small Business Technology Transfer Program (STTR) - Phase I project we will develop reconfigurable photonic circuits using single and coupled micro-resonators embedded with colloidal quantum dots. Specifically, we will develop two archetype devices that demonstrate the feasibility of using optical coupling in active resonators to obtain bistable behavior. The first device demonstration is a bistable two mode laser using coupled active microdisks. In the second proposed device, two active waveguides will be coupled via a single microring resonator to realize an all-optical flip-flop. Here, coupling of the clockwise and counterclockwise modes creates a memory effect. The proposed devices will be simulated using software that will be developed as part of this program. The fabrication of the devices will be done using a combination of soft lithography and photolithography. In addition to their specific functionalities, these novel device demonstrations and their development will likely enable the production of lower cost all-optical photonic circuits as compared to more traditional production techniques. BENEFIT: Design, develop, and analyze new basic photonic switching element with bi-state optical reconfigurability (all-optical flip-flop). The element will be based on a microring resonator with active waveguide fabricated using colloidal quantum dot based active medium.

HyPerComp, Inc.
2629 Townsgate Road, Suite 105
Westlake Village, CA 91361
(805) 371-7500

PI: Shashi Aithal
(805) 371-7500
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0010
Lawrence Livermore National Lab
Box 808, L-560 ,
Livermore, CA 94551
(925) 423-7002

ID#: F08A-020-0170
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T020       Awarded: 7/1/2008
Title: Efficient Multi-Scale Radiation Transport Modeling
Abstract:  &nbs Radiative transfer is of special importance in several applications from re-entry flows to rocket engines and air- breathing engines. Solution of the Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE), which is a complex integro-differential equation, places stringent requirements on the computational resources. Additionally, radiative transfer can occur over widely differing spatial scales further increasing the computational complexity. Hence efforts have to be made to develop efficient numerical algorithms and solvers to address issues of accuracy and computational time. Furthermore, there is a need to develop accurate physical models that include real gas effects such as non-ideal equations of state and frequency-dependent radiative properties for the participating medium. In this research, HyPerComp proposes to develop a high-performance, multi-physics, multi-scale computational platform to address a large class of problems involving radiative transfer. PWRFlow, an in-house unstructured, parallel continuum flow solver currently solves the RTE for turbulent reacting flows. This capability will be extended to solve the RTE from the optically thin to thick limits. Use of computationally efficient hybrid methods and accurate physical models will be developed as a part of this research effort. BENEFIT: The main focus of this STTR is to develop an understanding of the role of multi-scale radiative transport in turbulent reacting flows. Work done under this research will have applications in several technologies critical in aerospace propulsion, automobile engines and plasma processing reactors. Additionally, manufacturers of gas turbines and combustors along with the energy industry using coal/oil- fired furnaces will benefit from this research. HyPerComp envisions the development of a commercial suite of software tools to assist in combustion-based applications for general propulsive and chemical engineering applications. It is anticipated that such a commercial tool will be ready for marketing on the successful completion of Phase II of this STTR.

HYPERCOMP, INC.
2629 Townsgate Road, Suite 105
Westlake Village, CA 91361
(805) 371-7500

PI: Dr. Ramakanth Munipalli
(805) 371-7500
Contract #: FA9550-08-C-0068
UNIV. OF MICHIGAN
François-Xavier Bagnoud Bldg., 1320 Beal Avenue
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
(734) 764-4305

ID#: F08A-023-0094
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T023       Awarded: 9/26/2008
Title: High-order modeling of applied multi-physics phenomena
Abstract:  &nbs In this proposal, we seek to extend the capabilities of an existing suite of high order accurate complex geometry, multiphysics software to enable production level applicability to problems of Air Force interest. The focus of this STTR project will be on efficient methods to handle diffusive phenomena, discontinuities (in material and field properties,) and generalized boundary conditions in the discontinuous Galerkin method. We intend to also improve the speed of high order accurate solvers based on recent advancements in implicit techniques, domain decomposition and multigrid strategies. In Phase-I we intend to incorporate the “recovery discontinuous Galerkin (RDG)” method in HyPerComp’s DG-based solver and demonstrate its extension to complex geometry and systems of nonlinear conservation laws in clearly defined stages. We propose a suite of test problems involving aerothermal effects and boundary layer stability to establish the scope and applicability of the methods investigated. Team members are widely recognized for their contributions to computational modeling for aerospace applications, and have a long record of research pertinent to this project.

ILLINOISROCSTAR LLC
P. O. Box 3001,
Champaign, IL 61826
(765) 494-1055

PI: Mr. William A. Dick
(217) 417-0885
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0012
PURDUE UNIV.
Sponsored Program Services, 302 Wood Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907
(765) 494-1055

ID#: F08A-010-0107
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T010       Awarded: 8/31/2008
Title: Dynamic Behavior of Nano-sized Particles in Novel Energetic Materials for Space Propulsion
Abstract:  &nbs We propose a comprehensive computational and experimental program to investigate the charac-teristics and dynamic behavior of nano-size aluminum in novel energetic materials. Two classes of advanced propellants will be considered. The first will be composite propellants, consisting of solids including AP, HMX, RDX, or nano-aluminum with a suitable binder such as HTPB. The second will be a nanoscale aluminum and ice propellant. For the computational portion of the proposed work, we plan to (i) use our in-house packing code to generate morphologies of interest for heterogeneous propellants; (ii) modify our CFD code to include appropriate models for chemistry, radiation, and nano-sized aluminum; and (iii) simulate transient behavior of the pro-pellants at rocket motor conditions. For the experimental portion, we plan to (i) use the mixing facility at Purdue to prepare appropriate propellant samples containing nano-sized aluminum, thus allowing for a full characterization of the propellant (composition; particle size distribution) necessary for a coordinated modeling and experimental program; and (ii) carry out both steady and unsteady experiments to fully characterize the propellants. The experiments will also be used for model calibration and for validation.

Illuminaria
117 Devlen Road,
Groton, NY 13073
(607) 592-3778

PI: Scott Stelick
(607) 592-3778
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0053
Cornell University
240 Upson Hall, Sibley School
Ithaca, NY 14853
(607) 342-1799

ID#: F08A-024-0128
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T024       Awarded: 9/15/2008
Title: OPTOFLUIDIC WAVEGUIDES FOR RECONFIGURABLE PHOTONIC SYSTEMS
Abstract:  &nbs Modern microfluidic and nanofluidics has enabled the development of a present day equivalent of such devices centered on the marriage of fluidics and optics which we refer to as “Optofluidics.” In our device a stream of high refractive index liquid is fluidically focused down to a narrow width between two low refractive index solution streams. These two “focusing streams” enable us to place the liquid core waveguide directly over a solid core waveguide allowing the light to evanescently couple into it. Once the light is captured the switching streams allow us to switch the liquid waveguide so that it runs over one of the different output waveguides. Analogous to the previous case when the liquid core waveguide flows over the solid core one the liquid evanescently couples out back into the solid structure. One of the limitations of developing such devices in the past has been the need for additional fluidic extra infrastructure (pumps and valves for example). We solve this problem here through the use of an electrohydrodynamic pump which generates pressure driven liquid flow through a low voltage driven electrolytic phase transition. BENEFIT: This research will lead to the development of optical switches in computing applications. These commercial applications include optical signal processing in telecommunications and scientific research.

IMPACT TECHNOLOGIES, LLC
200 Canal View Blvd,
Rochester, NY 14623
(585) 424-1990

PI: Dr. Michael J. Roemer
(585) 424-1990
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0035
ROCHESTER INSTITUTE OF
141 Lomb Memorial Drive, L. Slaughter Bldg., Ste. 2000
Rochester, NY 14623
(585) 475-7984

ID#: F08A-008-0138
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T008       Awarded: 8/1/2008
Title: Bio-Inspired Sensing and Control for Improved Micro Air Vehicle Agility
Abstract:  &nbs Impact Technologies, LLC in collaboration with Georgia Tech, Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) and our commercialization partner Boeing, is proposing to develop a bio-inspired autonomous Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) platform capable of agile flight operations in cluttered urban environments. Building upon the experience of this team with UAV controls and autonomous urban operations, we will develop and demonstrate the following innovative technologies to improve MAV flight agility: (1) a bio-inspired agile MAV platform with morphing wing actuation; (2) an innovative micro attitude estimation device using a set of inexpensive accelerometers and angular rate sensors for highly accurate attitude estimation; and (3) a hierarchical intelligent control architecture featuring autonomous mode transitioning and neural network-based adaptive controls. We will take advantage of the MAV test platforms the team has built and tested in the past few years as initial test bed to integrate and evaluate the proposed sensor, control architecture and algorithms. Phase I will provide a proof-of-feasibility demonstration in an integrated software-hardware simulation environment. Hardware integration and flight tests are planned with our commercialization partner Boeing for Phase II. In addition, Impact will work closely with industry partners to develop a technology transfer and commercialization plan for developed MAV platforms.

Impact Technologies, LLC
200 Canal View Blvd,
Rochester, NY 14623
(585) 424-1990

PI: Carl A. Palmer
(585) 424-1990
Contract #: FA9550-08-C-0073
Ohio State University
Research Foundation, 1960 Kenny Road
Columbus, OH 43210
(614) 292-6643

ID#: F08A-015-0110
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T015       Awarded: 8/19/2008
Title: Chemical Weapons Sensing System (CheSS)
Abstract:  &nbs Impact Technologies and The Center for Industrial Sensors and Measurements at The Ohio State University propose to develop a sensing system for determining the presence of vapors from explosives or chemical agents (CWA). Such agents include nerve agents Sarin, blister agents (e.g. mustard gas) and choking agents (phosgene, chlorine). The basic sensing material will be ion-exchanged zeolites. Previous OSU research has shown that cation- exchanged zeolites exhibit a change in complex impedance upon interaction with gases such as NH3. We expect that the chemical agents of interest can act as Lewis bases and interact with intrazeolitic cations to alter the impedance. We will examine zeolites with varying Si/Al ratios to test the impedance change brought on by surrogate molecules. Key Phase I tasks include: 1)Creation of analytical models to understand the fundamental chemistry; 2)Selection and synthesis of zeolite sensing technologies to test; 3)Laboratory tests of sensor response to CWA simulants; 4)Basic design of back-end sensing hardware; 5)Creation of embedded electrochemical impedance measurement electronics; 6)Prototype demonstration; It is anticipated that successful completion of this research into sensing mechanisms and sensor electronics will enable creation of robust chemical detection systems during phase II and beyond. BENEFIT: To combat the threats that come from chemical weapons and explosives, it is imperative to have portable chemical sensors that can detect the presence of these non-standard weapons so that both civilian and military personnel can be alerted to take proper precautions. As part of this, the sensing system should also determine which specific compound is being used, so that the front-line response team knows how to deal with the threat. The chemical vapor sensing technology developed in this program can be widely used to detect pathogens in the battlefield. The sensing technology itself will be small, to drive low cost, low power consumption and fast response. These features would enable a large number of sensors (‘ubiquitous sensing’) to be deployed economically across a wide area (handheld or stationary), which can be used to pinpoint the source and overall amount of the contaminant. This sensing technology also would have direct applicability in homeland security applications. Possible applications include integration into visible ‘portal’ monitoring at ports of entry, transit hubs, and large events, use in undercover sensing applications as well as monitoring of shipping containers.

INFOSCITEX CORP.
303 Bear Hill Road,
Waltham, MA 02451
(781) 890-1338

PI: Mr. James H. Goldie
(781) 890-1338
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0030
RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC
110 8th Street,
Troy, NY 12180
(518) 276-6177

ID#: F08A-007-0075
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T007       Awarded: 9/1/2008
Title: Distributed Conformal Actuation with Electroactive Polymer
Abstract:  &nbs Application of electro-active polymer (EAP) to critical aerodynamic surfaces of Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) is proposed, in order to manage the boundary layer. EAP offers a means to achieve distributed actuation and can be readily conformed to the shape of an airfoil. At low Reynolds number-flight, typical of MAVs, the intent is (1) to promote transition to turbulence, where laminar separation would otherwise occur, and (2) to maintain laminar flow, where separation is not an issue. In Phase I, requirements for frequency, amplitude, and spatial character of the perturbations to the nominal airfoil shape will be established, including dynamic roughness (high spatial and temporal frequencies) and camber control (low spatial and temporal frequencies). EAP layers will be designed, manufactured and applied to a representative test airfoil. Bench tests will verify the capability of the airfoil to meet requirements, and indicate design improvements. Wind tunnel tests will also be conducted on the airfoil with EAP, in order to demonstrate the ability of the EAP to affect flow in a controlled manner. In Phase II, EAP would be applied to airfoils with compound curvature and with large and time-varying pressure gradients, and the benefits would be measured in a wind tunnel.

INNOVATIVE AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGIES, LLC
1222 N.W. 36th Street,
Gainesville, FL 32605
(352) 219-1452

PI: Dr. Peter Ifju
(352) 392-6744
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0019
UNIV. OF FLORIDA
Rm. 131 NEB, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
(352) 392-6744

ID#: F08A-014-0030
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T014       Awarded: 8/1/2008
Title: Micro Air Vehicle Tether Recovery Apparatus (MAVTRAP)
Abstract:  &nbs The micro-air vehicle tether recovery apparatus (MAVTRAP) is a combination of a tether, and apparatus to attract and capture a micro-air vehicle (MAV). The MAV is attracted to the end of the tether via a signal transmitting the GPS location, altitude and trajectory information. Once closing in on the trap the MAV makes its final approach via vision based detection and targeting. The MAVTRAP is composed of a parachute type device and small streamers or a small net that ensnares the MAV. We have found that the propeller of an MAV will snag a streamer and wind it on the propeller hub. This is the preferred method to capture the MAV since the control surfaces of the MAV are free to continue to guide the vehicle. The thrust of the propeller is thus replaced by the pull of the streamer.

Intelligent Automation, Inc.
15400 Calhoun Drive, Suite 400
Rockville, MD 20855
(301) 294-5221

PI: Tuna Guven
(301) 294-4620
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0008
Arizona State University
Electrical Engineering Dept, GWC 411D
Tempe, AZ 85287
(480) 727-7389

ID#: F08A-011-0290
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T011       Awarded: 7/1/2008
Title: Information Geometric Network Architecture for Heterogeneous Network Management
Abstract:  &nbs We present a unifying architecture for modeling, optimization and design for heterogeneous networks that can effectively address the existing limitations inherited from the generalized network utility maximization (GNUM) framework. In general, GNUM framework is a unifying mathematical model as it combines different objectives and constraints from different layers into a single global optimization formulation. The solution to this optimization problem automatically provides the benchmark for all layering schemes and hence is the ultimate upper bound on the overall performance of the network. However, GNUM lacks vital components to effectively formulate the realities observed in heterogeneous networks. In this work, we address the key issue of nonconvexity observed in many GNUM formulations. We propose a new perspective to analyze and discover decomposition structures that the GNUM problems exhibit. Theory of Information Geometry and in particular Differential Geometry is central to our approach as we make use of the geometric properties of the problem that can lead to valuable insights and lessons regarding the general structure of the GNUM problems. It is believed that the proposed architecture by innovatively incorporating the theory of Information Geometry into to GNUM formulation potentially provides the necessary tool currently missing for effective management of heterogeneous networks. BENEFIT: The proposed information geometric network architecture and various optimization mechanisms provide a solid solution that can facilitate systematic investigation of holistic network modeling, analysis and design. We expect to produce a comprehensive optimization and simulation toolbox equipped with our flexible framework and efficient algorithms for military as well as researchers in the networking community to investigate homogeneous and optimized network management problems. The models and the software tool can be applied to a broad range of military networks including war-time command and control, real-time surveillance network, homeland security, etc. Other potential commercial applications include border and coast patrol, law enforcement agency, emergency control center and various civil applications. In essence, the product resulting from this effort will be applicable to virtually all networks. The market is quite large and still developing due to the fact that there is no systematic network modeling and design tool that can render the much needed “holistic” investigation of network modeling and design. The aggregated commercial market size can be much larger than that of military applications. IAI is more than a “think tank”, and we have actively pursued with our partners the application of our technologies into actual products in the past. For this proposed

INTELLIGENT FIBER OPTIC SYSTEMS CORP.
2363 Calle Del Mundo,
Santa Clara, CA 95054
(408) 565-9000

PI: Dr. Behzad Moslehi
(408) 565-9004
Contract #: FA9550-08-C-0052
THE OHIO STATE UNIV.
2036 Neil Avenue,
Columbus, OH 43210
(614) 292-3983

ID#: F08A-026-0069
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T026       Awarded: 9/23/2008
Title: Stability and Performance Analysis of Turbine Engines under Fiber Optic Networked Distributed Control Architecture
Abstract:  &nbs Gas Turbine Engine Control is one of the most complex tasks ever attempted. Currently, a centralized architecture system, labeled, Full Authority Digital Engine Control (FADEC) is being widely used. However, new engine performance technologies started to increase the burden of FADEC. This has necessitated the beginning of a new phase of engine control development, Distributed Engine Control system (DEC). The advantages of DEC such as modularity, maintenance management, and fault detection have been well established in the engine control community. One of the major challenges in implementation of DEC is selection of communication architecture and functional partitioning of centralized controller. In this research proposal, IFOS and Ohio State University propose a methodology that improves the stability and performance of the overall propulsion system under various communication constraints. In this direction, we propose initially to make use of off-the-shelf network architecture. In Phase I, we address the issues of packet dropouts, time delay and bandwidth constraints in the Networked Control Systems (NCS) and their impact on stability and performance of turbine engine. We propose a decentralized framework consisting of a two level controller. Using this approach, improved encoders and decoders will be designed to maintain system stability under these communication constraints.

ITN Energy Systems, Inc.
8130 Shaffer Parkway,
Littleton, CO 80127
(303) 285-5129

PI: Russell Hollingsworth
(303) 285-5154
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0068
Colorado School of Mines
1500 Illinois Street,
Golden, CO 80401
(303) 273-3538

ID#: F08A-027-0139
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T027       Awarded: 9/15/2008
Title: Plasmonic Cavity Spectroscopic Polarimeter
Abstract:  &nbs This Small Business Technology Transfer program will develop a spectroscopic polarimeter-on-a-chip using novel plasmonic resonant cavities sensitive to linear polarization over a narrow wavelength range. Spectral selection will be possible through geometric scaling, with this work concentrating on the visible to near infrared wavelength band. Dielectric gratings with subwavelength period will act as a quarter wave plate to convert circularly polarized light into linear polarization on selected pixels. This will allow complete measurement of the polarization state with no moving parts. Detailed performance predictions will be obtained through finite element modeling (FEM) of the harmonic Maxwell’s equations. The FEM provides detailed field information, including E field, B field, energy density, and time dependent information with subwavelength resolution, which greatly aids in understanding the underlying physical mechanisms. Test structures will be made using well established nanofabrication facilities, and characterized with spectral and polarization sensitive far field techniques. Additional studies using near-field scanning optical microscopy will provide detailed information for subwavelength scale validation of the models. BENEFIT: This program will develop spectroscopic polarimeters for advanced imaging applications in visible to near IR wavelengths. However, the basic structures can readily be scaled to longer wavelengths. The plasmonic resonant cavities can be adapted for a wide range of other applications including surface enhanced RAMAN spectroscopy, optical modulators, and electric field sensors among others.

JMSI, Inc. dba Intelligent Light
301 Route 17 N, 7th Floor
Rutherford, NJ 07070
(201) 460-4700

PI: Earl P.N. Duque
(201) 460-4700
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0013
Regents of the U.C.
Office of Research Sp Proj, 1850 Research Park Dr., St 300
Davis, CA 95618
(530) 747-3922

ID#: F08A-017-0018
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T017       Awarded: 7/1/2008
Title: Intelligent In-Situ Feature Detection, Tracking and Visualization For Turbulent Flow Simulations
Abstract:  &nbs JMSI Inc. and the University of California, Davis, shall develop a methodology they call - Intelligent In-Situ Feature Detection, Tracking and Visualization For Turbulent Flow Simulations. This method utilizes a Python-based framework that enables any Python wrapped flow solver to share, without redundant memory penalties, pertinent data structures with intelligent feature detection-tracking tools and visualization software. The intelligent feature detection and tracking algorithm requires knowledgeable domain experts to use an interactive graphical front end tool to identify features rendered in a few initial and intermediary time steps of the solution. Then, as the computation progresses in time, the system self trains and adapts the transfer functions that allow for the feature to be tracked. The second method is to have the domain expert specify quantitative parameters that identify features within the flow. The transfer function adapts the feature detection to the user’s parameters and trains the system. A system that has been trained with inputs from a domain expert utilizing these two methods could then be utilized by non- expert users to detect and track features in another similar flow field and geometry. BENEFIT: This innovation will allow non-expert users to detect and track flow features contained within large unsteady datasets using knowledge of domain experts that has been captured within the trained intelligent system.

Kapteyn-Murnane Laboratories Inc.
1855 South 57th Court,
Boulder, CO 80301
(303) 544-9068

PI: Sterling Backus
(303) 544-9068
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0049
Colorado School of Mines
1500 lllinois St.,
Golden, CO 80401
(303) 273-3411

ID#: F08A-029-0060
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T029       Awarded: 8/1/2008
Title: Massively Parallel Micromachining with Ultrafast Lasers
Abstract:  &nbs Having recently built a 32-beam micromachining workstation, a systematic investigation that rigorously quantifies the multifocal, micromachining approach will be performed. While the manufacturing throughput gains of a multifocal approach are obvious, the method needs to be thoroughly characterized to identify the conditions that produce the features of highest integrity at the highest manufacturing rates. Initial studies will focus on those structures most important for laboratory-on-a-chip prototyping: microfludic channels, optical waveguide production, microlens fabrication. One of the tremendous advantages of using a single platform for a diverse fabrication process (such as creating a lab-on-a-chip), is that the characteristics of the fabricated structures (be they waveguides, channels, lenses, etc.) are dependent on essentially the same parameters: material type, focal geometry (e.g., degree of beam overlap) , focal spot formation, sample translation speed, laser wavelength, pulse energy, pulse duration, pulse stability, pulse pedestal, and repetition rate. Thus, it is important to understand the relationships between these parameters as applied to device fabrication. The experiments are specifically designed to measure this interplay, and compare to predicted, modeled material modifications. The anticipated experimental flow will follow a systematic procedure for each targeted feature. BENEFIT: This effort will provide information to help advance ultrafast machining in a highly paralell manner. It is intended to prove that this process can work for creating "lab on a chip" devices for sensors, and microfluidics for ultrafast chemistry. This could lead to a manufacturing station for making micro to nano size devices 100's to 1000's at a time.

KAZAK COMPOSITES, INC.
10F GIll Street,
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 932-5667

PI: Dr. Antonio Miravete
(781) 932-5667
Contract #: FA9550-08-C-0067
STANFORD UNIV.
Department of Aero / Astro, School of Engineering
Stanford, CA 94305
(650) 723-3317

ID#: F08A-025-0131
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T025       Awarded: 9/25/2008
Title: MMF-based Failure Initiation and Progression for Hybrid Composite Materials
Abstract:  &nbs Micromechanics of failure (MMF) is a new approach that links strength and life of fiber, matrix and their interfaces to those of plies, laminates and structures. Use of MMF for static strength and its extension to creep rupture and fatigue life prediction already show great promise. MMF for this proposal will be extended to interlaminar hybrids like Tigr and Glare, but also many structural details such as Pi- and T-joints, bonded joints, and toughened epoxy by addition of thermoplastic particles. Initiation of failure, subsequent propagation and eventual failure due to arbitrary load history will be cast in an internally consistent framework of MMF. This approach is generic, not a point design, and does not need knock down factors. This is fundamentally different from many prevailing ply-based failure criteria and empirical approaches that rely completely on testing and more testing. MMF is based on first principles of physics (micromechanics) and chemistry (interfacial strength and time/temperature superposition) so validation of analytic predictions can be accomplished by specifically designed experiments. The application of MMF to hybrid composites for this program is a natural extension. Far-reaching results can be expected and ready to be fed into a reliability theory in Phase II.

Kitware
28 Corporate Drive,
Clifton Park, NY 12065
(518) 371-3971

PI: David Thompson
(662) 325-2068
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0020
Mississipi State Univeristy
Walker Eng Bldg, Rm 319-C, 2 Research Boulevard
Starkville, MS 39762
(662) 325-2068

ID#: F08A-017-0223
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T017       Awarded: 6/1/2008
Title: Expert system for coherent feature detection in high-fidelity fluid dynamic simulations
Abstract:  &nbs Current computational fluid dynamics simulations produce large amounts of data. These data have become so large that traditional methods employing manual inspection and visualization cannot effectively process the information. Thus the value of these simulations is diminished because the information they contain is not fully utilized. We proposed to couple leading edge feature detection algorithms with an open-source visualization framework to create develop a flexible, robust, scalable and expandable framework that can be incorporated into industrial, commercial and research codes. Such a framework will enable broad collaboration, but still provide a platform for delivering proprietary modules for long term commercial potential. BENEFIT: This work will develop automated methods for identifying important features in computational fluid dynamics analysis. Such methods are critical to understanding the results of simulations, especially as the simulations become larger and more complex. Without such techniques, it is very difficult to effectively use modern computational tools.

Luna Innovations Incorporated
1 Riverside Circle, Suite 400
Roanoke, VA 24016
(540) 769-8400

PI: Vladimir Kochergin
(540) 769-8400
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0083
Virginia Tech
1880 Pratt Drive, Suite 2006
Blacksburg, VA 24060
(540) 231-8732

ID#: F08A-027-0261
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T027       Awarded: 9/1/2008
Title: Self-Assembled Polarizing Material
Abstract:  &nbs Detection and recognition of targets on a scene is the main utility of remote sensing in defense applications. Polarimetric imaging offers significant advantages for remote sensing. Utilization of polarization imaging was hampered by luck of speed, excessive volume, and expensiveness of common approaches. Polarization-sensitive imaging sensor employing micropolarizing plates offer a promising solution. However cost-effective fabrication of micropolarizer plates still represents a significant challenge, especially for visible wavelengths. Luna Innovations and Virginia Tech propose to develop a new class of polarization components based on a revolutionary bottom-up fabrication methodology that promises an unmatched level of morphological and orientational control of the nanostructures and nanomaterials. During the proposed Phase I effort, the team will develop a thorough model of the material, will develop and demonstrate key fabrication processes, and will show the utility of the proposed material in remote sensing applications. Phase II of the project will be devoted toward optimization of the nanoassembly design and fabrication techniques and on development of a polarizing plate that will be used to demonstrate polarization imaging. Relationships with appropriate OEMs will be developed during the Phase I and Phase II of the project and will serve as the basis of a successful Phase III. BENEFIT: The developed polarizing nanomaterial will significantly expand the application base of polarization imaging, particularly in areas important to the Department of Defense. Remote target detection and recognition at near UV-visible wavelengths will become more reliable, smaller, cheaper, thus providing the opportunity for use in smaller-scale missions. In addition to DoD applications the proposed nanomaterial is expected to find applications in astronomy and, possibly, photography and Liquid Crystal Display markets. the proposed approach will enable a number of other important applications such as highly nonlinear polymer materials, uniaxial and biaxial materials and many more. The proposed general method for selectively functionalizing metal nanoparticles could form the basis for forming a huge library of molecular building blocks with virtually unlimited functionality for use in assembling supramolecular structures with tailored photophysical, chemical and biochemical properties. Orientational control that we will develop in this project will provide further opportunities to integrate these materials into optoelectronic devices.

Mesa Photonics, LLC
174 Galisteo Lane,
Santa Fe, NM 87505
(505) 401-5271

PI: Daniel J. Kane
(505) 401-5271
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0004
University of New Mexico
CHTM, 1313 Goddard SE
Albuquerque, NM 87106
(505) 272-7868

ID#: F08A-029-0108
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T029       Awarded: 7/1/2008
Title: Ultrashort Pulse Quantum Dot Laser for Machining Applications
Abstract:  &nbs Optical micromachining using ultrafast lasers (< 1 ps) is an emerging technology that can create high quality nanoscale structures though a variety of matter-light interactions. Commercial success requires the development of inexpensive ultrafast laser systems that can tune system parameters for changing feature scales and removal rates in real-time. This ability requires real-time changes in fluence, spot size, and position at high-speeds with high precision and accuracy. Technical challenges include the development of new laser systems more suited for micro- machining applications, the development of new beam delivery systems for beam size adjustment, and positioning systems that can easily move large distances with nanometer precision and accuracy. In this project, Mesa Photonics and the University of New Mexico will develop a new laser system based on quantum dot technology that will be able to tune repetition rates and pulse energy in real time. The Phase I effort will focus on demonstrating the feasibility of our new laser design. In Phase II, we will implement our laser design in an ultrafast laser-based machining system. BENEFIT: Better micromachining technology will lower costs of manufacturing of semiconductors and allow for the development of new metamaterials, sensors, photonic materials for both miltary and consumers markets. Medical applications including medical imaging are other applications.

MICROMECHATRONICS, INC.
200 Innovation Blvd, Suite 155,
State College, PA 16803
(814) 861-5688

PI: Dr. Alfredo Vazquez Carazo
(814) 861-5688
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0029
THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.
229 / 233F Hammond bldg., Penn State
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 865-2569

ID#: F08A-007-0229
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T007       Awarded: 9/1/2008
Title: Distributed Conformal Actuation for Simultaneously Controlling Flow Separation and Transition
Abstract:  &nbs The objective of this proposal is to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a Conformal Actuator Array Active Skin (CAAAS) that can be implanted on the surface of the airfoil to deliver a system that can actively control transition and separation. It will be realized through operation of actuators with unique driving methods as well as recent advances and innovations in piezoelectric actuator technology, i.e. large displacement and blocking force. The actuator thickness will be below 2 mm so it can be distributed on the surface of the airfoil in the form of 2 dimensional arrays. The array will be covered by compliant outer membrane (active skin) to provide conformal actuation. The actuator will be excited by various driving frequencies, displacement, and waveforms to obtain required airflow controllability. Especially, waveform manipulation will induce effects analogous to conventional suctioning and blowing without making holes (conformal actuation). In addition, the array will generate traveling wave both in the transverse and streamwise directions to reduce shear stress and control airflow effectively. The combinatory effects of controlling each actuator and the array will be analyzed and optimized thus producing desired airflow.

Microtech Instruments
858 West Park Street,
Eugene, OR 97401
(541) 683-6505

PI: Vladimir Kozlov
(541) 683-6505
Contract #: FA9550-08-C-0056
Stanford University
Stanford University,
Stanford, CA 94305
(650) 723-0139

ID#: F08A-009-0068
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T009       Awarded: 8/20/2008
Title: Efficient High-Power Tunable Terahertz Sources using Optical Techniques
Abstract:  &nbs The main objective of the proposed Phase I project is to leverage the technology of THz generation in resonantly pumped QPM GaAs structures jointly developed by Stanford University and Microtech Instruments, Inc. and identify the best approach for product development activities planned for Phase II of the project. While high THz power, good efficiency and tunability across 0.5-4 THz range has been clearly demonstrated by the latest experiments at Stanford, the current THz OPO system is probably too complex to enable a compact and maintenance free instrument. Optimization of the THz OPO design with an objective to reduce complexity while maintaining high output power, good efficiency and tunability will be the primary focus of Phase 1 of the project. BENEFIT: If Phase I of the proposed project is successful, Microtech will introduce a product based on optical down conversion in QPM GaAs in early 2009. This is likely to be a narrow band THz source, covering spectral range around 1.5 THz and delivering 0.1-1 mW of power. Such product will compliment existing portfolio of THz generators offered by Microtech Instruments. It will also increase awareness of scientific and industrial community of QPM GaAs technology, creating market for next generations of THz sources based on this technology. Development of such systems (tunable across 0.5-5 THz range and delivering up to 10 mW of power) will be the main objective for Phase II of the project.

Millennium Dynamics Corporation
5860 Bridgemont Place,
Acworth, GA 30101
(770) 241-5045

PI: Vin Sharma
(770) 241-5045
Contract #: FA9550-08-C-0055
Georgia Institute of Technology
370 Ferst Drive,
Atlanta, GA 30332
(404) 271-9632

ID#: F08A-016-0050
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T016       Awarded: 8/1/2008
Title: Dynamics-based Nondestructive Structural Health Monitoring Techniques
Abstract:  &nbs The objective of the proposed research program is to advance the state-of-the-art in structural health monitoring (SHM) through an innovative research program, which effectively addresses the need for an approach capable of detection, diagnosis, and prognosis of damage in aerospace structures. More specific objectives are to use Guided Wave (GW) inspection in conjunction with full-field measurements as the basis for the development of novel analysis tools, which estimate phase gradients of propagating waves for an accurate damage location, predict mode conversion coefficients for damage quantification, evaluate scattering patterns for detailed damage characterization, and allow the determination of Stress Intensity Factors related to different types of damages. The development of the analysis tools will rely on novel and efficient analytical and numerical techniques, including spectral finite element methods and perturbation methods, for the simulation of the interaction of waves propagating in one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) complex structures with various types of defects. Finally the developed concepts and techniques will be transitioned from the laboratory to the field using a novel ultrasonic scanning Laser system, capable of simultaneously recording in-plane and out-of-plane velocity components at extremely high frequencies. BENEFIT: Robust damage detection techniques for deplot level application - detection of fatigue, corrosion, delamination, and disbond type damages - Future developments for onboard sensors for continuous monitoring - Shift of paradigm from scheduled based maintenance to condition based maintenance - Increased flight safety and higher mission readiness - Lower down time for the aircraft

MZA ASSOC. CORP.
2021 Girard SE, Suite 150
Albuquerque, NM 87106
(505) 245-9970

PI: Dr. Matthew Whiteley
(937) 432-6560
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0033
BATTELLE MEMORIAL INSTITUTE
505 King Avenue,
Columbus, OH 43201
(614) 424-3653

ID#: F08A-021-0027
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T021       Awarded: 8/3/2008
Title: Sub-aperture based EO imaging systems
Abstract:  &nbs MZA proposes refinement and optimization of a novel method of atmospheric phasing for a distributed array of sub- apertures enabling high-resolution imaging. The phasing method derives tilt correction through sub-aperture image shifts used to approximate sub-aperture piston correction with linear estimation. Piston correction is optimized through image-metric-based feedback, resulting in an accurately phased high-resolution image through the array. The applied phase modulation affects the receiver optical train as well as any outgoing common-path lasers. To digitally demonstrate the performance of phasing concept, MZA will refine a WaveTrain wave-optics simulation incorporating the sub-aperture phasing system as well as a transmitter phasing system for outgoing lasers. The wave-optics model will incorporate target models, atmospheric turbulence, and may include aero-optics disturbances for an aircraft platform. MZA has teamed with Battelle Memorial Institute (non-profit) making use of Battelle’s investment in graphics processor unit (GPU) technology for rapid parallel image processing. A laboratory demonstration of MZA’s phasing concept will be conducted during Phase I, including GPU-implemented processing of sub-aperture and high-resolution images. Optical and computational hardware will be evaluated during Phase I to support a preliminary design for a meaningful test of the sub-aperture phasing and imaging system during Phase II.

NANO ENGINEERED MATERIALS CORP.
2349 Lake Forest Trail,
Lawrenceville, GA 30043
(678) 371-2760

PI: Mr. Han Gi Chae
(404) 234-3507
Contract #: FA9550-08-C-0065
GEORGIA TECH RESEARCH CORP.
505 10th Street ,
Atlanta, GA 30332
(404) 894-6929

ID#: F08A-028-0224
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T028       Awarded: 9/23/2009
Title: Nanotailored Carbon Fibers
Abstract:  &nbs Polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/carbon nanotube (CNT) composite fibers will be spun to obtain precursor fiber with about 2 micrometer diameter. By optimizing stabilization and carbonization conditions, high tensile strength carbon fiber will be obtained with a diameter of about 1 micrometer. CNT incoporation can lead to the ordered graphitic structure in the vicinity of CNT, which will improve the mechanical properties of the resulting carbon fiber. These nano-tailored carbon fibers will have superior tensile and compressive properties as well as better electrical conductivity as compared to the conventional carbon fiber.

NanoMEMS Research LLC
P.O. Box 18614,
Irvine, CA 92623
(310) 259-0767

PI: Hector J. De Los Santos
(310) 259-0767
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0044
Texas A&M University
3123 TAMU,
College Station, TX 77843
(979) 845-4500

ID#: F08A-024-0101
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T024       Awarded: 10/1/2008
Title: Reconfigurable Materials for Photonic Systems
Abstract:  &nbs In this Phase I STTR proposal we present the research plan to demonstrate the feasibility of a continuously reconfigurable, photonically-connected FPGA-like system. BENEFIT: The proposed research and development is expected to result in new classes of reconfigurable photonics which will enable revolutionary expressions of pervasive morphability in warfighting systems of relevance to Air Force interests. The proposed device will also find application in commercial fiber-optic systems, where light buffers of the type to be produced are still lacking.

NANORIDGE MATERIALS, INC.
2315 Schlumberger St.,
Houston, TX 77023
(713) 928-6166

PI: Dr. Jiang Zhu
(713) 928-6166
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0061
RICE UNIV.
6100 Main Street,
Houston, TX 77005
(713) 348-0000

ID#: F08A-028-0125
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T028       Awarded: 9/2/2008
Title: Nanotailored Carbon Fibers & Forms
Abstract:  &nbs The incorporation of carbon nanotubes into host matrices or the assembly of them into devices is today’s technical challenge and opportunity. Carbon fibers are widely used in a variety of applications including aerospace, military and commercial. These applications are limited by the trade-offs that must be made between structural and conductivity properties. A new area of interest is the nanotailoring of fibers with carbon nanotubes to produce a high strength, high modulus light weight fiber that is thermally and electrically conductive. The greatest challenge to optimizing the benefits from SWNTs in polymer composites and fibers is the difficulty in obtaining a high degree of uniform dispersion and preferably, dispersion at the molecular level. To address these critical issues, the NanoRidge Materials / Rice University Team (TEAM) propose using several strategies to obtain high dispersion within the SWNT/polymer solution and fiber. The objective of this Phase I proposal is to establish the technical basis for synthesis and characterization of high strength light weight nanotube tailored carbon fibers. The NanoRidge/RICE Team will focus our work on developing continuous fiber processing technology based on pre-existing work to maximize SWNT dispersion and alignment for the fiber spinning process. Work will also include extensive characterization to understand internal structure and process-morphology, establish the performance data base of process-property-morphology on nanotube tailored carbon fibers.

NanoTechLabs Inc.
409 W. Maple St.,
Yadkinville, NC 27055
(336) 403-7762

PI: Jay Gaillard
(336) 849-7474
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0016
University of Texas Dallas
Office of Sponsored Projects, , 800 West Campbell
Richardson, TX 75080
(972) 883-2313

ID#: F08A-028-0158
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T028       Awarded: 9/2/2008
Title: Nanotailored Carbon Fibers via Ultra-Long Carbon Nanotubes: Scale-Up and Post Processing
Abstract:  &nbs The goal of the proposed work is to refine and scale-up the production of high strength continuous threads prepared from ultra-long carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The NanoTechLabs, Inc. (NTL) team will work to produce fibers spun from NTL’s ultra-long CNTs. Significant challenges remain that are primarily related to the development of scalable methods for making high strength, CNT threads for the production of ultra-strong and lightweight composite materials. The most significant ones are: 1) dispersion and functionalization of currently available long CNTs, 2) developing effective and scalable thread manufacturing processes for producing threads which express the desirable properties of the carbon nanotubes 3) developing post-production processes to enhance the mechanical properties of the threads, 4) developing a reliable method for producing ultra-long nanotubes (>5 mm) to increase the fiber interactions within the thread, and 5) scaling up the production of these ultra-long carbon nanotubes. Methods that rely on the strengths of the three partners working on the Phase 1 project will be used to overcome these challenges. BENEFIT: The MWNT yarns are interesting as multifunctional materials. The strength, toughness, reversible energy absorption capability, and resistance to knot-induced failure could be exploited for multifunctional materials applications, as could yarn diameters that are up to fifty times smaller than for a human hair. Replacing metal wires in electronic textiles with these nanotube yarns could provide important new functionalities, like the ability to actuate as an artificial muscle and to store energy as a fiber supercapacitor or battery. The small yarn diameters, like those of microdenier yarns used for soft fabrics, could eliminate the uncomfortable rigidity sometimes found for metal-wire-containing conducting textiles that provide radio or microwave absorption, electrostatic discharge protection, textile heating, or interconnect electronic devices.

NEW SPAN OPTO-TECHNOLOGY, INC.
16115 SW 117th Ave. A-15,
Miami, FL 33177
(305) 235-6928

PI: Dr. Pengfei Wu
(305) 235-6928
Contract #: FA9550-08-C-0066
UNIV. OF MIAMI
1251 Memorial Drive. Rm.406,
Coral Gables, FL 33146
(305) 284-4541

ID#: F08A-001-0298
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T001       Awarded: 9/25/2008
Title: Fast Updatable Large-area Holographic Display
Abstract:  &nbs Mapping awareness of battlefield is increasingly valuable for many military mission planning and activities, particularly in complex urban and mountainous terrain. Currently available two-dimensional (2D) visualization techniques have limit capacity to achieve understanding of full dimensionality of the battlefield. Rewritable 3D holographic storage is promising for updatable 3D display applications. Based on our encouraging preliminary study on reversible nonvolatile holographic storage, New Span Opto-Technology Inc. proposes herein a novel large-area 3D updateable holographic display (UHD), capable of reversible recording and nonvolatile reading based on a novel bi-photonic holographic technique without using high-voltage electrical field across the polymer film. The proposed technique exploits one laser source for both coherent recording and reading processes. The Phase I research will focus on feasibility studies of the proposed UHD concept by recording reversible holograms and reading the stored information without volatility using azobenzene photorefractive polymer films. In Phase II, we will improve the system design and construct and characterize a 300 x 300 mm prototype true 3-D display system. We will study the functionality of the prototype system through demonstration of high diffraction efficiencies, wide viewing angles, fast writing times, long persistence of hours or more, controllable erasure with thousands write/rewrite cycle capability.

Nitek Inc
1804 Salem Church Road,
Irmo, SC 29063
(803) 622-8064

PI: Vinod Adivarahan
(803) 777-0710
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0101
University of South Carolina
301 South Main St. RM 3A79,
Columbia, SC 29208
(803) 777-7941

ID#: F08A-006-0240
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T006       Awarded: 9/25/2008
Title: AlInN Lattice Matched Barrier HEMTs on Low Defect Bulk and Quasi-Bulk III-Nitride Substrates
Abstract:  &nbs The goal of the Phase I program is to demonstrate the feasibility of our technical approach to grow AlInN lattice Matched Barrier HEMTs on low defect Bulk and quasi-bulk III-Nitride Substrates (GaN). This will be accomplished using our pulsed MOCVD growth technique to deposit AlInN films at a higher growth temperature than conventional MOCVD deposition methods, resulting in better material quality. The developed material technology will be scaled-up to 2” diameter substrates in Phase II. In Phase II program we will also use the material from Phase I to develop robust sub-micron insulating gate HEMTs. The suitability of their insertion in military systems will be established via a joint processing and device testing program with DOD test labs (WPAFB and the Joint Services Task Team). In Phase III program we will develop a large volume manufacturing technology for epitaxial wafer supply to DoD and commercial outfits in a strategic partnership with a large company. BENEFIT: The primary commercial market that this development effort is directed towards is for high power T/R modules for both military and commercial (wireless) markets. Nitek expects that government military related radar applications will be the initial adopters. Nitek will supply telecommunications amplifier manufacturers with epi material for device development and collaborate with them to standardize device designs for next generation wireless. The total market size was projected to be approx. $155 M/yr in 2007.

