DoD STTR Program Phase I Selections for FY10.A

Army Selections

Navy Selections


---------- ARMY ----------

ANP Technologies, Inc.
824 Interchange Boulevard,
Newark, DE 19711
(302) 283-1730

PI: Yli Remo Vallejo
(302) 283-1730
Contract #: W911SR-10-C-0062
University of California, Irvine
Department of Chemistry, 1102 Natural Sciences 2
Irvine, CA 92697
(949) 824-5172

ID#: A10A-021-0354
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T021        Awarded: 8/25/2010
Title: DIPAIN-Based Handheld Assay for the Detection of T-2 Toxin in Water Using a Handheld Reader
Abstract: A rapid assay for the detection of T2 trichothecene mycotoxin in water is proposed that will use ANP Technology, Inc.'s established handheld reader and rapid acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor test ticket format. Dipain-II and other candidate Dipain derivatives will be immobilized on cellulose and other solid supports mounted as discs in wells on the existing test ticket, similar to the AChE inhibitor ticket which uses a cellulose support for an enzyme substrate. The fluorescent signal emitted when the association complex of Dipain-II and T2 is formed can be measured by ANP's handheld reader by changing the light source to an LED at or near 366 nm output. The current camera onboard can measure the resultant yellow orange emission. A time to result of ~10 seconds with a sensitivity to as low as 50 ng/mL is expected. The ticket will use a built in comparator so that it is self-calibrating.

Antek
106 Shuart Ave, Suite 1,
Syracuse, NY 13203
(315) 708-4198

PI: Sean C. Gifford
(617) 459-3915
Contract #: W81XWH-11-C-0008
Tulane University
1440 Canal St, Suite 830,
New Orleans, LA 70118
(504) 314-2940

ID#: A10A-026-0435
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T026        Awarded: 10/22/2010
Title: Automated Blood Component Separator
Abstract: The objective of the proposed research is to develop a portable, passive system for rapid and efficient blood component separation. While a number of macro-scale devices are routinely employed in laboratory settings to separate, for example, red blood cells (RBCs) from platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and an emerging class of microfabricated devices are slowly being developed to address various low-throughput, point-of-care applications, we propose a straightforward “mesoscopic” solution to reliably separate a unit of undiluted whole blood into RBCs, platelets, and plasma in under one hour.

Black Forest Engineering, LLC
12930 Morris Trail,
Colorado Springs, CO 80908
(719) 593-9501

PI: Stephen Gaalema
(719) 593-9501
Contract #: W911NF-10-C-0121
Case Western Reserve University
Office of Sponsored Projects, 10900 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, OH 44106
(216) 368-4510

ID#: A10A-004-0430
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T004        Awarded: 9/23/2010
Title: MEMS based thermopile infrared detector array for chemical and biological sensing
Abstract: Thermopile arrays manufactured using integrated process compatible materials and micro-machining will provide high performance with low manufacturing cost. Black Forest Engineering (BFE) teamed with Case Western Reserve University will design thermopiles using silicon based semiconductors and compare performance. Low cost thermopiles, differentially coupled with advanced BFE CMOS readout, will provide DOD with rugged, inexpensive, and high performance infrared sensing capabilities. Si (poly and single crystal) and SiC (poly) thermopiles will be designed and performance compared on the Phase I effort for fabrication of linear arrays applicable for infrared chemical and biological sensing missions. On Phase II the thermopile detector linear array will be fabricated and integrated with a BFE readout ASIC. The Phase II sensor will meet future ARMY sensing needs such as Bio-Aerosol Threat Alert.