NP Photonics, Inc.
UA Science and Technology Park, 9030 S. Rita Road, Suite #120
Tucson, AZ 85747
(520) 799-7424

PI: Wei Shi
(520) 799-7413
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0060
University of Arizona
PO BOX 3308, 888 N. Euclid Ave., Ste 510
Tucson, AZ 85722
(520) 626-6000

ID#: F08A-009-0177
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T009       Awarded: 9/1/2008
Title: Efficient high power tunable THz source based on all fiber-based pulsed fiber lasers at 1.55 micron
Abstract:  &nbs We propose to develop a fiber-based, high power, narrow linewidth, and tunable THz source by leveraging our proprietary fiber laser at ~ 1.55 micron and patented THz techniques. This proposed high power fiber-based THz source will be generated by using a ZnGeP2 crystal based on difference-frequency generation (DFG) pumped by high power pulsed fiber lasers in MOPA, which will reach a high power of 10-100 mW, a widely tuning range of 0.2- 6 THz, and a narrow linewidth of <500 MHz. This proposal will use an external power cavity to enhance the conversion efficiency of parametric THz generation. This efficient pump recycling has the possibility to enhance the efficiency close the Manley-Rowe limit. BENEFIT: Currently, the THz spectral region has been underutilized because of the inadequacy of THz sources. The proposed THz source is expected to break this limit, which has the advantages of compact, high power, high spectral resolution, extremely wide tunability, and room temperature operation. So this proposed THz source will have large potential market in THz applications, such as real-time imaging, non-destructive evaluation, stand-off sensing and chemical detection and analysis. The proposed THz source can be used by military agencies for communications on the battlefield or in space, trace detection of hazardous materials and explosives in filed due to the fast response, room-temperature operation, low noise, and high spectral resolution, used in atmospheric environment sensing, airport and subway for screening hazardous materials and explosives from a wide-spectrum of the population, and used in research and development of biological materials, pharmaceuticals and other chemicals because THz spectrum can reveal the unique structure features of the molecules.

OPTICAL PHYSICS CO.
26610 Agoura Road, Suite 240
Calabasas, CA 91302
(818) 880-2907

PI: Dr. Richard A Hutchin
(818) 880-2907
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0040
CALIFORNIA STATE UNIV.
18111 Nordhoff Street,
Northridge, CA 91330
(818) 677-2901

ID#: F08A-021-0006
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T021       Awarded: 8/3/2008
Title: Speckle image processing for conformal sub-aperture arrays
Abstract:  &nbs Optical Physics Company has developed two speckle imaging techniques to achieve diffraction-limited quality using subaperture data. Both have already been proven by the Air Force - one in the lab and the other in ground-to-space imaging. Each method uses a different process for recovering the sub-aperture phase and reconstructing the image. During this STTR effort, we will combine these two techniques to design, build, and demonstrate an end-to- end practical and cost-effective conformal sub-aperture array. Based on our preliminary estimates, the resulting imaging system has the signal-to-noise ratio to image a target 100 km away at a resolution of 7.5 cm with automatic compensation for atmospheric and boundary layer turbulence. When combined with liquid crystal and laser technologies already being developed by the Air Force, a TRL 8 sub-aperture based conformal array flight system can be deployed within six years. During Phase I, we will develop the initial opto-mechanical and algorithm design and perform a high fidelity simulation to evaluate vibration, jitter, noise, thermal gradients and atmospheric turbulence. This will be followed by a lab demonstration using 256x256 sub-apertures, scaled to an AF selected operational scenario. Phase I work will conclude with the Phase II prototype design.

ORBITAL TECHNOLOGIES CORP.(ORBITEC)
Space Center, 1212 Fourier Drive,
Madison, WI 53717
(608) 229-2730

PI: Dr. Martin Chiaverini
(608) 229-2732
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0037
THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.,
Division of Business and Engin, 203 Force Technology Center
Altoona, PA 16601
(814) 949-5074

ID#: F08A-022-0159
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T022       Awarded: 9/1/2008
Title: Energetic Polyazide Materials
Abstract:  &nbs Orbital Technologies Corporation and Penn State University propose to examine and characterize novel energetic formulations in solid fuels to replace conventional, low-energy, binders such as HTPB. The proposed solid fuels will provide higher enthalpy, higher density, and improved rocket engine performance. In Phase I, we will calculate theoretical rocket performance of selected materials, characterize the friction sensitivity of candidate materials, perform laboratory burning rate and performance experiments in two different types of test apparatus, and develop plans for Phase II efforts. At the conclusion of Phase II, we expect to thoroughly characterized a down-selected group of energetic materials for propulsion applications and other applications requiring energetic materials.

PARASYM
624 Sixth Street,
Manhattan Beach, CA 90266
(626) 394-1114

PI: Ms. Falvia Cardarelli
(617) 230-1259
Contract #: FA9550-08-C-0070
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF
77 Massachusetts Avenue,, Room 37-46
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-7518

ID#: F08A-023-0242
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T023       Awarded: 9/26/2008
Title: High-order modeling of applied multi-physics phenomena
Abstract:  &nbs This proposal is concerned with the development of a commercial, high order, multi-physics simulation capability based on the Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method. The proposed capability will build on the extensive research carried out by the key personnel on high-order DG methods which includes efficient and accurate discretization methods for the the viscous terms, shock capturing algorithms and the development efficient pre-conditioners and implicit solvers. The tool develop will also incorporate the latest developments in high order methods made by the scientific community. The proposed system will provide a step change in multi-physics predictive capability relative to current simulation codes. This will be accomplished through higher order approximations, mesh adaptivity and a software engineering design that facilitates coupled multi-physics simulations.

PHYSICAL SCIENCES, INC.
20 New England Business Center,
Andover, MA 01810
(978) 689-0003

PI: Dr. Thomas W. Vaneck
(978) 689-0003
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0080
WEST VIRGINIA UNIV.
Office of Sponsored Programs, 886 Chestnut Ridge Rd
Morgantown, WV 26506
(304) 293-3998

ID#: F08A-007-0320
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T007       Awarded: 9/1/2008
Title: Dynamic Roughness Applied to Boundary Layer Control
Abstract:  &nbs The United States Air force, DARPA, and other military and civilian organizations have current, active programs focused on increasing the performance and reliability of current, next generation and generation after next aircraft. An element of nearly all of these programs is boundary layer control – passive and/or active means to delay separation and transition. Boundary layer control is a recurring theme in these programs because truly effective, widely applicable solutions have been elusive. Physical Sciences along with West Virginia University, Iowa State University and Penn State University have teamed to address the boundary layer control problem using a novel new technique, actively controlled dynamic roughness. Through proper placement of an actively controlled dynamic roughness appliqué we believe that our concept can be used to delay or eliminate the flow separation, as well as delay transition to turbulence. The research effort will examine the effects of dynamic roughness on flow control phenomena and investigate two mechanism (one novel) for actuation of the dynamic roughness. The assembled team has all of the necessary skills to address this problem; theoretical framework, CFD modeling, experimental testing and validation, and systems integration.

PHYSICAL SCIENCES, INC.
20 New England Business Center,
Andover, MA 01810
(978) 689-0003

PI: Dr. Thomas W. Vaneck
(978) 689-0003
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0028
HARVARD UNIV.
Office for Sponsored Programs, 1350 Mass Ave, Holyoke Ctr 600
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 495-0460

ID#: F08A-008-0091
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T008       Awarded: 8/1/2008
Title: Robust MAV design and control using biomimetic principles
Abstract:  &nbs Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) will likely become the ISR platform of choice for urban operations because they have the advantages of being able to effectively maneuver in difficult terrain, look under vertical obscuration, etc. – all with minimal risk to human safety. While MAVs have many advantages, they do have a significant drawback: the likely loss of the vehicle due to a collision with an obstacle. MAV developers and operator are addressing this issue by: developing sophisticated obstacle detection sensors, reducing the flight velocity in cluttered environments, and limiting the flight operating envelope – unfortunately these simultaneously increase costs and dramatically reduce utility. A far better approach is to take a clue from nature; design the vehicle so that it can collide with obstacles without suffering permanent damage or loss of control. In this program Physical Sciences Inc. and the Harvard Microrobotics Lab will take insect inspired collision recovery concepts and apply them to MAV designs. This will dramatically improve the vehicle’s capability, performance and robustness. In the near future MAVs will be able to operate in highly cluttered, low visibility, dynamic environments, and do so at high speed and without the concern for the loss of the vehicle due to collisions.

PolarOnyx, Inc
470 Lakeside Drive, Suite F,
Sunnyvale, CA 94085
(408) 245-9588

PI: Jian Liu
(408) 245-9588
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0006
University of California at Davis
One Shields Ave,
Davis, CA 95616
(530) 752-0360

ID#: F08A-029-0217
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T029       Awarded: 8/1/2008
Title: High-throughput femtosecond fiber laser microstructuring system
Abstract:  &nbs Based on our success in developing the world first commercial 100 micro Joule <200 fs fiber laser system and our leading technology development in ultrashort pulsed fiber laser, PolarOnyx and University of California at Davis proposes, for the first time, a fs-high power (100 W), high energy (>100 uJ) and high repetition rate (MHz) fiber laser microstructuring system to meet with the requirement of the solicitation 08-T029. It is incorporating our proprietary technology of pulse shaping, beam shaping, spectral shaping and polarization shaping. These will make the fiber laser microstructuring system superior in terms of throughput, size, and cost. Experiment on microstructuring glass and microfluidic channels will be carried out. A table top demonstration will be given in Phase I. BENEFIT: The proposed high energy fs-100W fiber laser micromachining system can be used in many military applications, such as micromachining, space, aircraft, and satellite applications of LADAR systems and communications, laser weapons, and target designation and illumination. PolarOnyx will develop a series of products to meet various requirements for military deployments. With successful development of the laser, the technology proposed by PolarOnyx will provide a vital tool to solve the existing and potential issues and merge with the huge markets including • Material processing. This includes (1) all types of metal processing such as welding, cutting, annealing, and drilling; (2)semiconductor and microelectronics manufacturing such as lithography, inspection, control, defect analysis and repair, and via drilling; (3) marking of all materials including plastic, metals, and silicon; (4) other materials processing such as rapid prototyping, desk top manufacturing, micromachining, photofinishing, embossed holograms, and grating manufacturing. • Medical equipment and biomedical instrumentation. The high power amplifier/laser can be applied to ophthalmology, refractive surgery, photocoagulation, general surgery, therapeutic, imaging, and cosmetic applications. Biomedical instruments include those involved in cells or proteins, cytometry, and DNA sequencing; laser Raman spectroscopy, spectrofluorimetry, and ablation; and laser based microscopes.

PRISM COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCES, INC.
455 Science Drive, Suite 140
Madison, WI 53711
(608) 280-9182

PI: Dr. Joseph J MacFarlane
(608) 280-9182
Contract #: FA9550-08-C-0051
UNIV. OF WISCONSIN
21 North Park Street, Suite 6401
Madison, WI 53715
(608) 262-3822

ID#: F08A-020-0062
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T020       Awarded: 9/29/2008
Title: Development of Multi-Frequency Multi-Scale Radiation Transport Modeling
Abstract:  &nbs The objective of this proposal is to develop advanced radiation transport modeling techniques that accurately and efficiently treat transport in media having widely varying optical properties; in particular, hot gases and plasmas with optical depths ranging from the optically thin to the optically thick regimes. In doing this, we will develop a hybrid diffusion-Monte Carlo (HDMC) model that efficiently transports multi-frequency radiation on multi-dimensional grids. During Phase I, we will perform initial development of the HDMC software, and demonstrate its accuracy and efficiency on simple 1-D grids. Also in Phase I, we will: study the potential for utilizing variance reduction methods for improving efficiency, investigate the use of escape probability techniques to more accurately treat the transport of line radiation, and develop plans for implementing efficient domain decomposition techniques for 3-D grids. Modeling techniques developed during Phase I will be extended to support simulations on 2-D and 3-D grids during Phase II. The new models will be benchmarked against known solutions, and will be tested for efficiency and scalability to many-processor systems. Successful completion of this work will result in an efficient multi-scale multi-dimensional radiation transport package that accurately treats radiation flow in materials with realistic frequency-dependent radiative properties.

PROCERUS TECHNOLOGIES LC
452 South 950 East,
Orem, UT 84097
(801) 376-8099

PI: Mr. Reed Christiansen
(801) 224-5713
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0102
BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIV.
Electrical / Computer Engineer, 459 Clyde Building
Provo, UT 84602
(801) 422-8392

ID#: F08A-014-0225
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T014       Awarded: 8/1/2008
Title: Autonomous Aerial Recovery of Micro Air Vehicles
Abstract:  &nbs ddddThe objective of this project is to develop a strategy to recover micro air vehicles into a flying aircraft. Our solution combines three key technologies that have received significant research attention in recent years, namely towed cable systems, cooperative control, and vision-based terminal guidance. We propose to demonstrate the feasibility of using a flying-aircraft mothership pulling an actuated drogue using light-weight, high-strength cable to recover MAVs. When the mothership enters a constant-angular-rate orbit, the drogue drops into an orbit with the same angular rate but a much smaller radius, and therefore a significantly lower airspeed. The drogue will be actuated and have an on-board autopilot to ensure that it enters a stable, well defined, orbit. The drogue will have a mechanism to capture the MAV upon rendezvous. Cooperative control techniques will be used to bring the MAV to within capture range of the drogue. Vision-based guidance algorithms will be used during the terminal phase of the flight to maximize the probability of capture. The Phase I effort will largely consist of trade studies to enable an efficient system design during the Phase II effort. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing algorithms that are robust to wind.

Q Peak, Inc.
135 South Road,
Bedford, MA 01730
(781) 275-9535

PI: Evgueni Slobodtchikov
(781) 275-9535
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0001
Harvard University
Holoyoke Center, Room 600,
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 495-0460

ID#: F08A-029-0145
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T029       Awarded: 7/1/2008
Title: Ultrashort Pulse Manufacturing Technology
Abstract:  &nbs High power femtosecond laser sources are recognized now as excellent tools for high precision micromachining. Unlike conventional laser machining, femtosecond laser machining reduces collateral damage to the surroundings. We propose to develop a compact diode-pumped femtosecond Yb:KYW oscillator with increased output pulse energy. The laser will employ a cavity design that will allow for a few times increase in single pulse energy compared to a standard femtosecond laser resulting in 100-nJ, 100-fs pulses at a repetition rate of 20 MHz. The proposed laser system can be used in applications such as direct laser writing, surface micro-structuring, creating micro-channels in transparent materials, waveguide writing in poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA), cutting of biological materials, and plastic welding. For applications requiring mJ pulse energy levels, the system can be upgraded to a femtosecond oscillator – regenerative amplifier laser system with >1 mJ per pulse laser output at 1-10 kHz with 100- 200 fs pulse duration. The compact, directly diode-pumped ultrafast laser represents an enabling technology, allowing ultrafast systems to emerge from the laboratory into widespread scientific and industrial applications. BENEFIT: The proposed high power ultrafast laser has the potential for significant scientific and commercial impact. With the lower cost made possible by the simplicity of design, a wider range of research groups in academia and industry will be able to obtain ultrafast sources. The simplicity, higher reliability, and smaller size of the systems will also greatly expand and accelerate the use of ultrafast lasers in biotechnology, medical imaging, industrial process control, and security systems.

QmagiQ, LLC
One Tara Boulevard, Suite 102
Nashua, NH 03062
(603) 821-3092

PI: Axel Reisinger
(603) 821-3092
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0058
Purdue University
Potter Engg. Center, Rm 304, 500 Central Drive
West Lafayette, IN 47907
(765) 494-0757

ID#: F08A-027-0204
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T027       Awarded: 9/15/2008
Title: Sub-wavelength Optical Antenna for Multispectral Polarimetric Focal Plane Array
Abstract:  &nbs We propose to combine Purdue University’s expertise in the area of nano-scale antennae with QmagiQ’s Qwip technology to develop a new class of polarimetric longwave infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs). The Phase 1 effort will pave the way toward the development in Phase 2 of dual-band polarimetric FPAs producing simultaneous imagery in two spectral bands with polarization discrimination capability, all embedded within a single integrated package. BENEFIT: Multispectral polarimetric FPAs will enhance target recognition, identification and discrimination by combining polarization information, spectral content, spatial and temporal information provided by the imaging array. The polarimetric properties of the FPA will have applications in remote environmental sensing applications.

QuesTek Innovations LLC
1820 Ridge Avenue,
Evanston, IL 60201
(847) 425-8211

PI: Jason T. Sebastian
(847) 328-5800
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0027
Northwestern University
Office of Sponsored Research, 633 Clark Street, 2-502
Evanston, IL 60208
(847) 491-5468

ID#: F08A-031-0042
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T031       Awarded: 8/5/2008
Title: Improved Soft Magnetic Materials for High Power Density Electrical Machines
Abstract:  &nbs QuesTek proposes to apply its Materials by Designâ technology to the design and development of a new high performance soft magnetic material. Working closely with our OEM partner (Hamilton Sundstrand) and with our research institution collaborator (Northwestern University), we will identify the critical performance criteria for a new high performance soft magnetic material including saturation magnetization, mechanical strength, alloy cost, magnetic hysteresis loses, temperature performance, and electrical resistivity. Property and microstructural models will be developed. Microstructural concepts with the potential of achieving the program goals will be explored, including a novel precipitation-strengthened FeCo alloy concept. A series of prototype alloys that explore different aspects of our modeling- and microstructural concept-spaces will be designed, produced, and tested for mechanical and magnetic performance. In Phase II, Phase I results would be leveraged to design, produce, and test a final alloy composition at intermediate scale and (eventually) full industrial scale. Initial property models would be revisited and refined in Phase II to aid in the final alloy design. BENEFIT: The need for high performance soft magnetic alloys with improved strength, magnetization, and temperature capabilities is prevalent in numerous electrical motor and actuator applications, aerospace and otherwise. A high performance soft magnetic alloy with improved mechanical and magnetic properties could directly address requirements on DoD platforms for higher power generation and actuator performance. Improved temperature resistance in the new alloy would enable application in hotter environments, including those environments in very close proximity to turbine engine hot zones.

R. HYERS & ASSOC.
15 Blue Hills Rd,
Amherst, MA 01002
(413) 253-3409

PI: Dr. Robert W. Hyers
(413) 545-2253
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0089
UNIV. OF MASSACHUSETTS,
OGCA, Research Adm Bldg, 70 Butterfield Terrace
Amherst, MA 01003
(413) 545-0698

ID#: F08A-004-0234
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T004       Awarded: 9/22/2008
Title: Non-contact Measurement of Creep in Ultra-High-Temperature Materials
Abstract:  &nbs Our team has developed a novel approach to measuring creep at extremely high temperatures using electrostatic levitation (ESL). This method has been demonstrated on niobium up to 2300°C, while ESL has melted tungsten (3400°C). High-precision spheres, 2-3 mm diameter are levitated in the NASA MSFC ESL, a national user facility, and rotated at up to 250,000+ RPM at the measurement temperature. The rapid rotation loads the sample through centripetal acceleration, causing it to deform. The deformation of the sample is captured on high-speed video, which is analyzed by machine-vision software from the University of Massachusetts. The deformations analyzed to determine the constitutive constants in the creep relation. Furthermore, the non-contact method exploits stress gradients within the sample to determine the stress exponent in a single test, versus the many tests required with conventional methods. This method was validated in collaboration with the University of Tennessee for niobium at 1985 °C, with agreement within the uncertainty of the conventional measurements. A similar method will be employed on Ultra-High-Temperature Ceramics of interest to the AFOSR, such as ZrB2 or HfB2 SiC composites.

RNET TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
240 W. Elmwood Dr., Suite 2010
Dayton, OH 45459
(937) 433-2886

PI: Mr. Todd Grimes
(937) 433-2886
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0005
UNIV. OF DAYTON
UDRI,
Dayton, OH 45469
(937) 229-4053

ID#: F08A-021-0301
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T021       Awarded: 8/3/2008
Title: Sub-aperture based EO imaging systems
Abstract:  &nbs RNET Technologies, Inc., (RNET), a small business located in Dayton, OH, is responding to the STTR in collaboration with Prof. Bradley Duncan and Prof. Joe Haus of the University of Dayton (UD). The solicitation states that the objective of this STTR is to develop sub-aperture based EO imaging systems capable of being near conformal and of compensating for atmospheric effects. It also states that high efficiency non-mechanical, or micromechanical, steering of the field of view of the sub-apertures should be used. RNET is submitting this proposal since UD has already developed a sub-aperture based imaging system that can be transitioned to RNET. The goal of this proposal is to further develop this UD system so that it will meet all the stated Air Force requirements. A compute board that will facilitate real-time calculations and system control will be designed in Phase I and developed in Phase II.

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS, LLC
530 New Los Angeles Avenue, , # 122
Moorpark, CA 93021
(805) 529-3800

PI: Dr. Karl Christe
(805) 529-3800
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0076
UNIV. OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
Loker Research Institute, 837 Bloomwalk
Los Angeles, CA 90089
(213) 740-2692

ID#: F08A-022-0277
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T022       Awarded: 9/1/2008
Title: Novel energetic materials from new polyazide ingredients
Abstract:  &nbs Polynitrogen and high-nitrogen compounds hold great potential for High Energy Density Materials (HEDM). Particular advantages of these compounds are their high energy content, environmentally more benign combustion products, low plume signatures, low smoke, low gun barrel corrosion, and potential for oxidizer and fuel compatible gas generators. During the past decade, much progress was made in the synthesis of novel polyazides, however these compounds were not evaluated systematically for potential applications. The goals of this proposal are the summarization of our unpublished results in polyazide chemistry in manuscript form, the systematic evaluation, including sensitivity and stability data, of the known polyazides, the identification of potential candidates for applications, such as primary explosives, and the synthesis and characterization of missing links in this field. A second area of interest involves high nitrogen heterocycles. Generally, these compounds have high nitrogen content, very favorable heats of formation, good densities and high stability, but suffer from bad oxygen balances. We would carry out systematic studies to improve their oxygen balances either by combination with high-oxygen carrying anions, which are being developed by us under an ongoing AFOSR STTR Program, or by the introduction of oxidizing groups into heterocyclic cations.

SCIENTIFIC FORMING TECHNOLOGIES CORP.
2545 Farmers Drive Suite 200,
Columbus, OH 43235
(614) 451-8320

PI: Dr. Wei-Tsu Wu
(614) 451-8322
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0056
NORTHWESTERN UNIV.
633 Clark Street,
Evanston, IL 60208
(847) 491-2847

ID#: F08A-013-0117
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T013       Awarded: 9/22/2008
Title: Modeling Spin Test Using Location Specific Material Properties
Abstract:  &nbs To meet the demands of increasing thrust and high pressure ratios of jet engines, nickel based superalloy engine components are manufactured with dual microstructure distributions. Fine grain, high strength bore properties are contrasted with coarser grain, creep resistant rim properties. It is critical to evaluate the performance of jet engine disks during spin pit test as well as under service conditions. The proposed work focuses on incorporating modeling infrastructure to analyze the disk behavior during spin pit test using location specific material properties. The effects of residual stresses and local microstructure features from the prior thermo-mechanical processing along with the centrifugal forces due to high cyclical rotational speed encountered during the spin test need to be analyzed for its impact on the burst speed and permanent disk growth. We propose to implement an infrastructure in DEFORM modeling system to handle location specific material properties and microstructure features such as grain size, orientation and precipitate size. Critical variable affecting plastic strain and burst speed of the disk will be studied. At the end of the first phase, we would study and propose models for grain evolution, precipitation and creep behavior. Applicable tensile strength prediction models will be evaluated for future implementation.

SCIENTIFIC MONITORING, INC.
8777 E.Via de Ventura, Suite 120
Scottsdale, AZ 85258
(440) 328-5832

PI: Dr. Walter Merrill
(440) 328-5832
Contract #: FA9550-08-C-0059
STANFORD UNIVERISTY
551 Serra Mall,
stanford, CA 94305
(650) 723-4432

ID#: F08A-026-0049
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T026       Awarded: 9/23/2008
Title: Analysis of Distributed Control of Turbine Engines
Abstract:  &nbs SMI in partnership with Stanford University will perform research to develop and apply new methods to analyse and predict stability and performance of a distrubuted control for a gas turbine engine.

Scientific Simulations LLC
1582 Inca,
Laramie, WY 82072
(307) 766-2868

PI: Dimitri Mavriplis
(307) 766-2868
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0021
University of Wyoming
Research Office, Dept 3355, 1000 E. University Ave.
Laramie, WY 82071
(307) 766-5353

ID#: F08A-023-0287
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T023       Awarded: 7/1/2008
Title: High-order modeling of applied multi-physics phenomena
Abstract:  &nbs A new physics-based simulation capability will be developed based on high-order discretizations in both space and time for application to practical engineering problems involving complex physical phenomena and complicated geometries. The goal is to develop a tool which can accurately handle multiphysics simulations, both in analysis mode, and for design optimization purposes. The approach will rely on high-order (up to 6th order) Discontinuous Galerkin discretizations in space and second-order backwards difference as well as higher-order (up to 5th order) implicit Runge-Kutta temporal discretizations. Efficient solution techniques will be employed in order to make these methods competitive with current simulation tools in terms of required computational resources. The favorable asymptotic properties of these methods, combined with the use of unstructured meshes, will enable accurate simulation of complex phenomena with wide ranges of scales from first principles. BENEFIT: The use of high-order methods will deliver much higher accuracy for complex multi-scale problems while using coarser underlying grids. This in turn will reduce discretization errors to manageable levels, providing superior reliability in numerical analysis and optimization problems, while at the same time relieving the grid generation bottleneck for high resolution calculations, and enhancing scalability on massively parallel multi-core architectures. Commercial applications exist in computational fluid dynamics, particularly for difficult problems involving wakes or vortical flows such as rotorcraft and high incidence maneuvering aircraft, as well as other areas such as aeroacoustics and electromagnetics.

Seacoast Science, Inc
2151 Las Palmas Drive Suite C,
Carlsbad, CA 92011
(760) 268-0083

PI: Todd E. Mlsna
(760) 268-0083
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0026
University of California, San Diego
University of California, SD, 9500 Gilman Drive
San Diego, CA 92093
(858) 534-6175

ID#: F08A-015-0211
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T015       Awarded: 8/15/2008
Title: Orthogonal Chip Based Electronic Sensors for Chemical Agents
Abstract:  &nbs Recent years have seen a shift in threats to US national security. Today increasing focus for national security is management of terrorist activities. Deliberately exposing a civilian population to chemicals and explosives to cause harm represents a looming terrorist threat. Early detection and identification is a difficult but essential element to minimizing the threat. The Seacoast Science/University of California San Diego team believes that a successful portable real time chemical detector must contain a suite of sensor technologies. Thus the ultimate goal with this program is to incorporate multiple miniature sensing technologies into a single portable unit. Individually any one technology may fall short, but used in concert many of their technical limitations are eliminated. We feel that this is the solution to the selectivity and reliability problems that plague most sensor systems. This technique will combine the strengths of the existing independent and uncorrelated detection technologies and minimize their weaknesses. The concept is simple but implementation will be very challenging and we believe this combination works well with the DOD STTR because the research to be carried out requires an interdisciplinary approach in which physicists, materials scientists, chemists and engineers collaborate, from academia and business, toward the same aim. BENEFIT: The development of an orthogonal chemical sensor based detector for chemical warfare agents and explosives would result in a system with improved selectivity, reliability and reduce the problems that plague current sensor systems, such as false alarms. This technology will be designed as dual use and would have great appeal not only with soldiers and marines, but with first responders. Future application could include industrial process control, environmental monitoring, and low cost worker personal protection.

SIENNA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
19501 144th Avenue NE, Suite F-500
Woodinville, WA 98072
(425) 485-7272

PI: Ms. Stephanie Sawhill
(425) 485-7272
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0003
UNIV. OF NEW MEXICO
1700 Lomas NE, Suite 2200, MSC01 1247
Albuquerque, NM 87131
(505) 277-7575

ID#: F08A-030-0206
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T030       Awarded: 7/1/2008
Title: Nonlinear Dielectric Nanocomposites for High Frequency Operation
Abstract:  &nbs This SBIR program will develop a highly non-linear polymer-ceramic nanocomposite capable of operation at >1 GHz. Highly non-linear, nanocrystalline ceramic dielectric particles will by synthesized via sol-gel processing. We will control the chemical composition and particle size to obtain nanosize particles with a high dielectric constant (e>1000), low loss (<0.005) and short relaxation time (<1 ns). We will employ a novel processing method to produce nanocomposites with >70% volume dielectric material that are well dispersed in the polymer matrix. The proposed processing technique can be used to produce mechanically strong complex shapes and large size composites (>1 m length) for pulse forming or nonlinear transmission lines. In Phase I, we will determine the effect of the chemical composition and particle size of the nanodielectric material on the dielectric properties of the polymer- ceramic nanocomposite. The breakdown strength, loss, dielectric constant, and non-linearity of the nancomposite will be measured at 100 MHz to 1 THz. In Phase II, we will determine the exact nanodielectric composition and particle size that results in a polymer-ceramic composite with the highest dielectric constant, lowest loss, and shortest relaxation times.

SIGMA TECHNOLOGIES INTL, INC.
10960 N. Stallard Place,
Tucson, AZ 85737
(520) 575-8013

PI: Dr. Angelo Yializis
(520) 575-8013
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0038
UNIV. OF ARIZONA
The University of Arizona,
Tucson, AZ 85721
(520) 626-6941

ID#: F08A-030-0269
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T030       Awarded: 7/1/2008
Title: Nanodielectrics with Nonlinear Response for High Power Microwave Generation
Abstract:  &nbs This proposal addresses the development of nanostructured dielectric materials with a nonlinear parametric response, designed to be integrated into a high power capacitor system. Recent developments in nanodielectrics utilizing metal-insulator transition and plasmon based phenomena have resulted in non linear capacitor dielectrics with ultra high dielectric constants but relatively low breakdown voltage and energy densities. The proposed nanostructured capacitor dielectric is composed of metal nanoparticles arranged with a high level of orientation in a polymer matrix. The nanoparticles are arranged in close proximity to each other in a two dimensional matrix to take advantage of charge coupling that results from Plasmon interactions. Furthermore, several 2D nanoparticle matrices are arranged in a 3D matrix in a precise manner to elevate the breakdown strength of the composite dielectric. The nanoparticles can have different size and density and their major role is to increase the dielectric constant and enhance the non linear behavior of the dielectric. A vector network analyzer will be used to measure the complex dielectric permittivity and permeability in microwave frequencies from 50MHz to 67GHz and Terahertz time domain spectroscopy in both transmission, and reflection modes, will be used to measure both the complex refractive index and the wave impedance. This will allow extraction of the permittivity and permeability values in the terahertz frequency range. The Phase I program will focus in the design, fabrication and parametric evaluation of composite dielectrics comprising of 2D nanoparticle arrays in a 3D matrix, where the number of arrays will be varied along with nanoparticle size and density. Basic capacitor properties such as DC and AC breakdown strength, dissipation factor, and capacitance will be measured at select frequencies and temperatures

Spang and Company
110 Delta Drive,
Pittsburgh, PA 15238
(412) 963-5736

PI: Joseph F. Huth III
(412) 963-5511
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0024
Carnegie Mellon University
5000 Forbes Avenue,
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 268-2703

ID#: F08A-031-0044
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T031       Awarded: 8/15/2008
Title: Improved Soft Magnetic Materials for High Power Density Electrical Machines
Abstract:  &nbs CMU and Magnetics, A Division of Spang and Co. have developed a new high-saturation induction, high-temperature nanocomposite alloy for high-power inductors. This material has FeCo nanocrystals with an A2 or B2 structure embedded in an amorphous matrix. Field annealing resulted in a linear B-H response with a relative permeability of 1400, constant up to fields of 1.2 T. The material was used in a 25 µH inductor for a 25 kW DC-DC converter rated for operation in discontinuous conduction mode at a peak current of 300A and a switching frequency up to 20 kHz. Compared to commercially available materials this new alloy can operate at higher flux densities and higher temperatures thus reducing the overall size of the inductor. A recent scientific focus has been on Co-rich nanocomposites which sacrifice some induction for improved mechanical properties, stronger response to magnetic field processing, and potentially lower losses and magnetostriction. These are subject of a provisional patent and proposed for further development. BENEFIT: Soft magnetic materials that have good Bsat, long term stability above 200C, and low losses above 50 kHz will find use in demanding applications where forced cooling is impractical or space is at a premium. Materials that exhibit these traits could trade off higher core losses for the ability to operate at higher flux density levels and result in smaller components. Applications could include automotive, downhole drilling, aircraft and power conversion.

SPECTRAL ENERGIES, LLC
2513 Pierce Ave.,
Ames, IA 50010
(937) 266-9570

PI: Dr. Sivaram P. Gogineni
(937) 266-9570
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0018
FLORIDA STATE UNIV.
FAMU/FSU College of Engg., 2525 Pottsdamer Street
Tallahassee, FL 32310
(850) 644-0053

ID#: F08A-007-0104
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T007       Awarded: 9/1/2008
Title: Active-Distributed Boundary Layer Management Using Flow Sensory Actuators
Abstract:  &nbs The goal of achieving efficient flow control becomes even more challenging for MAVs as a result of the significant weight and size limitations. These preclude the use of complex hardware and control schemes which may be usable in conventional aircraft. In this research program, we propose an ambitious but realistic approach for developing and implementing, self-adapting, integrated sensor-actuator systems (sensory flow actuators) for the next generation of MAVs. Our highly interdisciplinary team of researchers with expertise in fluid dynamics, smart materials, actuator design and control has worked in this area for a number of years with a record of success in rapidly transitioning technologies to practical platforms of interest to the Air Force. Using a systematic approach consisting of analytical studies, design and rigorous experimental characterization, we propose to: a) Develop simple and robust sensory flow actuators using smart materials and innovative designs; b) Demonstrate their efficacy in achieving measurable boundary layer transition and separation control in wind tunnel studies and finally c) To deliver design tools for actuator and control schemes, together with a better understanding of the fluid dynamics and engineering know-how needed for implementing practical, efficient control in MAVs.

SPECTRAL ENERGIES, LLC
2513 Pierce Ave.,
Ames, IA 50010
(937) 286-5711

PI: Dr. Robert P. Lucht
(565) 494-5623
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0022
PURDUE UNIV.
School of Mech. Engineering, 585 Purdue Mall
West Lafayette, IN 47907
(765) 494-5623

ID#: F08A-010-0222
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T010       Awarded: 8/15/2008
Title: ULTRAFAST DIAGNOSTICS FOR NOVEL ENERGETIC MATERIALS IN ROCKET ENGINE ENVIRONMENTS
Abstract:  &nbs Abstract

Spectrum Magnetics, LLC
318 Mourning Dove Dr.,
Newark, DE 19711
(302) 379-9808

PI: Stoyan Stoyanov
(302) 345-6666
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0100
University of Delaware
Research Office, 210 Hullihen Hall
Newark, DE 19716
(302) 831-8618

ID#: F08A-031-0236
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T031       Awarded: 8/19/2008
Title: Improved Soft Magnetic Materials for High Power Density Electrical Machines
Abstract:  &nbs This STTR Phase I proposal is aimed to develop high induction soft magnetic nano-composites (SMNC) capable of high power operations at frequency between 20 kHz to 10 MHz. With Spectrum Magnetics’ proprietary technique, leveraged with research excellence in magnetic materials at the University of Delaware, we will develop magnetic nano-entities of large aspect ratio which effectively eliminates undesired demagnetization factor. Subsequent consolidation of laminated magnetic nano-entities leads to SMNC cores, which is a nano-scale version of the conventional laminated soft FeSi (silicon steel) cores. Our process greatly simplifies the manufacture procedures and reduces the cost. BENEFIT: The successful development of proposed soft magnetic nanocomposites (SMNC) will fill the frequency (20 kHz – 10 MHz) and induction level gaps (B>0.4T) that cannot be satisfied with existing commercial soft magnetic materials, either metallic amorphous ribbons or ferrites. The proposed SMNC have huge potentials for applications in motors and generators, high frequency and high power inductors, switching power supply applications such as DC-DC convertors, and electromagnetic aircraft launch system (EMALS). The total market size for switching power supply alone is about US$26.7B in 2007 and is projected to grow to US$31B in 2011.

SYMPLECTIC ENGINEERING CORP.
2901 Benvenue Ave.,
Berkeley, CA 94705
(510) 528-1251

PI: Dr. Shmuel L. Weissman
(510) 528-1251
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0032
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY
6131 Etcheverry Hall, Mailsto, University of California
Berkeley, CA 94720
(510) 642-3358

ID#: F08A-003-0134
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T003       Awarded: 7/1/2008
Title: Solid Propellant Shock to Detonation Modeling and Formulation
Abstract:  &nbs The objective of this project is to develop software capable of predicting shock-to-detonation transition (SDT) of solid propellant formulations. SDT is prompted by localized events, occurring at the meso-scale (material) level, and leading to hot spots (e.g., adiabatic shear bands, hydrodynamic hot spots, and void collapse), which trigger violent chemical reactions. However, for the reaction to be able to propagate, the diameter of the propellant must be above a (propellant dependent) critical value for which chemical energy generation exceeds loss processes. A multi-scale finite element based model is employed to simulate SDT in composite solid propellants. This approach permits the incorporation, in a single analysis, of meso-scale structure effects such as void collapse, with the macro-scale characteristics such as the external diameter and bore shape of the solid propellant. A coupled thermal-mechanical- chemical model represents the propellant. The proposed approach will be implemented in a nonlinear finite element code. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach, numerical simulations of the Naval Ordnance Laboratory Large-Scale-Gap-Test will be carried out. The results of these simulations will be validated against data obtained from real experiments.

SYMPLECTIC ENGINEERING CORP.
2901 Benvenue Ave.,
Berkeley, CA 94705
(510) 528-1251

PI: Dr. Shmuel L. Weissman
(510) 528-1251
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0073
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY
6131 Etcheverry Hall, Mailsto, University of California
Berkeely, CA 94720
(510) 642-3358

ID#: F08A-013-0135
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T013       Awarded: 9/22/2008
Title: Robust Model for Behavior of Complex Materials during Spin Testing
Abstract:  &nbs The objective of this project is to develop a practical finite element based simulation of spin-pit tests of discs, incorporating localized effects including: residual stresses, dislocations, and chemical-composition gradients. Some of these localized effects are introduced during the shape forming process. Disc failure in spin-pit tests critically depends on localized effects. A multi-scale finite element model is proposed that enables the incorporation of macro- and meso-scale effects in a single analysis. An important feature of the proposed approach is that it enables the simulation of localized effects that are arbitrarily oriented relative to the geometry of the finite element mesh. This feature is critical because it enables the simulation of the propagation of oriented localized effects, such as fatigue cracks, independent of the mesh geometry. A numerical simulation of a spin-pit test of a disc of simple geometry will be used to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach. In this simulation, location-specific effects such as material properties, locked-in stresses, and dislocations present in the disc at the beginning of the mesh will be assumed known, and will be introduced through procedures developed in this project.

TAITECH, INC.
1430 Oak Court, Ste. 301
Beavercreek, OH 45430
(937) 431-1007

PI: Dr. Chung-Jen Tam
(937) 255-4146
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0031
WRIGHT STATE UNIV.
209 Russ Eng. Center, MME, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway
Dayton, OH 45435
(937) 775-5040

ID#: F08A-008-0205
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T008       Awarded: 8/1/2008
Title: Ultra-sensitive shear stress/pressure sensor and smart piezoelectric actuator for flapping-wing dragonfly model
Abstract:  &nbs The innovation of the proposal is threefold: 1) the application of AFM technology on MAVs to pursue ultrahigh- sensitive pressure sensor, 2) 3-dimensional high-efficiency flight control model of flapping-wing dragonfly, 3) piezoelectric materials based smart actuator to control the dragonfly flight. In particular, the sensing of environment by snulps and the successive reaction by smpa are inspected and supervised through the state-of-art 3- dimensional aerial dynamic modeling. This provides a close-to-real platform to study the aerodynamics with small Reynolds number, and to exam the flight condition visually to eventually realize the control of the agile flight. The coherent study on coordination of sensing, date-processing, and actuating, we believe, is the core knowledge and technology for future MAVs. In addition, a high-fidelity shear stress sensor will be developed to measure the flow features on the MAV and also to validate the numerical predictions in the Phase II efforts. The unique technology proposed here is compatible with the standard semiconductor industry, which guarantees a straightforward technology transfer from university to industry.

TAO OF SYSTEMS INTEGRATION, INC.
144 Research Drive,
Hampton, VA 23666
(757) 220-5040

PI: Dr. Mangalam
(757) 220-5040
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0094
UNIV. OF FLORIDA
Office of Engineering Research, 339 Weil Hall, Box 116550
Gainesville, FL 32611
(352) 392-9447

ID#: F08A-008-0228
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T008       Awarded: 8/1/2008
Title: A Phenomenological Approach to Adaptive Flight Control of Agile MAVs
Abstract:  &nbs Recent experimental studies have shown that insects, bats, and birds manipulate vortex structures (circulation) with active wing morphing in order to achieve high lift even at low speeds. Tao Systems in partnership with the University of Florida proposes the development of an innovative technique to directly measure relative changes in vortex strength in order to control the instantaneous lift generated by flexible wings. The vortex structures and their spatial translation along the wing surface will be characterized with flush-mounted, micron-thin hot-film sensor arrays that are operated by high-sensitivity, large bandwidth signal conditioning and processing system pioneered by Tao Systems. The low-Reynolds number flow that is unique to the MAVs poses severe challenges to conventional approaches that are based on computing and collecting vast amounts of data to characterize the complex aerodynamic environment. Practically all the current methods used for flight control depend primarily on inputs from structural response to the unsteady aerodynamic environment, which is rarely, if ever, measured directly. The proposed innovation will make it possible to sense, actuate, and control the unsteady aerodynamic- structural interactions for precision operation of MAVs.

Techno-Sciences, Inc.
11750 Beltsville Drive, 3rd Floor
Beltsville, MD 20705
(240) 790-0600

PI: Ashish Purekar
(240) 790-0582
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0045
University of Maryland
3181 Glenn L. Martin Hall Bldg,
College Park, MD 20742
(301) 405-1927

ID#: F08A-016-0219
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T016       Awarded: 8/1/2008
Title: Dynamics-based Nondestructive Structural Health Monitoring Techniques
Abstract:  &nbs Damage detection and health monitoring is a of rising interest for Air Force systems. Health monitoring systems can be implemented as retrofits to existing platforms as included in the design phase of next generation vehicles. Techno-Sciences, Inc. (TSI) and the University of Maryland (UMD) propose to develop a novel damage detection concept to be designed and tested during the STTR effort. The damage detection system uses wave propagation techniques for active interrogation of aircraft structures and sensing systems based on phased array filters. The sensing system will extend existing technology and provide functionality not a vailable in current implementations. The sensor concept will utilize emerging materials systems for transduction. A prototype data acquisition system will be demonstrated in conjunction with the sensor system. Novel signal processing algorithms will be utilized to analyse sensor data for damage detection to be demonstrated in the laboratory. BENEFIT: The proposed health monitoring technology will be applicable to a wide range of end-users in the defense, commercial, and industry sectors. Key benefits and payoffs of the proposed technology are: 1. In-situ and low-profile transducer technology 2. Extensible sensor array design analysis 3. Damage detection algorithms based on innovative signal analysis tools 4. Small form factor data acquisition units designed for damage detection

TIPD, L.L.C.
9030 S. Rita Road, Ste 120,
Tucson, AZ 85747
(520) 250-4405

PI: Dr. Arkady Bablumyan
(520) 465-5081
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0015
UNIV. OF ARIZONA
Sponsored Projects Services, PO BOX 3308
Tucson, AZ 85722
(520) 626-6000

ID#: F08A-001-0149
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T001       Awarded: 8/15/2008
Title: Updateable 3D Display Using Large Area Photorefractive Polymer Devices
Abstract:  &nbs The overall goal of this proposal is to develop a large area updateable 3D color display using unique photorefractive (PR) polymers with fast writing times (ms), long persistence (hours) and rapid erasure (seconds). As published in a recent Nature paper, the University of Arizona team has demonstrated for the first time that photorefractive polymers may be used for 3D displays with an image persistence of a few hours. The proposed work seeks to explore materials and techniques to enable a 300 mm × 300 mm display area, full color, long term persistence and a wide viewing angle. A multi-pronged approach is planned to integrate the presently established materials, materials approaches, and electronics/photonics techniques to achieve this goal. Primary tasks to be performed include the development of large area photorefractive polymer devices, formulation of a photorefractive polymer with high trap densities for reflection operation, reflection hologram development to provide wider viewing angle, and hologram multiplexing for multicolor operation. Reaching these demanding goals will further ensure broad application of PR polymers, and move updatable 3D display devices into applications in defense, aircraft design and manufacturing, surgery, advertising and training, to name a just a few of the most promising avenues.

Traycer Diagnostic Systems, Inc.
1275 Kinnear Road,
Columbus, OH 43212
(614) 937-8480

PI: Phillip Smith
(614) 506-5084
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0017
Notre Dame University
511 Main Building,
Notre Dame, IN 46556
(574) 631-8710

ID#: F08A-006-0022
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T006       Awarded: 9/14/2008
Title: GaN/AlGaN/AlInN Based THz Focal Plane Array Detectors, Ultraviolet (UV) Lasers, and HEMT High Power RF Devices on Low-Dislocation AlN and GaN Substra
Abstract:  &nbs In this Phase I effort our team, a collaboration between Traycer Diagnostic Systems and The University of Notre Dame, proposes to develop a single pixel detector of terahertz frequency electromagnetic radiation. The devices we propose are AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors which, via the excitation of plasma waves in the device channel, exhibit a nonresonant broadband and resonant response to THz radiation which considerably exceeds their operational limit as transistors. The commercial viability of these devices is critically dependent on electrical metrics such as the two dimensional electron gas mobility and channel concentration. Therefore, the growth of high quality epitaxial layers by reducing dislocations, roughness, and defect densities at the AlN/GaN heterointerface is critical to a functional device. Leveraging important results achieved at NDU on sapphire substrates, we propose developing this detector on AlN substrates based on a two part strategy which combines a materials development and characterization effort with the fabrication, broadband nonresonant, and resonant testing of individual devices in the sub-terahertz and terahertz regimes. Towards the goal of a commercially viable focal plane array, we also propose the early stage investigation of novel antenna and device architectures to achieve lower noise equivalent power measurements. BENEFIT: Traycer Diagnostic System’s (TDS) core focus is creating an imaging system for the screening and detection of epithelial or excised breast cancer. This system-level architecture involves an array of novel technologies being developed by TDS for the emission and detection of microwave and terahertz frequency radiation. The relatively low photon energies of this radiation provide significant advantages over conventional x-ray methods for cancer detection. Non-ionizing terahertz imaging can elicit dielectric contrast information and indirectly recognize the chemical composition of material under study, allowing for passive mapping of material composition for use in the high-resolution, non-destructive evaluation of biologic and non-biologic samples. The development of III-N detectors of terahertz radiation therefore directly relates to TDS’ mission in that the devices hold significant promise for THz-sensitive, tunable, focal plane arrays that have not been effectively realized with competing technologies. While the mammography market is the initial focus of TDS, high-sensitivity microwave and terahertz sensor technologies potentially address any of a number of applications of interest to the Department of Defense and other federal agencies, along with important private sector markets. Most prominently, terahertz radiation can be used in security applications such as screening individuals for weapons or contraband,

TRS CERAMICS, INC.
2820 East College Avenue,
State College, PA 16801
(814) 238-7485

PI: Dr. Seongtae Kwon
(814) 238-7485
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0002
PENN STATE UNIV.
278 Materials Research Laborat,
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 865-6992

ID#: F08A-030-0129
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T030       Awarded: 7/1/2008
Title: Nanodielectrics with Nonlinear Response for High Power Microwave Generation
Abstract:  &nbs The proposed barium strontium titanate (BST) nanodielectric devices will combine some of the best features of bulk and thin-film based tunable dielectrics: low microwave losses, high tunability at high fields, the potential for low operating voltages, and less temperature dependent dielectric response. The miniaturization of devices and reduction of insertion losses requires developments of materials with high dielectric constant (>1000) and low dielectric loss (<0.0005). In addition, our materials will permit operation at high-power (>10 MW) with tunable and selectable operational frequency range. To achieve tunability, high dielectric constant low dielectric loss, and high insulation resistance, we propose to develop nanoscale (BaxSr1-x)TiO3 (BST) based bulk nonlinear microwave components. If higher electric breakdown fields can be achieved in bulk materials through nanocrystalline ceramic engineering, then high tunability will become a reality for high power devices.

Vescent Photonics
4865 E. 41st Ave,
Denver, CO 80216
(303) 296-6766

PI: Mike H. Anderson
(303) 296-6766
Contract #: FA9550-08-C-0071
University of Central Florida
PO Box 162700, 4000 Central Florida Blvd
Orlando, FL 32816
(407) 823-4763

ID#: F08A-021-0207
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T021       Awarded: 8/3/2008
Title: A Large Aperture Electro-Optic Beamsteerer
Abstract:  &nbs We propose to develop a fully electro-optic beamsteerer for large aperture beams. The beamsteerer will be able to deflect 3-cm beam into a field of regard of 50 deg x 20 deg. In Phase I we will demonstrate and model key technologies needed for a Phase II deliverable. These include a highly birefringent liquid crystals, waveguide couplers, and high-index, high contrast waveguides that will give a tunable refractive index of 0.25. The anticipated Phase II deliverable will require only 19 electrical connections and weigh under 0.5 kg. BENEFIT: Large angle beam deflectors are needed for laser ranging (LADAR) and will find many commercial application for security sensors, situational awarenss sensors for military, space and transportation, volume metrology in mining operations, grain storage, and more.

WRIGHT MATERIALS RESEARCH CO.
1187 Richfield Center,
Beavercreek, OH 45430
(937) 431-8811

PI: Dr. Seng C. Tan
(937) 431-8811
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0095
THE UNIV. OF AKRON
302 Buchtel Common,
Akron, OH 44325
(330) 972-6459

ID#: F08A-028-0316
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T028       Awarded: 9/2/2008
Title: PAN-based Continuous Nanocomposite Carbon Fibers
Abstract:  &nbs The high strength, superior stiffness, and lightweight characteristics of carbon fibers have created enormous interest as reinforcing element for use in various structures of polymer matrix composites. Approximately 90 percent of all commercial carbon fibers are produced from a PAN precursor. The rest are manufactured from pitch and cellulose (rayon). Commercially used wet spinning of PAN-based fibers use large amount of toxic solvent. In recent years, nanomaterials and technology have shown promising in numerous areas with only a very small amount of content. In this proposed STTR project we will team up with University of Akron to process PAN fibers by an extrusion technique. We propose two approaches to tailor the nanostructure of the PAN fibers. These approaches enable continuous nanostructure carbon fibers and the associated composite to possess multifunctional properties. Preliminary research results indicated that both the proposed approaches are very promising. Nanostructure PAN- based carbon fibers with superior thermal-mechanical and electrical properties can be manufactured in a continuous and economical manner when the proposed technique is fully developed under this STTR program.

Zomega Terahertz Corporation
1223 Peoples Ave,
Troy, NY 12180
(518) 833-0577

PI: Jianming Dai
(518) 833-0577
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0059
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Center for Terahertz Research, 110 8th Street
Troy, NY 12180
(518) 276-3079

ID#: F08A-009-0315
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T009       Awarded: 9/1/2008
Title: Intense and Broadband THz Source Using Laser-Induced Gas Plasma
Abstract:  &nbs A compact, broadband terahertz source using optical parametric processes in laser-induced gas plasma is capable to produce >10 mW average terahertz power with a spectral range from 0.1 THz to over 10 THz. This technique has already demonstrated strong field strength (>100 kV/cm), and generated THz waves at 10m distance with a field strength comparable to local generation, suggesting that remote THz sensing (>30m) is possible without problems from signal attenuation due to atmospheric turbulence or water vapor. Using an optical phase compensator, a gas cell, and an amplified femtosecond laser, we will advance the current average power from tens of μW to mW level with a bandwidth over 10 THz. The resulting compact source will be coupled with our THz-ABCD heterodyne detector for applications in defense & security, pharmaceutical and industrial inspection. BENEFIT: Stand-off detection of explosives and related compounds, Pharmaceutical diagnostics for drug development and process control, Advanced Research and Development of THz Nonlinear Spectroscopy at National Labs and Universities.

ZONA Technology, Inc.
9489 E. Ironwood Square Drive,
Scottsdale, AZ 85258
(480) 945-9988

PI: Dr. Chunpei Cai
(480) 945-9988
Contract #: FA9550-09-C-0093
University of California, Irvine
300 University Tower,
Irivine, CA 92612
(949) 824-9015

ID#: F08A-019-0025
Agency: AF
Topic#: 08-T019       Awarded: 9/1/2008
Title: A Unified Multidimensional Hybrid Gaskinetic BGK method using Cartesian Grid for Nonequilibrium and Chemically Reacting Flows
Abstract:  &nbs A consistent time-accurate Hybrid gaskinetic Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) method (H-BGK), valid in the full Knudsen number (Kn) range, is proposed using Cartesian grid as a 3D tool to handle hypersonic aerothermodynamics from continuum to thermochemical nonequilibrium and ionized/plasma flows. H-BGK method is to provide automated sub-domain solutions by direct BGK method and the gaskinetic BGK method of Xu (BGKX) in the high and low Kn regimes respectively. Direct BGK employs the Shakov model using quadratures, i.e., values of the distribution function at certain discrete velocities being used in the integration, and high-order upwind scheme for its solution. The BGKX solver is a finite volume method, proven applicable for thermochemical nonequilibrium flows with accurate heat rate prediction. The Cartesian method proposed is a Gridless Boundary Condition Cartesian (GBCC) method due to Feng Liu, which is a grid-automated scheme with built-in multigrid to accelerate convergence and has proven applicable to unsteady/steady 3D flows. Phase I will validate H-BGK solutions with that of DSMC in terms of pressures and heat rates for cylinders and blunt cones at various Knudsen numbers. Phase II will fully develop the H-BGK solver in 3D with GBCC in chemically-reacting and ionization flows, boundary layer resolutions and aerothermodynamic prediction capability. BENEFIT: The developed hybrid BGK (H-BGK) solver with a Gridless Boundary Condition Cartesian (GBCC) grid framework can be used for hypersonic applications from continuum to rarefied flow regimes for thermochemical nonequilibrium effects up to ionization/plasma flows. H-BGK solver can generate accurate aerodynamic forces and heat rates, and GBCC will largely relief users heavy burden on meshing. Typical applications are for launch vehicles in space access, entry command module and ballutes in atmospheric entry ; plume flows in chemical engines or rockets. Civilian dual-use applications include micro flows and micro heat transfer, such as those inside Micro- or Nano- Electro-Mechanical Systems, MEMS/NEMS. Examples include the heat flow rate prediction of microchips inside a vacuum packaged enclosure, gas flows through micro- thrusters, gas phase chemical sensors, lab-on-a-chip. Potential customers include the Air Force, DoD, NASA and private sectors using the solver for hypersonic vehicle design/analysis. Civil applications will provide design/analysis methods for MEMs, and biomedical equipments.

---------- ARMY ----------

ADVANCED MATERIALS & PROCESSES
104 Inwood Drive,
San Marcos, TX 78666
(512) 557-7461

PI: Dr. John Massingill
(512) 557-7461
Contract #: W9132T-08-C-0033
TEXAS STATE UNIV.-SAN
OSP JCK 489, 601 University Drive
San Marcos, TX 78666
(512) 245-2314

ID#: A08A-028-0132
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T028       Awarded: 7/16/2008
Title: Development of a Fire-Resistant, Thermal Barrier Coating with Low-Temperature Flexibility
Abstract:  &nbs Advanced Materials and Processes (AMP) can deliver a Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) with low temperature flexibility. This is possible because of a major breakthrough in hollow clay nanotube technology. Halloysite nanotubes (HNT™) have been shown to increase coating flexibility an order of magnitude by reinforcing the binder at the nanolevel. HNT have been filled with liquid flame retardant (FR) phosphates, which impart FR properties to polymers without deteriorating physical properties by plasticization. This novel FR system, with a unique combination of properties, will allow AMP to deliver high performance TBC coatings with low temperature flexibility, traditional corrosion resistance, good appearance, and ease of application. The innovative new TBC will be comprised of: • A commercial polyurethane hybrid binder from Scorpion Protective Coatings optimized for low temperature flexibility • Halloysite hollow clay nanotubes filled with liquid FR additives from NaturalNano. • Polysilazane ceramic precursor polymers from KiON® Specialty Polymers. • Polyurethane plasticizers from Shell Chemical Company. • Insulating hollow ceramic beads from Hy-Tech. (A NASA Spin Off 2003)

AGAVE BIOSYSTEMS, INC.
P.O. Box 80010,
Austin, TX 78708
(512) 656-6200

PI: Dr. Julien Fey
(607) 272-0002
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0088
CORNELL UNIV.
120 Day Hall,
Ithaca, NY 14853
(607) 255-7123

ID#: A08A-006-0268
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T006       Awarded: 7/11/2008
Title: Cell-based High Throughput Screening of Compounds Improving Mitochondrial Energetics
Abstract:  &nbs Improving age-related decrease in cognitive and physical capabilities has tremendous potential for the civilian population and military personnel, including prolonged aptitude of highly-trained military personnel and lowering of healthcare costs. Mitochondria, the organelle responsible for energy production in eukaryotic cells, are directly involved in programmed cell death and associated to the aging process. Agave BioSystems and Professor Tom Fox at Cornell University propose to develop cell-based assays to monitor positive changes at the mitochondrial level. High throughput screening of compound collections will identify increases in mitochondrial mass or membrane potential in yeast cells and polynucleated myotybes. To develop an optimal screening strategy, assays will be developed with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and differentiated myotubes. Assays using yeast, with fast doubling time, should be more sensitive than mammalian cells. Myotubes will serve as a model system very close to post-mitotic tissues and allow detection of compounds that affect targets specific to mammalian cells. In addition to identifying new compounds, characterization of their mechanism of action will identify new targets, most likely in the nuclear genome or mitochondrial proteome, leading to development of focused target-specific screens as a means to identifying more potent and bioavailable compounds.

AGAVE BIOSYSTEMS, INC.
P.O. Box 80010,
Austin, TX 78708
(512) 656-6200

PI: Dr. Janet Huie
(607) 272-0002
Contract #: W81XWH-08-C-0108
CORNELL UNIV.
120 Day Hall,
Ithaca, NY 14853
(607) 255-7123

ID#: A08A-035-0283
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T035       Awarded: 7/16/2008
Title: Ante-Mortem TSE Diagnosis by Electric Cell-Substrate Impedance Sensing
Abstract:  &nbs Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) are responsible for fatal neurodegenerative diseases in humans, cattle, and sheep/goats. As TSEs can take many months and even years to present clinical symptoms, it is critical for food and contact safety to diagnose the disease at the earliest possible time point. A cell culture based system can offer the sensitivity and specificity required for anti-mortem diagnosis. In cells, cellular prion protein selectively binds copper to prevent oxidative damage and resulting cell death. Loss of this protein through addition of infective scrapie TSE induces an enhanced sensitivity to copper. Thus, monitoring cell health as copper is added can provide an indicator of the presence of TSEs. Agave BioSystems proposes to detect the change created by infective scrapie TSE through the use of electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS). Change in electrical impedance is a highly sensitive predictor of the integrity of the cell membranes and of cell viability. Thus, we predict rapid diagnosis of ante-mortem, preclinical samples from this sensitive and specific cell culture impedance detection system. Agave BioSystems, in collaboration with the Cornell University Animal Health Diagnostic Center (AHDC), proposes to develop a scrapie-susceptible cell line for ante-mortem detection of scrapie in real time by ECIS.

AMERICAN GNC CORP.
888 Easy Street,
Simi Valley, CA 93065
(805) 582-0582

PI: Dr. Seong K. Mun
(202) 687-7955
Contract #: W81XWH-08-C-0117
GEORGETOWN UNIV. HOSPITAL
3000 Reservoir Rd, N.W., Building D, Room 162
Washington, DC 20057
(202) 687-0020

ID#: A08A-034-0281
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T034       Awarded: 7/31/2008
Title: Robotic Standoff Neck and Spinal Injury Assessment Device
Abstract:  &nbs Our long-term objective of this project is to develop an integrated system that is capable of categorizing and managing injured combatants in the field of combat trauma care. In this STTR, however, we focus on developing suitable imaging systems that can triage the combatants who are salvageable, assess their immediate potential head and spine injury and determine those with unstable spine injuries requiring special stabilization during battlefield rescue. A robotic-based intelligent system will also be employed to deliver the medical care. In this STTR project, the research team at the ISIS Center Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC), American GNC Corporation (AGNC), and Imperium Inc. would like to propose methods of using a special type of ultrasound system and an infra- red imaging device to judge spine alignment and diagnose potential spine injury. GUMC researchers have been performing various research in the fields of advanced medical imaging and image-guided intervention. AGNC has a wide range of expertise in the automation of robotic intelligence and will be responsible for the modification of the robotic arm and integration of the imaging device systems and intelligent communications for combat casualty care. Imperium has been specializing on CMOS-based ultrasound sensors and ultrasound imaging system development. Imperium plans to develop a multi-angle projection-reflection C-mode system for imaging the spine in this project. In this Phase I program, we will perform a feasibility study by testing two main devices potentially suitable for imaging injured spine in the battle field. We will also perform simulation studies on operation of the image devices, image acquisition, and network communications using the AGNC Coremicro® Robot.

ANDROBIOSYS, INC.
73 High Street,
Buffalo, NY 14203
(716) 860-7920

PI: Dr. Michael Zwick
(716) 860-7920
Contract #: W81XWH-08-C-0099
ROSWELL PARK CANCER
Elm and Carlton Streets,
Buffalo, NY 14263
(716) 845-2312

ID#: A08A-041-0388
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T041       Awarded: 7/10/2008
Title: Circulating Prostate Cancer Progenitor Cell Assay Development
Abstract:  &nbs This Phase I contract proposal will evaluate and identify markers associated with prostate cancer progenitor stem cells, that differentiate these cells from adult tissue stem cells and benign prostate progenitor cells. The eventual goal of this work would be to develop a high throughput blood-based assay highly specific for circulating prostate cancer progenitor cells. A cell shed from a tumor must be capable of surviving separate from the microenvironment of the primary tumor, and possess the capacities of proliferation and plasticity, to regenerate a metastasis. These traits essentially describe a cancer stem cell (CSC). Therefore, we propose to develop a technology to identify circulating CSCs, or more accurately the progenitor cells that are their immediate progeny, an approach that should provide a more informative prognostic tool for prediction of aggressiveness and metastatic potential.

APTIMA, INC.
12 Gill Street, Suite 1400
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 496-2415

PI: Dr. Kara Orvis
(781) 496-2417
Contract #: W91WAW-08-P-0430
GEORGE MASSON UNIV.
4400 University Drive, MSN 4C6
Fairfax, VA 22030
(703) 993-4573

ID#: A08A-002-0309
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T002       Awarded: 9/2/2008
Title: Emotion Management Orientation and Training Exercises (EMOTE)
Abstract:  &nbs Army leaders face a wide variety of emotionally charged situations. Success in dealing with these situations requires that Army leaders manage their emotions and those of others. Army leaders, however, receive relatively little training in this area. Neither the Army Leadership Field Manual (FM 6-22) nor the Psychology Research literature provides a great deal of guidance regarding the trainable attributes (e.g., knowledge and skills) that are needed to manage emotions in oneself and others. One purpose of the proposed Phase I work is to compile and synthesize research from various domains in order to build a theoretical model depicting the nature of emotional management and the attributes that predict it. A second purpose will be to outline a strategy for testing the model empirically. This strategy will include scenario based assessment of key variables. The model will then inform a web-based training program, the Emotion Management Orientation and Training Exercises (EMOTE) program, that will help Army leaders to develop emotion-relevant knowledges and skills. We will also outline in Phase I a strategy for evaluating the EMOTE system.

APTIMA, INC.
12 Gill Street, Suite 1400
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 496-2415

PI: Dr. Michael Keeney
(202) 552-6118
Contract #: W91WAW-08-P-0429
UNIV. OF NEBRASKA AT OMAHA
6001 Dodge Street,
Omaha, , NE 68182
(402) 554-2286

ID#: A08A-003-0218
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T003       Awarded: 9/2/2008
Title: Military Advisors Training System (MATS)
Abstract:  &nbs The United States provides experienced personnel to advise foreign military and security forces. Success in this critical role requires advisors to be more than just competent warriors. Unfortunately, there is a continuing gap between the degree of training, cultural, and interpersonal expertise that advisors need and the training available to prepare them for success. Aptima, Inc. has partnered with the University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO) and its Center for Afghanistan Studies (CAS) to propose the development of a training system to improve the ability of military advisors to interact with their host-county counterparts in ways that will be effective in furthering host nation and American interests. The Army needs a theoretical model of how advisors should teach and coach counterparts that considers differences in the individual advisor and the individual counterpart, situational and cultural factors, counterpart learning strategies, and counterpart motivation levels. The model must identify best practices for instruction, relate these best practices to learning theory, account for the success or failure of coaching strategies, describe learning style differences in a specific Middle Eastern culture, and offer recommendations for overcoming language and communication difficulties and interpreter problems. The training must seamlessly integrate into existing Army training systems.

ASPEN PRODUCTS GROUP, INC.
186 CEDAR HILL STREET,
MARLBOROUGH, MA 01752
(508) 481-5058

PI: Mr. Neng Ye
(508) 481-5058
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0089
UNIV. OF MASSACHUSETTS
100 Morrissey Blvd.,
Boston, MA 02125
(617) 287-5377

ID#: A08A-009-0377
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T009       Awarded: 7/11/2008
Title: Low-Temperature, Hydride-Based, High Purity Hydrogen Generator
Abstract:  &nbs A supported metal hydride with high gravimetric hydrogen density and high volumetric hydrogen density has been proposed for application as a hydrogen generating material for Army soldier-portable fuel cell generator requirements. The hydride is thermodynamically capable of releasing pure hydrogen at less than 80C. Quantitative demonstration of increased hydrogen production rate, reduced operating temperature, and increased reactant conversion relative to the unsupported hydride will be achieved. The low decomposition temperature and high hydrogen gravimetric density will facilitate the devleopment of a compact, simple and reliable fuel cell generator.

BAMBOO LLC
1507 Plateau Lane,
Rapid City, SD 57703
(605) 484-0680

PI: Mr. Bernt Askildsen
(605) 484-0055
Contract #: W81XWH-08-C-0111
SD SCHOOL OF MINES &
501 East Saint Joseph Street,
Rapid City, SD 57703
(605) 394-1668

ID#: A08A-037-0046
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T037       Awarded: 7/31/2008
Title: A Real-Time, Portable Non-Invasive Monitoring System of Muscle Oxygen and pH in Trauma Patients
Abstract:  &nbs War fighters face increased risk in the post 9-11 era of expanding terrorist activity and urban military conflicts. The problem is compounded by complex modern urban areas and modern rules of engagement often preclude the use of wide area offensive tactics. Consequently dismounted forces are called to enter challenging hostile terrain in search of select enemy targets. Many of these respondents are injured or killed each year due to improvised explosive devices detonated from remote locations. War fighters injured by these explosions often have significant loss of blood that leads to shock, which results in inadequate organ perfusion and tissue oxygenation. Hemorrhage is therefore a major cause of soldier death in the modern day battlefield. Resuscitation from shock aims to correct the mismatch between available oxygen and the demands of critical organs. Accurate knowledge of partial oxygen pressure, the oxygen saturation, and the pH of the peripheral muscle tissue support a successful resuscitation procedure. Therefore, this project will develop technology for a miniature device able to measure these parameters. The proposed system will utilize ultra bright directive light emitters with narrow photon energy spread in the 660nm to 1050nm spectrum. Each sensing objective will be optimized on a 3-layer phantom using an artificial neural network classifier scheme already proven to extract very reliable signals from highly cluttered ultra wide band raw data. The artificial neural network training strategy will take into account issues such as inhomogeneous medium, variation of light intensities, lack of monochromatic light sources, and the relation between light absorption, scatter and reflections. Under ideal conditions, the accuracy is expected exceed 95%.

BIODETECTION INSTRUMENTS, LLC
535 W. Research Ctr. Blvd., Suite 135, M/S 300
Fayetteville, AR 72701
(479) 571-2592

PI: Dr. Lisa Bielke
(479) 527-9763
Contract #: W81XWH-08-C-0112
CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIV.
Research Office,
Cleveland, OH 44106
(216) 368-5525

ID#: A08A-032-0131
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T032       Awarded: 7/31/2008
Title: Bacteriophage-based Aerosol Decontaminant for Use in Patient Care Areas
Abstract:  &nbs Nosocomial transmission of multi-drug-resistant microorganisms in combat support hospitals is a well-recognized and growing problem. BioDetection Instruments proposes a rapid, simple and safe method for reducing contamination in hospital wards with a novel bacteriophage-based aerosol application. Bacteriophages are natural to the environment and pose no risk to humans. The bacteriophage product will have the potential to thoroughly coat and penetrate niches of bacterial reservoirs typically overlooked by standard housekeeping procedures. This Phase I project is focused on isolation and preliminary testing of bacteriophages that can reduce levels of Acinetobacter baumannii calcoaceticus and Klebsiella pneumoniae on stainless steel and Teflon surfaces. Additionally, bacteriophages will be selected to withstand drying to facilitate a lasting effect within the environment.

BIOSTAR WEST
17535 Holiday Dr.,
Morgan Hill, CA 95037
(408) 778-1914

PI: Dr. Stacy Townsend
(909) 447-6858
Contract #: W81XWH-08-C-0100
HARVEY MUDD COLLEGE
Department of Chemistry, 301 Platt Boulevard
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 621-8643

ID#: A08A-032-0342
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T032       Awarded: 7/17/2008
Title: Aerosol Decontaminant for Use in Patient Care Areas
Abstract:  &nbs This Phase I STTR project will develop an innovative aerosol-based decontamination product effective against common nosocomial organisms. Nosocomial transmission of multi-drug-resistant microorganisms is an increasing concern at military and civilian healthcare facilities. The proposed project focuses on the development of an easily dispersed, nontoxic product capable of providing the rapid decontamination of a variety of microorganisms. The key component(s) of this proposed product are not only biocompatible, their method of action is such that they will not contribute to the development of microbial resistance to antibiotic medications nor cause harm to hospital equipment. A product such as the one proposed, providing accurate and prompt decontamination, would greatly mitigate the spread of nosocomial infection. An additional benefit of this material is that it provides a prophylactic against future contamination as well as a persistence of potentially over a month. This Phase I effort shall culminate in a fully operational proof of concept unit capable of demonstrating the feasibility and utility of the proposed technique, including bactericidal and bacteriostasis ability for decontamination and prophylactic use in compliance with EPA regulations.

BODYMEDIA ADVANCED DEVELOPMENT, INC.
4 Smithfield Street, 11th Floor
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
(412) 543-1338

PI: Dr. Kavyan Najarian
(804) 828-9731
Contract #: W81XWH-08-C-0115
VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIV.
1201 E. Marshall St, , PO Box 980401
Richmond, VA 23298
(804) 828-9731

ID#: A08A-033-0235
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T033       Awarded: 7/29/2008
Title: Bioinformatic Based Wearable Critical Care Monitor
Abstract:  &nbs The objective of this Phase I application is the focused development of an advanced bioinformatic based wearable critical care monitor to enhance warfighter medical care. This will be accomplished by building upon an existing advanced sensor, hardware and software platform developed by BodyMedia Advanced Development combined with additional computational and clinical expertise provided by Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU). The effort will utilize advanced computational techniques allowing for data fusion of easily obtained low level signals to derive meaningful physiologic outputs. In this application we will harness our current capability to record galvanic skin response, temperature, heat flux, and heart rate to produce usable values of blood pressure, pulse pressure, oxygen consumption, oxygen debt, and heart rate related changes in volume loss. Physiologic data for the initial level of computational development will be obtained through an existing relationship between VCU and the US Army Institute of Surgical Research using models of lower body negative pressure. The device will provide contextual information such as level of activity to the analysis of physiologic signals thus making their interpretation more useful. Such a device should enable remote triage as well assisting in the point of care diagnosis and treatment of the wounded warfighter.

BRUSH MOUNTAIN TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
502 Cedar Orchard Dr. W,
Blacksburg, VA 24060
(540) 998-6883

PI: Mr. Philip Gillett
(703) 625-7217
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0095
VIRGINIA TECH
141 Durham Hall,
blacksburg, VA 24061
(540) 231-5846

ID#: A08A-019-0141
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T019       Awarded: 7/16/2008
Title: Development of a Soldier Battlespace Auditory Analyzer System
Abstract:  &nbs The objective of this project is to develop a man wearable auditory analyzer system that can improve the situational awareness, listening capability and communication of a soldier operating in an urban environment. This will be developed through three main technologies: 1. A data collection system consisting of a microphone array embedded on a soldier. Array characterization and diffraction compensation techniques will be employed. 2. Using continuous information networks and other efficient signal processing techniques, detection, error compensation, classification and estimation will be conducted on a low weight, power efficient platform 3. Using usability engineering methods the information extracted will be presented to the user in a format that creates clarity, reduces confusion and enhances situational awareness A working prototype system based on a laptop computing platform will be demonstrated at the end of phase I. It will consist of a wearable microphone array with external sensor conditioning and data acquisition. In real time the system will detect, classify and display a variety of sound sources and their relative bearings. The system will automatically detect user voice signals, user footsteps and microphone impacts and classify them as “near-field” events. A commercial laptop, simulating the soldier’s view, will act as a display.

C3 PROPULSION
3100 Fresh Way SW,
Huntsville, AL 35805
(256) 713-1220

PI: Mr. Alton J. Reich
(256) 713-1220
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0080
UNIV. OF ALABAMA
152 Rose Administration Bldg, Box 870104
Tuscaloosa, AL 35487
(205) 348-7249

ID#: A08A-022-0459
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T022       Awarded: 7/25/2008
Title: Ionic Liquid Monopropellant Based Gas Generator
Abstract:  &nbs Energetic ionic liquids (EIL) represent a new, and potentially revolutionary development in propulsion chemistry. These salts, with unique attributes of surface tension, vapor pressure, thermal stability, and reactivity are leading candidates for low-toxicity, reduced hazard replacements of conventional (hydrazine based) monopropellants. C3 Propulsion, in collaboration with the Center for Green Manufacturing of the University of Alabama propose to design, develop, and demonstrate the feasibility of an on-demand gas generator based on ionic liquid monopropellant that supplies pressures up to 3500psi and is suitable for use with pressurizing liquid and gelled fuel and oxidizer tanks. In Phase I, we will identify and evaluate ionic liquid monopropellants and ignition systems, conduct hazard and toxicity evaluations, and demonstrate experimentally the rapid, controlled ignition of a prototype GG system. In Phase II, the effort will be to design, construct, and evaluate an on-demand ionic liquid monopropellant based gas- generator to pressurize fuel and/or oxidizer tanks at various pressures, and deliver a complete system to the Army for evaluation testing. C3 Propulsion involves its technology transition partners in the early phase of the project to maximize Phase III potential. Moreover, to drive our technology transition, we work with SBIR technology brokerage services to help align small business innovation with industry technology gaps.

CBANA LABORATORIES
60 Hazelwood Dr,
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 239-1950

PI: Dr. Byunghoon Bae
(217) 244-4872
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0077
TRUSTEES UNIV. OF ILLINOIS
1901 S First St Suite A,
Champaign Il, IL 61820
(217) 333-2187

ID#: A08A-014-0319
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T014       Awarded: 7/22/2008
Title: Micro-burner Based Flame Ionization Detectors for Micro-scale Gas Chromatographs
Abstract:  &nbs Micro-Gas Chromatographs (micro-GC) have the potential of providing a fieldable device that could 1) identify chemical threats in a battlefield, 2) provide assessment of warfighter health status, chemical exposure, stress level, and hydration, but we need better detectors if this potential is to become a reality. The objective of the proposed work to develop a micro-flame ionization detector (micro-FID) with critical dimensions below 1 millimeter that has enough sensitivity to be used in conjunction with a micro-GC for chemical threat identification and warfighter health assessment. In the proposed work we will select the most promising approaches for integration with a MEMS- based GC system, build a prototype device, and demonstrate the detection of eight battlefield-relevant fuel surrogates, simulants, and interferents with the micro-FID.

CELLTECH POWER, LLC
131 Flanders Road,
Westborough, MA 01581
(508) 898-2223

PI: Dr. Thomas Tao
(508) 898-2223
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0075
UNIV. OF SOUTH CAROLINA
301 Main Street, Department of Chemical Eng.
Columbia, SC 29208
(803) 777-3270

ID#: A08A-007-0313
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T007       Awarded: 7/11/2008
Title: Liquid Metal Anodes for a JP-8 Fuel Cell
Abstract:  &nbs This work will explore the relevant parameter space and continue development of a sulfur-tolerant, direct JP-8 fuel cell using the liquid tin anode SOFC. This work will review potential liquid metal anodes for direct JP-8 applications followed by a characterization of the physical processes involved in power production. A mathematical model will be developed to predict the behavior of the cell, individual components and key processes. Finally, a conceptual study of a 500 Watt power source based on the liquid tin anode will be developed.

CREARE, INC.
P.O. Box 71,
Hanover, NH 03755
(603) 643-3800

PI: Dr. Darin A. Knaus
(603) 643-3800
Contract #: W909MY-08-C-0047
UNIV. OF MINNESOTA
151 Amundson Hall, 421 Washington Ave. S.E.
Minneapolis, MN 55455
(612) 625-9391

ID#: A08A-023-0229
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T023       Awarded: 9/9/2008
Title: Reactive Flash Volatilization JP-8 Reformer
Abstract:  &nbs Compact, efficient, and sustainable electric power generators are needed to provide electric power for deployed military operations. In order to meet logistical requirements, the military is seeking to convert combustion-powered systems to a common fuel: JP-8. Generators that operate on JP-8 fuel are currently available for powers above 2,000 W-electric, and batteries generally meet power needs below 250 W. For the “transitional” power range of 250 to 2,000 W, most available generators are based on reciprocating engines that operate on gasoline. This project seeks to develop logistics fuel reforming technologies capable of converting JP-8 into synthetic gasoline, enabling JP-8 operation of a commercial generator in the transitional power range. Our technical approach involves reactive flash volatilization (RFV) catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) fuel reforming. This approach inhibits the formation of solid carbon, which can clog catalyst pores, and is well suited for “on-board” reforming. In Phase I, we will demonstrate the feasibility of our RFV JP-8 reforming approach experimentally, and we will develop a design for a fieldable system for in-situ reforming. In Phase II, we will develop, build, and test a fieldable version of the in-situ RFV reformer, and deliver it to the Army for independent evaluation in the field.

DBC TECHNOLOGY CORP.
4221 Mesa St.,
Torrance, CA 90505
(310) 378-4156

PI: Dr. David Cohn
(310) 378-4156
Contract #: W911SR-08-P-0058
SRI INTERNATIONAL
333 Ravenswood Ave,
Menlo Park, CA 94025
(650) 859-5508

ID#: A08A-024-0102
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T024       Awarded: 7/31/2008
Title: Advanced Point Sensor
Abstract:  &nbs The enhanced capability point bio and chem sensor is based respectively on the recently discovered phenomenology of biological aerosol differential backscatter in the long wave infrared proven in field trials with a standoff sensor and on differential absorption. The novel point sensor will use compact, wavelength agile transmitters, including quantum cascade lasers and/or miniature CO2 lasers operating in the 8-12 ƒÝm band that will be integrated into a combined differential absorption and backscatter cell with diagnostics typical of ringdown spectroscopy. The new point sensor will improve on present technology with the ability to detect and identify biological agent classes with good specificity and distinguish them from naturally occurring aerosols and interferants such as diesel exhaust, and it will be able to identify chemical agents using the same components and in the same package.

DIAGNOSTIC VISION CORP.
33 Sheridan Road,
Wellesley, MA 02481
(781) 237-7429

PI: Dr. David Zahniser
(781) 237-7429
Contract #: W81XWH-08-C-0106
NORTHEASTERN UNIV.
316 Hurting Hall, 360 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 373-2922

ID#: A08A-036-0118
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T036       Awarded: 7/23/2008
Title: Automated Microscopic Malaria Diagnosis
Abstract:  &nbs In this project we will develop a computerized microscope based imaging system for field testing that will allow location and quantization of malarial parasites (trophozoites). The system will automatically scan a blood smear, locating the portions of the smear that are adequate for analysis and then counting the total number of red cells and the number of red cells containing parasites. The system will be capable of displaying digital images of all candidate parasites for confirmation by an operator if needed, and will allow relocation to objects located on the slides. The computer system will allow the operator to observe classes of located candidates (for example, high probability of being a parasite vs low probability) and confirm or reject objects. Total counts will be automatically updated during the editing process. High speed and high accuracy through sophisticated multi-spectral analysis are primary objectives of this project.

ECROSSCULTURE
777 29th Street, Suite 102,
Boulder, CO 80303
(303) 544-1978

PI: Dr. Andi O'Conor
(303) 544-1978
Contract #: W91WAW-08-P-0428
KENT STATE UNIV.
International Affairs, Van Campen Hall
Kent, OH 80309
(330) 672-0728

ID#: A08A-003-0290
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T003       Awarded: 9/2/2008
Title: Training Tools to Improve the Teaching and Coaching Skills of Military Advisors
Abstract:  &nbs We propose to develop and evaluate an innovative training system for improving military advisors’ ability to teach and coach their host nation counterparts from a different country. Our effort will involve a comprehensive literature review, inclusion of an expert in cross-cultural training, interviews with SMEs, experts in the field, advisors, and host-national who have received US military advisor training. We'll produce a grounded theoretical model with identification of cultural, situational, and individual factors. We'll describe learning style differences in a specific Middle Eastern culture and make recommendations for overcoming language and communication difficulties.

ENABLING ENERGY SYSTEMS
575 Comstock Ave,
Elmhurst, IL 60126
(773) 218-3598

PI: Dr. Farzad Mashayek
(630) 217-7610
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0107
UNIV. OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO
Dept Mech Indust Engng, 842 W Taylor St
Chicago, IL 60607
(312) 413-9662

ID#: A08A-012-0027
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T012       Awarded: 7/22/2008
Title: Electrostatic atomizing fuel injector for small scale engines
Abstract:  &nbs The goal of this proposal is to develop a fuel injection system for direct-injection, spark-ignition, small engines that provides tunable atomization and good fuel-air mixture with low power consumption, low weight penalty, and small space footprint. The proposed method injects electric charge into an electrically insulating liquid, such as JP-8, within a specific atomizer design. The primary atomization of the jet emerging from the atomizer is enhanced by the presence of the electric charge as is the downstream dispersion of the spray. The essence of the ‘charge injection’ concept is that the high-voltage electrode supplying the electric current is encased within an earthed atomizer and completely immersed within the liquid fuel being sprayed. This ensures that the high voltage electrode is completely decoupled from the ionized combustion environment and cannot ‘short’ through it. The proposed research will use in-house, specialized CFD codes to identify the drop size and charge requirements for particular time and length scales involved in small engines burning JP-8. Our preliminary estimates indicate that, while we know our existing single-orifice atomizer will successfully spray JP-8, a novel multi-orifice design will be more suited to meet the above requirements. The proposed effort will benefit from collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago with extensive expertise in both internal combustion engines and development of electrostatic atomizers for combustion applications.

ENOGETEK, INC.
2716 Sunrise Street,
Yorktown Height, NY 10598
(914) 290-4747

PI: Dr. Lin-Feng Li
(914) 290-4747
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0104
UNIV. OF CINCINNATI
University of Cincinnati, P. O. Box 210222
Cincinnati, OH 45221
(513) 556-5054

ID#: A08A-011-0133
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T011       Awarded: 7/18/2008
Title: A NOVEL OXYGEN SEPARATION AND STORAGE APPARATUS FOR UNDERWATER AND HIGH ALTITUDE FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS
Abstract:  &nbs U.S. Military operations have come to depend more and more on unmanned vehicles (unmanned undersea vehicles UUVs and unmanned air vehicles UAVs) to carry out numerous missions. However, the transit distance for many of these missions is often well limited by the energy storage capacity of their power systems. Fuel cell, particularly SOFC that can be fed directly with reformate, looks promising. Conventional oxygen supply takes up a lot of volume (up to 40%). To solve this problem, one has to figure out a way to utilize the on-site oxygen resource. To separate oxygen from water, gill-swim bladder system constitutes an ideal model. Following this principle, in this SBIR program, a novel high selectivity, high efficient oxygen separation technology is proposed. Preliminary analysis suggests that Enogetek¡¯s oxygen extraction and storage technology has the following advantages, 1) low cost; 2) low power consumption; 3) high oxygen flux and 4) robust and compact. Therefore, once developed, it could exceed the requirement of this solicitation.

EON CORP.
707 4th Street, Suite 305
Davis, CA 95616
(530) 756-6903

PI: Dr. Gino Cortopassi
(530) 754-9665
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0092
UC DAVIS
VM:Molecular Biosciences, 1120 Haring Hall
Davis, CA 95616
(530) 754-9665

ID#: A08A-006-0022
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T006       Awarded: 7/11/2008
Title: Identifying compounds that increase mitochondrial performance
Abstract:  &nbs The objective of this proposal is to isolate drugs that will enhance human physical and cognitive performance and resilience to trauma through enhancement of mitochondrial function. The significance of this opportunity is to reduce biological constraints on the modern army. Smaller, faster-moving fighting forces are constrained by physical endurance, which in turn is directly related to number and efficiency of muscle mitochondria. Additionally, mitochondrial function declines with age, contributing to the age-related loss of physical and cognitive performance. Experienced soldiers are forced to retire because of these losses of performance. Finally, field trauma leads to tissue death when metabolic reserves are insufficient. We have modified a high-throughput cell-based assay to sensitively monitor mitochondrial function, and will use this assay to screen for compounds increasing mitochondrial performance, through increased proliferation or increased electron transfer. We demonstrate that the assay detects a known mitoproliferation drug, and will optimize the assay for screening in 96 and 384-well plates in Phase I. In Phase II multiple drug and natural compound libraries will be screened, and mito-active drugs identified. The discovery of mitochondrial enhancers would represent an important step toward improving human performance and trauma resistance through augmentation of mitochondrial function througout aging.