Brimrose Technology Corporation
P.O. Box 616, 19 Loveton Cirlce
Sparks, MD 21152
(936) 588-6901

PI: Jolanta I. Soos
(410) 472-0700
Contract #: W911NF-11-C-0024
Regents of the Univ. Of Colorado
Administrative Research Center, 3100 Marine Street, Room 479
Boulder, CO 80309
(303) 492-6221

ID#: A10A-008-0385
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T008        Awarded: 10/22/2010
Title: Ultraviolet Acousto-Optic Devices Using Barium Borate (BBO)
Abstract: We will develop novel acousto-optic devices for use in the UV using the new material Barium Borate (BBO) which not only has the required UV transparency, but a unique combination of acoustic and optical properties. The capabilities provided by these new UV AO devices are ideally suited for optical addressing arrays of trapped ions with focused spots from appropriately tuned UV and visible lasers to program initial states and implement 2-qubit gates. BBO, which has received extensive development as a nonlinear optical material, has just recently emerged as a candidate AO material, and appears to be an ideal choice for addressing arrays of trapped ions since it will allow high efficiency AO modulators and deflectors throughout the UV, visible, and IR spectra. To achieve this goal we will first make more precise acoustic and acousto-optic measurement of the tensor properties of a-BBO and b-BBO than have been previously reported. Then we will design and fabricate the first high efficiency BBO modulators and deflectors optimized for QIP application in the UV. Their performance will be measured and the designs verified, and then improved devices will be designed and analyzed in preparation for Phase II.

CFD Research Corporation
215 Wynn Dr., 5th Floor,
Huntsville, AL 35805
(256) 726-4884

PI: Yi Wang
(256) 327-0678
Contract #: W911SR-10-C-0081
RTI International
3040 Cornwallis Road,
Research Triangle Pk, NC 27709
(919) 248-4181

ID#: A10A-016-0112
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T016        Awarded: 9/27/2010
Title: An Automated, High Throughput, Filter-Free Pathogen Preconcentrator
Abstract: Accurate real-time waterborne pathogen detection is of paramount importance to security of U.S. military forces and installations. Fieldable high-throughput pathogen concentration is a critical analytical need for enhanced detection performance. Existing concentration methods are time-consuming, bulky, labor-intensive, power- and reagent-hungry, and consequently ill-suited for battlefield deployment and on-site investigation. To overcome these limitations, we propose to develop and demonstrate a high-throughput, filter-free preconcentrator for automated enrichment of threat pathogens in water samples. The underlying principle of our preconcentrator is to form contactless exclusion barriers to pathogens by combining cross flow features and dielectrophoresis. Our technology enables order-of-magnitude improvement in throughput, concentration factor, and recovery efficiency and significant reduction in logistical burden and operating cost. In Phase I, we will design, fabricate, characterize and demonstrate a laboratory-scale prototype to establish proof-of-principle of the proposed technology. The preconcentrator designs will be optimized using high- fidelity simulation tools, and the fabricated device will be tested and demonstrated in our well-equipped bioengineering laboratories. In Phase II, a quarter-scale preconcentrator system with additional design refinements will be developed for enhanced performance, integrability and manufacturability. The preconcentrator will be integrated with COTS technologies for automated operation. The Phase II prototype will be demonstrated for continuous, long-term concentration of threat pathogens from composite sample matrix. Design requirements for full-scale system and compatibility to various detection technologies will be identified. The final product will be fully automated and filter-free with readily deployability in research and real environments.

Charles River Analytics Inc.
625 Mount Auburn Street,
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 491-3474

PI: Camille Monnier
(617) 491-3474
Contract #: W56HZV-10-C-0442
Boston University
Office of Sponsored Programs, 25 Buick Street
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 353-4365

ID#: A10A-030-0359
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T030        Awarded: 9/22/2010
Title: Monocular Unmanned Leader-Follower (MULE-F) System
Abstract: The Army has a clear need for a small unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) capable of autonomously accompanying a single soldier or vehicle. Such a UGV would help solve both logistical problems of soldiers needing to transport more equipment and supplies than they can carry in a backpack, and tactical problems of scouting unsafe areas. Multiple designs for such UGVs exist; however, they require active remote control or teleoperation, even for mundane tasks such as long-distance travel. Teleoperation is undesirable for these types of situations, as it requires “heads down” attention from the soldier, which reduces situational awareness and causes fatigue. We propose a Monocular Unmanned Leader- Follower (MULE-F) system for the autonomous tracking and following of a designated soldier or vehicle. The proposed system enables a UGV to autonomously follow a soldier or vehicle from up to 50m away and travelling at up to 20Kph, using lightweight UGV-mounted passive sensors and requiring no modifications to the leader’s equipment. The system is specifically designed to operate in the presence of multiple visually-similar soldiers or vehicles by integrating the designated leader’s tracked kinematics with a learned appearance model, and may be controlled at a distance using intuitive arm/hand gestures.