EPIR TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
590 Territorial Drive, Suite B,
Bolingbrook, IL 60440
(630) 771-0201

PI: Mr. Hari Vemuri
(630) 771-0203
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0110
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF
3301 South Dearborn St.,
Chicago, IL 60616
(312) 567-8813

ID#: A08A-017-0430
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T017       Awarded: 7/25/2008
Title: Ultra-Low-Noise Infrared Detector Amplifier for Next Generation Standoff Detector
Abstract:  &nbs An ultra-low noise integrated circuit for mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) infrared detectors is proposed. Noise reduction techniques such as active noise cancellation are commercially successful and have been implemented using silicon-based integrated circuits to reduce background and externally-induced noise. While silicon dominates infrared sensor readout electronics, silicon-based circuits have a limited bandwidth due to low electron mobility. Compound semiconductor-based amplifiers circuits, employing transistors like the pseudomorhic high electron mobility transistors (pHEMTs), have lower noise figures than conventional silicon-based circuits. They are also faster due to the higher electron mobility and have greater efficiency.. However, circuits employing active noise cancellation have not been implemented using compound semiconductor transistors. This project involves the design, fabrication, packaging and testing of a GaAs-based low noise read-out integrated circuit for HgCdTe infrared detectors employing active noise control. The circuit will have a noise figure less than 1 dB and a bandwidth of at least 10 GHz.

EPIR TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
590 Territorial Drive, Suite B,
Bolingbrook, IL 60440
(630) 771-0201

PI: Dr. Silviu Velicu
(630) 771-0203
Contract #: W911SR-08-C-0077
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ
1156 High St. MS:SOE2,
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-1073

ID#: A08A-027-0010
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T027       Awarded: 9/5/2008
Title: Super Hardened, EMI and Vibration Immune Chemical Biological Sensor
Abstract:  &nbs To satisfy Joint Services needs for the detection and identification of chemical and biological agents, infrared detectors must discriminate within a narrow spectral band tunable over large portions of the infrared spectrum. Currently, large, complex, power hungry and computationally intensive FTIR systems are used for this purpose. We propose here the integration of HgCdTe infrared emitter and detector technology with MEMS technology, which matches HgCdTe’s sensitivity and spectral resolution characteristics with an inexpensive microscale MEMS device immune to vibration and hardened to survive shocks. Initially, an optically pumped HgCdTe microcavity emitter will be coupled with an HgCdTe detector to detect agents with infrared spectral characteristics. In the second step, MEMS technology will be used to tune the emission of the HgCdTe microcavity. In the last step, both the emitter and the detector will be integrated in a monolithic architecture, significantly reducing the complexity and cost of the sensor package. In Phase I, we will design the microcavity and detector components of the sensor. We will also fabricate MWIR fixed cavity emitters and MWIR high operating temperature detectors. The sensors will be used to detect chemical agents and their sensitivity and spectral capabilities will be experimentally measured.

GMATEK, INC.
3 Church Circle, Suite 266
Annapolis, MD 21401
(443) 306-3387

PI: Mr. R. Glenn Wright
(443) 306-3387
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0112
JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV.
Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, 3400 N. Charles St.
Baltimore, MD 21218
(410) 516-0214

ID#: A08A-013-0383
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T013       Awarded: 7/25/2008
Title: Three Pole Auston Switch Terahertz Ellipsometer
Abstract:  &nbs A new spectroscopic instrument – a time-domain terahertz ellipsometer (TDTE) – and the associated techniques for characterization of advanced materials in the terahertz (THz) spectral range will be developed. A novel three pole Auston-type switch will serve as the detector which is capable of simultaneously measuring two electric field polarizations. Standard THz time domain spectroscopy requires transmission of the beam through the test sample and will not work for opaque materials. Ellipsometry measurements with the TDTE will overcome this limitation by directly detecting the polarization change of the incident beam after reflection due to the material properties of the target surface. During Phase I, the design, fabrication, and testing of the three pole Auston switch will be implemented. The TDTE system will be designed around the three pole switch. Benchmark measurements will be performed on opaque target materials that had been previously impossible to characterize with standard transmission THz spectroscopy. In Phase II, a compact fiber coupled TDTE will be designed and constructed, suitable for laboratory and commercial environments. Advanced analysis and automation controls will enable the TDTE to perform previously impossible measurements rapidly and with high precision.

HIGH PRECISION DEVICES, INC.
1668 Valtec Lane Suite C,
Boulder , CO 80301
(303) 447-2558

PI: Mr. Charlie Danaher
(303) 447-2558
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0091
UNIV. AL, SANTA BARBARA
Broida Hall,
Santa Barbara, CA 93106
(805) 893-3910

ID#: A08A-020-0393
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T020       Awarded: 7/11/2008
Title: Dilution refrigerator technology for scalable quantum computing
Abstract:  &nbs Develop a Pulse Tube Cooler (PTC) driven Dilution Refrigerator (DR) to provide for cryogen free, rapid turn-around for operating large number of qubits. This effort will incorporate low vibration features, high-density and high-speed wiring technology. The proposed system will require no liquid helium, thereby avoiding the cost and availability issues.

HSTAR TECHNOLOGIES
82 Guggins Lane,
Boxborough, MA 01719
(617) 869-9691

PI: Dr. John Hu
(978) 239-3203
Contract #: W81XWH-08-C-0116
MGH (HARVARD MEDICAL
Dept of Orthopedic Surgery, Yawkey Ctr, 55 Fruit Street
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 724-1476

ID#: A08A-034-0404
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T034       Awarded: 7/31/2008
Title: Robotic Noninvasive Neck and Spinal Injury Assessment Device
Abstract:  &nbs We propose a robotic non-invasive 3D ultrasound injury assessment system that a) allows local autonomous neck/spine injury assessment using pattern recognition, b) provides capability of telepresence injury assessment operation, c) creates 3D ultrasound imaging and visualization, d) integrates the injury assessment system onto an Hstar combat casualty extraction robotic system called cRoNA (Combat Robotic Nurse Assistant). We will leverage our existing advanced model of RoNA (Robotic Nurse Assistant) system into a Combat Robotic Nurse Assistant (cRoNA) system for battle field casualty extraction and injury assessment. Our proposal has several components. Our primary innovation is a humanoid mobile dexterous robotic manipulation system called cRoNA that can run in local autonomous and telepresence operation mode for combat casualty extraction and injury assessment. This proposal also includes integration of an innovative robotic system enabled autonomous ultrasound image acquisition technology for 3D ultrasound imaging and visualization. Advanced pattern recognition algorithms will be developed for enhancement in local autonomy of injury assessment.

HUMMINGBIRD SCIENTIFIC
8300 28th CT NE, Unit 200
Lacey, WA 98516
(360) 252-2737

PI: Mr. Norman J. Salmon
(360) 252-2737
Contract #: W9132T-08-C-0032
OAK RIDGE NATIONAL
PO Box 2008,
Oak Ridge, TN 37831
(865) 241-7315

ID#: A08A-029-0282
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T029       Awarded: 7/18/2008
Title: A Continuous Flow Liquid Cell Holder for the Transmission Electron Microscope
Abstract:  &nbs Electron microscopy of specimen in liquid has recently been demonstrated by Niels de Jong at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A sample was enclosed in a liquid compartment with electron transparent windows and imaged using a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). Expanding on this expertise it is proposed to develop the technology of a liquid holder for both TEM and STEM that provides a resolution in the nanometer-range on a wide variety of materials and that is cost effective, quick and easy to use. In addition we will include the capability to continuously flow liquid through the specimen region, to be able to precisely control the liquid environment (chemical composition, temperature, flow). In Phase I we will design and construct this holder at Hummingbird Scientific. Sample loading and the electron microscopy imaging with operation of the holder will be tested on a range of materials and liquids at ORNL. Radiation damage (charging, creation of radicals and heating) on the specimen will be investigated and remedies will be tested, e.g., flushing of the liquid. The deliverable will be a commercial tested liquid holder.

IMMUNOTOPE, INC.
The Pennsylvania Biotechnology , 3805 Old Easton Road
Doylestown, PA 18902
(215) 357-1814

PI: Dr. Anand Mehta
(215) 489-4905
Contract #: W81XWH-08-C-0097
DREXEL UNIV.
Office of Research Compliance , 3201 Arch Street, Suite 100
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 895-2311

ID#: A08A-041-0341
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T041       Awarded: 7/10/2008
Title: Novel Biomarkers Assessment in the Progression from Androgen Dependent Prostate Cancer to Androgen Independent Prostate Cancer
Abstract:  &nbs Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in males. Treatment with androgen ablation therapy after radical prostatectomy (RP) eventually leads to relapse and development of androgen-independent disease. Patients with androgen independent prostate cancer experience high morbidity and morality. At present, the ability to monitor the transformation to hormone independence at the earliest stages is inadequate and there is a desperate search for sensitive detection and monitoring methods to improve disease management and provide the most effective treatment strategies for these high risk patients. Progression from androgen dependent cancer to the more fatal androgen independent prostate cancer is a multi- step process involving androgen receptor (AR) and its associated growth regulatory signal transduction pathways. A highly sensitive, selective, noninvasive screening assay is needed to diagnose the development of hormone refractory prostate cancer and to monitor effectiveness of treatment or recurrence. We propose to identify the differential glycoprotein signatures from androgen-dependent LnCAP and androgen-independent PC3 cancer cells and complement their analysis with a comparison of glycoproteins identified in serum samples from hormone sensitive and refractory prostate cancer patients. Both the proteins and glycoforms of the proteins will be identified using glycoproteomics technologies developed by Drexel and Immunotope. Because the majority of glycoproteins are either surface-expressed or secreted, the panel of glycoproteins that we identify will be confirmed by the analysis of surface expression on circulating tumor cells (CTC) and/or detected specifically in the serum from patients with androgen-independent prostate tumors by comparing samples from androgen dependent patients. The identification of a panel of glycoproteins with modified glycan signatures will pave the way to the development of sensitive and selective hormone refractory prostate cancer specific diagnostic assays useful for rapid screening of large patient populations.

INFOSCITEX CORP.
303 Bear Hill Road,
Waltham, MA 02451
(781) 890-1338

PI: Dr. Vladimir Gilman
(781) 890-1338
Contract #: W81XWH-08-C-0104
COLORADO STATE UNIV.
408 Univ Services Center,
Fort Collins, CO 80523
(970) 491-0439

ID#: A08A-035-0122
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T035       Awarded: 7/16/2008
Title: Aptamers for Ante-mortem Diagnostics of Prion Infection
Abstract:  &nbs All forms of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) are caused by a unique infectious agent termed “prion”, a proteinaceous pathogen lacking nucleic acid. Prions are actually a misfolded variant of the normal mammalian prion protein, PrPc. Normal disease transmission occurs when prions are ingested by a naive animal. The current test for TSE is a post mortem diagnosis looking for protease-resistant PrPSc in brain tissue by immunohistochemistry. The ante mortem diagnosis of prion disease is complicated due to very low concentration of PrPsc and high presence of PrPc associated with all blood components and serum even in infectious animals. Any blood diagnostic test would need to discriminate pg/mL concentrations of PrPsc from PrPc. To address the need for ante mortem diagnosis of the prion disease the IST and CSU team will attempt detection of the pg quantities of PrPsc /mL directly in bodily fluids using uniquely specific and highly affinitive DNA aptamers developed using our proprietary technology for DNA aptamer production.

INTELLIGENT FIBER OPTIC SYSTEMS CORP.
2363 Calle Del Mundo,
Santa Clara, CA 95054
(408) 565-9004

PI: Dr. Richard Black
(408) 565-9000
Contract #: W81XWH-08-C-0103
STANFORD CENTER FOR DESIGN
Building 560, 424 Panama Mall,
Stanford, CA 94305
(650) 450-0589

ID#: A08A-038-0091
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T038       Awarded: 7/15/2008
Title: MRI-Compatible Fiber-Optically Sensorized Surgical Tools for Precision Removal of Solid Tumors
Abstract:  &nbs Robotic surgery is a recent breakthrough that is still rapidly emerging. Even the best surgical robotic tools lack the sense of touch that surgeons use to great advantage in the removal of tumors. IFOS proposes to address this shortcoming by embedding arrays of optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors into metal-free miniature robotic surgery end-effectors. Multiple FBGs can be placed along a single fiber and optically multiplexed to create a tool capable of resolving multiple contact forces and locations as well as temperature profiles. FBG sensors are very small, and are sensitive to mechanical strains as small as 0.1 microstrain. They are more robust than conventional strain gauges, and immune to electromagnetic interference, making them compatible with MRIs. Phase I will explore the feasibility of MRI-compatible fiber-sensorized tools enhancing surgical accuracy for tumor removal. It will include design of an optical interrogator for real-time processing of signals from multiple FBGs, and development of new fabrication methods for bonding optical fibers to surgical tools. The end result will be a sensitive and robust prototype tool that will give physicians unprecedented ability to monitor and respond to forces at the distal ends of surgical and endoscopic instruments, whether used in-situ or remotely.

J. A. WOOLLAM CO., INC.
645 M Street, Suite 102,
Lincoln, NE 68508
(402) 477-7501

PI: Dr. Craig M. Herzinger
(402) 477-7501
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0111
UNIV. OF NEBRASKA-LINCOLN
312 N. 14th St, Alexander West
Lincoln, NE 68588
(402) 472-1930

ID#: A08A-013-0042
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T013       Awarded: 7/25/2008
Title: Terahertz Ellipsometry for Reflection-Mode Material Characterization
Abstract:  &nbs As technologies utilizing THz radiation (light) are developed, the optical properties for many materials need to be determined accurately as a function of frequency. In a security screening system, measured optical properties might be used to distinguish, independent of shape, between threat and background materials. Improved optical elements for increasingly advanced THz systems will require optical constants and instrumentation for design and quality control. Measured THz optical properties are intrinsically connected to underlying low-energy physical processes and thereby allow testing of existing scientific theories and exploration of novel developments such as artificially structured meta-materials. Ellipsometry is the preeminent technique for accurate, quantitative determination of complex-valued optical constants and for non-destructively characterizing layered structures. The J. A. Woollam Co. proposes developing a variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometer for operation at terahertz (THz) frequencies as an addition to the company’s existing line of ellipsometers, which span frequencies from the infrared (IR-VASE®, 10 to 150 THz) to the vacuum ultraviolet (VASE® 150 to 2000 THz). Work by Drs. Mathias Schubert and Tino Hofmann at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) in far-infrared and THz ellipsometry using frequency- domain techniques shows promise. In collaboration with UNL, phase I would evaluate potential system components (sources, detector, polarization-state control optics) for use in a commercial THz ellipsometer.

LEONARDO TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
PO Box 128, 70245 Bannock Uniontown Road
Bannock, OH 43972
(603) 647-3000

PI: Dr. Jorge L. Alvarado
(979) 458-1900
Contract #: W9132T-08-C-0034
TEXAS A&M UNIV.
Dept of Engineering Technology, 3367 Tamu
College Station, TX 77843
(979) 458-1900

ID#: A08A-030-0032
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T030       Awarded: 7/18/2008
Title: Straight Vegetable Oil Modification for Combustion
Abstract:  &nbs Current bio-based fuels represent an alternative energy option due to their high energy content, and availability of sources. Biodiesel and straight vegetable oils (SVO) can be used as fuels in a myriad of applications. However, conversion of SVO to biodiesel requires additional resources including water, catalysts, and energy. Direct use of SVO in diesel engine is not entirely feasible without engine modifications. Therefore, there is a need to re-examine how SVO are formulated, prepared and processed as bio-based fuels. This proposal outlines a clear plan that will result in the reformulation and processing technology of straight vegetable oils (SVO) as fuels, resulting in optimal engine performance. It specifically presents a series of experimental and analytical activities that will bring about a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lower viscosity in current SVO. The proposed studies will determine the impact of additives, new formulations, and shear-induced microemulsificiation on viscosity, heating value, and performance. Analytical studies will consider fundamental thermodynamic properties and relations, as well as combustion efficiency, power output and hydrocarbon emissions. Anticipated results include a new formulation of SVO with low viscosity, low emissions, stability, and high energy content. It will include an economic analysis that would serve as roadmap for future studies in the area. Preliminary studies indicate that shear- induced microemulsification can yield a very stable low viscosity SVO fuel without the use of co-solvents. The study will examine and identify the role of co-solvents and shear-induced microemulsification in the improvements of SVO properties.

LIGHT AGE, INC.
500 Apgar Drive,
Somerset, NJ 08873
(732) 563-0600

PI: Dr. Marc Klosner
(732) 563-0600
Contract #: W81XWH-08-C-0109
VANDERBILT UNIV.
Division of Sponsored Research, Box 357749, Vand. U. Station B
Nashville, TN 37235
(615) 322-3977

ID#: A08A-038-0078
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T038       Awarded: 7/16/2008
Title: Dual-Functionality Laser System for High-Contrast Diagnostic Imaging and Precision Surgery
Abstract:  &nbs We propose to develop a laser system that provides a new surgical paradigm for precise tumor detection and localization, and ultra-precise excision of lesions down to the cellular level, with little or no damage to adjacent tissues. This laser system will operate in either of two modes: diagnostic and treatment. In diagnostic mode, the laser output will be in the deep-red and near-infrared spectral regions, to enable opto-acoustic tomographic imaging, which permits the discrimination and localization of metastatic tumors. In treatment mode, the laser will operate at mid-infrared wavelengths, in a particular spectral region that has been demonstrated to be uniquely effective in removal of tissue with little collateral damage. In conjunction with the laser system development, our Research Institution Partner, Vanderbilt University and Medical Center (Nashville, TN), will perform studies on various tissue samples using a mid-IR laser developed by Light Age, and installed at Vanderbilt. The studies performed by Vanderbilt in the Phase I effort will complement the aspects of the program related to mid-IR laser development by providing a characterization of the performance of the laser by means of measurement of tissue ablation rates and through histological analysis of collateral damage in a variety of tissue samples.

LYNNTECH, INC.
7610 Eastmark Drive,
College Station, TX 77840
(979) 693-0017

PI: Dr. Christopher Rhodes
(979) 693-0017
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0079
UNIV. OF FLORIDA
PO Box 116400,
Gainesville, FL 32611
(352) 846-2991

ID#: A08A-007-0140
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T007       Awarded: 7/18/2008
Title: Advanced Low Temperature Liquid Metal Anode Solid Oxide Fuel Cells
Abstract:  &nbs Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) offer significant benefits to the Army/DoD based on their high efficiencies, fuel versatility, quiet operation, and negligible emissions. Liquid tin anode solid oxide fuel cells (LTA-SOFCs) can operate directly on military logistics fuels (JP-8, JP-5, and diesel), even with high levels of impurities, thereby avoiding the requirement for an additional fuel reformer. Current LTA-SOFCs have low power densities (~120 mW/cm2) and require high operating temperatures (~1000 degrees Celsius), which limits their use in portable power systems. Lynntech and the University of Florida propose to develop high power density, low operating temperature LTA- SOFCs based on advanced electrolyte and electrode components. During Phase I, advanced cells will be fabricated and optimized to achieve high power densities (target at least 500 mW/cm2) at low operating temperatures (target at or below 600 degrees Celsius), and modeling will be used to maximize cell performance. The cell’s long-term stability operating on JP-8 fuel will be determined, and a lightweight, low temperature SOFC stack will be designed. In Phase II, a prototype, low temperature 200-500 W SOFC that operates directly on JP-8 will be developed to provide a compact electric generator for use a squad-level battery charger/power supply.

MAINSTREAM ENGINEERING CORP.
200 Yellow Place, Pines Industrial Center
Rockledge, FL 32955
(321) 631-3550

PI: Dr. Alan Brothers
(321) 631-3550
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0087
UNIV. OF WASHINGTON
302M Roberts Hall, Box 352120
Seattle, WA 98195
(321) 616-9084

ID#: A08A-009-0100
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T009       Awarded: 8/7/2008
Title: A Nanotechnology-Based Hydrogen Generator for a Compact Fuel Cell Power System
Abstract:  &nbs Advances in microelectronics technology have digitized the modern battlefield by enabling night vision, global positioning, laser range-finding/targeting, digital communications, and advanced sensing. As these powerful new battlefield technologies emerge and mature, the need for compact, efficient, silent, and safe power generation will continue to increase. While fuel cells have kept pace with these power needs, the hydrogen storage and retrieval technologies on which they depend are still transitioning out of the laboratory. This proposal outlines the first part of a three-phase program for bringing low-temperature hydrogen technology onto the battlefield, by integrating lab- scale hydrogen fuel with state-of-the-art commercial fuel cells. It capitalizes on the success of supported ammonia borane, one of the most promising modern hydrogen storage materials, and on laboratory work showing that its hydrogen release kinetics can be tailored by manipulation of support materials at the nanometer length scale. In Phase I of the proposed program, carbon-cryogel-supported ammonia borane fuel composite will be optimized, and then integrated into a hydrogen generator designed to run a commercial fuel cell according to the Army’s specifications. In Phase II, materials and designs will be refined, and a working prototype provided; in Phase III, the design will be finalized, scaled-up, and marketed.

MATERIALS & ELECTROCHEMICAL RESEARCH (MER) CORP.
7960 S. Kolb Rd.,
Tucson, AZ 85706
(520) 574-1980

PI: Dr. Raouf O. Loutfy
(520) 574-1980
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0117
ARIZONA STATE UNIV.
Center for App. NanoBioscience, Biodesign Institute
Tempe, AZ 85287
(480) 727-8169

ID#: A08A-010-0264
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T010       Awarded: 8/8/2008
Title: Lightweight Fuel Cell Panel Utilizing High Temperature Ionic Polymer
Abstract:  &nbs Ionic polymers are ionically conductive organic salts with excellent thermal and chemical stability, useful for their large specific capacitances across a wide operational temperature range. In this program, MER Corporation and Arizona State University propose the fuel cell use of electroactive solid state ionic polymers that conduct protons across an even wider temperature range from subzero to < 200°C. The proposed protic solid acids will be tested in a flexible, thin-sheet multi-cell fuel cell panel. This novel proposed stack design, one that breaks with the traditional state-of-the-art panel configuration, will not required gas diffusion layers, bipolar plates, end plates, bus plates or clamping nuts and bolts. These simplifications will improve the overall power density and energy density of the fuel cell system as well as adapt it to fit against irregular internal contours.

MATERIALS MODIFICATION, INC.
2721-D Merrilee Drive,
Fairfax, VA 22031
(703) 560-1371

PI: Dr. Kris Rangan
(703) 560-1371
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0073
DREXEL UNIV.
3201 Arch Street, Suite 100
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 895-5849

ID#: A08A-015-0378
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T015       Awarded: 7/16/2008
Title: Development of a Novel Chemically Impervious and Breathable Membrane
Abstract:  &nbs In this Phase I, Materials Modification Inc. will develop a novel breathable membrane liner for use as protection against chemical warfare agents, toxic industrial chemicals, and toxic industrial materials. Traditional protective suit materials such as butyl rubber do not allow permeation of water vapor through the membrane, which can cause overheating and limits the time the suit can be worn. Although the current Joint Service Lightweight Integrated Suit Technology (JSLIST) which uses activated carbon, has excellent water vapor transport rate, it provides limited protection for chemical agents and the activated carbon imposes additional weight on the garment. In the proposed Phase I effort, a novel membrane liner will be developed based on the knowledge and designs created by the partner academic institution. The design will include a durable, lightweight, flexible membrane that incorporates both a water permeable component and a barrier component against CWAs, TICs and TIMs. The permeation rates of water and chemical agent simulants will be measured and compared to the current technology, including JSLIST. In Phase II, the membrane liner design will be expanded and tested for its ability to perform in a wider range of applications. In addition, a method for incorporating the membrane liner in the soldier’s suit will be performed and advanced fluid testing will be undertaken in the Phase II effort.

MECHANICAL SIMULATION INTERNATIONAL
604 Lakeland Crescent,
Yorktown, VA 23693
(757) 344-3005

PI: Dr. Jeff Freeman
(612) 605-8242
Contract #: A56HZV-08-C-0622
UNIV. OF TENNESSEE, KNOXVILLE
Biosys Eng & Soil Sci Dept, 2506 E.J. Chapman Dr, - U.T.
Knoxville, TN 37996
(865) 974-4942

ID#: A08A-042-0114
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T042       Awarded: 9/27/2008
Title: Advanced Vehicle/Terrain Interaction Modeling to Support Power and Energy Analysis
Abstract:  &nbs The overall objective of this project is to develop, validate and verify an universal physics-based vehicle terrain interaction model. The model should be able to account for a variety of soil and vehicle loading (wheel and track) conditions. The purpose of the model is to predict soil and vehicle wheel and track deformations in order to determine the vehicle power and energy requirements. Models components that need to be considered include 1) vehicle wheel and track force loadings and deformations, 2) subsurface soil stress distribution, and 3) soil strength and deformation descriptors.

MIRUMTOO CORP.
805 Gibbon St,
Alexandria, VA 22314
(703) 683-1840

PI: Mr. Joseph Chiara
(703) 683-1840
Contract #: W91WAW-08-P-0437
UNIV. OF CENTRAL FLORIDA
3100 Technology Parkway,
Orlando, FL 32826
(407) 882-1325

ID#: A08A-001-0286
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T001       Awarded: 9/2/2008
Title: Application of Critical Thinking to Interpersonal Interactions
Abstract:  &nbs The intent of the proposed research effort is to identify the critical thinking skills that apply particularly to the reasoning and understanding of complex social contexts. The skills set defining this critical thinking capacity would allow soldiers to respond effectively across an array of complex social and interpersonal contexts that increasingly characterize their missions. A second intent of this proposal is to design a comprehensive training strategy that targets particular high impact critical social thinking skills. The training interventions to be designed as part of this Phase I effort will be grounded in best practices for developing critical thinking skills reported in the educational and training literature.

MO-SCI CORP.
4040 Hypoint North, PO BOX 2
Rolla, MO 65402
(573) 364-2338

PI: Dr. Cheol-Woon Kim
(573) 364-2338
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0105
MISSOURI UNIV. OF SCIENCE &
202 University Center ,
Rolla, MO 65409
(573) 341-4154

ID#: A08A-008-0112
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T008       Awarded: 7/18/2008
Title: Infrared Retroreflective, Visible Absorbing, and Electrostatically Adhesive Microsphere Taggants
Abstract:  &nbs MO-SCI Corporation and the Missouri University of Science & Technology (MST-formerly University of Missouri- Rolla) propose to develop low cost, IR retro-reflective (800 nm - 2800 nm), visible absorbing glass microspheres for ubiquitous spectroscopic tagging through our innovative material design, fabrication and characterization technologies. These glass microspheres of any size (e.g., 20 - 100 microns, diameter) absorb visible light and, thus, are minimally visible to the unaided human eye. The refractive index of the glass microspheres will be tailor-designed to allow a maximum retro-reflection in the IR region and, thus, can be easily spotted using a man-portable IR viewing device. We will also coat the microspheres with a layer that is strongly negative in the triboelectric series such as saran. The coating will increase the electrostatic attraction of the microbeads to human skin, hair, and commonly worn clothing fabrics. Daytime detection (e.g., on a sunny day) of the IR retro-reflective glass microspheres is possible with gated illumination and lock-in amplification techniques.

NANOCOMPOSIX, INC.
4878 Ronson CT STE K,
San Diego, CA 92111
(619) 890-0704

PI: Dr. Steven Oldenburg
(619) 890-0704
Contract #: W911SR-08-P-0059
NEW MEXICO STATE UNIV.
Office #157 MSC 3D, PO Box 30001
Las Cruces, NM 88003
(575) 646-1931

ID#: A08A-025-0380
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T025       Awarded: 8/11/2008
Title: Broadband Obscurants for Visible and IR Countermeasures
Abstract:  &nbs Obscurants and smokes are a combat multiplier that can assist in the defeat of trackers, sensors, optical enhancement devices, seekers, and the human eye. Obscuration is desirable at wavelengths that range from the short wavelength visible (0.4 micron) to the far-infrared (25 micron). Historically, this has been accomplished using separate munitions for the visible and IR regions of the spectrum. During the Phase I research period we will demonstrate a broadband obscurant device that will block the visible and IR regions of the spectrum with a volume extinction coefficient that is greater than the value of currently fielded munitions. To accomplish this goal, new materials with nanoscale dimensions will be integrated into a composite formulation that will be processed and packed into a fixed volume device. Methods designed to maximize the fill fraction and dispersive capabilities of the packed composition will be developed. The most promising candidates will be delivered to the Army for chamber test validation.

NANOSCALE MATERIALS, INC.
1310 Research Park Drive,
Manhattan, KS 66502
(785) 537-0179

PI: Dr. Shyamala Rajagopalan
(785) 537-0179
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0082
KANSAS STATE UNIV.
Dept. of Chemistry,
Manhattan, KS 66502
(785) 532-6849

ID#: A08A-016-0067
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T016       Awarded: 7/25/2008
Title: Engineered Reactive Metal Oxyhydroxides (ERMO) for Detection and Decontamination of Toxic Reagents
Abstract:  &nbs Several shortcomings such as lack of reactivity and selectivity are associated with currently available sorbent- based decontaminants. For example, carbon based sorbents can only physisorb toxins without neutralizing them. Secondly, all solid sorbents are sensitive to humid air. Thirdly, reduced reactivity due to mass transfer problem is characteristic of solid sorbents. Finally, solid sorbents capable of both chemical and biological decontaminations are scarce. This proposal addresses these needs by developing methodologies for preparation of highly reactive mixed metal oxyhydroxides for use in the area of protective garments and filters. The overall objective of this collaborative Phase I research between NanoScale and Kansas State University is to create and test new materials that would be useful for protection against chemical and biological hazards. In order to achieve the overall objective, initially, methodologies will be developed to make porous high surface area mixed metal oxyhydroxide materials. Following performance assessment, formulations with optimum reactivities will be incorporated with organic dyes and evaluated for their utility as visible indicators of CBWs and TICs.

ODYSSIAN TECHNOLOGY, L.L.C.
511 East Colfax Avenue,
South Bend, IN 46545
(574) 257-7500

PI: Mr. Barton Bennett
(574) 257-7500
Contract #: W9132T-08-C-0037
UNIV. OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CH
1406 W. Green St.,
Urbana, IL 61801
(217) 333-4694

ID#: A08A-031-0249
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T031       Awarded: 8/6/2008
Title: Advanced Distribution and Control for Hybrid Intelligent Power Systems
Abstract:  &nbs Odyssian Technology and its team of highly regarded experts propose to develop advanced distribution and control technology for hybrid intelligent microgrids. The novelty of their proposed concept is in the use of a wireless mesh network to control distributed generation assets in concert with system loads through multi-layer intelligent load shedding. A technology proprietary to Odyssian Technology called eBoard™ will be further developed and adapted to provide load control through the use of intelligent load shedding at the device and small area network levels. Odyssian’s partner EmNet has a proprietary low power wireless network technology that will be adapted to achieve a highly responsive intelligent wireless power control network. Another unique aspect of this proposed program is the coupling of network science with power engineering to an extent not commonly demonstrated. Dr. Chapman from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign with expertise in power control has collaborated with Dr. Lemmon from Notre Dame University with expertise in network control to develop a concept for intelligent control of electric power microgrids. This concept offers a novel solution of an integrated intelligent control design that allows for the plug-and-play of a diverse range of various distributed power generation assets.

ONTAR CORP.
9 Village Way,
North Andover, MA 01845
(978) 689-9622

PI: Ms. Alyssa Douglass
(978) 689-9622
Contract #: W91WAW-08-P-0438
UNIV. OF OKLAHOMA
731 Elm Ave, Room 134
Norman, OK 73019
(405) 325-4757

ID#: A08A-002-0242
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T002       Awarded: 9/2/2008
Title: Training Leaders to Manage Emotions in an Interpersonal Context
Abstract:  &nbs The ability to recognize, control, and appropriately express emotions has become increasingly important in an organization as dynamic and complex as the Army. In addition to facing many of the challenges of leading groups and individuals, such as providing encouragement or negative feedback to individuals and facilitating group performance in the face of obstacles, Army officers are also called upon to exert leadership in stressful environments and combat situations capable of testing the limits of even the most emotionally stable individuals. These challenges require emotion-related skills and capabilities that have gained considerable attention in the broader research and practice of leadership. The intent of the current research is to develop a skills-based theoretical model of emotion management that will serve as the underpinnings for developing officer training. The model will focus on how these skills can exert positive influences on interpersonal effectiveness in various kinds of affectively-laden situations likely to arise in a military context, such as dealing with combat-related stress, providing performance feedback, and handling interpersonal conflict. The model resulting from this Phase I work will be the foundation for a larger Phase II proposal focusing on developing and validating web-based training on the skills specified in the model.

PARTICLE SYSTEMS
9954 SW 52nd Road,
Gainesville, FL 32608
(301) 461-1615

PI: Dr. Madhav B. Ranade
(301) 461-1615
Contract #: W911SR-08-P-0062
UNIVERISTY OF FLORIDA
205 Particle Science, Center Drive
Gainessville, FL 32611
(352) 846-1194

ID#: A08A-025-0029
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T025       Awarded: 8/29/2008
Title: Bi-spectral (Visible & Infrared) Material for Smoke/Obscurant Munitions
Abstract:  &nbs Particle Systems and the Particle Engineering Reserach Center (PERC) of the university of Florida propose to develop high aspect ratio dielectric particles with metallic coating providing optimal cross section in the visible and IR wavelengths. Phase I effort will produce sufficeient material to test the concept and scale up to production level will follow.

PHYSICAL SCIENCES, INC.
20 New England Business Center,
Andover, MA 01810
(978) 689-0003

PI: Dr. John D. Lennhoff
(978) 689-0003
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0090
CORNELL UNIV.
Office of Sponsored Programs, 373 Pine Tree Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 255-0655

ID#: A08A-008-0339
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T008       Awarded: 7/15/2008
Title: Improved Physical Security through Perimeter Tagging
Abstract:  &nbs Physical Sciences, Inc. (PSI) has developed an environmentally friendly, microencapsulated chemiluminescent formulation that emits at a tunable visible (deterrent use) or near infrared (covert tag) wavelength, depending upon the fluorophore selected. The chemiluminescence occurs when the microcapsule is ruptured by an intruder or other applied force, activating the luminescent chemistry. PSI will collaborate with the Wiesner Group at Cornell University and utilize their C-Dot technology to enhance chemiluminescent brightness. The microcapsule can be formulated to provide a tunable rupture pressure and contains both adhesion and low observable components. Using the proposed technology for taggant applications, we expect to be able to see an intruder footprint at 1 km standoff using night vision goggles (NVG) by achieving a brightness of greater than 1 microwatt/cm2. At the end of the Phase I program, we will conduct a field test using the taggant material and NVG sensor. A potential Phase II program would include additional formulation, pilot manufacture and field testing of the taggant microcapsules.

PHYSICAL SCIENCES, INC.
20 New England Business Center,
Andover, MA 01810
(978) 689-0003

PI: Dr. Prakash B. Joshi
(978) 689-0003
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0078
THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.
College of Engineering, 101 Hammond Building
University park, PA 16802
(814) 865-1804

ID#: A08A-022-0337
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T022       Awarded: 8/8/2008
Title: On-demand, Rapid-response, Ionic Liquid Monopropellant Gas Generator
Abstract:  &nbs Physical Sciences Inc. and the Pennsylvania State University (Professor Stefan Thynell) propose a novel gas generator concept utilizing inert and safe ionic liquids as monopropellants and innovative techniques for their fast ignition and stable, sustained combustion. An STTR program is proposed to develop the concept into a gas generator system that can be operated only when needed and responds extremely rapidly when activated. A Phase I program is planned to demonstrate the feasibility of key elements of our gas generator concept. It will include performance predictions and evaluation of various monopropellants, detailed measurements of the ignition, ignition delay, and combustion characteristics of candidate monopropellants and initiation schemes, considerations of system level issues, and a plan for Phase II developments.

PRECISION PHOTONICS CORP.
3180 Sterling Circle,
Boulder, CO 80301
(303) 444-9948

PI: Dr. Kristan L. Corwin
(785) 532-1663
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0106
KANSAS STATE UNIV.
116 Cardwell Hall, Department of Physics
Manhattan, KS 66506
(785) 532-1663

ID#: A08A-021-0152
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T021       Awarded: 7/22/2008
Title: Eye-safe Optically-Pumped Gas-filled Fiber Lasers
Abstract:  &nbs An eye-safe optically-pumped laser based on a gas-filled hollow optical fiber is proposed. Such a laser will be the first in a new class of lasers, based on gas-filled fibers and incorporating many advantages of optically-pumped gas lasers, including the ability to use multiple incoherent pump sources to result in a single coherent beam. We will model the lasing action in acetylene gas pumped at 1530 nm and lasing near 1700 nm, which are wavelengths well suited to an initial demonstration because fiber and pump lasers are readily available. We will also experimentally demonstrate lasing in an acetylene-filled fiber, and explore ways to package the laser entirely in optical fiber. The vision is to develop additional wavelengths across the near-infrared and infrared, and to coherently combine the output of many such gas-filled fiber lasers for high power applications such as infrared countermeasures and laser defense.

REFLECTANCE MEDICAL INC.
15 Franklin Circle,
Northboro, MA 01532
(203) 426-8495

PI: Dr. Babs Soller
(508) 856-5904
Contract #: W81XWH-08-C-0114
UMASS MEDICAL SCHOOL
Research Funding Services, 55 Lake Ave North
Worcester, MA 01655
(508) 856-2119

ID#: A08A-037-0206
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T037       Awarded: 7/31/2008
Title: A Real-Time, Portable Non-Invasive Monitoring System of Muscle Oxygen and pH in Trauma Patients
Abstract:  &nbs Trauma and severe hemorrhage remain the most frequent causes of death in the 1-44 year age group in both the civilian and military settings. Early recognition of shock and prompt institution of appropriate resuscitative measures are widely believed to improve outcome and decrease the progression to multi-system organ failure by virtue of maintaining end-organ perfusion. The physiological response to hemorrhage includes significant vasoconstriction to help maintain adequate perfusion to vital organs. Based on this known physiological response, noninvasive assessment of muscle oxygen and pH can provide a significantly earlier indication of blood loss than the standard vital sign measurements. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can be used to noninvasively and continuously determine muscle oxygen and pH and has been demonstrated to successfully recognize physiologic changes in a laboratory model of pre-shock (LBNP). Current NIRS systems employing fiber optic light cables are too large and fragile for portable use near the battlefield. This proposal describes novel technology for a portable, spectroscopic monitor to determine muscle oxygen and pH without fiber optic cables. The components of this system will be demonstrated on tissue-like phantom materials, as well as on human subjects. An initial design for a handheld, portable monitor will be completed as part of this Phase I project.

REMCOM, INC.
315 S. Allen St. , Suite 222
State College, PA 16801
(814) 861-1299

PI: Dr. Stephen Fast
(814) 861-1299
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0097
NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV.
Department of Electrical and C, NC State University
Raleigh, NC 27695
(919) 515-5191

ID#: A08A-004-0365
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T004       Awarded: 7/15/2008
Title: Field/Circuit Computational Modeling and Simulation Software Tool
Abstract:  &nbs With ever sophisticated antenna and transceiver designs, the traditional separation between antennas and circuits has become blurred. Many antenna designs now contain integrated circuitry and have circuitry that includes active and passive devices with nonlinear and time-varying characteristics. In order to design such antennas and conduct a correct a thorough investigation of proposed designs, it is necessary to model both the electromagnetic effects and the circuitry. The proposed tool will be able to model the high fidelity time domain of radio transceivers circuits with both nonlinear and dynamic characteristics. Thus the goal of this proposed project is to integrate proven circuit modeling tools with electromagnetic modeling and simulation tools. The proposed tool will support not only radiated energy but also the effects of external fields such as co-site interference on the circuitry. The proposed tool shall extend two widely used and proven software packages: fREEDA, a circuit simulator with its schematic capture engine ifREEDA, and XFdtd, a finite difference time domain electromagnetic simulator.

RESODYN CORP.
130 North Main Street, Suite 600
Butte, MT 59701
(406) 497-5252

PI: Dr. Fangxiao Yang
(406) 497-5241
Contract #: W9132T-08-C-0031
UNIV. OF UTAH
Office of Sponsored Projects, 1471 East Federal Way
Salt Lake City, UT 84102
(801) 587-8074

ID#: A08A-030-0151
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T030       Awarded: 7/16/2008
Title: Vegetable Oil Conditioning for Combustion
Abstract:  &nbs The development of a straight vegetable oil (SVO) blending technology for combustion in boilers and in diesel engines is proposed. The overall objective of the proposal is to address the problems associated with using SVO as fuel; such as high viscosity, poor low temperature flow behavior, fuel inject and combustion chamber carbon deposition and engine power loss due to long term use. Vegetable oil conditioned to improve engine performance and to reduce exhaust emissions. Mathematical models will be established for predicting and calculating the viscosity, cloud point and heat of combustion of blended fuels. Diesel engine tests will be performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed technology and correctness of the calculations. The project will be designed to identify fuel properties, e.g., viscosity, volatility, heat of combustion, density, etc., that must be modified to meet ASTM fuel performance specifications. Provided basic feasibility is demonstrated in Phase I, the Phase II strategy is to extend research to in large-scale and long-term diesel engine testing. The formulated fuel testing will also be extended to boilers, generators and other diesel based combustion devices and machineries.

SAFETY DYNAMICS
9030 South Rita Road, Suite 100
Tucson, AZ 85747
(520) 981-1275

PI: Mr. Steven A. Berger
(303) 666-8480
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0103
LAB FOR NEURAL DYNAMICS
University of Southern CA, 1042 Downey Way, DRB 166
Los Angeles, CA 90089
(310) 791-3817

ID#: A08A-019-0104
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T019       Awarded: 7/18/2008
Title: Development of a Soldier Battlespace Auditory Analyzer System
Abstract:  &nbs To develop a low-weight soldier acoustic sensor system that takes outside audio, extracts relevant acoustic information, and provides graphics and/or audio for use on a Soldier’s display to provide alerts (personnel, vehicles, weapons fires, etc). These alerts include identity, approximate range and azimuth for each alert source, along with a confidence value. This system will be implemented using acoustic recognition algorithms and small, helmet- mounted microphones to create a field-deployable “Smart Helmet.”

SOUTH BAY SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY CORP.
7525 W. 81st St.,,
Playa del Rey, CA 90293
(310) 337-7230

PI: Dr. David Cohn
(310) 607-6894
Contract #: W911SR-08-C-0060
SRI INTERNATIONAL
333 Ravenswood Avenue,
Menlo Park, CA 94025
(650) 859-5508

ID#: A08A-026-0101
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T026       Awarded: 8/7/2008
Title: Advanced Algorithms For A Combined Chem-Bio Standoff Sensor
Abstract:  &nbs The program addresses algorithm development in critical areas that have received little or no attention in the past, including mixtures of chemical vapors, single and mixed chemical aerosols, mixtures of bio aerosols, and mixtures of chemical vapors. New approaches based on parallel extraction of material spectral dependence of the material in parallel with its path-integrated concentration and nonnegative matrix factorization originally used for unmixing hyperspectral data will be attempted. The algorithms will combine orthogonal data sets for DIAL and DISC in the likely case of mixtures of chemical vapors and aerosols. Methods to process DIAL and DISC data collected simultaneously to achieve rapid realtime output will be investigated and analysis will be undertaken to show the specific sensor changes required to take full advantage of the new algorithms.