deciBel Research, Inc.
PO Box 5368,
Huntsville, AL 35814
(256) 489-6193

PI: Michael Jones
(256) 683-9280
Contract #: W911SR-10-C-0094
Rochester Institute of Technology
141 Lomb Memorial Drive, Suite 2400
Rochester, NY 14623
(585) 475-7984

ID#: A10A-019-0012
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T019        Awarded: 9/29/2010
Title: Passive Infrared Detection of Aerosolized Bacterial Spores
Abstract: deciBel Research and our university partner, Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT)-Center for Imaging Science, propose to develop a dual MWIR/LWIR imaging polarimeter for the detection and discrimination of aerosolized biological spores. The system will exploit spectral absorption and MIE scattering-induced radiometric and polarimetric phenomenon exhibited by clouds of aerosolized biological spores. The prototype sensor to be delivered under Phase II will utilize a temporal acquisition architecture to acquire the polarimetric portion of the signatures while the dual MWIR and LWIR channels will exploit the spectral absorption signatures. Under the Phase I effort, the spectral and MIE scattering signatures of a candidate aerosolized biological spores will be estimated using models based on RIT’s micro Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generator (DIRSIG). Multi-variate analysis, such as Principal Components Analysis (PCA), will be used to identify key features of the spectro-polarimetric signatures for detection and discrimination. Sensor performance requirements will be derived and the performance of several sensor architectures will be evaluated with respect to these requirements. A concept design will then be completed under the Phase I effort while a field deployable prototype sensor will be fabricated under the Phase II program.

Engineering and Scientific Innovations, Inc.
6740 Kelseys Oak Ct,
Cincinnati, OH 45248
(513) 605-3700

PI: Norman Toy
(513) 605-3700
Contract #: W911NF-11-C-0031
University of Cincinnati
Dept of Aerospace Engineering, 2600 Clifton Ave
Cincinnati, OH 45221
(513) 556-3355

ID#: A10A-010-0377
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T010        Awarded: 11/23/2010
Title: AUTOMATED SYSTEM FOR DETERMINATION OF JP-8 SMOKE POINT AND LUMINOMETER NUMBER
Abstract: Engineering & Scientific Innovations, Inc. (ESI) in cooperation with University of Cincinnati (UC) will develop an automated, standalone radiative heat and smoke point measurement device that provides improved accuracy and removes much of the subjectivity of the current method (ASTM D1322) by incorporating more modern and automated equipment. The proposed system utilizes a standard, laminar diffusion flame within a calibrated, documented and well conditioned naturally convecting airflow environment. Sensors connected to a fan controller ensure a constant mass flow rate independent exiting the test fixture, allowing for constant burn rates independent of fuel specimen. Radiative heat transfer measurements will be accomplished using optically sensitive instrumentation that is benchmarked against highly resolved spectral and blackbody radiators. Correlations will be developed between the quantities obtained by ASTM D1322 and the newly proposed methodologies for generational comparison between past and present data.

EntroPlus Technology Solutions & Services, LLC
11108 Chennault Beach Road #2421,
Mukilteo, WA 98275
(425) 533-7657

PI: Jesudos J. Kingsley
(425) 533-7657
Contract #: W911NF-10-C-0120
Arizona State University
Office for Research and Spons., Projects Admin. Box 873503
Tempe, AZ 85287
(480) 727-7983

ID#: A10A-011-0044
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T011        Awarded: 9/23/2010
Title: Enhanced power density PEM fuel cells via activated reactants
Abstract: The overpotentials and inefficient electrochemical reactions are largely responsible for the lowered power density in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) based H2/O2 fuel cells. Despite the use of large amounts of expensive precious metals (e.g. Platinum, Pt) the overall efficiency of PEM fuel cells are still about 50% only. The proposed project seeks to build on Entroplus's preliminary results of enhancement in the power density of PEM fuel cells via the use of activated reactants for practical applications. This approach also has the potential to enable the use of non-precious metals or lower amounts of precious metals for lowering the cost of PEM fuel cells. The Phase-I of this project aims to evaluate and demonstrate the technological feasibility for developing the PEM fuel cell and its components for sustained and improved performance using activated reactants.

EPIR Technologies Inc
590 Territorial Drive, Suite B,
Bolingbrook, IL 60440
(630) 771-0203

PI: Audrius Budrys
(630) 771-0203
Contract #: W911SR-10-C-0082
University of Michigan
1st Floor Room 1064, 3003 South State Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
(734) 764-7250

ID#: A10A-019-0077
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T019        Awarded: 9/20/2010
Title: Passive Infrared Detection of Aerosolized Bacterial Spores
Abstract: The capability to reliably and remotely detect, identify and track biological aerosols is a critical need for the United States military. EPIR Technologies proposes to improve this capability by making use of the infrared signatures from biological aerosol broadband Mie scattering, comprising both mid and long wavelength infrared (MW/LWIR) components, as well as a potential polarization component. EPIR proposes to meet this need with the design and fabrication of a passive standoff sensor based upon molecular beam epitaxy-grown n-p-n HgCdTe simultaneous two- color infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs) capable of MW/LWIR detection combined with a differential polarization detection capability. Phase I will focus on performance modeling and system trades including FPA geometry, spectral response, noise requirements and operating temperature to meet the system requirements while minimizing cost and risk, and maximizing yield. A parallel effort in Phase I will include polarization grid test structure design, fabrication, and testing on an infrared transparent material. Phase II will focus on infrared detector array prototyping and characterization, as well as system design and fabrication. Phase III will focus on manufacturing with design refinements including field deployable packaging and increasing detection capabilities to include chemical vapors as well as the primary objective of biological aerosols.

EPIR Technologies Inc
590 Territorial Drive, Suite B,
Bolingbrook, IL 60440
(630) 771-0203

PI: Silviu Velicu
(630) 771-0203
Contract #: W9132T-10-C-0043
University of Michigan
2350 Hayward, 2146 G.G. Brown Laboratory
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
(734) 763-6624

ID#: A10A-024-0185
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T024        Awarded: 9/3/2010
Title: Photovoltaic cells integrated with thermoelectric coolers for critical electronic equipment cooling and thermal management of base camps
Abstract: Present thermoelectric devices operate at about 10% of the Carnot efficiency, whereas the efficiency of compressor- based refrigerators is larger than 30%. An increase in the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT above 3 is needed before thermoelectric technology can replace current air conditioning technologies in many applications. Recent models have predicted that ZT can reach 6 in metal/HgCdTe superlattice-based devices. The ultimate goal of this project is to develop the technology required for the fabrication of HgCdTe-based thermoelectric devices with high thermoelectric figures of merit, monolithically integrate them with the silicon-based solar cells currently available at EPIR, and apply the technology to critical electronic equipment cooling and military base camp air conditioning purposes. The feasibility of using HgCdTe-based materials grown on silicon substrates for thermoelectric cooling will be demonstrated during Phase I. We will develop an accurate model for the thermoelectric properties of HgCdTe superlattice structures and perform the molecular beam epitaxy growth and characterization of these materials. In addition to materials development, EPIR will optimize and fabricate test device structures suitable for the extraction of the materials’ thermal and electrical characteristics. We will measure device ZT and the coefficient of performance, and compare them with values obtained from modeling.

Five Stones Research Corporation
5767 Cove Commons Drive, Suite 103
Hampton Cove, AL 35741
(256) 975-0848

PI: Kevin Lance Kelly
(256) 428-1677
Contract #: W31P4Q-10-C-0350
Northwestern University
Department of Chemistry, 2145 Sheridan Rd
Evanston, IL 60208
(847) 491-3516