SUPERPROTONIC, INC.
530 South Lake Avenue, #312
Pasadena, CA 91101
(626) 793-9314

PI: Dr. Dane Boysen
(626) 793-9314
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0072
CLIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF
Steele Laboratories , Mail Code 309-81
Pasadena, CA 91125
(626) 395-2958

ID#: A08A-010-0017
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T010       Awarded: 7/16/2008
Title: A Compact Solid Acid Electrolyte Fuel Cell Generator
Abstract:  &nbs This project addresses the Army's needs for a compact power source. The system design is based on state-of-the- art high CO tolerant solid acid fuel cells (SAFCs) operating at 250 degrees C and a thermally matched methanol reformer creating a 20 Wnet lightweight, rugged, efficient unit capable of running for 72 hours with an energy density of about 1 kWh/kg.

TDA RESEARCH, INC.
12345 W. 52nd Ave.,
Wheat Ridge, CO 80033
(303) 940-2300

PI: Dr. James Nabity
(303) 940-2313
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0081
UNIV. OF COLORADO AT
Dept. of Mech. Engineering, 427 UCB
Boulder, CO 80309
(303) 492-7110

ID#: A08A-012-0338
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T012       Awarded: 7/25/2008
Title: A MEMS Pulsed Injection Electrostatic Atomizer for Small Engines
Abstract:  &nbs The Army needs energy dense, portable power generation and propulsion units. In order to reduce the consumables and simplify logistics, very small engines (defined as a power rating of less than 5 hP) need to be fueled with readily available logistic fuels, such as JP-8 and diesel. Unfortunately, these fuels are extremely difficult to vaporize and burn, which has hindered their use in spark ignition engines and especially Direct Injection Spark Ignition (DISI) engines. Hence, new atomization technologies are needed to directly inject micron sized JP-8 liquid droplets into the chamber so that they can burn within the short time available for combustion. Therefore, TDA Research proposes a MEMS pulsed injection electrostatic fuel atomizer to produce micron-sized droplets. In Phase I the atomizer will be designed to charge inject JP-8 into a spark ignition engine. The University of Colorado will predict the secondary droplet breakup behavior upon electrostatic excitation. TDA will construct prototypes for liquid spray experiments. In Phase II we will develop the capability to use the MEMS atomizers to pulse inject the fuel. After development, MEMS pulsed injection electrostatic fuel atomizers will be built and tested. One system will be delivered to the Army.

TDA RESEARCH, INC.
12345 W. 52nd Ave.,
Wheat Ridge, CO 80033
(303) 940-2300

PI: Dr. Brian J. Elliott
(303) 940-2341
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0076
UNIV. OF COLORADO
Dept. of Chemical and Bio-, logical Engineering, Box 424
Boulder, CO 80309
(303) 492-7640

ID#: A08A-015-0395
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T015       Awarded: 7/18/2008
Title: Breathable Elastomer Membrane for Chemical Agent Protection
Abstract:  &nbs Defense against chemical weapons is a critical DoD requirement. An effective defense requires the development of unique clothing systems that are a physical barrier to toxic vapors, liquids, and aerosols. In addition, the protective material must be permeable to water to reduce incapacitating heat stress, and must be lightweight, flexible, and cost effective. High barrier materials currently in use by DOD are effective at blocking chemical and biological weapons but they are not permeable to water vapor, produce dangerous heat stress and are bulky, severely reducing maneuverability and the overall effectiveness of the wearer. TDA Research, Inc. proposes to develop a breathable protective clothing material from polymerizable surfactants and a proprietary elastomeric compound. A thin layer of the compound will form a continuous porous structure with nanometer scale pores large enough to allow water vapor to pass while preventing chemical agents from reaching the wearer.

TRANSLUME
655 Phoenix Drive,
Ann Arbor, MI 48108
(734) 528-6371

PI: Dr. Philippe Bado
(734) 528-6330
Contract #: W911SR-08-C-0058
KETTERING UNIV.
1700 West Third Avenue,
Flint, MI 48504
(810) 762-9934

ID#: A08A-027-0084
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T027       Awarded: 7/29/2008
Title: Super Hardened, EMI and Vibration Immune Chemical Biological FTIR Sensor
Abstract:  &nbs The Joint Services have the need for affordable, wide area monitoring, detection and alarm for presence of chemical agents, biological agents and toxic industrial chemical and materials. Infrared spectrometers are known to provide the desired sensitivity and selectivity for the application of interest but they large, delicate and expensive instruments. Translume has developed techniques and manufacturing expertise to fabricate small, optical analyzers for demanding field-applications. These micro-analyzers are carved from glass monoliths. We will use our unique ability to micromachine fused silica, and to integrate mechanical elements with optical elements in a fused silica monolith to produce a very small, extremely robust, inexpensive, yet sensitive Fourier-transform Infrared spectrometer for chemical/biological detection. Our Fourier-transform (FT)spectrometer is based on a monolithic scanning interferometer with integrated optical position readout. This approach is the most conductive to the successful development of a functioning FT spectrometer prototype within the context of a SBIR program.

TRIOSYN CORP.
1191 South Brownell Rd,
Williston, VT 05495
(802) 865-5084

PI: Dr. David Ohayon
(802) 865-5084
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0074
UNIV. OF VERMONT
Department of Chemistry, 82 University Place
Burlington, VT 05495
(802) 656-0270

ID#: A08A-016-0317
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T016       Awarded: 7/22/2008
Title: Devices and Textiles for Broad-Spectrum Protection
Abstract:  &nbs The objective of this Phase I STTR proposal is to demonstrate the effectiveness of a several highly porous silica- based solids in the presence of chemical challenges from chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and toxic industrial chemicals (TICs). In Phase II, the most effective solids will be combined with a reactive polymer resin to make an adsorptive material that could be used in devices and textiles. In the event of a chemical challenge, a media coated with the reactive polymer will be used as the first line of defense to neutralize the chemical vapor by means of oxidation that will then render it inactive.

VDG, INC.
6009 Brookside Drive,
Chevy Chase, MD 20815
(412) 441-0383

PI: Dr. Virgil Gligor
(412) 268-9833
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0093
CARNEGIE MELLON UNIV.
2111 CIC, 4720 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 268-4912

ID#: A08A-005-0074
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T005       Awarded: 7/15/2008
Title: Trustworthy Execution of Security-Sensitive Code on Un-trusted Systems
Abstract:  &nbs Computing devices are routinely targeted by a wide variety of malware. The presence of exploitable vulnerabilities in computing device software, and the easy availability of know-how and tools for construction of exploit code has made it easy for attackers to introduce malware into computing devices by exploiting software. Since computing devices are routinely used for security-sensitive applications like electronic commerce, command and control systems, and critical infrastructure monitoring and control, malware present on computing devices can potentially compromise sensitive user information, and the privacy and safety of users. To use computing devices with confidence, users thus need an assurance that the software they use on their computing devices executes untampered by malware. Three classes of security-sensitive software best illustrate user-verifiable secure execution in the presence of malware on commercially available platforms: (1) secure remote login, (2) secure signing of critical data, and (3) secure execution of non-circumventable intrusion detection tools. In this STTR, we propose to investigate a technique for user-verifiable execution of security-sensitive code on untrusted platforms in the presence of malware. We also propose to illustrate the use of our technique through the three classes of security applications mentioned above.

VENTURE GAIN
212 Fiala Woods,
Naperville, IL 60565
(800) 516-7902

PI: Mr. Stephan Wegerich
(800) 516-7902
Contract #: W81XWH-08-C-0113
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA BERKELEY
634 Soda Hall MC 1776, Engineering Research Support
Berkeley, CA 94720
(510) 642-3417

ID#: A08A-033-0120
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T033       Awarded: 7/28/2008
Title: Bioinformatics-enabled wearable vital signs monitor for combat triage
Abstract:  &nbs Acute hemorrhage with subsequent shock remains a leading cause of battlefield mortality. It is the primary cause of death in approximately 30% of injured soldiers who die from wounds. Early diagnosis of the onset and severity of hemorrhagic shock is critical for providing effective combat triage and optimizing survival. This project will demonstrate the feasibility of applying a nonparametric, kernel-based technology called Similarity Based Modeling (SBM) to a set of readily field-measured vital signs from a wearable, mobile sensing device for improved visibility into health status in humans. Kernel-based modeling technology has been shown in commercial applications to map otherwise unknown interrelationships between instrumented variables using empirical data. Such mapping can be used to predict/infer non-instrumented signals, such as predicting an unmeasured pressure from other, measured parameters of a system. Furthermore, the empirical mapping of these interrelationships can provide ensembles of expected values that can be compared to measured values to ascertain incipient deviations from normal system behavior. These capabilities mean (a) values can be predicted for physiological parameters for which no direct measurement can practically be made, and (b) differences between measured values and “expected” values can indicate physiological instability that is about to cascade into a physiological emergency.

WAVE COMPUTATION TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
1800 Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway, Suite 204
Durham, NC 27707
(919) 360-6475

PI: Dr. Tian Xiao
(919) 419-1500
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0096
DUKE UNIV.
Office of Research Support, Box 104010
Durham, NC 27708
(919) 681-8689

ID#: A08A-004-0087
Agency: ARMY
Topic#: 08-T004       Awarded: 7/11/2008
Title: A Multiscale Software Tool for Field/Circuit Simulation
Abstract:  &nbs Wave Computation Technologies, Inc. (WCT) proposes to develop a new multiscale solver for electromagnetic field/circuit co-simulation. This solver combines three efficient electromagnetic field algorithms, (a) the spectral element time-domain (SETD) method for coarse scales, (b) the enlarged cell technique (ECT) for the boundary conformal finite-difference time-domain method [i.e., the FDTD method improved to the second order in the presence of curved conductors] for intermediate scales, and (c) the finite-element time-domain (FETD) method for fine scales; this field solver is coupled with nonlinear circuit solver based on SPICE (d). The field/circuit solver is highly efficient for arbitrary mixed-scale problems. The WCT team has extensive experience with these advanced computational electromagnetics algorithms, and is in an excellent position to develop such a multiscale field/circuit simulation tool. WCT has developed an EM software tool based on the ECT and a sophisticated graphic user interface, and has demonstrated that its speed is at least several times faster than existing commercial software packages. Furthermore, WCT has implemented a preliminary field/circuit solver to simulate direct antenna modulation, an important defense communications application. The proposed multiscale field/circuit solver will further extend the application domain to include large antenna arrays and complete circuitry and other dynamically changing environments.

---------- DARPA ----------

AGILTRON CORP.
15 Cabot Road,
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 935-1200

PI: Dr. Jinsong Huang
(781) 935-1200
Contract #: W31P4Q-08-C-0439
STANFORD UNIV.
Department of Chemical Enginee,
Stanford, , CA 94305
(650) 724-6883

ID#: 08ST1-0230
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 08-015       Awarded: 9/5/2008
Title: Printed transparent backplane for displays and spatial light modulators based on organic thin film transistors
Abstract:  &nbs Recent materials development together with an improving understanding of organic transistors has enabled solution- processed materials that show good performance, with high transparency in the visible range. In this program, leveraging on our extensive experience in organic material development and large scale organic material deposition by solution based processing, AGILTRON and Stanford University propose to realize the first transparent backplane based on organic thin film transistor to drive displays and spatial light modulators. The organic semiconductor materials proposed have high field effect mobility, good solubility and are transparent. The transparent cross-linked dielectric layer ensures low leakage current and enables multiple layer structures to be created by solution based processing. Furthermore, our optimized device design and fabrication process can maximize the performance of the organic semiconductor through the matching of organic semiconductors and dielectric materials. In this phase I program, we will demonstrate a new generation of transparent organic thin film transistors fabricated by our advanced inkjet printing method surpassing the requirements necessary for their use in high performance display driver circuits.

APTIMA, INC.
12 Gill Street, Suite 1400
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 496-2415

PI: Dr. Paul Allopenna
(781) 496-2486
Contract #: W31P4Q-08-C-0433
BROWN UNIV.
Box 1929, 164 Angell Street, 3rd Floor
Providence, RI 02912
(401) 863-1799

ID#: 08ST1-0122
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 08-006       Awarded: 9/16/2008
Title: UBER-HEB: Universal Biologically-inspired Environment for Research: Hierarchical Ersatz Brain
Abstract:  &nbs Decades of exponential advancement in computer capabilities have transformed the world, from toddlers’ playthings to the technologies of war and peace. Some further advances are constrained by the limits of von Neumann machines; in particular, they do not learn well. Aptima proposes to conduct a feasibility study to design “UBER-HEB,” a non-von Neumann hierarchical universal learning system. The work is grounded in the Ersatz Brain Project, a biologically-inspired architecture for cognitive computing, based on decades of research by Professor James Anderson of Brown University, a founder of neural networks. The team members have collaborated for a decade. The approach uses many sparsely connected modules inspired by cortical columns. Learning takes places via several integrated mechanisms: Hebbian, dynamic systems forming attractors, interference patterns of activations. It includes hierarchical structures and hierarchical properties also emerge naturally. It takes a biologically plausible and computationally powerful topographical approach to temporal encoding. We will structure the work around three test problems, for which we will develop running code. One of the problems concerns anomaly detection, which is of clear operational relevance. The feasibility assessment and resulting design will thus be based on both theoretical considerations and the results and analysis of the test problems.

CAE-NET
1033 Third Avenue SW, Suite 210
Carmel, IN 46032
(812) 249-7486

PI: Dr. Josh Nema
(317) 496-2884
Contract #: W31P4Q-09-C-0046
INDIANA UNIV.
501 Morton Street, Suite 224
Bloomington, IN 47404
(812) 369-7233

ID#: 08ST1-0014
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 08-001       Awarded: 11/7/2008
Title: Advanced Development for Defense Science and Technology
Abstract:  &nbs The objective of this proposal is to research, develop and characterize Composite materials with the ability to increase blast and fragment protection. In Phase I, CAE-net will conduct research into an integrated network of visco-elastic dampers and stiffeners constructed of materials suitable for use in the environmental, geometric and blast/fragment conditions. CAE-net will develop a methodology for optimizing the thickness and location of various materials and substrates. Substrate materials will include but are not limited to aluminum alloys, ceramics, fibers, rolled homogenous armor (RHA) and composites. Based on our research, CAE-net will create a conceptual design including estimated weight, cost and performance characteristics. The objective of this proposal is to investigate novel, non-traditional blast mitigation materials, techniques & phenomenologies and synergistically integrate them with traditional armor approaches to demonstrate the most optimal, mass efficient, underbelly armor solution against blast/fragment threats. Our approach is different from other armoring technologies. We are designing an integrated network of dampers and stiffeners rather than simply stiffeners that other organizations have used. Our approach will be to use specialized polyurethane, specialized fabric, anti-ballistic fragile material integrated with special type of light metal. In phase I, CAE-Net will propose and test the feasibility of the predictive approach for PBLAST countermeasure modeling and simulation. The solution architecture including input data sources, the predictive model(s), and the output should be designed and tested. CAE-net will conduct a study to determine alternate materials for the current coding for the blast protection appliqué that would reduce or eliminate the effects of shear, penetration, and fragmentation during an anti-vehicular blast event. We will also compare the alternate materials to the current material with regard to weight, availability, and cost. We will model and simulate the current design under normal operating conditions as well as during an anti-vehicular blast impact. We will model, design, and develop four (4) 2’X2’ panels for blast protection appliqués in phase I. Physical prototypes will be built by CAE-net and tested by the DARPA in phase II.

CHARLES RIVER ANALYTICS, INC.
625 Mount Auburn Street,
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 491-3474

PI: Subrata K. Das, PhD
(617) 491-3474
Contract #: W31P4Q-08-C-0413
HARVARD UNIV.
Holyoke Center, Room 600, 1350 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 495-0460

ID#: 08ST1-0075
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 08-004       Awarded: 9/4/2008
Title: Probabilistic and Relational Inferences in Dynamic Environments (PRIDE)
Abstract:  &nbs Reasoning under uncertainty is a critical capability for systems that support intelligent decision making in defense applications. Probability theory is a sound, widely accepted basis for reasoning under uncertainty. The environments in which decisions are made are rich and complex. Logical languages are powerful and expressive, providing the capability for making general statements and describing the world concisely and naturally. In order to support reasoning under uncertainty in rich, complex environments, we need a language that combines support for probabilistic reasoning with the ability to talk about the world in terms of objects and relationships and make general statements. We will build a system for Probabilistic and Relational Inferences in Dynamic Environments (PRIDE) that supports such a language, based on Probabilistic Relational Models (PRM). PRMs allow a model to be described in terms of classes of objects in the world, instances of those classes, and relationships between them. They make it possible to describe uncertainty about general logical statements involving entities in the world. We will extend PRMs to handle both discrete and continuous variables in full generality. We will also develop dynamic PRMs, an extension of PRMs to handle scenarios taking place over time.

CONFLICT KINETICS
9521 Luebcke ln,
Crown point, IN 46307
(720) 212-7468

PI: Mr. Brian Stanley
(720) 212-7468
Contract #: W31P4Q-09-C-0033
INDIAN UNIV.
107 S. Indiana Ave,
Bloomington, IN 47405
(812) 855-4848

ID#: 08ST1-0016
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 08-001       Awarded: 10/15/2008
Title: Advanced Development for Defense Science and Technology
Abstract:  &nbs Conflict Kinetics will develop an innovative new technology, the “Elevated Ocular Tactical Conditioning” (EOTC) system, for firearms training. The Conflict Kinetics’ EOTC utilizes a three-step training methodology that will mathematically prove that the soldier of today sees, reacts, and shoots targets with small arms weapons at around one-third his or her natural potential. This small arms weapons training platform will lead to the understanding and improvement of personal and team performance, the advancement of rapid decision-making abilities, and address the inherent limitations in traditional firearms training.

DECISIVE ANALYTICS CORP.
1235 South Clark Street, Suite 400
Arlington, VA 22202
(703) 414-5024

PI: Dr. Chris Smith
(703) 682-1615
Contract #: W31P4Q-09-C-0041
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF
32-G486 32 Vassar St. ,
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 258-9695

ID#: 08ST1-0076
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 08-004       Awarded: 10/22/2008
Title: Probabilistic Logic for Knowledge Representation and Automated Reasoning
Abstract:  &nbs Conventional statements of logic (e.g., simple statements of the form “if x then y”) allow individuals and machines to make quick and efficient determinations of the state of the world through the rules of deduction. This type of reasoning, however, does not naturally accommodate a fundamental and irreducible aspect of our knowledge about the world: we are more often than not uncertain about our knowledge to some degree or another. Dealing with uncertainty requires using a probabilistic representation of reasoning that allows one to express and draw inferences in cases when the facts are uncertain rather than just true or false. The Decisive Analytics Corporation/MIT (DAC/MIT) team proposes a powerful and elegant method which combines the desired expressive power of conventional logic with a sound and consistent treatment of uncertainty, resulting in an automated reasoning engine that integrates logical relations with probabilistic reasoning about complex, imprecise, and uncertain situations. The proposed hybrid inference engine will moreover be capable of hypothesizing new attributes, new relationships, and even new types of objects in its representation space and thus yield more expressive capability than other statistical relational formalisms.

DIACARTA
6519 Dumbarton Circle,
Fremont, CA 94555
(510) 818-2656

PI: Dr. Aiguo Zhang
(510) 378-3758
Contract #: W31P4Q-08-C-0417
UNIV. OF ROCHESTER
ORPA (RC Box 270140), 518 Hylan Building
Rochester, NY 14627
(585) 275-8036

ID#: 08ST1-0060
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 08-003       Awarded: 8/19/2008
Title: Novel Methods for Rapid Detection of Infection Agents and the Severity of Cellular Damage
Abstract:  &nbs The development of early detection methods to aid in the identification of virulent infectious pathogens is of strategic importance so that exposed warfighters and other individuals can be treated early or appropriately quarantined. We are currently developing a nucleic acid-based assay that can selectively and sensitively detect and quantify the RNA or DNA specific to a broad range of pathogens in the blood of infected individuals. In addition, the assay might also be useful for detection of radiation exposure and for following the severity of tissue damage during an infection. The assay has the following advantages: 1) it is comparable to real-time PCR in terms of sensitivity and accuracy in dsDNA and superior for RNA pathogens; 2) it has a standard curve for precise quantification, which is better than cycle number used in real-time PCR; 3) it can be expanded to multiplex bead systems for simultaneous detection of a large number of pathogens; 4) it does not have the complexity of real-time PCR methodology that requires training and experience; and 5) the result is read-out by chemiluminescent substrate using a portable and durable luminometer, which can be handheld and low cost.

FRACTAL SYSTEMS, INC.
200 9th Avenue North, Suite 100,
Safety Harbor, FL 34695
(727) 723-3006

PI: Dr. Elena Komarova
(727) 723-3006
Contract #: W31P4Q-08-C-0415
UNIV. OF SOUTH FLORIDA
4202 E. Fowler Avenue, FAO 126
Tampa, FL 33620
(813) 974-5555

ID#: 08ST1-0020
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 08-001       Awarded: 8/18/2008
Title: Ultra-Sensitive Portable Biotoxin Sensor
Abstract:  &nbs This Phase I STTR project addresses the development of a biotoxin sensor with high sensitivity and specificity based on our preliminary study. We have identified a highly sensitive fluorophore-quencher pair based on a fluorescent molecular wire polymer in order to amplify the detection signal. The conductive fluorescent polymer and the protein substrate specific towards botulinum toxin type B having a pendant quencher group have been successfully synthesized in our laboratory. Field/laboratory application of this assay would require specific detection of the different serotypes of the toxin with high sensitivity. Therefore, the different protein substrates will be modeled and synthesized during this effort, which will be continued in Phase II towards optimization of the assay in a buffer solution and its expansion to a variety of matrices such as milk, human serum spiked with the toxin. We are currently interacting with interested parties in the industry for the purpose of commercializing the technology.

FREEDOM PHOTONICS LLC
75 Willow Springs Lane Suite 201,
Goleta, CA 93117
(805) 708-3960

PI: Mr. Jonathon Barton
(805) 680-2176
Contract #: W31P4Q-08-C-0414
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA
ECE Dept, UCSB
Santa Barbara, CA 93116
(805) 893-4847

ID#: 08ST1-0221
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 08-014       Awarded: 8/21/2008
Title: Ultra Low Drive Voltage Electro-Optic Modulator
Abstract:  &nbs The main objective of this proposal is to develop ultra low drive voltage, low insertion loss, and high bandwidth modulators. This will be achieved using substrate removed optical nanowires. This new phase modulator design and fabrication platform will be combined with existing techniques for achieving the required high bandwidth and high efficiency operation, such as traveling wave electrode design and push-pull Mach Zehnder modulator architecture. The proposed approach enables a modulator that has a drive voltage on the order of 0.1V and the potential for integration of a driver amplifier.

KITWARE
28 Corporate Drive,
Clifton Park, NY 12065
(518) 371-3971

PI: Dr. Anthony Hoogs
(518) 371-3971
Contract #: W31P4Q-09-C-0051
UNIV. OF PENNSYLVANIA
Moore Business Office, 220 S 33rd St., room 280 Towne
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 898-3150

ID#: 08ST1-0178
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 08-009       Awarded: 11/10/2008
Title: Building Recognition by Function
Abstract:  &nbs The activity surrounding a building can provide functional information that is not available in static imagery. We propose to develop a method to classify buildings based on observed video activity that addresses the primary challenges of noisy, partial observables, and urban environments where buildings are close together. Our approach is based on probabilistic modeling of the activity surrounding a building, characterized by functional elements such as building entrances/exits, parking spots and traffic lanes. Activity patterns for each building type are learned over time from buildings with known type. Unknown buildings are classified by comparing their observed activity signatures against those for known building types. The method does not assume reliable tracking, does not rely on building geometry or appearance, and accounts for intermittent temporal coverage and buildings in close proximity. In Phase 1, we will determine which building types can be functionally recognized, and the associated requirements for video sensing such as resolution and extent of temporal coverage. We will also examine the effects of motion extraction accuracy on recognition.

LOGOS TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
3811 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 100
Arlington, VA 22203
(703) 584-5839

PI: Dr. Geoff Hazel
(919) 827-0088
Contract #: W31P4Q-08-C-0443
MICHIGAN TECH RESEARCH
3600 Green Ct., Ste. 100
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
(734) 913-6859

ID#: 08ST1-0160
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 08-008       Awarded: 9/8/2008
Title: Dynamic Multisensor Exploitation (DYME)
Abstract:  &nbs Logos Technologies and Michigan Tech Research Institute propose a Dynamic Multisensor Exploitation approach that uses complementary attributes of Wide Area Persistent Surveillance (WAPS), provided by EO/IR and RF-GMTI, sensors and multiple narrow field of view “identification” systems that provide classification and identification information. For Phase 1, we propose a phenomenology survey to identify key signatures and observables, a conceptual system architecture and CONOPS, and a demonstration of this system using existing and modeled data. We will demonstrate how specific algorithms can be used to let the identification sensors improve the tracking performance of the WAPS system, how information from the WAPS system can be used to improve the quality of information from identification sensors to facilitate correct detection and, thirdly, how information collected across multiple sensing modalities can provide enhanced identification of targets across time and space. The result will be a concept for a robust system that greatly improves tracking and identification of mobile threats in complex terrains. In Phase II, we will work with the government to define data collections that will support expanded demonstrations and development of advanced algorithmic frameworks necessary to implement this DYME concept, culminating in the development of a prototype processing unit.

MAYACHITRA, INC.
5266 Hollister Avenue, Suite 299,
Santa Barbara, CA 93111
(805) 967-9828

PI: Dr. Kenneth Sullivan
(805) 967-9828
Contract #: W31P4Q-08-C-0464
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA, RIVERSIDE
Dept. of Electrical Engineerin, University of California
Riverside, CA 92521
(951) 827-7886

ID#: 08ST1-0192
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 08-010       Awarded: 9/15/2008
Title: Automated Video Activity Analysis for Military Operations
Abstract:  &nbs The increasing use of video in force protection, autonomous vehicles reconnaissance, and surveillance in general has created a great demand for automated analysis and monitoring. It is infeasible to have humans monitoring and analyzing the vast amount of video used in such surveillance, and automated analysis yields hope to ease the burden and increase the amount of information extracted from collected video. Recent research on automated analysis has focused on detection of a set of simple activities in a given context. However further development is needed to generalize this analysis to be truly useful in effectively using collected video. For example, it is not generally possible to know ahead of time what an image analyst will be looking for. Additionally in many cases human attention is required for decision making, but this attention needs to be focused on a very limited set of collected video. We propose to develop a system for extracting useful information from large-scale video collections. To do this we will develop effective tools applicable to several scenarios: finding activities in a video collection matching an example activity, notification and highlighting of abnormal activity, and recognition of known activities.

MICROLINK DEVICES
6457 Howard Street,
Niles, IL 60714
(847) 588-3001

PI: Dr. Noren Pan
(847) 588-3001
Contract #: W31P4Q-08-C-0421
UNIV. OF NOTRE DAME
261 Fitzpatrick Hall,
Notre Dame, IN 46556
(574) 631-5693

ID#: 08ST1-0215
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 08-013       Awarded: 8/20/2008
Title: Front End Opto-Electronics for Future Radio Communications
Abstract:  &nbs The innovation in the proposed program is the development of a unique process technology that will enable the realization of a high current InP based photodetector with improved current response and reliability performance. The process technology is an epitaxial lift-off (ELO) process where the epitaxial material is completely removed from the substrate. The InP substrate is left intact and can be reused for additional growths, which provides a pathway to a lower cost solution. The ELO process can provide significant improvements in the thermal impedance of the high current photodetector since the substrate is completely eliminated and the remaining photodetector active material can be bonded onto a high thermal conductivity material or other flexible plastic material to provide further integration with a patch antenna. The thermal impedance of the high current photodetector will be the combination of the InGaAs absorber and the thermal sink. The frequency bandwidth of the photodetector will be up to 20 GHz with a goal towards achieving a high output power of 5 W. The wavelength of interest is 1.55 μm, which is lattice matched InGaAs on InP.

MORTON PHOTONICS, INC.
3301 Velvet Valley Drive,
West Friendship, MD 21794
(410) 707-0949

PI: Dr. Paul A. Morton
(443) 745-4779
Contract #: W31P4Q-08-C-0427
JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV.
Research Project Admin., 3400 N. Charles Street,
Baltimore, MD 21218
(410) 516-8668

ID#: 08ST1-0209
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 08-012       Awarded: 8/20/2008
Title: Versatile Miniature Silicon WDM Modulators for Complex Modulation Formats
Abstract:  &nbs This program will transfer technology created at the Johns Hopkins University to Morton Photonics, additionally creating novel new devices and systems approaches in an ongoing collaboration. The focus is on the design, fabrication and testing at the system level of a number of novel active-silicon microring resonator based WDM modulators. These devices will be wavelength-selective WDM modulators; they will demultiplex a single wavelength channel, modulate that channel, and then multiplex that modulated wavelength back onto the WDM signal, without affecting any of the other wavelengths within the WDM signal. This program will develop novel linearized WDM modulators that can support both analog modulation, as well as advanced modulation formats that are becoming increasingly important for future communications systems. Devices will be fabricated on silicon using CMOS compatible processes to take advantage of the tremendous capabilities of modern CMOS fabrication lines, which support large scale photonic integration and high volume manufacture with low device costs. This program addresses the advanced modulation formats being researched currently for long haul optical fiber communication systems, and through integration onto an active silicon-photonics platform will enable these transmission techniques to be utilized for a broad range of optical network scenarios.

NICO TECHNOLOGIES CORP.
3233 Andora Drive,
Ypsilanti, MI 48198
(734) 945-8131

PI: Dr. R. Chris Doty
(734) 763-8768
Contract #: W31P4Q-08-C-0426
UNIV. OF MICHIGAN
2300 Hayward, Chemical Engineering
Ann Arbor, MI, MI 48109
(734) 763-8767

ID#: 08ST1-0047
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 08-002       Awarded: 8/20/2008
Title: Novel Neural-Electrical Interfaces for Neural Device Control
Abstract:  &nbs A new method of manufacturing of deep brain stimulation devices is proposed. We will use proprietary method of processing of carbon nanotubes into ultrastrong and highly conductive thin sheets. Flexibility of the sheets and special electrode design will make possible effective integration of the designed implants into the brain tissues. This will greatly reduce inflammation which will be tested in-vivo (rats). High impedance and charge storage capacity comparable to that of irridium oxide will provide excellent interface for electrical excitation of neurons.

OBJECTVIDEO
11600 Sunrise Valley Drive, Suite # 290
Reston, VA 20191
(703) 654-9314

PI: Dr. FENG GUO
(703) 654-9300
Contract #: W31P4Q-08-C-0470
NORTHWESTERN UNIV.
2145 SHERIDAN ROAD,
EVANSTON, IL 60208
(847) 491-2901

ID#: 08ST1-0147
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 08-007       Awarded: 9/25/2008
Title: Wide Area Video Motion Blur Elimination
Abstract:  &nbs This Small Business Technology Transfer Phase I project will investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of fusing image analysis with Global Position System (GPS) and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) information to eliminate motion blur from hi-resolution wide area videos. The key innovations in the proposed effort are: 1) a novel non Linear Shift- Invariant (LSI) motion blur estimation algorithm that estimates the space variant motion blur field from ƒÑ-channel of the input color image, and 2) an efficient unified framework to deblur hi-resolution wide area image. In the proposed framework, estimates from non-LSI blur estimation algorithm are used not only to refine blur parameters obtained using the GPS and IMU measurements but also to account for different blurring of independently moving targets. An efficient patch-by-patch solution is proposed to handle high resolution imagery that incorporates the structure of Bayer pattern for blur estimation and correction. In addition, enabling technologies will be developed to investigate and correct the impact of several factors, including lens distortion, rolling shutter, hilly terrain, parallax, etc. The Phase I effort will include: development of enabling algorithms, implementation of the framework, demonstration of proof of concept, theoretical computational complexity analysis and quantitative evaluation of the proposed technologies.

PRINCETON VISION LLC
P.O. Box 408,
Princeton Junction, NJ 08550
(856) 316-6717

PI: Dr. Peng Chang
(609) 468-4570
Contract #: W31P4Q-08-C-0429
THE ROBOTICS INSTITUTE
Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 268-2585

ID#: 08ST1-0107
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 08-005       Awarded: 8/22/2008
Title: Monte Carlo Sampling Based Collision Detection Algorithm Development And False Positive And False Negative Rate Analysis: A Bayesian Approach
Abstract:  &nbs The ability to detect and avoid collision is vital for intelligent vehicles navigating in dynamic environments. There is an acute need of high quality collision detection systems to improve the performance of the US military UGV/UAV, and to develop active safety devices for the conventional automotive market. In the proposed Phase I work, a Monte Carlo sampling based collision detection algorithm will be developed and evaluated rigorously. A sampling based framework will also be built to facilitate the analysis of FAR/FNR with respect to the realistic noise distributions.

SCIENCE RESEARCH LABORATORY, INC.
15 WARD STREET,
SOMERVILLE, MA 02143
(617) 547-1122

PI: Dr. Allen Flusberg
(617) 547-1122
Contract #: W31P4Q-08-C-0457
BOSTON UNIV.
25 Buick Street, Office of Sponsored Programs
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 353-4365

ID#: 08ST1-0202
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 08-011       Awarded: 9/22/2008
Title: High-Speed Diagnostic of Temperature and Intensity Variation on Diode-Laser Facets
Abstract:  &nbs In this STTR project, Science Research Laboratory (SRL) and Boston University Photonics Center (BU Photonics) will develop a revolutionary optical technology for detecting localized increases in temperature on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds. By appropriately responding to instabilities in laser diodes (LDs), SRL has demonstrated a 10X increase in their lifetime. Localized diode heating is a critical factor limiting the lifetime of LDs; such heating causes optical and electrical instabilities that damage the emitters and lead to their failure. These instabilities lead to catastrophic optical damage (COD), in which a dramatic temperature increase causes melting in the vicinity of the output facet. In Phase 1 we will obtain electrical and optical data that presage emitter failure. This data will enable SRL to design intelligent electronics that will help protect laser diodes and increase their performance and lifetime. In Phase 2, we will (1) fabricate intelligent fault-protection electronics that are based on the results of Phase 1; (2) demonstrate the improvement in lifetime and performance obtained by protecting; and (3) deliver a prototype of the protection circuit to a facility of DARPA’s choice for additional testing and verification.

TDA RESEARCH, INC.
12345 W. 52nd Ave.,
Wheat Ridge, CO 80033
(303) 940-2300

PI: Dr. Silvia Luebben
(303) 940-2317
Contract #: W31P4Q-08-C-0460
UNIV. OF PITTSBURGH
5063 BST3, 3051 Fifth Ave.
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
(412) 383-6672

ID#: 08ST1-0052
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 08-002       Awarded: 9/12/2008
Title: Design of Novel Brain-like Materials for Neural Interfacing
Abstract:  &nbs In recent years there has been an increased interest in the development of microelecrode arrays for implantation in the brain in the hope of stimulating paralyzed body parts, providing blind people with artificial vision, and allowing disabled people to operate a computer-controlled prosthetic device with their thoughts. Current neural probes have achieved a high spatial resolution and superb ability to record and transduce high quality neural signals. Unfortunately, existing electrode arrays show 40-60% failures within the first year, primarily because of neuronal necrosis around the electrode and encapsulation by scar tissue, which effectively insulates the electrode from the neuronal process and causes signal deterioration. In contrast, for chronic applications in humans, it would be desirable to have electrodes that functions for decades. The objective of this Phase I project is to develop electrically conducting and insulating materials that cause minimal foreign body response when in contact with brain tissue and could be used to fabricate neuronal prosthetic devices for chronic applications. The new materials will be screened in vitro during the Phase I project. Selected materials will then be used in Phase II to fabricate microelectrode prototypes, the performance of which will be tested in vivo.

TECHNOLOGY SERVICE CORP.
1900 S. Sepulveda Blvd, Suite 300
Los Angeles, CA 90025
(301) 576-2397

PI: Mr. Wayne Haack
(203) 268-1249
Contract #: W31P4Q-08-C-0445
GEORGIA TECH RESEARCH
7220 Richardson Rd.,
Smyrna, GA 30080
(404) 407-8274

ID#: 08ST1-0167
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 08-008       Awarded: 9/10/2008
Title: Dynamic Multisensor Exploitation (DYME)
Abstract:  &nbs The goal of the TSC/GTRI program is to enhance expeditionary (or other small force) ISR capabilities by providing: 1) improved performance for an aggregate of existing or near-term airborne sensors, mobile ground sensors and UGS, 2) more efficient use of data links, and 3) target discovery algorithms that are designed for the available exploitation equipment. The multiple sensor exploitation architectures and report-level fusion techniques will be compatible with the sensor and exploitation equipment capabilities. The techniques and algorithms will consider environmental conditions including terrain and foliage obscuration, weather, enemy tactics and CC&D measures. The DYME objectives will be achieved through: 1) a combination of sensor enhancements that can improve the aggregate performance when used in a sequential mode or as a sensor network, and that would have minimal hardware impact on the sensor hardware, 2) enhanced sensor siting and mission planning tools and techniques that consider the sequential use of individual sensors and the aggregate performance to improve the detection, location, identification and tracking of insurgent forces, and 3) the development of techniques that allow the rapid transmission, evaluation and dissemination of the key information for supporting multi-sensor data correlation, situation analysis and providing actionable information to the soldier.

UTOPIACOMPRESSION, CORP.
11150 W. Olympic Blvd., Suite 1020
Los Angeles, CA 90064
(310) 473-1500

PI: Dr. Joseph Yadegar
(310) 473-1500
Contract #: W31P4Q-08-C-0449
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA AT LOS
Department of Statistics, 8142 Math-Science Building
Los Angeles, CA 90095
(310) 794-5193

ID#: 08ST1-0116
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: 08-005       Awarded: 9/18/2008
Title: Passive Collision Detection for UAV Sense and Avoid Systems
Abstract:  &nbs The Department of Defense (DoD) has invested heavily and successfully in Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) technology. Currently, UAS face limitations on their utilization in civil airspace because they do not have the capability to sense and avoid (SAA) other air traffic. Ability to detect collisions with low False Alarm and False Negative Rates are crucial for SAA. Moreover, in several situations use of only passive sensors is necessary. To address this problem, UtopiaCompression in collaboration with the University of California, Los Angeles proposes to develop a Collision Detection system based on passive Electro-optical or Infra-red sensors. We show that it is possible to extract sufficient information from the images to completely observe the states of an approaching obstacle. We then propose Collision Detection methodologies based on statistical decision theory to decide whether or not a collision is going to occur. The desired False Alarm and False Negative Rates are input parameters to the algorithm.

---------- NAVY ----------

3 PHOENIX, INC.
13135 Lee Jackson Hwy, Suite 330
Fairfax, VA 22033
(703) 956-6480

PI: Mr. Michael Dickerson
(240) 604-2332
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0316
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO
9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0085,
La Jolla, CA 92093
(858) 534-5951

ID#: N08A-029-0023
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T029       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Novel Fiber Optic Methods for Sensing Shape, Orientation and/or Heading of Undersea Arrays and Tethers
Abstract:  &nbs Structural state awareness can be vitally important to a wide variety of both commercial and military systems, including buildings, bridges, vehicles and advanced sensors. Equipment required to provide this telemetry has typically been large and heavy making it difficult to incorporate into the desired environment. The use of a strain and temperature sensing technique based in fiber optics can provide significant benefits for such systems including low cost and non-intrusive sensor elements. Coupled with an accurate and robust shape reconstruction algorithm, a fiber sensing system can provide the required health monitoring necessary for enhanced safety and performance of these structures. In this Phase I effort, the team of 3 Phoenix, Inc. (3Pi) and the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) propose to examine alternative interrogator architectures that simultaneously provide high reliability and rapid data acquisition; adapt, refine and evaluate a real-time shape estimation and reconstruction algorithm that takes discrete strain measurements as input; and present a comprehensive design for a fiber sensing system to remotely measure the position and orientation of tethered payloads as well as the tether structure itself.

3E TECHNOLOGIES INTERNATIONAL, INC.
9715 Key West Avenue, Suite 500
Rockville, MD 20850
(972) 819-0220

PI: Mr. Chris Guo
(301) 944-1294
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0318
VIRGINIA TECH
342 Durham Hall (0350),
Blacksburg, VA 24061
(540) 231-2963

ID#: N08A-034-0378
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T034       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Extensible Affordable Software Defined Radio with Cross-Band Cross-Protocol Capability
Abstract:  &nbs Software Defined Radio (SDR) technology and solutions are proven and capable. However, the cost of the systems limits their immediate use outside of military applications. Beside the cost of the SDR systems, it has been difficult to develop SDR concepts and prototypes on platforms that have clear migration paths to become commercial products. EFJI and Virginia Tech propose to develop a versatile Software Defined Radio (SDR) platform that is flexible and scalable in capabilities, functions and cost for a wide range of solutions from inexpensive single- function, single channel radio to high-performance multi-application, multi-channel communications system. New software, hardware, modeling and simulation architecture will be developed for versatility and cost reduction. The platform will be offered in commercial form factor to researchers and practitioners for development with interface to proprietary features to shorten the time from concepts to products. The design will leverage OSSIE (The Open Source SCA Implementation: Embedded).

ACADIA OPTRONICS, LLC
1395 Piccard Drive, Suite 210,
Rockville, MD 20850
(240) 731-1300

PI: Dr. Edward Hagley
(240) 731-1300
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0310
UNIV. OF KANSAS
2385 Irving Hill Road, 228 Youngberg Hall
Lawrence, KS 66045
(785) 864-7705

ID#: N08A-034-0243
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T034       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Extensible Affordable Software Defined Radio with Cross-Band Cross-Protocol Capability
Abstract:  &nbs Acadia Optronics, LLC, in partnership with the University of Kansas, proposes to develop a hybrid reconfigurable Software-Defined-Radio (SDR) architecture in which plug-in, front-end, rf modules interface to powerful, reconfigurable processing hardware and software through high-throughput interconnects. The complexity of the plug-in modules may range from simple antennas, to complete communication systems (e.g. 802.11b/g/n), depending on the availability of COTS chipsets/hardware. The interface specifications between the plug-in modules and the reconfigurable hardware (FPGAs) will be flexible enough to support analog-rf, or digitized-data transmission, depending on the degree of signal processing in the plug-in module itself. The FPGAs will be interfaced to the host operating system through the use of high-bandwidth PCI-Express x8 interfaces, which each provide an aggregate throughput of 16 Gb/s. This hybrid architecture, benefitting from recent developments in communication interfaces, FPGA processing power, and COTS products, will be powerful, flexible, and low cost.

ACTA, INC.
2790 Skypark Drive, Suite 310,
Torrance, CA 90505
(310) 530-1008

PI: Dr. Timothy K. Hasselman
(310) 530-1008
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0347
SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES
PO Bos 5800, Mail Stop 0557
Albuquerque, NM 87185
(505) 844-7052

ID#: N08A-002-0195
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T002       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Innovative Approaches to the Automated Simulation of Aircraft Structural Joints in Structural Analysis Models
Abstract:  &nbs ACTA Incorporated and Sandia National Laboratories propose a seven month STTR Phase I project to demonstrate the feasibility of developing an automated simulation of aircraft structural joints in structural analysis models. The technical approach includes an expert system executive to create detailed models of abstracted joint components including interfacing structural components, fasteners and nonlinear interface constitutive models. Optional tasks are proposed with a three month performance period to implement a selected joint model in an existing finite element structural modeling code to demonstrate the feasibility of integrating the proposed joint model within conventional finite element modeling software.

ACTIVE SIGNAL TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
Hammonds South, Unit Q, 611 North Hammonds Ferry Road
Linthicum Heights, MD 21090
(410) 636-9350

PI: Dr. Keith Bridger
(410) 636-9350
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0311
ALFRED UNIV.
One Saxon Drive,
Alfred, NY 14802
(607) 871-2964

ID#: N08A-020-0176
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T020       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Heat Extraction from Underwater Acoustic Projectors
Abstract:  &nbs The present proposal is focused on developing novel methods to counteract excessive heat build-up in underwater sonar projectors. Building on over 25 years of experience in the design of Navy sonar devices and thermal management applied to high power density transducers and smart material actuators, Active Signal Technologies and Alfred University will model several readily implemented passive and active techniques for enhanced heat transfer to the surrounding water. A Terfenol driven transducer was selected because of its very high intrinsic power density at low frequency and its broad operating temperature range. In addition to model-based optimization of various combinations of convective, conductive and evaporative cooling, driver designs will also be developed that minimize the source-heat through efficiency improvements in the Terfenol rod and its associated drive elements (magnetic circuit design including laminations, permanent bias magnets, coil configuration, etc). Using an integrated systems approach the team will also examine and attempt to mitigate any adverse impacts of the cooling mechanism on acoustic performance, reliability and methods/materials of construction. Similarly, while distortion is not the central theme of the present effort, the baseline transducer design will incorporate a novel depth compensation mechanism that is effective in minimizing it.

ADVANCED COOLING TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
1046 New Holland Avenue,
Lancaster, PA 17601
(717) 295-6058

PI: Mr. Richard Bonner
(717) 295-6105
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0312
PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.
North Atherton Street, Applied Research Laboratory
State College, PA 16801
(814) 865-6531

ID#: N08A-020-0220
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T020       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Heat Pipe Cooling of Underwater Acoustic Projectors
Abstract:  &nbs This Small Business Technology Transfer Phase I project will develop an innovative thermal solution to cool underwater acoustic projectors. More efficient cooling of the acoustic projectors will allow the devices to run at longer duty cycles, higher output powers and with longer service life. Current acoustic projectors use thermal conduction through the transducer parts to dissipate the waste heat to a surrounding water sink. For past applications at lower powers and duty cycles, this thermal management approach has been sufficient to maintain the acoustic performance. Stress and electric field limits tend to be more of an issue at these operating conditions. As the Navy requires higher duty cycles (>10%) and power outputs from the transducers, the thermal limit becomes of greater concern. Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) and Pennsylvania State University’s Applied Research Lab (ARL) propose to develop a heat pipe assisted thermal solution to increase the effective thermal conductivity of the transducer so that the transducer can operate at lower temperatures.

AGILTRON CORP.
15 Cabot Road,
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 935-1200

PI: Dr. Guanghai Jin
(781) 935-1200
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0326
UNIV. OF NORTH TEXAS
P.O. Box 305250,
Denton , TX 76203
(940) 565-3940

ID#: N08A-007-0229
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T007       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Photonic WDM Digital Beamformer
Abstract:  &nbs An innovative concept for a scalable Digital Beamformer that can be applied to the full range of Navy radars/RF communication is proposed. The concept is photonics based and will support transmit/receive applications over the 0.1 to 40 GHz, and V bands. The design provides a digitally controlled True Time Delay based Beamformer effectively adaptive to a phased array in any portion of the spectral coverage. The Phase I approach will develop the dual channel photonic WDM true time delay and demonstrate the key characteristics followed by a Phase II Program that will miniaturize the design and test a multi channel implementation. The team of Agiltron and University of Northern Texas is working closely with BAE Systems on this unconventional approach leveraging our recent breakthroughs in manufacturing high performance fiber delay lines and polymer waveguide technologies. The proposed approach overcomes the deficiencies associated with electronic beam forming components, offering frequency independent performance by controlling the phase and amplitude in a small, lightweight package with minimal power consumption. Our approach provides unprecedented performance in terms of wide dynamic range, low noise and fast dynamic reconfigurability.

AKRON AIR MATERIALS, LLC
411 Wolf Ledges, Suite 105,
Akron, OH 44311
(330) 666-6196

PI: Dr. Fred Choy
(330) 972-6847
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0298
UNIV. OF AKRON
Mechanical Engineering, University of Akron
Akron, OH 44325
(330) 972-6847

ID#: N08A-013-0016
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T013       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Innovative Concepts for Non-Thermal Based Anti-Icing/De-Icing of Rotor Blade Leading Edges
Abstract:  &nbs This proposal aims at the development of a low-power deicing system using the newly developed magnetostrictive alloy as functional materials, namely the Ni-Mn-Ga alloy. Present studies have shown that the Ni-Mn-Ga smart alloy does not require excessive input power to operate while an impulsive strain of over 5% can be generated under a load of over 1 Mpa. When power is applied to the solenoid around the functional material, strain is produced by the Martensitic transformation of the alloy and will exhibit a sudden volumetric expansion resulting in a substantial impulsive force. Finite element models will be generated to determine the necessary impulse force/strain required to de-bond the accreted ice. By installing actuators in series along the rotor blade structure and activated sequentially, surface accreted ice can be de-bonded effectively. As the surface area of leading edge in the rotor blade is relatively small, miniaturized design and fabrication technologies will be applied to fabricate the de-icing devices to be attached to the blade surface. While the proposed deicing system will be jointly developed by the University of Akron and Akron Air Materials, LLC., the prototype will be tested in the icing wind tunnel at Goodrich Deicing Division.

ALETAV TECHNOLOGIES
298 Janine Way,
Bridgewater, NJ 08807
(908) 229-5966

PI: Dr. Jungsang Kim
(919) 660-5258
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0299
DUKE UNIV.
ECE Department, Box 90291
Durham, NC 27708
(919) 660-5258

ID#: N08A-027-0368
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T027       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: High Sensitivity Analog to Digital Converter for Wideband RF Signal
Abstract:  &nbs With the advances in solid-state electronics and optoelectronics, ultra wideband radio frequency receiver designs are now practical. One of the consequences of these large bandwidth waveforms is the very high range resolution that results. Various architectures of receivers have been proposed for the ultra wideband applications, but most popular architectures among them are heterodyne, homodyne, low-IF and zero-IF. The receiver designs require large bandwidths to preserve signal waveforms and high-speed circuits for signal detection. Normally, the wideband signal components at the low and the high bounds are processed with different fidelity due to the difference in dispersion and loss. Additionally, the frequency-dependent wideband signal loss must be also addressed in the receiver design. The ultra wideband receiver must be equipped with high-performance analog-to- digital converters (ADCs). In receiver, extremely high sampling rate is required in order to preserve and repeat the wideband signal for digitizing. In light of this, we propose an ADC architecture which includes a novel analog signal pre-processing stage. Through the pre-processing stage, incoming signals are filtered and transformed at real time within analog RF domain. The proposed architecture enhances the robustness against noise and jitter, ultimately SNR and SFDR, for the high fidelity signal-to-information conversion.

ANDRO COMPUTATIONAL SOLUTIONS, LLC
Beeches Technical Campus, 7902 Turin Road, Ste. 2-1
Rome, NY 13440
(315) 334-1163

PI: Mr. Andrew L. Drozd
(315) 334-1163
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0242
OKLAHOMA STATE UNIV.
College of Engineering, Archit, 201 Advanced Technology Resear
Stillwater, OK 74078
(405) 744-9500

ID#: N08A-006-0263
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T006       Awarded: 7/10/2008
Title: Stochastic Characterization of Naval Aircraft Electromagnetic Vulnerability - ElectroMagnetic Susceptibility Threshold Analysis Techniques by Estimation and Statistics (EMSTATES)
Abstract:  &nbs Military aircraft come replete with interconnected electronic systems (e.g., communication, radar, and navigation systems). As the operating frequencies broaden and systems become more complex, their proper functioning is increasingly threatened by electromagnetic interference (EMI) from high-power external sources encountered in their operating environments as well as internal sources. Because experimental testing of these systems’ EMC in their operational environments comes late in the acquisition process, simulation tools are needed to gauge their system-level immunity to EMI as early as possible in the program in order to minimize acquisition cost and timeline. For such tools to be useful, they must be capable of accounting for the complexities encountered with this problem. This includes computing the fields within aircraft cockpits, cabins and equipment bays as well as currents on objects such as avionic systems and their interconnecting cables. Computations must be done over a broad frequency range representative of the operational EM environments and a nearly infinite number of source geometries fields on and within these complex structures. Significant uncertainty arises due to the complexity of both the physical structures and the variability of the electromagnetic sources to the point of rendering computational electromagnetic (CEM) codes an inefficient means of addressing this problem. The geometrical complexity of critical electronic systems and cabling found on military aircraft and other systems has increased to the point where classical methods of analysis and numerical computation no longer give satisfactory results for EM coupling, propagation, compatibility and other issues of practical concern. Moreover, these systems face a broad range of intentional and unintentional EMI sources and threats. This effort is aimed at developing new computational technologies, called EMSTATES, that permit the characterization of EMI phenomena in complex systems while accounting for their stochastic nature and uncertainties in their composition and input-output characteristics. A key component of this tool is its ability to quantify the results in a stochastic sense in order to facilitate weapon system performance risk assessments. This effort focuses on methods to combine reverberation and mode-stir measurement insight with electromagnetic field sampling statistics to the current problem.

APPLIED EM, INC.
144 Research Drive,
Hampton, VA 23666
(614) 292-8671

PI: Dr. C. J. Reddy
(757) 224-2035
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0279
THE OHIO STATE UNIV.
1320 Kinnear Road,
Columbus, OH 43212
(614) 292-8671

ID#: N08A-023-0253
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T023       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Design Tools for Applying Characteristic Modes to Platform Integrated Antennas
Abstract:  &nbs Characteristic modes are proposed to optimize placement of vehicular antennas in the HF through lower UHF bands (2MHz to 450MHz). Characteristic modes provide physical insight into the currents induced on the vehicle and provide for placement of the antenna to excite desirable mode with increased efficiency. Computation of characteristic modes for arbitrary shaped platforms is documented in the literature. However, a design methodology to use characteristic modes as means to optimize vehicle integrated antennas is not yet devised. In this project, Applied EM proposes to develop a design optimization methodology to provide antenna engineer to utilize characteristic modes to increase radiation efficiency of vehicle integrated antennas. Powerful iterative eigen solvers will be utilized for fast computation of the modes. Combined with state of the art optimizers such as genetic and particle swarm algorithm, the proposed design tool will guide the engineer to quickly come up with the optimized location. Development of graphical user interface is planned to make the tool user friendly and suitable for commercialization.

APPLIED PHYSICAL SCIENCES CORP.
475 Bridge Street, Suite 100
Groton, CT 06340
(860) 448-3253

PI: Dr. Benjamin Connell
(860) 448-3253
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0295
MASSACHUSETTS INST OF
77 Massachusetts Ave, Building E19-750
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-6762

ID#: N08A-030-0377
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T030       Awarded: 6/30/2008
Title: Efficient, Highly Maneuverable Artificial Fish for Stealthy Surveillance
Abstract:  &nbs Experimental and computational studies have indicated the benefits of fish swimming propulsion for efficiency and fast maneuvering capability. The biological paradigm of using unsteady body motion to generate and manipulate flow vorticity for desired hydrodynamic thrust marks a shift from the quasi-steady treatments used in practice for the engineering of vehicle hydrodynamics. A key component to fish efficiency and maneuvering capability is the precision evolutionary tuning of structural properties of the fish body. This tuning allows the fish to lock in efficient natural fluid-structural modes of propulsion with minimal energy input. The storage and re-release of structural potential energy into the flow permit high swimming efficiencies and the large power deliveries required for fast maneuvering. The proposed vehicle follows the biological design of an underactuated structurally tuned flexible primary propulsor, utilizing natural dynamics of the system to realize locomotive efficiencies. The single point modally actuated flexible tail propulsor is complemented by a pair of two-degree-of-freedom three-dimensional foils to be used in quasi-static mode as control surfaces, and in flapping mode for maneuvering. Vehicle design will be built upon previous studies into passive and actuated fluid-structural modes and propulsion of tuned flexible bodies, and maneuvering control using three-dimensional flapping foils.

APTIMA, INC.
12 Gill Street, Suite 1400
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 496-2415

PI: Ms. Emily Wiese
(781) 496-2449
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0338
UNIV. OF IOWA
Operator Performance Lab., 3131 Seamans Center
Iowa City, IA 52242
(319) 631-4445

ID#: N08A-004-0374
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T004       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Optimized Real-time Complex Information Display (ORCID)
Abstract:  &nbs Advances in modeling and simulation, networking, and computer graphics technology have made it possible to conduct large-scale, distributed LVC training events, such as the Navy’s Fleet Synthetic Training-Joint (FST-J) exercises on a regular basis. However, FST-J exercises are not without room for improvement. Instructors and exercise controllers often confront difficulties assessing the state of trainees with respect to their tasks and performance on those tasks, maintaining situational awareness concerning the state of the exercise system, and coordinating diagnostic activities between the distributed team of instructors, exercise controllers, and information systems specialists. Without the ability to understand the status of the trainees and the networked exercise system, it is difficult to diagnose and fix potential failures quickly and with minimal impact to the overall training exercise. To assist in this, we propose developing a common operating picture (COP) designed specifically for use by instructors during LVC exercise execution. Such a COP will present performance and simulator status data to instructors in a way that helps them 1) assess trainee status across teams and locations, 2) assess the exercise system status, and 3) determine how to adjust the exercise scenario in order to fix technological or pedagogical failures in the exercise.

APTIMA, INC.
12 Gill Street, Suite 1400
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 496-2415

PI: Dr. Amy Alexander
(781) 496-2471
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0280
UNIV. OF IOWA
Operator Performance Lab., 3131 Seamans Center
Iowa City, IA 52242
(319) 631-4445

ID#: N08A-005-0255
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T005       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Intuitive Navigation System for Effective Collision-avoidance Tactics (INSECT)
Abstract:  &nbs Vertical short takeoff and landing (VSTOL) operators face numerous challenges, particularly during takeoff, hover, and landing operations. Threats take the form of power lines, structures, and—in the case of combat—enemy fire. Often, these threats are obscured when visibility is compromised by dust, sand, or snow. Maintaining awareness of the surrounding environment becomes almost impossible. VSTOL operators need a set of electronic eyes that can “see” even under conditions of zero visibility. To meet this need, Aptima and the University of Iowa Operator Performance Laboratory propose to develop an Intuitive Navigation System for Effective Collision-avoidance Tactics (INSECT). In Phase I, INSECT will provide a simplified perceptual display to enhance situation awareness not only during maneuvers such as vertical landing, but throughout flight. Addressing operational and perceptual challenges during VSTOL operations is only part of the problem. Upon the completion of Phase II, INSECT will provide a comprehensive navigation and guidance system for VSTOL operators, supporting collision avoidance, terrain negotiation, flight planning, and flight path adherence. The system will integrate a proven synthetic vision display with a model terrain force field and a unique external sensor display to provide operators with enhanced awareness of their surrounding environment.environment.

ARCON CORP.
260 Bear Hill Road,
Waltham, MA 02451
(781) 890-3330

PI: Ms. Teresa H. O'Donnell
(781) 890-3330
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0302
THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.
Applied Research Laboratory, PO Box 30
State College, PA 16804
(814) 865-7299

ID#: N08A-031-0348
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T031       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Antenna design by genetic algorithms
Abstract:  &nbs ARCON Corporation, in collaboration with The Pennsylvania State University Applied Research Laboratory, proposes to develop a genetic algorithm (GA) that places multiple antennas and/or arrays on a platform in order to optimize the radiation pattern objectives and spectrum co-utilization. We will investigate the application of different types of genetic algorithms to optimize several hybrid electromagnetic models. The proposed research includes: (1) exploring several possible chromosome representations in the GA, including binary, real, and mixed; (2) trying several types of GA, such as Pareto, Efficient Global Optimization (EGO), and mixed integer; (3) testing methods of increasing the computational speed of the cost function in order to accelerate the GA; and (4) finding appropriate constraints on the parameters in order to narrow the search space

ATC - NY
33 Thornwood Drive, Suite 500,
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 257-1975

PI: Mr. Daniel Tingstrom
(607) 257-1975
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0304
CORNELL UNIV.
Office of Sponsored Programs, 373 Pine Tree Rd
Ithaca, NY 14853
(607) 255-0655

ID#: N08A-032-0061
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T032       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: ALMA: The Agile Loss Management Approach in Wireless Networks
Abstract:  &nbs Tactical military wireless networks present unique challenges. They must provide the capabilities of commercially available wireless networks—under radically different conditions. Nodes are very mobile and network topologies change often. Military networks cannot use commercially available frequencies, which have line-of-sight limitations and are easily detected and jammed. Software defined radios (SDRs) provide new capabilities in which the physical layer can be controlled by software, and the underlying radio characteristics (waveforms) can be easily reconfigured by a software change. The programming of SDR networks, however, often ties higher layer performance to the physical layer characteristics. And inefficient use of the network results in suboptimal performance for both data packets, which require reliable transmission, and voice packets, which require timely transmission. The ALMA protocol will decouple the physical layer from the higher layers, and increase reliability by using redundant transmission paths. These paths occur in any combination of three ways: retransmission, simultaneous transmissions to multiple nodes (which split into multiple paths that converge on the destination), and multiple radio channels. We will demonstrate the feasibility of ALMA by creating the protocol and simulating its performance.

ATI, INC.
1505 , Bull Lea Road
Lexington, KY 40511
(304) 541-1825

PI: Dr. Alex Cho
(304) 541-1825
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0333
THE OHIO STATE UNIV.
177 Watts hall, 2041 College Road
Columbus, OH 43210
(614) 292-6085

ID#: N08A-010-0409
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T010       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Innovative Approaches to the Development of Corrosion Resistant Aircraft Alloys
Abstract:  &nbs Aluminum alloys are known to suffer from Stress Corrosion Cracking(SCC). SCC of high strength alloys can proceed rapidly, and can lead to devastating structural failures. However, a solid understanding of combined interactions of metallurgical, environmental and mechanical factors surrounding the crack tip during SCC is still elusive. Therefore, Al alloy developement for high corrosion resistance has been empirical in nature. The objective of this study is to understand the effect of microstructure in conjuction with the local environment(chemical and electrochemical)on the transition behavior from the incubation regime to high rate crack propagation regime during SCC. A quantitative predictive model will be developed based on the mechanistic underestanding fo SCC. This model will be utilzed in development of a new Al alloy most suitable for Navy aircrafts which normally operates in the most severe environment.

AVID LLC
1750 Kraft Drive, Suite 1400,
Blacksburg, VA 24060
(757) 872-8733

PI: Mr. Samuel B Wilson III
(540) 961-0067
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0292
VIRGINIA TECH
Aerospace & Ocean Engineering, 213C Randolph Hall 0203
Blacksburg, VA 24060
(540) 231-2548

ID#: N08A-030-0057
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T030       Awarded: 6/30/2008
Title: Efficient, Highly Maneuverable Artificial Fish for Stealthy Surveillance
Abstract:  &nbs AVID LLC and Profs. Neu, Philen, and Stilwell of Virginia Tech propose development of an artificial fish using Flexible Matrix Composite actuator technology for propulsion and control. This innovative approach to fin actuation uses structurally integrated hydraulic actuators to avoid the losses associated with conventional means of driving bioinspired propulsors, and more closely match the exceptional performance of natural swimmers. Two main areas will be addressed in Phase I. First, computational studies using an unsteady vortex lattice method will quantify synergistic hydrodynamic interactions between individual fins and between fins and body flexibility, and will aid in designing the test vehicle. Secondly, FMC caudal and pectoral fins will be constructed and integrated into a tank test vehicle capable of propelling itself along a wire. The vehicle will be characterized for propulsive efficiency. If awarded, the Phase I option will address improved system miniaturization and packaging in preparation for free swimming tests in Phase II.

BOSTON ENGINEERING CORP.
411 Waverley Oaks Road, Suite 114
Waltham, MA 02452
(781) 314-0714

PI: Mr. Michael Rufo
(781) 314-0723
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0294
FRANKLIN W. OLIN COLLEGE OF
Olin Way,
Needham, MA 02492
(781) 292-2556

ID#: N08A-030-0202
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T030       Awarded: 6/30/2008
Title: GhostSwimmer: Tactically Relevant, Biomimetically Inspired, Silent, Highly Efficient and Maneuverable Autonomous Fish Robot
Abstract:  &nbs GhostSwimmer is a tactical, efficient, biomimetic autonomous artificial fish UUV that employs the actual mechanics and dynamics of biological fish to create the ultimate in efficient swimming while remaining responsive to the needs of current covert, riverine, and littoral missions. It endeavors to attack problems facing current UUVs. A product of the combined experience of David Barrett (Olin College), inventor/developer of MIT’s groundbreaking Robo-Tuna, and Michael Rufo (Boston Engineering), inventor/developer of marsupial underwater UUV/Crawler technologies, it mimics the actual motion of a tuna (one of nature’s fastest and most maneuverable fish). This proposal doesn’t represent “another university research program” but endeavors to create a functional fish robot in Phase I that proves its advantages. The program’s focus is to reduce the mechanics of robotic swimming to practice. An important part of GhostSwimmer is its use of fins and their effect on its maneuverability. GhostSwimmer has the ability to adjust its dorsal, pectoral, and caudal fins in concert to provide significant thrust, maneuverability, and propulsive efficiency. This effort develops the integration of artificial muscles for fin and tail actuation. Modularity and use of COTS technology as well as inexpensive prototyping hardware allow GhostSwimmer to be cost effective and inexpensive to upgrade.

CFD RESEARCH CORP.
215 Wynn Dr., 5th Floor,
Huntsville, AL 35805
(256) 726-4884

PI: Dr. Robert Arslanbekov
(256) 726-4808
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0350
GEORGIA TECH RESEARCH CORP.
Office of Sponsored Programs, 505 Tenth Street, NW
Atlanta, GA 30332
(404) 894-6929

ID#: N08A-008-0100
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T008       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Viscous Cartesian Flow Solver with AMR Capabilities for Automated Flow Simulation
Abstract:  &nbs The computational grid generation process remains a troublesome bottleneck in development of aerodynamic databases for complex geometries and multi-body configurations. The ability of Cartesian-grid based methods to perform automatic mesh generation and dynamic mesh adaptation allows for substantially reduced manpower, time and cost. The advantages of octree-based Cartesian-mesh methods have been already demonstrated for inviscid flow simulations. The goal of this STTR project is to expand the Cartesian-mesh CFD methods for viscous flow simulations. During Phase I, we will explore several innovative methodologies including binary-tree based anisotropic mesh refinement near embedded boundaries, gas-kinetic scheme with embedded boundaries, a normal ray refinement technique and hybrid Cartesian/mesh-free methods. These approaches will be evaluated and ranked for efficient treatment of viscous flow effects near complex boundaries. The ease of implementation, accuracy, efficiency and generality will be investigated for selected test cases. Our framework will provide capabilities for direct simulations up to high Reynolds numbers with support of different turbulence models. The experience of the CFDRC team with Cartesian solvers will be enhanced by the Georgia Tech team to demonstrate the proposed innovations. During Phase II, we will fully implement, demonstrate and validate the prototype algorithms selected in Phase I with particular emphasis to Navy systems.

CFD RESEARCH CORP.
215 Wynn Dr., 5th Floor,
Huntsville, AL 35805
(256) 726-4800

PI: Dr. Alex Zhou
(256) 726-4800
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0271
STANFORD UNIV.
Department of Bioengineering,
Stanford, CA 94305
(650) 723-1230

ID#: N08A-019-0219
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T019       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: An Integrated Optimization System for Lightening the Load of Warfighters
Abstract:  &nbs Warfighters are increasingly relying on technology equipment to ensure safety, mission effectiveness, and situational awareness. This equipment increases the capabilities of warfighters but also adds to their weight burden. This excess load could cause significant stress on the musculoskeletal system and lead to physiological deficits. The overall objective of the proposed project is to develop a system level optimization environment to design a squad for critical missions while automatically lightening the load on individual warfighters. The main focus of Phase I work is to determine the feasibility of integrating the various components to form an optimization system for tradeoff analysis between the weight and squad combat effectiveness. This optimization system is composed of four major modules, including rigid body dynamics that simulates the motion of equipment, dynamic motion prediction that simulates the motion of individual warfighter, equipment-distribution that considers various factors and an equipment database. The functionalities of these component modules will be defined first and then a comprehensive plan for the transfer of I/O between modules will be developed to ensure seamless integration. Finally, the prototype optimization environment will be demonstrated on selected missions for individual as well as squad.

CHARLES RIVER ANALYTICS, INC.
625 Mount Auburn Street,
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 491-3474

PI: Scott S. Potter, PhD
(617) 491-3474
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0340
INST. FOR HUMAN & MACHINE
40 South Alcaniz Street,
Pensacola, FL 32502
(850) 202-4473

ID#: N08A-004-0059
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T004       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Integrated Visualization and Control for Live, Virtual, and Constructive Training Management IVAC-4-LVAC)
Abstract:  &nbs To help training managers process the diverse and high-volume streams of information from LVC training exercises and control the entities within those exercises, we propose to design and demonstrate a system for Integrated Visualization and Control for Live, Virtual, and Constructive Training Management (IVAC-4-LVAC). Our solution is comprised of three key elements: 1) Advanced visualizations of complex training exercises provide observability of the training objectives and behaviors of the entities working toward achieving these training objectives; 2) Innovative control techniques provide directability to training managers so that they can manipulate entities to achieve the training objectives; 3) A framework for the intelligent collection and fusion of real-time entity behavior characteristics provides the information necessary for the visualizations and transmits direction from the control techniques. A key aspect of our technical approach is to ground the solution in a Cognitive Work Analysis (CWA) of the work environment. The CWA captures the relationships between entity behavior and higher-level intended effects (i.e., objectives) in a functional model of the environment. This model produces a set of functional requirements for the visualizations and control techniques.

CHARLES RIVER ANALYTICS, INC.
625 Mount Auburn Street,
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 491-3474

PI: Ryan Kilgore, PhD
(617) 491-3474
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0279
MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF
77 Massachusetts Avenue, Building E19-750
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-3906

ID#: N08A-005-0060
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T005       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Displays for Ecological VSTOL Operation (DEVO)
Abstract:  &nbs Despite their utility, VSTOL aircraft have been plagued by high accident rates, leading to unacceptable safety risks and extensive equipment maintenance costs. To enhance VSTOL safety, particularly under instrument flight or degraded visual conditions, we will design, demonstrate, and evaluate novel visual Displays for Ecological VSTOL Operation (DEVO). These displays—the first application of ecological design principles to VSTOL flight control—will increase the safety of both manned and unmanned VSTOL operations through simple visual cues to support operators’ direct perception of vehicle dynamics. Three major components comprise our approach. First, we will combine demonstrated work domain analysis techniques, theories of ecological perception, and rapid software prototyping techniques to design and demonstrate simple display mechanisms for presenting critical system information to the operator. Second, we will conduct basic human-performance experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of these display mechanisms in enhancing novice pilots’ skill acquisition and performance. Third, we will identify potential approaches for developing self-paced intelligent tutoring systems to leverage these displays in training VSTOL operators. We will also work with subcontractor Aurora Flight Systems to identify a pathway for demonstrating the use of these displays to control an Aurora unmanned vehicle in a live flight test under Phase II.

COMPOSITE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT, INC.
2600 Campus Drive, Suite D,
Lafayette, CO 80026
(303) 664-0394

PI: Dr. Steven Arzberger
(303) 664-0394
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0323
THE UNIV. OF TEXAS AT DALLAS
NanoTech Institute and Departm, P.O. 830688, M/S: BE26
Richardson, TX 75083
(972) 883-6538

ID#: N08A-017-0187
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T017       Awarded: 7/3/2008
Title: A Novel Approach to Impregnating Structural Resin into Carbon Nanotube (CNT) Assemblies to Yield Ultrahigh-Loaded Polymer Nanocomposites
Abstract:  &nbs The primary objective of this program is the investigation of new approaches to achieve well-dispersed ultrahigh loading of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in structural resins for advanced composites. “Well-dispersed” means CNTs that are optimally dispersed for achieving desired properties like strength, modulus, toughness, and thermal conductivity, rather than uniformly dispersed CNTs. Phase I will include the development of a scientific understanding of the fundamental impediments to well-dispersed ultrahigh CNT-based nanocomposites, including the development and demonstration of techniques for the characterization of interfacial bonding between CNTs and structural resins, establishment of relevant analytical models, and correlation of the degree of loading and nature of dispersion with mechanical performance for small nanocomposite test coupons. Our efforts will benchmark previous developments at The University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) that have already met CNT loading goals in polymer matrices of 10 percent by weight, and build upon these efforts through the development of novel approaches for the polymer impregnation of solid-state CNT textile precursors. This will include the evaluation of several key CNT aspects (purification, dispersion, functionalization, and processing) to establish a maximum loading capability of well-dispersed CNTs that display excellent CNT-matrix wetting. In Phase II, the most promising approaches will be used to fabricate large nanocomposite panels with various CNT loading ratio up to the maximum possible value for mechanical characterization. Detailed cost analyses will be prepared and methods proposed for lowering the cost and expansion of production capabilities anticipated to transition the technologies developed herein into a scalable demonstration in Phase III.

CONVERGENT MODELING, INC.
14532 Lisalynne Ct.,
Orlando, FL 32826
(321) 663-8962

PI: Mr. Kevin Erhart
(321) 947-7104
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0348
UNIV. OF CENTRAL FLORIDA
Mechanical Engineering Dept., P.O. Box 162450
Orlando, FL 32816
(407) 823-5778

ID#: N08A-008-0157
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T008       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Viscous Modeling for Automated Flow Simulation
Abstract:  &nbs Existing Computational Fluid Dynamic solutions suffer from several major limitations which prevent widespread use within the scope of complex aerospace flow situations, specifically, the area of weapons development. These limitations include requiring significant model setup time, requiring skilled labor to generate the underlying computational grid, and requiring extensive computational resources to construct large models. In response to these issues, the proposed solution is to utilize a novel Meshless method that promises to eliminate the need for complicated meshing procedures which demand time and labor to complete. The success of this project will have significant impact on aerospace design by the Navy, as it will remove the tedious mesh generation and shift the focus to more important tasks such as solution analysis and design optimization. Furthermore, this technique is perfectly suited for recursive Cartesian based grid generation schemes which allow for highly automated, adaptive, and efficient solutions. In this project the feasibility of an adaptive octree grid generation scheme and Meshless flow solver will be determined. Its success will lay the foundations for Phase II efforts where a turn key CFD package will be developed, which would allow designers to seamlessly transition from CAD model to CFD solution.

CORNERSTONE RESEARCH GROUP, INC.
2750 Indian Ripple Road,
Dayton, OH 45440
(937) 320-1877

PI: Richard D Hreha
(937) 320-1877
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0261
UNIV. OF DAYTON
300 College Park,
Dayton, OH 45469
(937) 229-2919

ID#: N08A-001-0042
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T001       Awarded: 9/8/2008
Title: Optimization of Polyurea Coatings for Blast and Impact Resistance
Abstract:  &nbs Cornerstone Research Group, Inc. (CRG) proposes to fully develop polyurea coatings for blast and impact resistance. Polyurea coatings show promise for increasing the blast and impact resistance of buildings and vehicles, but further development is necessary to ensure the success of these materials. Currently, there is no method for assessing the suitability of a coating for blast and impact resistance, as well as optimizing characteristics such as thickness and geometry. CRG will characterize polyurea materials on a variety of substrates and geometries, and develop a method for characterizing and optimizing the coating performance. Characterizing testing using a Universal Testing Machine (UTM) as well as real-world ballistics testing will be performed on coatings applied to a variety of substrates, with the end goal of developing an effective coating for blast and impact resistance.

CREARE, INC.
P.O. Box 71,
Hanover, NH 03755
(603) 643-3800

PI: Mr. David B. Kynor
(603) 643-3800
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0284
STATE UNIV. OF NY AT BUFFALO
Sherman Hall, Room 124, 3435 Main Street, Building 25
Buffalo, NY 14260
(716) 829-2746

ID#: N08A-025-0156
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T025       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Diver Health Monitoring System
Abstract:  &nbs Divers operate in a hostile environment that is physically stressful and mentally demanding. They must also function autonomously as communications are very limited during the dive. Each diver must be responsible for his/her own safety, as well as accomplishment of mission objectives. For some time, dive computers have been used to monitor dive profiles (depth and dive duration) and equipment (tank pressure and gas mixture). However, divers have no tools for monitoring the most critical determinant of their safety and effectiveness—their body. The goal of this project is development of a Diver Health Monitoring System (DHMS). The DHMS will provide the Navy with a powerful capability for real-time monitoring of both physiological and cognitive function during diving. The system will evolve the concept of the current dive computer into a physiological monitor capable of measuring the diver’s critical “vital signs” and predicting impending problems (e.g., hyperbaric oxygen toxicity, hypothermia, and excessive fatigue).

D&P LLC
3409 N. 42nd Pl.,
Phoenix, AZ 85018
(480) 518-0981

PI: Dr. Lei Tang
(480) 518-0981
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0349
NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV.
Campus Box 7910/3211 Broughton, Hall
Raleigh, NC 27695
(919) 515-2365

ID#: N08A-008-0204
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T008       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: A Cartesian Mesh Method For Turbulent Flow Simulation
Abstract:  &nbs This STTR Phase I project proposes to develop a Cartesian mesh solver for high Reynolds number turbulent flow simulations. Due to its ease of grid generation, simplicity of flow solver, lower computational storage requirement, significantly less operational count per cell, and also due to rapid growth of computer power, the Cartesian mesh approach gets revitalized recently with grid adaptation. These reinvented Cartesian mesh methods use body surfaces to perform cell cutting to preserve the geometric fidelity. With a robust cell-cutting algorithm, the grid generation process can be completely automated. Coupled with a tree-based data structure and solution-based grid adaptation, these methods have made great success for inviscid flow simulations. On the other hand, the extension of the Cartesian mesh approach to viscous flows meets tremendous technical challenges. This is because a very fine mesh is usually required near the body surface, leading to largely varying cell sizes associated with the mesh refinement and the small cut cells associated with the body surface. This STTR effort proposes to use subgrid near the body surfaces to alleviate those issues.

DELCROSS TECHNOLOGIES, LLC
2009 Fox Drive, Unit K
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 895-2067

PI: Dr. Robert A. Kipp
(312) 431-7413
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0230
THE UNIV. OF MICHIGAN
1301 Beal Avenue,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
(734) 647-1793

ID#: N08A-006-0106
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T006       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Stochastic Characterization of Naval Aircraft Electromagnetic Vulnerability
Abstract:  &nbs We will develop a simulation framework aimed at statistically characterizing EMI in aircraft replete with navigation, communication, and sensing systems subject to excitation and geometric uncertainties. The framework will simulate a carefully chosen set of deterministic coupling scenarios (i.e., aircraft of known composition subject to specific excitations) optimally spanning the space of possible excitations and geometries, and compute multidimensional integrals defining the averages and variances of EMI quantities. While the idea of collecting EMI statistics by repeated simulation of deterministic coupling scenarios is not new, it only recently has become practical due to the development of (i) fast and accurate electromagnetic simulators for analyzing broadband EMI into airframes loaded with cable interconnected electronic systems, and (ii) stochastic collocation methods for efficiently evaluating multidimensional integrals. Specific choices for (i) and (ii) include the EMTOPOL hybrid time domain integral equation framework, and weighted Stroud-2 and -3 multidimensional integrators. The proposed framework is anticipated to permit the statistical characterization of EMI in realistically modeled airframes up to 3 GHz in Phase I and 17 GHz in Phase II. We believe the framework ingredients proposed here present the best opportunity to date to yield satisfactorily accurate EMI statistics on readily available parallel computer platforms.

DYMAS RESEARCH, INC.
22 Pond View Dr.,
Plainsboro, NJ 08536
(609) 275-4464

PI: Dr. Wei Hu
(609) 275-4464
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0329
NJIT
Uniersity Heights, , Fenster Hall, Room 349
Newark, NJ 07102
(973) 596-6053

ID#: N08A-007-0293
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T007       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Photonic Switched True Time Delay (TTD) Beam Forming Network
Abstract:  &nbs Photonic links and networks offer numerous advantages to analog RF systems including inherent wide bandwidths, a harness exhibiting a reduced size, weight and improved flexibility, and nearly lossless signal. Current all-electronic delay line systems based on microwave components suffer from high signal loss and dispersion as well as large size and weight. An efficient way to achieve true-time-delay beamforming is to use optic fiber dynamic delay lines. In this SBIR program, Dymas Research proposes to develop an innovative high-performance programmable true- time-delay module using our high-performance photonic devices. This is especially of benefit to phased array antennas and optic telecommunications.

ELECTRO STANDARDS LABORATORIES
36 western Industrial Drive,
Cranston, RI 02921
(401) 943-1164

PI: Dr. Steven Bastien
(401) 943-1164
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0277
UNIV. OF RHODE ISLAND
70 Lower College Road, Suite 2,
Kingston, RI 02881
(401) 874-5138

ID#: N08A-021-0386
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T021       Awarded: 6/30/2008
Title: Ocean Energy Extraction for Sensor Applications
Abstract:  &nbs “Ocean Energy Extraction for Sensor Applications” has applications on buoy systems to be used by the United States Navy to increase situational awareness and battle-group integration by enabling power independent data acquisition and distributed sensor networks. Electro Standards Laboratories proposes to meet the requirements with mechanical wave energy extraction accomplished using integrated electrical generators. This work develops, demonstrates, and tests, direct-drive wave-energy conversion concepts. A detailed system model is developed to predict scalability of the proposed system to higher power levels. Form factor constraints are considered and the system is optimized for different deployment strategies. This approach is designed to achieve the goal of inexpensive, compact, efficient and reliable wave energy harvesting.

EMAG TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
775 Technology Dr., Suite 300
Ann Arbor, MI 48108
(734) 996-3624

PI: Dr. Kazem F. Sabet
(734) 996-3624
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0301
THE UNIV. OF MICHIGAN
3003 South State St., Wolverine Tower, Room 1068
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
(734) 647-3263

ID#: N08A-031-0337
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T031       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Antenna design by genetic algorithms
Abstract:  &nbs The overall objective of this STTR project is to develop a comprehensive CAD environment for design and optimization of antennas and arrays on complex platforms such as topsides of naval surface combatants. EMAG Technologies Inc. has teamed up with the University of Michigan to develop a novel solution for genetic algorithm based placement of antennas on such platforms. The proposed solution involves fast electromagnetic solvers based on frequency domain and time domain integral equation techniques accelerated by fast multipole methods. The resulting simulation and optimization codes will be fully integrated within EMAG’s EM.CUBE software framework complete with 3-D CAD modelers and extensive data visualization tools.

FERRO SOLUTIONS, INC.
5 Constitution Way,
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 935-7878

PI: Dr. Robert O'Handley
(781) 935-7878
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0313
CARNEGIE MELLON UNIV.
248 Roberts Hall, 5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(617) 253-0981

ID#: N08A-020-0233
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T020       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Novel management of transducer heat and nonlinearity
Abstract:  &nbs Ferro Solutions and Carnegie Mellon University propose to develop a novel technology for management of transducer heat and nonlinearity. Non-linear transducer response generates excessive heat and thus reduced efficiency in the transducer. Higher frequencies in the acoustic signal are more strongly absorbed and this leads to reduced range in the acoustic signal. we have designed a novel and efficient self-pumping, cooling cycle based on a fluid filled with small magnetic particles. Ultimately, these would be either Fe-Ni or giant magnetocaloric nano- particles The composition of the particles is designed so that their Curie temperature lies between that of the heat sink and the acceptable upper operating temperature of the transducer.The self-pumping action is due to the fact that the colder, ferromagnetic particles are attracted to the high magnetic field region near one end of the transducer (heat load), and the heated, paramagnetic particles are not drawn back as they leave the magnetic field near the transducer. The heated particles drive the fluid flow and their net heat content is delivered to the cold reservoir. Calculations indicate that this system should drive the magnetic fluid at close to 10 cm/sec giving cooling rates of about 1kW per10 cm-long, 1 cm2-diameter cooing channel in the transducer.

FREEDOM PHOTONICS LLC
75 Willow Springs Lane Suite 201,
Goleta, CA 93117
(805) 708-3960

PI: Dr. Jonathon Barton
(805) 680-2176
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0312
UNIV. OF CALIF. SANTA
ECE DEPT, Harold Frank Hall
Santa Barbara, CA 93106
(805) 893-4847

ID#: N08A-009-0315
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T009       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: 10G Multi-Channel Tunable Transmitter Array for Avionic Applications
Abstract:  &nbs Avionic platforms pose stringent requirements on the size, weight and power consumption of optical components as well as wider temperature operating range (-40 to 100°C) requirements. In order to meet these needs, monolithic integration offers a solution by enabling high speed (10G) multi-channel tunable transmitters that can be packaged in an extremely compact form factor, lowering costs, and providing the next generation of dynamic provisioning and functionality. The proposed work evaluates the feasibility of developing a qualified multi-channel module that can work over a wide temperature range and offer built-in-test BIT functionality.

FREEDOM PHOTONICS LLC
75 Willow Springs Lane Suite 201,
Goleta, CA 93117
(805) 698-9624

PI: Dr. Jonathon Barton
(805) 680-2176
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0308
UNIV. OF CALIF SANTA BARBARA
ECE Dept,
Santa Barbara, CA 93106
(805) 729-2069

ID#: N08A-012-0346
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T012       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Tunable Polarization Insensitive Digital Fiber Optic Wavelength Converter with Built-In Test Capability
Abstract:  &nbs A polarization insensitive wavelength converter is proposed to meet the stringent demands of avionic networks. Feasibility will be determined based on its ability to handle operation over large temperature ranges, and to provide Built in test functionality.

GC HOLDINGS, INC.
1220 Page Ave.,
Fremont, CA 94538
(240) 456-7170

PI: Dr. Peter Heim
(240) 456-7102
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0306
MIT LINCOLN LABORATORY
244 Wood Street,
Lexington, MA 02420
(781) 981-7670

ID#: N08A-012-0391
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T012       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Tunable Polarization Insensitive Digital Fiber Optic Wavelength Converter with Built-In Test
Abstract:  &nbs We propose to develop a compact, ruggedized tunable wavelength converter for use in avionic WDM networks. An integrated SOA-MZI InP chip will be demonstrated in Phase I of this project. The performance characteristics of this all-optical wavelength converter will be characterized and specifications for the complete polarization insensitive module with built-in test (BIT)will be defined.

HELIOS REMOTE SENSING SYSTEMS, INC.
101 Bleecker Street,
Utica, NY 13501
(315) 732-0101

PI: Mr. Walter E. Szczepanski
(315) 732-0101
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0281
SYRACUSE RESEARCH
6225 Running Ridge Road,
North Syracuse, NY 13212
(315) 452-8159

ID#: N08A-024-0124
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T024       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: IMAGING OF OBJECTS FROM RF RADAR RETURNS
Abstract:  &nbs Helios Remote Sensing Systems and Syracuse Research Corporation propose to develop algorithms that interpret raw high resolution sense through the wall (STTW) radar returns of objects of interest, both stationary and nonstationary, and to develop visualization methodologies providing virtual renderings of these objects based on parametric information contained in raw image data. 2-D and 3-D imaging of objects of interest detected behind walls, particularly humans, is the primary focus of this research. Movements of the human body provide characteristic RF features that provide information on the location of human limbs and joints, as well as human body orientation and direction of travel. Properly interpreting these signatures within the radar returns will enable the generation of virtual renderings of human posture and orientation signatures of the detected human using STTW radar measurements. It is the objective of this proposed research and development effort to exploit these subtle dynamic micro-Doppler and instantaneous frequency features and to develop the algorithms for real-time display of virtual images of the interpreted radar returns. Similarly, inanimate objects will be imaged using UWB high resolution SAR techniques similar to those currently being used in ongoing sense through the wall radar developments.