ID#: A10A-002-0473
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T002        Awarded: 9/21/2010
Title: Plasmonic MEMS Sensor Array
Abstract: Sensor development researchers and engineers have perpetually sought novel methods to reduce sensor size and improve performance. Continued miniaturization of sensors through micromachining has enabled novel applications and introduced new paradigms for engineered systems to interact with the world. The challenge has always been to improve performance while continually reducing size. In the current state-of-the-art, miniaturized sensors are often pushing the limits of physics, fighting against the effects of reduced scale on sensor mechanics. Meanwhile, in unconnected fields of research, physicists and chemists have been exploring methods for phenomenally sensitive detection of chemical and biological substances through controlled utilization of surface plasmons. Significant progress in this field over the past decade has led to tremendous advances in our ability to detect minute changes in physical and chemical properties very near to a nanostructured surface. Despite these advances, the field of plasmonics has largely been focused on chemical and biological detection. It is our contention, however, that plasmonics can serve a viable and effective role in a wide range of sensing needs. By combining the extreme sensitivity of plasmonic coupling with the versatility of micromachined sensing, miniaturization will continue, enabling inroads into new applications.

Folded Structures Company LLC
1142A Old York Road,
Ringoes, NJ 08551
(617) 347-9065

PI: Daniel Kling
(908) 237-1955
Contract #: W911SR-10-P-0029
University of Minnesota
206 Church Street SE,
Minneapolis, MN 55455
(612) 625-1119

ID#: A10A-020-0278
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T020        Awarded: 9/27/2010
Title: Topological Data Analysis and Wide Area Detection of Chemical and Biological Contamination
Abstract: Topological data analysis is a new mathematical method used to study these massive data sets that arise in a variety of situations including military operations and national security. The use of passive infrared sensors for a wide area detection system involving chemical and biological contaminants produces massive amounts of hyperspectral image data. Recent research in this area include fast algorithms for computing homology dimension, the extension of homology from sets to distributions and functions, and a smart convolution filter that interprets local topological features that span between user defined geometric boundaries. Together these innovations give a new morphology grammar implemented through the geometry of the filter, its density distribution values, and iteration with other statistical procedures that extracts and manipulates the desired information in the most effective and efficient manner possible. If successfully demonstrated, the use of homology could change the very nature of data analyses for a multitude of national security and military situations where the current statistical methods are not capable of detecting qualitative structures.

Frontier Technology, Inc.
75 Aero Camino, Suite A,
Goleta, CA 93117
(805) 685-6672

PI: Chris Smith
(978) 927-4774
Contract #: W911NF-11-C-0006
University of Rhode Island
University of Rhode Island,
Kingston, RI 02881
(401) 874-5882

ID#: A10A-012-0382
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T012        Awarded: 10/13/2010
Title: Random Number Generation for High Performance Computing
Abstract: Frontier Technology, Inc. and University of Rhode Island Physics department propose to develop innovative, scalable random number generators for use on multiple parallel computing architectures. Our Phase I effort will include a comprehensive assessment of currently available algorithms for parallel random number generation as well as the currently available tests designed to uncover statistical defects. The considerable experience of the researchers involved in this proposal strongly suggests that the simplest and most versatile method for constructing new, more scalable algorithms will be to work with combinations of some of the most reliable generators currently available and that application based tests which rely on comparison with exactly solved models of continuous phase transitions will be among the most reliable. Random number generator algorithms and hardware specific implementations will be analyzed and optimized given the computational constraints. The most reliable and distributable of these algorithms will be implemented on multi-core systems, parallel computing clusters, graphics processing units (GPUs), GPU clusters and other parallel architectures. These algorithms will be compiled into a standardized library for release as part of a Phase II effort. A prototype of this library will be made available upon the completion of the Phase I effort.

FuelCell Energy, Inc.
3 Great Pasture Rd.,
Danbury, CT 06813
(203) 825-6057

PI: Stephen Jolly
(203) 830-7519
Contract #: W911NF-11-C-0015
University of Minnesota
151 Amundson Hall, 421 Washington Ave. SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455
(612) 625-9391