INFOSCITEX CORP.
303 Bear Hill Road,
Waltham, MA 02451
(781) 890-1338

PI: Dr. Anna Galea
(781) 890-1338
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0294
MAYO CLINIC
13400 East Shea Blvd.,
Scottsdale, AZ 85259
(480) 301-6057

ID#: N08A-011-0170
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T011       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Preventing Simulator Sickness of Onboard Flight Simulators
Abstract:  &nbs Simulator sickness prevents the use of simulators immediately prior to a mission. The main cause for simulator sickness appears to be a mismatch between ocular cues and vestibular cues. This is especially apparent in simulators that do not utilize a motion base, and logistically it is largely not feasible to maintain a simulator with a motion base in a deployed setting, compounding the problem. In a natural setting, our bodies sense motion through the visual, proprioceptive (‘seat of the pants’) and vestibular systems. Realizing that the large-scale proprioceptive inputs require considerable logistics that are extremely difficult in a deployed setting, our team of engineers and clinicians has been developing a vestibular display that, combined with visual stimulation, accounts for most of the sensation of motion present in a real setting. Our oculo-vestibular recoupled flight simulator will therefore mitigate or eliminate simulator sickness. We have found in our studies to date that there is a variability in the vestibular sensitivity among individuals. Our device and methods lead to a direct assessment of this phenomenon, and we will use this to study the strength of the link to motion sickness susceptibility. This could result in a simple, safe method to determine an appropriate individualized training regimen.

INFOSCITEX CORP.
303 Bear Hill Road,
Waltham, MA 02451
(781) 890-1338

PI: Dr. Robert Kovar
(781) 890-1338
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0293
TEXAS STATE UNIV.
Department of Chemistry, 601 University Drive
San Marcos, TX 78666
(512) 245-2156

ID#: N08A-013-0279
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T013       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Innovative Concepts for Non-Thermal Based Anti-Icing/De-Icing of Rotor Blade Leading Edges
Abstract:  &nbs The titanium sheath that currently protects most leading edges of rotary wing aircraft is plagued with several issues associated with the thermal deicing system. Of greatest concern is the overheating damage. An elastomeric boot offers lower weight, flexibility, abrasion-resistance and field repairability. To date, these have failed due to sand and rain droplet impact damage and have also not been capable of thermal deicing. Infoscitex has already demonstrated its nanocomposite elastomer boot material’s ability to withstand the full battery of sand and rain erosion tests and is now proposing to develop a boot capable of non-thermal anti-icing/de-icing without requiring electric power. This is accomplished by incorporating both a non-toxic freezing point depressant additive (<-65 °F) in a proprietary manner in conjunction with the nanomaterial reinforcement. This enables the freezing point depressant to gradually exude and migrate to the surface of the boot to form a thin, anti-icing/de-icing boundary layer. In Phase I the Infoscitex/University of Texas team will demonstrate the non-thermal anti-icing/de-icing performance as well as the sand and rain erosion-resistance for this novel technology. In Phase II, the team will scale up the material formulation and extrusion techniques to enable full scale testing.

INSCOPE SOLUTIONS
1851 Alexander Bell Dr Suite 105,
Reston, VA 20191
(703) 231-4186

PI: Mr. Jason Craig
(703) 480-1356
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0303
UNIV. OF COLORADO
University of Colorado,
Boulder, CO 80309
(303) 492-9688

ID#: N08A-033-0251
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T033       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Energy management system for unmanned, untethered sensors
Abstract:  &nbs Research Proposed:The feasibility of developing an innovative and comprehensive energy management technology that could lead to revolutionary improvements in Combat Reach Capabilities (CRC)and significant increases in a force multiplier will be investigated. The goal is to optimize energy sources of untethered unmanned vehicles and unattended sensors in order to improve the overall mission capabilities of the platform.Problem/Opportunity:UUVs and underwater sensor technologies are maturing rapidly to serve a variety of fleet applications. The autonomous vehicle/sensor development is diverse and dynamic with specifications influenced by technological advances and emerging requirements.Sensor advancements have outpaced energy management development and this divergence has slowed the evolution and potential of this capability.Technology now exists that can solve this disparity and lead to a spiral type energy and mission package development.Plan/Process Outline:Identify innovative energy sources/systems and deliver a refined model that characterizes a trade space enabling detailed design solutions.Benefits:This technology will be the novel solution in overcoming the undersea energy management challenges and advancing into the next generation of long range and extended endurance UUVs/unmanned sensors.

INTELLITECH MICROSYSTEMS, INC.
4931 Tesla Drive, Suite B
Bowie, MD 20715
(301) 860-0825

PI: Dr. Prashanth Krishnamurthy
(301) 860-0825
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0293
VASSAR
Main Building North Room 112, 124 Raymond Avenue # 176
Poughkeepsie, NY 12604
(845) 437-5376

ID#: N08A-030-0099
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T030       Awarded: 6/30/2008
Title: Efficient, Highly Maneuverable Artificial Fish for Stealthy Surveillance
Abstract:  &nbs For maximum effectiveness and applicability, an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) should be affordable and expendable, have the capability to be launched on-demand from any submarine or surface ship, stealthy, and able to carry out its mission with minimal possibility of detection. An effective AUV system must also have a high degree of autonomy, reliability, and robustness and should be efficient to minimize size, weight, and power (SWaP) requirements. A promising direction in which to seek innovative designs for AUVs with the aforementioned desirable characteristics is biology and the examination of the mechanisms used in natural swimmers. The study of fish swimming mechanisms provides a large set of potential design ideas. Selecting an appropriate model from this set depends critically on matching the engineering design inputs to the species that most closely embodies the desired solution. In the proposed effort, an artificial fish design based on the biological model of the electric ray will be developed to meet the desired characteristics. The important advantages of the proposed biologically inspired AUV system are energy efficiency, range of low and medium speeds, flexible fins and body leading to high maneuverability, stealth, and fully autonomous operation.

INTERNATIONAL ELECTRONIC MACHINES
60 Fourth Avenue,
Albany, NY 12202
(518) 449-5504

PI: Mr. Zack Mian
(518) 449-5504
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0283
CENTER FOR NANOSCALE
255 Fuller Road; Suite 214,
Albany, NY 12203
(518) 437-8697

ID#: N08A-025-0114
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T025       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Diver Health Monitoring System (DHMS)
Abstract:  &nbs Military and professional diving is one of the most dangerous professions, with high death and injury rates; however, it is difficult to monitor the condition of an active, free-swimming diver. International Electronic Machines Corporation (IEM), in cooperation with the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) of the State University of New York at Albany and with the advice and assistance of Dr. Neal Pollock of the Center for Hyperbaric Medicine and Environmental Physiology at Duke University, will create the Diver Health Monitoring System (DHMS), an innovative, low-cost, self-contained, multisensor, expandable system which will detect multiple different potentially dangerous conditions and provide both on-the spot and remote detection and diagnosis capability for the diver and the controlling Master Diver. Building on technology developed for the Navy, U.S. Army, NASA, and other government agencies, the DHMS will be unobtrusive, lightweight, easy to use, survive in all diving environments, provide sufficient range of communication to be usable in most if not all diving scenarios, offer either wired or wireless (acoustic) data transmission capability, on-diver data evaluation to address the potential issue of stealth or loss of ranged communication, adaptability to different environments and mission parameters, and a number of other useful features.

IPITEK
2330 Faraday Avenue,
Carlsbad, CA 92008
(760) 438-1010

PI: Dr. Celestino Gaeta
(760) 438-1010
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0332
UCLA, EE DEPT
56-125B Engr IV Bldg,
Los Angeles, CA 90095
(310) 825-3431

ID#: N08A-007-0067
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T007       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Scalable Photonic Beam-Forming System For Large, Wide-Bandwidth RF Phased Array Antennas
Abstract:  &nbs IPITEK proposes to design a highly scalable photonic true time delay solution enabling a multifunction wideband electronically scanned antenna. Our innovative architecture utilizes passive Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) true-time-delay (TTD) modules to address all antenna array elements in parallel, while not requiring active optical elements, in the control of a large array of antenna elements for both broadband RF and wide angle steering. Phase I will investigate the proposed design and validate the feasibility to meet Navy specifications. Phase II will address a COTS-based demonstration of the concept for a limited array size, and justify the scalability to large arrays.

L2 TECH, INC.
3149 S. Chrysler Ave.,
Tucson, AZ 85713
(520) 790-0200

PI: Dr. Philip Lam
(520) 790-0200
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0299
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA-SANTA
1156 High Street ,
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2639

ID#: N08A-003-0320
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T003       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Infrared Transparent Glass Ceramics with Near-Zero Thermal Expansion
Abstract:  &nbs The thermal shock resistance of current mid-infrared window and dome materials is insufficient for some high speed flight application due to their relatively large thermal expansion. Leveraging our extensive experience on infrared materials, L2 Tech, Inc and University of California-Santa Cruz propose to develop a new glass ceramic material with high mid-infrared transmission and low emissivity at elevated temperature. The material has 45-60% (in volume) crystals that have negative thermal expansion. It balances with the positive thermal expansion of the surrounding glass to give a combined Near-Zero Thermal Expansion of less than 0.5 ppm/K over a wide temperature range from 0-600 oC, and has superior thermal shock resistance. By specially designing the composition, the material will have very good mechanical properties and high chemical erosion resistance. In Phase I, we will fabricate the glass ceramic, measure its thermal expansion and optical transmission.

LEWTECH CO., INC.
3201 Stellhorn Road,
Fort Wayne, IN 46815
(260) 399-1652

PI: Mr. William Serstad
(260) 312-4705
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0274
UNIV. OF MIAMI
Rosenstiel School of M & AS, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway
Miami, FL 33149
(305) 421-4798

ID#: N08A-021-0111
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T021       Awarded: 6/30/2008
Title: Ocean Energy Extraction for Sensor Applications
Abstract:  &nbs Energy extraction is needed for various ocean deployed devices. Extracted energy can be expected to be at various levels and intermittent, but plentiful. The Phase I effort will recommend an extraction technique that directly converts ocean energy into electrical power. The extractor will be inherently self-starting, require no external inputs from the crew when deployed and produces enough power to provide buoy operational life for long periods. For extracting energy from the environment some of the possible inputs may be wind, wave motion, water current, solar, etc. For this program a scalable, energy extraction technique was selected that could work on various ocean deployed buoy types. The approach will use ocean modeling to determine achievable electrical power from various ocean conditions. The candidate system will trade-off representative buoy sizes from “A” size to large data buoy sizes, in both a moored and free-floating configuration, to determine the associated electrical power extraction capability. Various hardware parameters will be evaluated and modeled to optimize the power extracted during the Phase I study. The proposed approach will not be affected by corrosion, bio-fouling or mechanical degradation for long operational periods in various sea states and will have a low manufacturing cost.

LUNA INNOVATIONS, INC.
1 Riverside Circle, Suite 400
Roanoke, VA 24016
(540) 769-8431

PI: Mr. Adam Goff
(540) 769-8400
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0263
SOUTHWEST RESEARCH
6220 Culebra Rd.,
San Antonio, TX 78238
(210) 684-5111

ID#: N08A-001-0213
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T001       Awarded: 9/8/2008
Title: Polyurea Development and Modeling for Advanced Blast and Impact Mitigation
Abstract:  &nbs The Marine Corps Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle (EFV) represents the next generation of armored and tracked troop carriers designed to operate over harsh terrain and in extreme environments. The protection of troop personnel on board the EFV is of paramount importance and recent developments in spray-applied polyurea materials have shown the potential to significantly increase blast protection to metallic and non-metallic substrates. Luna proposes to develop an innovative spray-applicable polyurea system that offers increased mechanical properties (e.g. elastic modulus and tensile strength), translating into enhanced energy absorption capabilities and spall resistance. Luna will utilize their polymer and coatings formulation expertise to optimize the performance properties and processibility of the advanced polyurea materials. In addition, Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) will work with Luna to perform blast testing of substrates coated with Luna’s polyurea materials to evaluate their blast mitigating qualities under high strain rate deformation and impulsive blast loads. SwRI will also develop a modeling strategy to aid in predicting the response of various polyurea-coated substrates to different blast loads, providing the Marine Corps with an integrated blast mitigation solution.

LUNA INNOVATIONS, INC.
1 Riverside Circle, Suite 400
Roanoke, VA 24016
(540) 769-8430

PI: Dr. Sandra Klute
(540) 769-8400
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0315
VIRGINIA TECH
225 Norris Hall (MC 0219),
Blacksburg, VA 24060
(540) 231-6651

ID#: N08A-029-0298
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T029       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Distributed Fiber Optic Twist Measurement in Shape Sensing Tethers
Abstract:  &nbs Existing methods to provide cable orientation and array element localization in the Navy’s fixed and towed array systems and tethered unmanned vehicles rely on devices embedded in the cable itself, such as hydrophones, magnetic heading and orientation sensors, and accelerometers. These traditional sensors have power, weight, space, and EMI budgets within the cable that require design compromises to be made and further increase the design complexity of the system. Luna has recently made advances in a break-through fiber optic shape sensing technology that is based on Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry, enabling accurate positional information at all points along a tether in an extremely small, lightweight, EMI-immune fiber optic package. In the proposed research effort we will conduct a concept study designed to add another degree of freedom to the measurement system, which will significantly increase the accuracy of the shape measurement and is essential for applications where external twist may be imposed on the fiber. Luna will work with a leading University to develop analytical and FEA models of new fiber geometries and to determine a baseline for comparison to experiments designed to be completed during the Phase I Base period of performance. In the Option period, designs will be refined based on experimental results and concepts down selected in advance of the Phase II.

LYNNTECH, INC.
7610 Eastmark Drive,
College Station, TX 77840
(979) 693-0017

PI: Dr. G. Duncan Hitchens
(979) 693-0017
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0290
TEXAS A&M UNIV.
Department of Oceanography, 3146 TAMU
College Station, TX 77843
(979) 845-9630

ID#: N08A-028-0317
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T028       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: High Power Density Sediment Microbial Fuel Cell for Powering Seafloor Sensors
Abstract:  &nbs Sediment microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are ideal for powering devices such as sensors that are designed to be operated marine, estuarine, and freshwater environments. However, low power densities and difficulties with building reliable multi-cell MFC systems have limited their use. To reach the Navy’s target power density for sedimentary fuel cells a dramatic improvement in microbial fuel cell electrode current density must be achieved. Current MFC designs suffer from poor electrode kinetics, are subject to biofouling, and take weeks to start up. Additionally, the issue of power conditioning, storage, and management has not been adequately addressed. Lynntech, in collaboration with Texas A&M University, proposes to solve these problems utilizing novel materials and unique biomimetic electrode designs to greatly enhance reaction kinetics at both the anode and the cathode. Additionally, Lynntech proposes a unique multi-cell architecture that will allow the effective utilization of energy from the seafloor and provide useful power to sea floor instuments.

MAINSTREAM ENGINEERING CORP.
200 Yellow Place, Pines Industrial Center
Rockledge, FL 32955
(321) 631-3550

PI: Dr. J. Michael Cutbirth
(321) 631-3550
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0325
UNIVERSITIES SPACE RESEARCH
10211 Wincopin Circle, Suite 500
Columbia, MD 21044
(410) 730-3496

ID#: N08A-017-0370
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T017       Awarded: 7/25/2008
Title: Characterization of Highly Loaded Nanocomposites
Abstract:  &nbs Since the advent of production-grade methods for producing single-walled (SWCNT) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), research has been conducted to utilize the extraordinary properties of these nanoscale cylindrical fullerenes. Tensile strength of an individual MWCNT has been observed as high as 63 GPa with Young’s Modulus approaching ~1 TPa. While nanocomposites may never achieve a tensile of the individual tubes, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are being used as composite fibers in polymers to improve the mechanical (as well as thermal and electrical) properties of the bulk product. Despite the extraordinary mechanical properties of CNTs, only limited improvements in mechanical strength have been demonstrated. Furthermore, these improvements are commonly associated with very low concentrations of CNTs (<1.0% wt.). Attempts in loading the polymer matrix beyond 5% wt. have resulted in failure of the resin to cure or inhomogeneous regions within the nanocomposite resulting in a loss of material strength. In addition, characterization of CNT dispersal within composites beyond bulk property measurements is generally lacking in open literature. For this STTR program, Mainstream Engineering will partner with the Universities Space Research Association to develop an innovative approach for uniformly dispersing CNTs within a polymer matrix and fully characterize the composite using optical microscopy.

MATERIALS & ELECTROCHEMICAL RESEARCH (MER) CORP.
7960 S. Kolb Rd.,
Tucson, AZ 85706
(520) 574-1980

PI: Dr. Raouf O. Loutfy
(520) 574-1980
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0326
RICE UNIV.
Office of Sponsored Research, 6100 Main Street, MS-16
Houston, TX 77251
(713) 348-4820

ID#: N08A-017-0407
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T017       Awarded: 7/10/2008
Title: Ultrahigh Loading of DWNTs for Advanced Composites
Abstract:  &nbs This proposal seeks to develop advanced Polymer Matrix Composites (PMCs) with ultrahigh loading of carbon nanotubes through a fundamental understanding and overcoming of impediments to their manufacture. On the base of theoretical analysis and experimental investigation of the main obstacles to achieving ultrahigh CNT loading, known from literature and MER’s practice in the area, we intend to create structural PMCs that will far surpass in desirable properties the presently achieved level and maximally utilize the great potential of nanotubes as reinforcement. This will be done by implementing the innovative technologies for incorporating very high loading ratios of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) in polymer matrices that are already under intense development at MER Corporation and by investigating a set of new approaches to the synthesis, post processing, modification and dispersion of MER’s ultralong DWNTs that will lead to their most effective utilization at that level of ultrahigh loading and by confirming their capability to provide exceptionally high mechanical properties to PMCs.

MATERIALS & SYSTEMS RESEARCH, INC.
5395 West 700 South,
Salt Lake City, UT 84104
(801) 530-4987

PI: Dr. Niladri Dasgupta
(801) 530-4987
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0301
UNIV. OF UTAH
122 S. Central Campus Dr.,
Salt Lake City, UT 84112
(801) 581-6449

ID#: N08A-003-0351
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T003       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Thermal-Shock-Resistant Sensor Windows and Domes for High-Speed Flight Made of Low-Expansion Ceramics
Abstract:  &nbs This Small Business Technology Transfer Research (STTR) Phase I proposal from Materials and Systems Research, Inc. (MSRI) and University of Utah (research institution) seeks to fabricate single-phase, polycrystalline KZr2P3O12 (KZP) and Al2-x(HfMg)x(WO4)3 ceramics with densities greater than 99.95% and a mean grain size of 1 ƒÝm. These ceramics have been chosen because of their low thermal expansion and low elastic modulus that render them highly thermal-shock resistant and, therefore, suitable for IR windows and domes in high-speed flight. The optical transmittance of these polycrystalline ceramics is expected to be comparable to that of sapphire in the midwave (3-5 ƒÝm) and long wave (8-14 ƒÝm) infrared ranges. The high density and small grain size will be achieved by a fabrication route that will combine the following steps: preparation of a stable suspension of submicron powders, forming a green compact by pressure filtration, and a two-stage densification by pressureless sintering followed by hot-isostatic pressing. The proposed fabrication route has two distinct advantages over conventional powder processing methods: (a) it eliminates microstructural inhomogenities that limit strength, durability and optical transmittance in conventional powder processing, (b) it eliminates a number of steps involved in conventional processing and leads to a lower cost. Research in Phase I will fabricate disks 50 mm in diameter and 2-3 mm in thickness. Material characterization will be done by University of Utah under a subcontract.

MUSHROOM NETWORKS, INC.
5703 Oberlin Drive, Suite 208
San Diego, CA 92121
(888) 842-1231

PI: Dr. Rene L. Cruz
(858) 452-1033
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0305
UCSD, CALIT2
Atkinson Hall,5th Floor, 9500 Gilman Drive #0436
La Jolla, CA 92093
(858) 534-0247

ID#: N08A-032-0090
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T032       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Ad Hoc Wireless Network for Rapidly Moving Disadvantaged Users
Abstract:  &nbs Mushroom Networks Inc. with collaboration of CalIT2 from University of California, San Diego (UCSD) is proposing to design, simulate, and implement a multi-hop wireless networking architecture with portable battery powered radios with limited transmission power capabilities. The architecture will be specifically optimized to deliver a text-based chat service, and when possible a voice-based Push-To-Talk service. In Phase I of the project a simulation model of the candidate architecture and protocols will be developed. One simulation model will assume standard 802.11 radio hardware. Other simulation models will incorporate hypothetical enhancements to 802.11 hardware to provide more flexibility to control the PHY layer transmission parameters and more information about PHY layer parameters when a packet is received. The simulation models will guide the further development and implementation of a prototype network that delivers the voice-based Push-To-Talk service in Phase II of this project.

NANOLAB, INC.
55 Chapel St,
Newton, MA 02458
(617) 581-6747

PI: Mr. David L. Carnahan
(617) 581-6747
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0324
UNIV. OF CINCINNATI
Dept of Aerospace Engineering, 745 Baldwin Hall, ML 0070
Cincinnati, OH 45221
(513) 556-3557

ID#: N08A-017-0212
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T017       Awarded: 7/3/2008
Title: Ultrahigh Loading of Carbon Nanotubes in Structural Resins for Advanced Composites
Abstract:  &nbs Over the past ten years, it has become clear that the high mechanical, thermal and electrical properties inherent to carbon nanotubes are not easily manifested in nanocomposites. The nanoparticle content that can be achieved in epoxy resin is limited to <5 wt% with traditional compounding equipment, due to the exponential increase in viscosity as nanotubes are added. Despite these low contents, significant improvements have been demonstrated for numerous properties. The goal of this project is to develop new methods to incorporate nanotubes at high loadings into nanocomposite resins, based on a scientific analysis of the impediments to the mixing of nanomaterials. NanoLab will team with Dr. Jandro Abot at the University of Cincinnati, to combine our expertise in nanotube synthesis, functionalization, & processing, with Dr. Abot’s expertise and unique equipment for mechanical testing and rheology. In the proposal, we review the geometric arrangement of nanotubes in fluids, and demonstrate that viscosity buildup is unavoidable in turbulent flows. We also propose a number of methods to formulate highly loaded composites, and will screen these in the Phase I effort.

NANOMECH, LLC
535 W Research Blvd, Suite 135, M/S 100
Fayetteville, AR 72701
(479) 571-2592

PI: Mr. Bhavin Parekh
(479) 527-6826
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0327
RUTGERS
3 Rutgers Plaza,
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
(732) 932-0115

ID#: N08A-017-0381
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T017       Awarded: 7/10/2008
Title: Ultrahigh Loading of Carbon Nanotubes in Structural Resins for Advanced Composites
Abstract:  &nbs High-loading carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based composites have found considerable application potentials in military. A key area of interest to Navy is unmanned vehicles that include air, ground, and sea platforms. However, the challenges in dispersing CNTs hind the development of such a composite in great demand. In this STTR phase I, NanoMech in partnering with Rutgers University proposes a novel approach to address the challenges. This approach starts with low-energy mechanical mixing process for uniformly combining CNTs and epoxy resin, followed by a proprietary spraying process, for deveoping a high-performance nanocomposite with at least 10 weight % CNTs. The main objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating nanocomposite with high percentage of CNTs (>10%). In addition, NanoMech team will develop the required techniques to quantify the volume or mass of CNTs, and examine the uniformity of CNTs distribution in the composite, and understand the basics on the change of reheological properties in CNTs dispersion or mixing. Based on successful demonstration of the feasibility in Phase I, NanoMech team will optimize the process, develop the quality control criteria and explore the scale-up of the manufacturing process for its repeatability, reproducibility, and durability for mass production in Phase II.

NANOSONIC, INC.
P.O. Box 618,
Christiansburg, VA 24068
(540) 953-1785

PI: Dr. Vince Baranauskas
(540) 953-1785
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0262
UNIV. OF DAYTON RESEARCH
Aerospace Mechanics Division, 300 College Park
Dayton, OH 45469
(937) 229-3008

ID#: N08A-001-0186
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T001       Awarded: 9/8/2008
Title: Lightweight Hybrid Polyureasiloxane Materials as Blast, Fragmentation Protective Coatings for the Marine Corps EFV
Abstract:  &nbs The objective of this Phase I STTR program is to develop innovative lightweight (density < 1.17 g/cm3) polyureasiloxane hybrid coatings as multi-mechanism blast, fragmentation and environmental protective coatings for the Marine Corps Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle. NanoSonic will synergistically combine the impact resistance and mechanical durability of its existing hybrid polyureasiloxane copolymers with the hardness, flame resistance of reinforcing ceramic nanoparticles to afford novel protective coatings for mitigating blast, fragmentation threats. The proposed effort will build from NanoSonic’s existing hybrid polysiloxane coatings that have independently validated 1) V50 values greater than 4,000 ft/s when deposited on 3/8” A36 steel panels (MIL-STD-662F), 2) multiple shot protection to 0.50 cal rounds and 3) flame resistance (time to ignition > 280 seconds at 50 kW/m2, average heat release rates of 38 kW/m2). To provide an initial proof-of-concept, NanoSonic has recently synthesized low modulus (E = 5 MPa) polyurea coatings that have tensile resiliency beyond 1000 % elongation, service temperatures from -60 to 300 C and V50 values 23 % greater than currently investigate blast resistant polyurea coatings (MIL- STD-662F). In addition, NanoSonic has received strong interest from General Dynamics, Northrop Grumman and Lockheed Martin for potential integration within numerous DoD vehicle platforms.

NANOSONIC, INC.
P.O. Box 618,
Christiansburg, VA 24068
(540) 953-1785

PI: Dr. Michael Bortner
(540) 953-1785
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0322
VIRGINIA TECH
Dpt. of Chemical Engineering, 128 Randolph Hall
Blacksburg, VA 24060
(540) 231-5998

ID#: N08A-017-0159
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T017       Awarded: 7/3/2008
Title: A Combinatorial Approach to Obtain Ultra-High CNT Loading in Multifunctional Polymer Matrix Nanocomposites
Abstract:  &nbs The objective of this Navy STTR program is to develop and demonstrate methodologies for ultrahigh loading of carbon nanotubes in thermosetting resins and engineering thermoplastics. A combinatorial approach will be pursued to achieve the STTR goal: partially involving the use of novel molecularly tailored copolymer dispersants, which may have the most impact on thermosetting resin systems, and the second involving use of supercritical CO2 to uniformly disperse nanoparticulates into polymer matrices, which will potentially have the most impact on engineering thermoplastic systems. NanoSonic anticipates that combination of the two technologies will provide a high likelihood for success, resulting in a wide variety of well-dispersed, highly loaded carbon nanotube composites. The proposed materials and manufacturing processes are inherently low cost, environmentally friendly, and extremely effective for fabrication of extremely uniform, well-dispersed nanocomposites for use in numerous Navy engineered structures. Additionally, the proposed materials and processes offer methods to fully realize the benefits of nanomaterial integration into PMCs, resulting in significant enhancements in composite performance, weight and cost reduction, and multifunctional integration, all of which are crucial for Navy and DoD vehicle and structure sustainability.

NAVMAR APPLIED SCIENCES CORP.
65 West Street Road, Building C
Warminster, PA 18974
(610) 619-7443

PI: Dr. Jeffrey Waldman
(215) 675-4900
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0303
UNIV. OF VIRGINIA
P.O. Box 400745, 395 McCormick Road
Charlottesville, VA 22904
(434) 982-5782

ID#: N08A-010-0205
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T010       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Development of Corrosion-Hydrogen Cracking Resistant Aircraft Alloys from Mechanistic Understanding
Abstract:  &nbs An innovative science-based approach is needed to develop ultra-high strength steels that resist corrosion and associated hydrogen cracking in the severe maritime operating environment, specifically to reduce life-cycle cost and improve mission reliability for Navy aircraft components such as the landing gear and drive mechanism. This Phase I proposal integrates a fundamentally based experimental and modeling approach to develop steels with NAVAIR-required hydrogen environment cracking resistance. Emphasis is on AerMetTM100 and Custom 465 steels, processed to yield strengths at or above 1725 MPa. Work will establish the microstructural mechanism for transgranular hydrogen cracking. Cutting-edge experiments will characterize hydrogen cracking resistance of these steels with simple process changes implemented to test the importance of retained/reverted austenite. Experiments are designed based on mechanistic understanding to emphasize electrochemical polarization and crack tip strain rate/passive film stability that govern H uptake. Micromechanical modeling is proposed to interpret laboratory data and guide alloy/process development (e.g., estimating intrinsic H accumulation at a crack tip). Preliminary design concepts will be developed for JSF components (e.g., landing gear, weapons bay door drive system). An Option Phase will answer the questions that hinder transition of fundamental understanding of Phase I results to impact Navy aircraft applications.

NEVA ASSOC.
15 Beck Street,
Newburyport, MA 01950
(978) 465-3951

PI: Ms. Kathleen Kondylas
(978) 804-8321
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0265
VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE
133 Durham Hall,
Blacksburg, VA 24061
(540) 231-7273

ID#: N08A-014-0216
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T014       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Acoustic Mitigation System For Horizontal, Planar Surfaces Onboard Naval Ships
Abstract:  &nbs Typical acoustic materials rely on embedded continuous mass layer to attenuate low frequency sound. Energy from low frequency sound is not effectively mitigated with these materials unless a substantial amount of mass is added. Thus, standard materials for low frequency noise control tend to be heavy, expensive and difficult to install. A new technology is being developed that utilizes optimized combinations of layers of acoustic materials and embedded masses to reduce noise and vibration specifically in the low frequency range of 60 to 200Hz. The technology permits attenuation of low frequency sound without significantly increasing mass and can be demonstrated to reduce both airborne and structure-borne noise and vibration. Although the technology has been successfully demonstrated for thinner panels such as in buildings and mechanical equipment, additional research and development is required to optimize the technology to the particular structures and acoustic signatures onboard Naval ships. The proposed work will investigate the design of the composite material for Naval applications. Two different material systems will be constructed and tested on a structure representative of selected onboard applications.

NEXTGEN AERONAUTICS
2780 Skypark Drive, Suite 400
Torrance, CA 90505
(310) 626-8384

PI: Mr. Adarsh Pun
(310) 626-8653
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0351
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO
9500 Gilman Drive, Mail Code 0,
La Jolla , CA 92093
(858) 534-0247

ID#: N08A-002-0047
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T002       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Innovative Approaches to the Automated Simulation of Aircraft Structural Joints in Structural Analysis Models
Abstract:  &nbs While there have been tremendous technological improvements in meshing technology in current commercial pre- processors, there is a gap in assembling meshed components. Engineers can usually mesh single parts with relative ease but the steps involved in identifying, cleaning up and modeling assembly features such as small tooling holes, washers, contact surfaces, and lugs consume a disproportionate amount of time and the subsequent step of generating connections and assembling meshed parts is both time consuming and is usually approximated to simulate the load transfer between the assembly parts. An innovative approach that focuses on utilizing assembly features in an advanced simulation framework is proposed. The research will demonstrate advanced techniques for assembly modeling early is in the design cycle to mitigate costs associated with costly retrofits and/or program delays.

NICO TECHNOLOGIES CORP.
3233 Andora Drive,
Ypsilanti, MI 48198
(734) 945-8131

PI: Dr. R. Chris Doty
(734) 763-8768
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0328
UNIV. OF MICHIGAN
2300 Hayward, , Chemical Engineering
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
(734) 763-8768

ID#: N08A-017-0350
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T017       Awarded: 7/9/2008
Title: Ultrahigh Loading of Carbon Nanotubes in Structural Resins for Advanced Composites
Abstract:  &nbs This project will develop a new family of composites from single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with loading equal or above 50%. A proprietary version of layer-by-layer assembly (LBL) technology will be applied to composite manufacturing of SWNTs combined with poly(ether ether ketone)(PEEK). The layers of polymer and SWNTs will be build-up on the substrate and then released to characterize the material in respect to structure, nanotube dispersion state, and mechanical properties. Using nanoscale engineering the structure of the LBL composite will be adjusted to exceed the record properties that we obtained previous for layered SWNT composites. Large scale coupons will be made using the method of fast LBL. The mechanical properties of the large scale samples will be evaluated and optimized.

OMNI TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
P O Box 766,
Slidell, LA 70459
(228) 813-1800

PI: Dr. Francis Grosz
(985) 643-6444
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0276
UNIV. OF NEW ORLEANS
NAME, 2000 Lakeshore Drive
New Orleans, MA 70148
(504) 280-6183

ID#: N08A-021-0307
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T021       Awarded: 6/30/2008
Title: Ocean Energy Extraction for Sensor Applications
Abstract:  &nbs This project researches the feasibility of creating a self-powered buoy system. The technology being investigated is a means of efficiently extracting energy from ocean wave dynamics. The mechanics of ocean waves is such that they contain significant energy in the water motion and pressure changes. If a portion of that energy could be efficiently extracted, it would easily be sufficient to power the sensor systems of various buoys of interest to both the Navy and commercial interests. The goal is to efficiently extract this energy in a robust and reliable manner without unduly affecting the sensor systems being powered or making the buoy more obtrusive than it would otherwise be. Doing this will require attention not only to the mechanical system but the ability to deploy and retrieve the buoy, the ability of the buoy to survive in the ocean environment, the capacity to operate in a wide range of different sea states and to store energy for times when the wave dynamics do not generate sufficient power to meet the requirement. The power requirement for the current system under investigation is 200 Watts averaged over deployment intervals from a few days to a few weeks.

OPTONET
828 Davis Street, Suite 206,
Evanston, IL 60201
(847) 425-7585

PI: Dr. Jing Ma
(847) 425-7585
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0314
NORTHWESTERN UNIV.
633 Clark Street,
Evanston, IL 60208
(847) 491-2103

ID#: N08A-009-0056
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T009       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Ultracompact Multi-Channel DWDM Laser Transmitter based on Super-Compact Grating On-A-Chip in Ruggedized Module
Abstract:  &nbs The proposed project will undertake the research, design, and development of key concepts and technologies for multi-channel Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexed (DWDM) laser transmitter with 10Gbit/sec modulation capability for civilian and military DWDM optical networks, based on super compact grating technology that has been developed in OptoNet. This project is proposed by a strong multidisciplinary team of industry and academic researchers, including device design and packaging experts from OptoNet Inc. and device physics and fabrication experts from Northwestern University. Phase I will focus on systematic design and feasibility studies of the proposed SCG (Super compact grating) based multi-channel high-modulation-rate compact DWDM laser transmitter to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the proposed technology for at least 2 wavelength channels. The feasibility will lay the ground work for Phase II. The proposed multi-channel DWDM laser chip will have the following attractiveness: (1). 8 Lasers Monolithically Integrated on a Single Chip; (2). Single Fiber Output with Multi Channels; (3) High Spectral Purity as good as a typical DFB laser; (4). High 10Gbits/sec Modulation Capability; (5) High Output Power of >10mW per Channel; (6). Integrated Built-In-Test Capability for Both Power and Wavelength; (7). Ruggedized packaging with wide operating temperature range and low module profile.

OPTONET
828 Davis Street, Suite 206,
Evanston, IL 60201
(847) 425-7585

PI: Dr. Jing Ma
(847) 425-7585
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0305
NORTHWESTERN UNIV.
633 Clark Street,
Evanston, IL 60208
(847) 491-2103

ID#: N08A-012-0055
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T012       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Tunable Wide-Dynamic-Range Polarization-Insensitive Digital Wavelength Converter with Built-In-Test based on Novel Integrated Chip in Ruggedized Module
Abstract:  &nbs The proposed project will undertake the research, design, and development of key concepts and technologies for tunable wide-dynamic-range polarization-insensitive digital wavelength converter with built-in-test based on novel integrated chip in ruggedized module for civilian and military DWDM optical networks. This project is proposed by a strong multidisciplinary team of industry and academic researchers, including device design and packaging experts from OptoNet Inc. and device physics and fabrication experts from the Northwestern University. Phase I will focus on systematic design and feasibility studies of the proposed tunable wavelength converter to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the proposed technology. The feasibility will lay the ground work for Phase II. The proposed wavelength converter module will have the following attractiveness: (1) Orders of magnitude lower power consumption than the typical SOA wavelength converters. (2) Operation with large input signal dynamic range of >20dB without feedback control. (3) Module packaging in low profile module of <5mm. (4) Module packaging in a temperature-controlled module with wide operating temperature range of -40C to 100C. (5) Better polarization insensitive operation. (6)High operating speed of >100Gbit/s possible.

OUT OF THE FOG RESEARCH LLC
Stuart Berkowitz, 2258 20th Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94116
(415) 505-3827

PI: Dr. Stuart Berkowitz
(415) 505-3827
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0270
MIT LINCOLN LABORATORY
244 Wood Street,
Lexington, MA 02420
(781) 981-4707

ID#: N08A-018-0232
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T018       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Cryogenic RF Excision System (CRES) for Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Cancellation
Abstract:  &nbs In this program, we will develop a concept for CRES to meet the EMI rejection and insertion loss requirements of the application. We will define a full set of specifications for the CRES technology that meets a current or future operational need. We will demonstrate through simulation a CRES architecture that can be used for removal of co- channel interference with minimal insertion loss. We will then design and optimize a power diverter (the key CRES component) to minimize the size and maximize the performance. In the Phase I option, we will fabricate a miniaturized power diverter, so that initial parameter measurements can be made. We will then outline the technical risks for Phase II. We will then have all of the building blocks to develop a CRES prototype in Phase II.

PROGENY SYSTEMS CORP.
9500 Innovation Drive,
Manassas, VA 20110
(703) 368-6107

PI: Mr. John Sevick
(703) 368-6107
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0285
DUKE UNIV.
Divers Alert Network, 6 Colony Place
Durham, NC 27708
(919) 684-2984

ID#: N08A-025-0295
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T025       Awarded: 8/15/2008
Title: Development of a non-invasive diver monitoring system
Abstract:  &nbs Navy and commercial divers are subjected to extreme environmental conditions which can compromise physiological and/or cognitive state. Divers are at risk of various health complications which can ultimately lead to death including barotraumas, hypo/hyperthermia, nitrogen narcosis, oxygen toxicity, decompression sickness, arterial gas embolism, and high pressure nervous syndrome. Even if the diver suffers no physical harm, their cognitive state can be compromised by mental and physical fatigue, stress, sleep deprivation, underwater blasts, and diving in polluted water. When cognitive state is impaired, divers can make mistakes and entire missions can be placed at risk. The safety and efficiency diving operations would be greatly improved if diver’s vital signs could be monitored by personnel on the surface. Data of interest might include bubble monitoring, core and skin body temperature, partial pressure of nitrogen, carbon dioxide and oxygen, respiratory rate, EEG, ECG, heart rate, ambient water temperature, depth, time of dive, blood pressure, noise dosimetry and a battery of cognitive measures. The opportunity exists to develop a Diver Monitor with all-inclusive data collection and analysis capability by leveraging advances in Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) computing technology, communications and environment monitoring built into Diving gear, bubble detectors, and wireless underwater acoustic modems.

QUESTEK INNOVATIONS LLC
1820 Ridge Avenue,
Evanston, IL 60201
(847) 425-8211

PI: Dr. Herng-Jeng Jou
(847) 425-8221
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0309
NORTHWESTERN UNIV.
Office of Sponsored Research, 633 Clark Street, 2-502
Evanston, IL 60208
(847) 491-2847

ID#: N08A-022-0053
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T022       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Integration of Computational Tools for Accelerating Insertion of Aluminum Alloys in Navy Applications
Abstract:  &nbs DARPA’s successful Accelerated Insertion of Materials (AIM) initiative and QuesTek’s Materials by Design® technology have together demonstrated the benefit of an integrated methodology incorporating emerging computational materials simulations to reduce the time and resources required for developing new alloys and/or applications. To take full advantage of this approach, however, existing mechanistic material models require alloy specific calibration, validation and software integration, which is often unavailable for Navy applications. In this Phase I STTR program, QuesTek will collaborate with Northwestern University, both having extensive experience in AIM methodology development, to demonstrate the feasibility of applying integrated computational models/tools and a calibration/validation protocol for marine-grade 5000 & 7000 series aluminum alloys, with an ultimate goal to demonstrate AIM benefits in Phase II. In particular we will utilize PrecipiCalc™ software, which played a central role in the DARPA AIM program, to model strengthening dispersion, grain boundary precipitates and grain refinement microstructures in aluminum alloys. The mechanistic strength and toughness models developed in the ONR/DARPA Digital 3-D Microstructure initiative will be extended to aluminum systems allowing a full software integration of microstructure and property model predictions, and a protocol and experimental data set will be developed for accurate and efficient model calibration and validation.

REFERENTIA SYSTEMS, INC.
550 Paiea Street , Suite #236
Honolulu, HI 96819
(808) 423-1900

PI: Mr. Gary Kollmorgen
(757) 962-1735
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0339
OLD DOMINION UNIV. (VMASC)
1030 Univnersity Boulevard,
Sufolk, VA 23508
(757) 686-6218

ID#: N08A-004-0194
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T004       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Knowledge Optimized Displays of Information in Human Computer Interaction (HCI)
Abstract:  &nbs In order to optimize training effectiveness as well as the contribution of a participating simulator in a live-virtual- constructive (LVC) driven synthetic environment exercise, a method is needed to overcome the overloading of instructors in being able to manage the amount of information available in the synthetic environment with the training needs and capabilities/limitations of the simulator(s). A user configurable system of filters, display techniques, and alerting needs to be developed to provide “at a glance” training contextual situational awareness and alerting to aid instructors in this complex environment. This effort will determine a set of training and display requirements working with subject matter experts, a software layer that will implement tagging/filtering/alerting algorithms, and a set of display characteristics that will be then be used as a basis for a preliminary design for a Knowledge Display system. Phase II will build a prototype and investigate expansion of the principles learned in utilizing the prototype to large scale simulation operators and team decision making.

REMCOM, INC.
315 S. Allen St. , Suite 222
State College, PA 16801
(814) 861-1299

PI: Dr. Stephen Fast
(814) 861-1299
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0300
THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.
ARL Penn State , PO Box 30, N. Atherton Street
State College, PA 16804
(814) 865-7299

ID#: N08A-031-0092
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T031       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Antenna design by genetic algorithms
Abstract:  &nbs In many military and civilian situations, the placement of an antenna is restricted by available space and surrounding structures. Additionally, antenna design engineers are continuously considering various methods that can optimize an antenna design for criteria, e.g. radiation efficiency, directionality, or S parameters. Once the performance criteria are specified, it becomes necessary to find the best solution(s) that satisfy the design constraints. For example, one might try to place an antenna on a vehicle in such a manner as to radiate energy in one direction while causing minimal interference to other antennas nearby. Optimal antenna placement of an antenna on a platform is a challenge to current approaches to electromagnetic modeling and numerical optimization. Genetic algorithms (GAs) and other "global" search algorithms have the advantage of being able to search cost surfaces with many local minima. They can also handle a large number of variables and constraints. Some current limiting factors include the optimization mixed variable types (continuous, discrete, and categorical) and the slow speed of calculating the cost function. This proposal addresses both of these impediments through the use of a very fast and accurate commercial code and a new type of GA called a mixed integer GA.

RESODYN CORP.
130 North Main Street, Suite 600
Butte, MT 59701
(406) 497-5252

PI: Dr. Milan Ivosevic
(406) 497-5242
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0266
PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.
Office of Sponsored Programs, 110 Technology Center
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 863-3411

ID#: N08A-014-0150
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T014       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Spray-on Composite System for Low Frequency Acoustic Mitigation
Abstract:  &nbs This proposal addresses the need for an innovative and affordable material system that mitigates low frequency acoustic radiation through the hull induced by airborne noise in shipboard compartments containing Electronic Modular Enclosures. The proposed low frequency acoustic mitigation treatment is based on multiply-tuned, micro- sized absorbers embedded into a viscoelastic polymer matrix with a custom engineered dynamic modulus. Both, fully dense and porous polymer matrices and embedded micro-absorbs are developed and characterized in this work. The proposed acoustic treatment is a spray-on solution that can be cost-effectively apply in the field using Resodyn Corporation’s portable Polymer-composite Thermal Spray (PcTS) system. Damping properties of the proposed dynamic attenuation method involving multiple tuned absorbers can be optimized to attenuate a predetermined low frequency acoustic noise band and meet all other shipboard application requirements.

RSK ASSESSMENTS, INC.
1040 Woodcock Road, Suite 227,
Orlando, FL 32803
(407) 894-5090

PI: Dr. Robert S. Kennedy
(407) 894-5090
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0296
FULL SAIL
3300 Universaity Blvd.,
Winter Park, FL 32792
(407) 679-0100

ID#: N08A-011-0369
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T011       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Simulator Sickness Counter Measures
Abstract:  &nbs This project is a phase I effort which will entail testing several potential simulator sickness reducing or mitigating strategies and devising a software and hardware based system which can be used in design and configuration of simulator systems on-board.

SA PHOTONICS
650 5th Street, Suite 505
San Francisco, CA 94107
(415) 977-0553

PI: Dr. Michael Browne
(408) 348-4426
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0295
OLD DOMINION UNIV.
VMASC, 1030 University Blvd
Norfolk, VA 23529
(757) 683-3246

ID#: N08A-011-0036
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T011       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Preventing Simulator Sickness in Onboard Flight Simulators
Abstract:  &nbs As more flight training is done in simulators instead of aircraft, the effects of simulator sickness on pilots is having a bigger impact on their training schedule. Navy pilots not only have to deal with simulator sickness, but with the compounding effect of being on-board a moving ship, whose motions do not correspond to the mission they are flying in their simulator. This combination of effects can exacerbate sim-sickness, resulting in reduced training and possibly reduced pilot effectiveness, especially if the simulator exposure makes the pilot unfit to fly. SA Photonics, along with its teammates from the Virginia Modeling and Simulation Center, have come up with an innovative method of predicting simulator sickness on an individual basis, real-time, for each mission. We will modify the mission if necessary, to ensure pilots can complete each training mission without becoming sim-sick. We will also develop a training system that can help condition pilots so that the effects of shipboard sim-sickness are minimized. As part of this, we will investigate the design of a portable training hardware system, which will habituate pilots to simulator and motion sickness without having to tie up the flight simulator.

SANTOS, INC.
Oakdale Research Campus,
Iowa City, IA 52242
(319) 335-5723

PI: Dr. Karim Abdel-Malek
(319) 335-5676
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0272
THE UNIV. OF IOWA
2 Gilmore Hall,
Iowa City, IA 52242
(319) 335-2123

ID#: N08A-019-0299
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T019       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Automated Modeling and Simulation Tool for Lightening the Load of Warfighters
Abstract:  &nbs Today’s Warfighter often carries an inordinate load that can lead to injuries and encumbered performance. Equipment is distributed among squad members with little, if any regard for differences in strength and anthropometry. Consequently, the current focus on human-centric design requires a modeling and simulation tool that can reduce the load Warfighters carry and can help distribute equipment among squad member more efficiently. This, in turn, increases effectiveness, saves money, saves time, and saves lives. Santos, Inc. and The University of Iowa’s Virtual Soldier Research (VSR) Program have experience and expertise tailored to providing precisely this kind of tool. The proposed research will leverage VSR’s long standing partnerships with the U.S. military and industries, and will center around SantosTM, which is a complete, high fidelity, autonomous digital human who predicts posture, motion, strength, muscle fatigue, physiological indices, and more. Phase I of this work will provide a feasibility study for four components of a comprehensive toolkit: 1) squad optimization for automatically distributing equipment among squad members based on mission and Warfighter characteristics, 2) physics-based dynamic motion prediction for predicting how Warfighters move, and 3) equipment models that link with motion prediction to determine how Warfighters interact with equipment.

SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS & RESEARCH ASSOC., INC.
6300 Gateway Dr.,
Cypress, CA 90630
(714) 224-4410

PI: Mr. Jess Sargent
(714) 224-4410
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0273
THE UNIV. OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN
Office of Sponsored Projects , PO Box 7726
Austin, TX 78713
(512) 471-6424

ID#: N08A-021-0075
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T021       Awarded: 6/30/2008
Title: Ocean Energy Extraction for Sensor Applications
Abstract:  &nbs We propose to generate electricity for data buoys in a whole new way, leveraging SARA’s laboratory- demonstrated and patented liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic (LMMHD) technology. Phase I will prove feasibility via experiments, analyses, and system-level design of a practical and compact MHD-based wave energy conversion system (MWEC) capable of providing continuously 200 W to buoy onboard sensor and telemetry systems. In previous SBIR work supported by the US Navy (ONR, NSWCCD), we designed and demonstrated both low power (200W) and much higher-power (~100kW) LMMHD generators in the lab. We propose now to develop a small-scale, efficient, economical, and reliable unit for use in sensor buoy applications. In contrast to problematic alternatives employing conventional generators, LMMHD allows us to shift the ocean-wave impedance-matching burden from the mechanical domain, where it is difficult to manage, to the electrical domain, where efficient switching-type upconversion can be applied to great advantage. Our STTR partner, the Center for Electromechanics (CEM) at the University of Texas, Austin, will provide key support in this area. The proposed R&D will lead to a hermetically-sealed and nearly maintenance-free LMMHD generator and upconversion unit, to be placed between the buoy and its underwater mooring cable, thus making retrofitting an existing buoy straightforward.

SCIENTIFIC FORMING TECHNOLOGIES CORP.
2545 Farmers Drive Suite 200,
Columbus, OH 43235
(614) 451-8320

PI: Dr. Wei-Tsi Wu
(614) 451-8322
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0297
DREXEL UNIV.
3141 Chestnut Street,
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 895-1311

ID#: N08A-022-0137
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T022       Awarded: 6/27/2008
Title: Integrated Thermo-mechanical Processing, Microstructure and Property Simulation System for Aluminum Alloys
Abstract:  &nbs Currently, no single design tool can predict the coupled effects of alloy composition, thermo-mechanical processing, microstructure evolution, and crystallographic texture. A reliable through-process computational materials modeling system would represent a next-generation approach to alloy and process design. It will greatly reduce the risk to develop novel materials and processes, and accelerate the insertion of new products into industry from conception to implementation. Towards this goal, this project proposes to enhance the process modeling and microstructure evolution system, DEFORM, with a new precipitation model specific to the beta phase of 5xxx series aluminum alloys; to allow DEFORM to communicate with the commercial crystal plasticity code Crysp, for texture prediction; and to validate the texture modeling predictions via material testing and characterization. The resultant product will be able to model, in integrated fashion, the coupled effects of material composition, initial microstructure, and process variables on final part properties - flow stress for Phase I, with the future goals of modeling ductility and ultimate tensile strength in Phase II. Grain size evolution, precipitate formation, texture evolution, work hardening, recovery and recrystallization will all be modeled. Modeling results will be evaluated with experimental testing and characterization of aluminum alloys Al5083 and Al5456.

SCRIBNER ASSOC., INC.
150 E. Connecticut Ave,
Southern Pines, NC 28387
(910) 695-8884

PI: Dr. Kevin R. Cooper
(910) 695-8884
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0289
UNIV. OF MASSACHUSETTS
Department of Microbiology,
Amherst, MA 01003
(413) 545-9651

ID#: N08A-028-0040
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T028       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Benthic Microbial Fuel Cells Engineered for High Power Density
Abstract:  &nbs Benthic microbial fuel cells are bio-electrochemical power sources that derive fuel from renewable detritus. They have the potential to be cost-effective, sustainable energy sources to power remote, widely distributed marine sensors and instruments for oceanographic, environmental and biological monitoring. Unfortunately, power densities so far demonstrated are insufficient to make these fuel cells practicable and cost-effective. Thus, the principal objective is to demonstrate the feasibility of developing high power density benthic fuel cells. This will be accomplished by selective preemptive colonization of electrodes with naturally-derived marine or sedimentary microbial populations that most effectively generate electrical current. Laboratory microbial fuel cells will be used to demonstrate that selective preemptive colonization can result in power densities exceeding 2.5 W/m2. Because efficient use of the available power is required, designs for a high-efficiency power conversion and management system will be developed. During Phase II, the microbiology, electrode, and system design of the benthic fuel cell will be optimized to further increase power density (> 4 W/m2). The long-term performance of a prototype benthic fuel cell device integrated with a marine sensor and telemetry system will be demonstrated in a field-trial.

SEA CORP.
62 Johnny Cake Hill, Aquidneck Corporate Park
Middletown, RI 02842
(401) 847-2260

PI: Mr. Dave Patridge
(401) 832-2568
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0267
MERCER ENGINEERING RESEARCH
Mercer University, 135 Osigian Blvd
Warren Robbins, GA 31088
(478) 953-6800

ID#: N08A-015-0018
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T015       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Submarine ES System RF Groom & Certification
Abstract:  &nbs US Navy submarine forces currently employ an independent team who typically conduct in excess of 60 man-days to test, measure, calibrate and certify radio frequency (RF) signal paths. Ships personnel have no means of self- calibrating or performing an operational verification of their Electronic Surveillance suites once underway. The SEA CORP Team proposes to develop innovative technologies to provide an Organic Groom and Certification System (OGCS). The proposed conceptual design will be incorporated as an independent modulation module and RF source for the testing of the complete frequency spectrum of the submarines periscope. Testing objectives will include an approach for adapting calibration waveforms and modulation formats for Specific Emitter Identification (SEID) and Low Probability of Intercept (LPI), as well as accurate measurement of degradation in the RF path and front end components in the form of group delay, gain/loss measurements, and system attenuation. The Team will develop test methodology for calculating energy levels at sensor antennas and across the RF path, through development of correction tables that can be applied to the individual ES subsystems. The Option portion will analyze the ability to conduct a Radiated RF test between a Mission Configurable Mast and the Periscope system under test.

SET ASSOC. CORP.
1005 N. Glebe Rd., Suite 400
Arlington, VA 22201
(703) 738-6217

PI: Dr. Ronald Dilsavor
(937) 426-5401
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0282
THE OHIO STATE UNIV.
Dept of Electrical Engineering, 1320 Kinnear Road
Columbus, OH 43212
(614) 292-4597

ID#: N08A-024-0162
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T024       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: IMAGING OF OBJECTS FROM RF RADAR RETURNS
Abstract:  &nbs This research topic focuses on the design of algorithms to exploit wideband standoff radar data so as to effectively see through walls in order to detect and characterize objects of interest within a building. The hypothesis is that people and objects of interest will exhibit characteristic signatures that allow you to, for example, discern human pose, detect the presence of carried weapons, and detect static weapons caches. In general, these characteristic signatures will be contaminated by through-wall dispersive transmission effects as well as reflective phenomena such as near-field coupling, multipath, and edge/corner diffraction within the building. SET Corp has teamed with The Ohio State University ElectroScience Lab to identify characteristic temporal, polarimetric, and spatial/spectral features and to recover them from the complex EM environment through the use of adapted in situ wall propagation models. We design classifiers that process the recovered characteristic features to provide situation awareness within the room.

SIENNA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
19501 144th Avenue NE, Suite F-500
Woodinville, WA 98072
(425) 485-7272

PI: Ms. Stephanie Sawhill
(425) 485-7272
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0300
UNIV. OF WASHINGTON
Office of Sponsored Programs, 1100 NE 45th St., Suite 300
Seattle, WA 98105
(206) 685-7065

ID#: N08A-003-0145
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T003       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Infrared Transparent Zero Thermal Expansion Ceramic
Abstract:  &nbs This program will develop a single-phase cubic material with near zero thermal expansion and high (>80%-85% in- line) infrared transmission from 3 µm to 5 µm for infrared domes and windows. The low thermal expansion material will have high thermal shock resistance as well as good mechanical strength to survive harsh environments. In this Phase I project we will produce a fully dense sample of the cubic material by hot pressing, and measure coefficient of thermal expansion and IR transmission on 1 mm thick planar samples.

SIGNAL PROCESSING, INC.
13619 Valley Oak Circle,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850
(301) 315-2322

PI: Dr. Chiman Kwan
(240) 505-2641
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0280
U. TEXAS PAN AMERICAN
1201 West University Drive,
Edinburg, TX 78541
(956) 381-2609

ID#: N08A-024-0069
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T024       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: A High Performance Imaging and Target Discrimination System Using SAR and ISAR
Abstract:  &nbs We propose a high performance, automated, and novel framework to behind-the-wall imaging and target discrimination. Our system has two paths: 1) stationary target detection using SAR images; 2) moving target detection using ISAR images. For the SAR imaging part, we first propose to apply high performance algorithm to form SAR images. Second, since feature extraction is the key component for a successful target discrimination system, we propose 4 different classes of features: 1) invariant moments; 2) low order Gaussian features based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA); 3) high order non-Gaussian features based on Independent Component Analysis (ICA); 4) shape features based on Fourier descriptors. Third, after features are extracted, we propose to apply proven and efficient classifier to classify the different targets. The robust classifier we use is called Support Vector Machine (SVM) that has several advantages, including no over training problem, global optimal solution, and computational efficiency. In the ISAR part, we have ISAR image formation algorithm, followed by a chirplet separation algorithm to separate different motions. After ISAR images are formed, the feature extraction and classification algorithms mentioned earlier will be applied for target discrimination. All the images and classification results will be displayed on a monitor.

SIMMETRIX, INC.
10 Halfmoon Executive Park Drive,
Clifton Park, NY 12065
(518) 348-1639

PI: Dr. Ottmar Klaas
(518) 348-1639
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0257
RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC
100 8th St,
Troy, NY 12180
(518) 276-6283

ID#: N08A-002-0262
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T002       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Automated Intelligent Simulation of Aircraft Structural Joints
Abstract:  &nbs The analysis of structural assemblies in aircraft requires careful consideration of the simplifications used in building the analysis models. Although using simplified analysis models has the benefit of reducing the time and cost of the analysis, they are only appropriate to use when the simplifications are valid. This project will provide automated tools that will both reduce the time to set up more detailed structural assembly models, through automated model and mesh generation, and will allow the evaluation of the appropriateness of the models used with appropriate consideration given to the behavior of structural joints.

SYNTONICS LLC
9160 Red Branch Road,
Columbia, MD 21045
(410) 884-0500

PI: Mr. Steven E. Gemeny
(410) 884-0500
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0278
THE OHIO STATE UNIV.
ElectroScience Laboratory, 1320 Kinnear Road
Columbus, OH 43212
(614) 292-2530

ID#: N08A-023-0244
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T023       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Design Tools for Applying Characteristic Modes to Platform Integrated Antennas
Abstract:  &nbs Syntonics and OSU will demonstrate the feasibility of using existing CM design tools to develop broadband, conformal antennas integrated with specific vehicular platforms. In Phase I a High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV or Humvee) will be used as the feasibility demonstration case for a conformal wideband VHF/UHF (30-450 MHz) antenna system.

TECHNOLOGY SERVICE CORP.
1900 S. Sepulveda Blvd, Suite 300
Los Angeles, CA 90025
(203) 268-1249

PI: Dr. Paul D Mountcastle
(203) 268-1249
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0291
RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC
Dept of Mathematical Sciences, 110 8th Street
Troy, NY 12180
(518) 276-2646

ID#: N08A-026-0019
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T026       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Bistatic High Range Resolution Radar Image Processing
Abstract:  &nbs Technology Service Corporation (TSC) and our academic partner Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) present an innovative approach to radar imaging of ships and other maritime targets that exploits monostatic, bistatic and multistatic wideband radar signals. The new signal processing technique is applied to the problem of imaging maritime targets using fixed-site surface surveillance radars, to identify traffic that is potentially hostile. The TSC team will develop and evaluate an algorithm that employs monostatic and bistatic wideband, high resolution radar returns to generate image signatures of ship targets. These images can be used to classify maritime traffic and identify potential threats to US Navy assets. In Phase I, TSC and RPI will generate high-fidelity simulated image data and evaluate the improved performance offered by our proposed bistatic radar processing technique when compared with conventional monostatic Inverse Synthetic Aperture (ISAR) radar processing. TSC and RPI propose new signal processing techniques that automatically determine the ship motion state, handle complex ship motions in which scatterers do not move linearly, exploit bistatic radar geometries where the transmitter and receiver are separate, produce multi-aspect images from a single coherent measurement, and allow longer coherent integration to suppress noise and interference.

TEXAS RESEARCH INSTITUTE AUSTIN, INC.
9063 Bee Caves Road,
Austin, TX 78733
(512) 263-2101

PI: Dr. Brad Rix
(512) 263-2101
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0264
UNIV. OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN
Aerospace Engineering , 1 University Station
Austin, TX 78712
(512) 471-4164

ID#: N08A-001-0332
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T001       Awarded: 9/8/2008
Title: Blast and Impact Resistance of Polyurea Coatings on Metallic and Non-Metallic Materials
Abstract:  &nbs Texas Research Institute Austin (TRI/Austin) proposes to utilize various software packages to model and design polyurea-based armor for improved blast and impact resistance of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle (EFV). Two commercial polyurea systems and one previously developed TRI/Austin proprietary system will be evaluated during the Phase I effort. Mechanical property testing will be performed so that the materials can be accurately represented in the modeling scenarios. Substrate compatibility will also be examined for each material. TRI/Austin will utilize the modeling programs to determine the appropriate coverage and thickness of polyurea armor to be applied to the EFV in order to maximize crew protection while minimizing armor and vehicle weight. University of Texas at Austin (UT/Austin) will partner with TRI/Austin in this effort by performing additional adhesion and modeling studies. The results of these modeling studies will be corroborated with blast and fragmentation impact testing during Phase II. Ultimately, this project is intended to result in a practical, lightweight, polyurea-based armor that can be easily applied to the EFV to enhance crew survivability during blast events.

TOUCHSTONE RESEARCH LABORATORY, LTD.
The Millennium Centre, R.R. 1, Box 100B
Triadelphia, WV 26059
(304) 547-5800

PI: Dr. G.S. Murty
(304) 547-5800
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0325
FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIV.
Office of Sponsored Research , 11200 S.W. 8th Street, MARC 43
Miami, FL 33199
(305) 348-2494

ID#: N08A-010-0063
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T010       Awarded: 7/14/2008
Title: Multi-Objective Optimization and Inverse Design of Corrosion-Resistant Aluminum Alloys
Abstract:  &nbs The objective of proposed Phase I study is to demonstrate feasibility of alloy design for corrosion resistance of aircraft aluminum alloys via the computational optimization route. The basic methodology involves the use of experimental corrosion data of relevant alloys over a wide range of compositions as input data. Optimization algorithm will be availed for optimization of alloy composition that will result in maximum corrosion resistance and tensile strength simultaneously. The multi-objective evolutionary optimization software packages at Florida International University have the capability to deal with various alloy design applications. Because of lack of availability of appropriate input data, the optimization will focus on concentrations of alloying elements and objectives to include corrosion resistance, tensile strength, weight and cost. Considering high-strength aircraft aluminum alloys, the type of corrosion of interest is Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). The optimization predictions will be experimentally validated in Phase II. The evolutionary optimization approach minimizes the effort needed for alloy design by avoiding the large volume of experimentation that is characteristic of conventional alloy development, and it guarantees the mathematically best possible solutions.

TRANSFORMATIONAL TECHNOLOGIES INNOVATIONS, INC.
3357 Barrow Hill Trail ,
Tallahassee, FL 32312
(850) 509-8161

PI: Dr. Richard Liang
(850) 410-6673
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0348
FLORIDA STATE UNIV.
2525 Pottsdamer Street,
Tallahassee, FL 32310
(850) 410-6141

ID#: N08A-017-0282
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T017       Awarded: 7/25/2008
Title: Solvent-Free Mixing and Buckypaper Prepreg solutions for Ultrahigh Loading of Carbon Nanotubes in Structural Resins for Advanced Composites Applications
Abstract:  &nbs Carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced polymer composites are attracting great interest for their potential applications as lightweight high-performance materials. However, the development and practical applications of these materials have been hindered by poor processability of nanotube/resin mixture systems, including difficulty of dispersion due to self-assembling nature of Van Der Waals interactions, large aspect ratio, viscosity increase due to extra-large surface areas and high density of electronic structures of nanotubes. Transformational Technologies Innovations, Inc. (TTI) in collaboration with Florida State University (FSU) proposes to develop science-based enabling manufacturing processes to overcome dispersion and loading issues and demonstrate exceptional properties of nanotube-reinforced nanocomposite systems. The project will focus on a unique two step technical approach to realize good nanotube dispersion and quality composite parts for a large range of high nanotube loading (10- 55wt.%). FSU’s previous experience with nanotube dispersion, manufacturing of buckypapers and nanocomposites will be used as a basis for this project. Phase I will focus on fundamental and experimental studies to prove the feasibility of high nanotube loading. Preliminary tests will be conducted to demonstrate the mechanical properties of the resulting nanocomposites. The project is fully supported by The Boeing Company for use in their future structural applications.

TREX ENTERPRISES CORP.
10455 Pacific Center Court,
San Diego, CA 92121
(858) 646-5566

PI: Dr. Edward Davis
(808) 442-7030
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0275
UNIV. OF HAWAII AT MANOA
2540 Dole Street, Hall 402
Honolulu, HI 96822
(808) 956-6818

ID#: N08A-021-0151
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T021       Awarded: 6/30/2008
Title: Ocean Energy Extraction for Sensor Applications
Abstract:  &nbs Remote ocean instrumentation often relies on floating buoys with sensors to acquire time series measurements such as ambient noise, acoustic tracking or communications, consuming 100 - 200 Watts of power. The operating lifetime of small remote buoys is limited by batteries (often to 12 - 24 hrs), and recharging is so inconvenient or impractical that many small sonobuoys are designed to scuttle themselves after about a day. The associated cost, as well as the environmental impact of sending large amounts of battery and electronic hardware to the bottom of the ocean is a strong driver for developing renewable ocean power. Trex Enterprises Corp, proposes to develop and demonstrate a simple, low-cost buoy size platform capable of generating power by scavenging energy from ocean waves. The phase 1 prototype will be designed to deliver over 50 Watts of power from moderate (sea state 3) waves, and the phase 2 prototype and ultimate product will develop 100 – 200 W. The basic power generation scheme will rely on a buoyant surface float that moves with the wave motion tethered to a submerged anchor (phase 1) or sea anchor (phase 2 & beyond) that does not move with the waves.

UES, INC.
4401 Dayton-Xenia Road,
Dayton, OH 45432
(937) 426-6900

PI: Dr. Satish I. Rao
(937) 426-6900
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0296
PENN STATE UNIV.
248 Deike Building, College-Earth&Mineral Sciences
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 865-7650

ID#: N08A-022-0046
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T022       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Development of Microstructure/Properties Simulation Tools for Marine Grade Aluminum Alloys
Abstract:  &nbs We propose to develop and validate a computational methodology to predict microstructural evolution, associated with thermal history during processing or during service of marine grade aluminum alloys, and use the results to predict the mechanical properties that are controlled by those microstructures. In Phase I, we will validate our models and evaluate the feasibility of integrating the computational tools into a design protocol. In Phase II, we will identify a challenge problem (alloy composition, application in a component) and develop a methodology to validate and implement the protocol. This work will result in developing a single cohesive computational package for simulation and prediction of processing/microstructure/property relationships in specific marine-grade alloy systems.

ULTRA COMMUNICATIONS, INC.
990 Park Center Drive, Suite H,
Vista, CA 92081
(760) 652-0007

PI: Dr. Charles Kuznia
(760) 652-0007
Contract #: N68335-08-C-0313
WEST VIRGINIA HIGH TECH
1000 Technology Drive,
Fairmont, WV 26554
(304) 233-1906

ID#: N08A-009-0324
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T009       Awarded: 7/18/2008
Title: Multi-Channel Compact DWDM Transmitter with BIT and Removable Pigtail
Abstract:  &nbs A DWDM transmitter capable of 2.5 to 10 Gbps data transport on multiple channels with selectable wavelengths for each channel would enable advanced network topologies in military and commercial aerospace platforms. This is proposal investigates the unprecedented integration of multiple lambda-tunable channels into a compact, rugged transmitter with a removable pigtail and built-in-test (BIT) capability for cable plant monitoring and determining the location of fiber faults.

UTOPIACOMPRESSION, CORP.
11150 W. Olympic Blvd., Suite 1020
Los Angeles, CA 90064
(310) 473-1500

PI: Dr. Jacob Yadegar
(310) 473-1500
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0306
UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA, LOS
UCLA Cmptr Sci, BOX 951596, 3732F BH
Los Angeles, CA 90095
(310) 825-4367

ID#: N08A-032-0238
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T032       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: A Thin Layer Approach to Highly Mobile Ad Hoc Networks
Abstract:  &nbs Today’s warfare is network centric and relies on efficient communications on the move. To support these requirements, wireless mobile ad hoc networks (MANET) have received a lot of attention because of self deployment and reconfiguration properties. Unfortunately, wireless networks in mobile environments face formidable challenges – from radio propagation effects to external jamming, path breakage and intermittent connectivity. Current radio platforms are not adequate for the challenge. While awaiting for more sophisticated radios (eg, SDRs and MIMO radios) that will alleviate the problem using physical layer techniques, in this Phase I project we propose to develop a “thin” software layer that transparently interacts with other layers. The thin layer exploits and in fact manages preexisting layer “redundancies” such as multiple paths and link layer retransmissions. The thin layer will support two independent coding techniques, namely, erasure/rateless coding (at the end-to-end level) and network coding (at the packet forwarding level). Nodes can successfully recover from packet losses by efficiently exploiting the redundancy intrinsic of each layer. We will compare these schemes with an aggressive modeling and simulation campaign.

VEHICLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
1900 Campus Commons Drive, Suite 300
Reston, VA 20191
(703) 620-0703

PI: Dr. Thomas F. Tureaud
(703) 620-0703
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0269
UMASS
706 S. Rodney French Boulevard,
New Bedford, MA 02744
(508) 910-6375

ID#: N08A-016-0269
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T016       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Expendable Glider for Oceanographic Research
Abstract:  &nbs The proposed Glider design concept is based on quantitative tradeoffs between cost and performance. Existing glider technology has been analyzed, and two significant design details have led to a simplified design that will result in a compact, less expensive glider and a simplified delivery/launching mechanism. Using its high fidelity simulation and design tools, VCT has gained important new insights into glider design for performance. This has led to tradeoffs among wing parameters, vertical fin size, Ycg shift and rudder deflection for optimizing turn performance. Combining these discoveries has led to the design of the proposed wingless glider that can achieve equal or better turn performance of the legacy winged gliders. Legacy gliders use a weight-shift method pitch, roll and heading control. This increases the internal complexity of the system as it requires the weight to be mobile, and also increases the size of the pressure housing, effectively increasing the gliders size, weight, buoyancy required, and ultimately, cost. The low-cost expendable glider we are proposing would use a lift-up mast to transmit information. The mast is raised using the same actuator that operates the variable buoyancy engine, but at an extended stroke position.

VIPMOBILE, INC.
120 Montgomery Street, Suite 2000
San Francisco, CA 94104
(415) 632-1236

PI: Dr. Jean Andrian
(415) 632-1239
Contract #: N00014-08-M-0307
FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIV.
10555 West Flagler Street, Room EAS-3914
Miami, FL 33174
(305) 348-2115

ID#: N08A-034-0121
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: 08-T034       Awarded: 6/23/2008
Title: Extensible Affordable Software Defined Radio with Cross-Band Cross-Protocol Capability
Abstract:  &nbs Currently developed and deployed communications systems, such as the Joint Tactical Radio System (JTRS,) already have the capability of providing multi-channel and multi-protocol high performance wireless communication. However, many of these systems have been delivered with high costs, high complexity, and with performance shortfalls, due primarily to immature technologies, unstable requirements, and aggressive schedules. As a solution to these problems, a scalable, low-cost, extensible, and expendable Software Defined Radio (SDR) platform is proposed. This platform will eventually support multiple platforms, waveforms, users, and radio standards. However, for our prototype design, a single-function, single channel communications device suitable for consumer use will be implemented, using commercial and in-house hardware and software technologies. For a future iteration, a more mature version of this inexpensive radio will be a high-performance multi-channel, multi-application system that will allow real-time “bridging” between legacy, current and emerging radio frequency communications standards and waveforms.

---------- OSD ----------

Anacapa Sciences, Inc.
301 East Carrillo Street 2FL, P. O. Box 519
Santa Barbara, CA 93102
(805) 966-6157

PI: Jack Stuster
(805) 966-6157
Contract #: W9132T-09-C-0017
University of Kansas
Department of Anthropology,
Lawrence, KS 66045
(785) 864-4103

ID#: O08A-002-2024
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 08-T002       Awarded: 3/9/2009
Title: Automation of Technical Reachback for PMESII Best Practices and Lessons Learned in Stabilization and Reconstruction Environments
Abstract:  &nbs This proposal offers a detailed work plan to conduct the research and development tasks necessary to produce a system for use by U.S. military planners and their U.S. Government interagency partners to access relevant lessons learned and reachback capabilities in stabilization and reconstruction environments. Development of the proposed Security, Stabilization, Transition, and Reconstruction Information System will be facilitated by our extensive military research and operational experience and by our knowledge of the technological and programmatic issues derived from our previous work in mobile computing and the development of distributed information sharing systems. Anacapa Sciences, Inc., has assem¬bled a uniquely qualified team of human factors engineers, programmers, subject matter experts, and scholars with extensive relevant experience from the University of Kansas to ensure that the products of our work will provide optimum utility to all potential users of the system.

CyberConnect EZ, LLC
37 Max Felix Dr.,
Storrs, CT 06268
(860) 428-5109

PI: Jeffrey Maddox
(860) 428-5109
Contract #: W9132T-09-C-0005
Harvard University
Carr Center for Human Rights, 79 JFK Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 384-8464

ID#: O08A-003-2014
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 08-T003       Awarded: 1/5/2009
Title: Linking Output Activity to Outcomes/Impacts in Complex Contingency Environments
Abstract:  &nbs One deficiency of existing planning systems is that they may report mission-level progresses, but are incapable of associating them with desired mission-level outcomes/impacts. USG agency planners and other organizations have produced general frameworks for measuring outcomes/impacts such as MPICE, but clearly planning activities and outcome/impact measure activities remain disconnected. We aim to develop a process framework and its associated prototype software, called LINK, which enables planners to interlink plans/tasks with outcome/impact measures. This software will be web-based and it will enable practitioners working at disparate locations to see not only one cohesive picture of the integration between plans and outcome/impact measures, but also allow them to share, respond and adjust ongoing planning and implementation as needed during the intervention and reconstruction. We will demonstrate that using LINK planners can do the following four activities: (i) import measures framework from MPICE and others, (ii) import plans/tasks/mission elements from planning software through XML APIs; (iii) specify the dependencies between plans and outcome/impact measures; and (iv) test the sensitivity of project progress over the outcome/impact measure. We plan to develop a case study involving the human rights crisis and intervention. Our computer demonstration will be based on our developed case study scenarios.

Discovery Machine Incorporated
454 Pine Street, Suite 1A
Williamsport, PA 17701
(570) 329-0251

PI: Todd W. Griffith
(570) 329-0251
Contract #: W9132T-09-C-0018
Pennsylvania State University
P.O. Box 30, North Atherton Street
State College, PA 16804
(814) 863-8876

ID#: O08A-002-2029
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 08-T002       Awarded: 3/4/2009
Title: A Toolkit for Deployable Best Practices
Abstract:  &nbs Discovery Machine, Inc. is partnered with Pennsylvania State University to produce a best practices capture system that goes beyond the storage and dissemination of lessons learned. The proposed system will leverage warfighters’ specific knowledge as deployable knowledge assets. These knowledge assets will be executable best practices that can be embedded in job aids and training systems. The lack of true best practices capture prevents the military from both identifying many useful standard processes but also from improving upon them over time. The problem is that bringing best practices to the warfighter requires the capture of real expertise. The tacit knowledge or key person know-how found in the heads of experienced individuals. To capture this expertise requires a methodology and technology based in cognition. It requires the military to reexamine what knowledge is and how to make it an asset. This proposal describes how to capture best practices and turn them into knowledge assets through a series of stages. Each stage leverages knowledge to provide value and each stage requires that real knowledge be captured with the intent to deploy that knowledge. The stages are described in the following sections: capture, collaborate, automate, optimize, embed and network.

Frontier Technology, Inc.
75 Aero Camino, Suite A,
Goleta, CA 93117
(805) 685-6672

PI: Sam Boykin
(937) 429-3303
Contract #: W9132T-09-C-0009
Fletcher School, Tufts University
160 Packard Avenue,
Medford, MA 02155
(617) 627-3796

ID#: O08A-003-2046
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 08-T003       Awarded: 1/5/2009
Title: Linking Output Activity to Outcomes/Impacts in Complex Contingency Environments
Abstract:  &nbs As the U.S. Government increases participation in post-conflict Stabilization and Reconstruction Operations (S&RO) around the globe, the ability to understand the relationships between task completion and mission completion is critical. The US Government employs a metrics tool developed though the Monitoring Progress in Conflict Environments project. The objective of this Phase I STTR is to provide S/CRS analysts and USG Interagency partners with additional capability to conduct analysis and establish clear interdependencies between activities, tasks, and the desired outcomes. Seasoned scholar practitioners will also support the refinement of the analysis framework and maximize synergy between task outputs to mission outcomes and impact to enable more effective S&RO implementation planning. The data fusion framework to link task progress to the end-state via the integration of multiple data sources will be built on an infrastructure initiated by investments from Missile Defense, Navy and Air Force offices to provide robust decision traceability during acquisition decisions. The Phase I program will solidify the Phase II requirements by allowing OSD and S/CRS stakeholders interact with the proof-of-concept user interface and supporting database structure to conduct actual progress evaluations. The Phase II program will fully develop a prototype tool and validate its operation and use concept.

GCAS Incorporated
1531 Grand Avenue,
San Marcos, CA 92078
(760) 591-4227

PI: Rajee Setty
(760) 591-4227
Contract #: W9132T-09-C-0012
Penn State University
Contracts and Grants Managemen, 334 IST Building
University Park,, CA 16802
(814) 863-6801

ID#: O08A-003-2010
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 08-T003       Awarded: 1/5/2009
Title: Linking Output Activity to Outcomes/Impacts in Complex Contingency Environments
Abstract:  &nbs The purpose of this project is to develop innovative methods for monitoring the evolving situation; intervention activities and consequences in a stabilization and reconstruction mission related to conflict, post-conflict or post emergency conditions in a country or region. The goal of our Phase I research is to develop a methodology and process to "link" planned/on-going implementation level projects/activities/tasks to broader mission-level outcomes/impacts within a common software operating environment.

Logos Technologies, Inc.
3811 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 100
Arlington, VA 22203
(703) 584-5839

PI: Scott Tousley
(703) 584-5727
Contract #: W9132T-09-C-0011
Fund for Peace
11th Floor, 1701 K Street NW
Washngton DC, DC 20006
(202) 223-7940

ID#: O08A-003-2044
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 08-T003       Awarded: 1/5/2009
Title: Linking Output Activity to Outcomes/Impacts in Complex Contingency Environments
Abstract:  &nbs Logos Technologies and the Fund for Peace will develop an Outcomes/Outputs Linkages Concept addressing complex stabilization & reconstruction environments, using the MPICE outcomes framework and applying relevant characteristics of MPICE, Effects-Based Operations and Conflict templates. The research approach includes the use of an experts team to draft both an outputs framework and an outcomes/outputs mapping concept, and the Linkage design will address structure, interagency process and software. Two examples (Haiti, Kosovo or East Timor) will provide data to support linkage investigation. The research effort will apply parts of the MPICE “expert knowledge” component, focus on an open “analyst assist” final product, consider how to combine manual with Bayesian analysis techniques, and integrate with MPICE/SHAPE software design and structures. The goal is to assemble and organize information concerning outputs and outcomes in S&RO environments, and support analysis to best understand how our efforts are/are not leading to desired outcomes. Each of the main concepts we are bringing to bear (EBO, Conflict Templates/Analysis and MPICE) offers useful elements to the overall linkage analysis problem, and the Logos research team will develop its Outcomes/Outputs Linkage concept and implementation through the appropriate integration of parts of these different supporting concepts.

MILCORD LLC
1050 Winter Street , Suite 1000
Waltham, MA 02451
(781) 839-7138

PI: Dr. Alper Caglayan
(781) 839-7138
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0140
DARTMOUTH COLLEGE
Department of Computer Science, 6211 Sudikoff Laboratory
Hanover, NH 03755
(603) 646-8747

ID#: O08A-001-2039
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 08-T001       Awarded: 9/19/2008
Title: HYMONT, a Hybrid system framework for detecting, classifying, and mitigating Malicious Outbound Network Traffic flows
Abstract:  &nbs We propose a hybrid system framework for detecting, classifying, and mitigating Malicious Outbound Network Traffic flows based on our work in botnet detection, security risk management, covert channel detection and intrusion detection. In particular, we propose to develop a taxonomy of data exfiltration based on application classes and underlying protocols, select a representative set of data exfiltration methods from this taxonomy, develop sensors for detecting malicious outbound network traffic flow the selected use cases, build a set of classifiers that fuse netflow sensor indicators, and research mitigation solutions. Performance metrics for our feasibility testing will be based on probability of detection, false alarm and misclassification rates. The data leak and exfiltration threat is broad-based and evolving. While our proposed framework provides the extensibility required to respond to a diverse and dynamic range of adversary tactics, we will concentrate on two emerging threat vectors we believe are especially challenging and underrepresented in the cybersecurity community – the use of covert networks and outbound DNS requests for data exfiltration. This capabilities-based focus takes direct aim at the botnets and Cyber Espionage attacks types described as ‘most likely to cause significant damage’ on the SANS Institute ‘Top Ten Cyber Security Menaces for 2008’ list.

SALARE SECURITY, LLC
200 S Wacker Drive, 15th floor
Chicago, IL 60606
(312) 994-2336

PI: Dr. Gary L Dorst
(312) 753-5445
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0137
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF
3300 South Federal,
Chicago, IL 60616
(312) 567-3035

ID#: O08A-001-2022
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 08-T001       Awarded: 9/19/2008
Title: Automatic Identification & Mitigation of Unauthorized Information Leaking from Enterprise Networks
Abstract:  &nbs This proposal addresses research and development of a system that can automatically identify and mitigate data exfiltration (a.k.a data leakage) from unauthorized out-bound voice over IP (VoIP) traffic flows. The risk of data leakage over VoIP is growing because of the rapid deployment of VoIP systems and because data leakage via TCP/IP is becoming better defended. VoIP provides a new opportunity and the existing data leakage solutions are pushing hostile agents to invent new ways to exploit protected networks.

Securboration Inc
1050 W NASA Blvd, Suite 154
Melbourne, FL 32901
(919) 244-3946

PI: Bruce McQueary
(321) 591-7371
Contract #: W9132T-09-C-0015
USC ISI
4676 Admiralty Way, Suite 1001,
Marina del Rey, CA 90292
(213) 821-1106

ID#: O08A-002-2025
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 08-T002       Awarded: 2/12/2009
Title: Automation of Technical Reachback for PMESII Best Practices and Lessons Learned in Stabilization and Reconstruction Environments
Abstract:  &nbs Failing or failed states and those emerging from conflict pose one of today’s greatest security challenges. To address these challenges DoD has given stability operations priority comparable to combat operations. DoD also recognizes that reconstruction and stability (R/S) operations are more than the DoD’s responsibility; they require involvement from departments and agencies in the United States Government, as well as Non-Governmnent Organizations. DoD and civilian partners in theater must be able to discover and leverage applicable lessons learned and best practices. To address this information ‘reachback’ capability, Securboration Inc., teaming Dr. Craig Knoblock from the University of Southern California Information Sciences Institute is pleased to propose the Reachback Environment for Stablization Operations (RESO). RESO is based on the advancements by Dr. Knoblock in the area of web-based ‘mashups’, extended by Securboration’s semantic models that formalize and reason about relationships across security, rule of law, governance, economic growth, and social well-being sectors. The result is a reachback capability that goes far beyond the search capability employed by current lessons learned systems. RESO enables ‘composite’ lessons learned information to be aggregated from disparate systems into a presentable format, and available on demand within the operational context of the R/S personnel in the field.

SECURE COMMAND, LLC
4972 Marshall Crown Rd,
Centreville, VA 20120
(703) 340-6569

PI: Dr. Anup K. Ghosh
(703) 340-6569
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0139
GEORGE MASON UNIV.
4400 University Drive, MS 5B5,
Fairfax, VA 22030
(703) 993-1653

ID#: O08A-001-2016
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 08-T001       Awarded: 9/19/2008
Title: Automatic Identification & Mitigation of Unauthorized Information Leaking from Enterprise Networks
Abstract:  &nbs In this proposed project, we will develop an automatic classifier that examines and mediates all outward-bound network packets to correctly identify the program that generates Internet-facing sessions. By categorically classifying all programs in the enterprise communicating to the Internet, we will be able to automatically identify, locate, and remediate malicious software that may be exfiltrating sensitive DoD information.

Stottler Henke Associates, Inc.
951 Mariner's Island Blvd., STE 360,
San Mateo, CA 94404
(650) 931-2700

PI: Eric Domeshek
(617) 616-3221
Contract #: W9132T-09-C-0023
Northwestern University (InfoLab)
2133 Sheridan Road, Dept. Elec. Eng./Computer Sci.
Evanston, IL 60208
(847) 491-3640

ID#: O08A-002-2019
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 08-T002       Awarded: 3/23/2009
Title: SSTR Tools Enabling Lessons Learned Access and Reachback (STELLAR)
Abstract:  &nbs Nothing yet.

WETSTONE TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
20 Thornwood Drive, Suite 105
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 266-8086

PI: Mr. Chester D Hosmer
(607) 266-8086
Contract #: W911NF-08-C-0136
NORWICH UNIV. APPLIED
57 Old Freight Yard, PO Box 30
Northfield, VT 05663
(802) 485-2140

ID#: O08A-001-2003
Agency: OSD
Topic#: 08-T001       Awarded: 9/19/2008
Title: Neural ANOVA Information Leak Shunt (NAILS)
Abstract:  &nbs The proliferation and sophistication of malicious code today is staggering. Within hours of the discovery of a new vulnerability, related exploits appear. Furthering the problem, virus protection methods are becoming less effective in detecting or responding to even known exploits due to the polymorphic and metaphoric nature of advanced malicious code. In many cases these exploits already exist and go undetected in already infective hosts, are opportunistically leaking information without detection, or they lay dormant awaiting activation. Once activated, these technologies look for opportunities to steal and leak vital information, and/or disrupt operations at the most critical time. Current solutions fall short in detecting malware information leakage behavior post infection. An effective solution needs to be scoped correctly to address the information leakage problem. It needs to work with both currently available as well as future distributed systems and that it need to be adaptable as well as extendable to new threats as they emerge. We shall produce a SELF verses OTHER approach to information leakage detection by leveraging and applying proven aspects of previous work including ontology creation, ANOVA analysis, neural network generation and automated network control, toward the specific goal of detecting and shunting information leakage.