ID#: A10A-009-0168
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T009        Awarded: 10/15/2010
Title: Development of a Butanol Fuel Processor for Person-Portable Fuel Cell Power Systems
Abstract: FuelCell Energy, Inc., in collaboration with the University of Minnesota, is proposing to develop an innovative fuel processor for person-portable fuel cell power system applications. The system will be designed to reform butanol into a hydrogen-rich stream suitable for use in a low-temperature Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The technical approach will focus on the development of a novel catalyst for the partial oxidation of butanol. Thermodynamic analyses will be performed to define the optimal system operating conditions, such as temperature(s) and air to fuel ratio(s). The catalyst design will be optimized and demonstrated in a laboratory-scale environment. A scaled-up fuel processor system design will be developed to supply a 75W PEM fuel cell with high-purity hydrogen for at least 72 hours. Integrated, multi-staged catalyst and heat transfer sections are envisioned to create a lightweight and compact package. 3-D Computer Aided Design (CAD) modeling will be performed to visualize and optimize the size and weight of the system. Results of this study will be applied to a more detailed design, development, and demonstration effort in Phase II.

Hi-Z Technology, Inc.
Suite 7400, 7606 Miramar Road
San Diego, CA 92126
(858) 695-6660

PI: Velimir Jovanovic
(858) 695-6660
Contract #: W9132T-10-C-0039
Office of Contract and Grant Admin.
University of California, SD, 9500 Gilman Drive # 0934
La Jolla, CA 92093
(858) 534-0247

ID#: A10A-024-0375
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T024        Awarded: 8/17/2010
Title: Sustainable Materials for Thermal Management of Base Camps
Abstract: Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) and the University of California San Diego propose to adapt Hi-Z’s innovative Quantum Well (QW) thermoelectric (TE) technology to develop a TE cooler for the Army’s base camp tents. The cooler is to be embedded in the flexible tent materials and powered by electricity generated by photovoltaics. Hi-Z has developed nanocomposite QW TE materials that have high Figures of Merit and that can attain very high coefficients of performance (COP) to provide adequate cooling for the tent personnel in extreme environments. With the new QW materials, cooling systems can be fabricated that are much smaller, quieter, lighter-weight and that have much lower power requirements than current thermoelectric materials or presently used vapor-compression equipment. TE coolers have additional advantages over vapor-compression systems because they do not use compressors or refrigerants. On- going development for QW TE materials funded by DOD and DOE has demonstrated high-efficiency TE materials for power applications. Now, coolers to meet Army’s requirements are feasible and will be developed through this STTR. In Phase I QW films will be fabricated to demonstrate that QW materials can be deposited on a low thermal conductivity substrate and provide a high COP and sufficient cooling capacity for this application.

Hstar Technologies
82 Guggins Lane,
Boxborough, MA 01719
(978) 239-3203

PI: John Hu
(978) 239-3203
Contract #: W81XWH-11-C-0007
Georgia Institute of Technology
Room 220F, Health Robotics Lab, 828 West Peachtree Street
Atlanta, GA 30332
(404) 385-8192

ID#: A10A-028-0471
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T028        Awarded: 10/21/2010
Title: A Near Autonomous Combat Casualty Extraction Robotic System
Abstract: Hstar proposes a near autonomous combat casualty extraction robot (c2Exbot) system that: 1) supports autonomous dexterous manipulation, safe patient lifting and near autonomous navigation control, 2) utilizes a supervisory telepresence operation mechanism, 3) provides near autonomous patient diagnosis, injury assessment and emergency treatment, and d) provides semi-autonomous patient monitoring and enroute care. The proposed c2Exbot system will be designed and developed by integrating the aforementioned functional components onto Hstar’s existing teleoperational combat casualty extraction robotic system called cRoNA (Combat Robotic Nurse Assistant). The proposed system has several components. Our primary innovation in c2Exbot includes a humanoid mobile dexterous robotic manipulation system that can run in near autonomous and supervisory telepresence operation mode. We will leverage the cRoNA system technologies available at Hstar. The state of art c2Exbot will be equipped with autonomous navigation control, patient lifting and extraction functions. It will also incorporate the industry standard JAUS (Joint Architecture for Unmanned Systems) protocols for integration with networked command and control systems.

III-N Technology, Inc.
4627 5th Street,
Lubbock, TX 79416
(806) 441-4570

PI: Jing Li
(806) 401-9289
Contract #: W911NF-10-C-0073
Texas Tech University
Office of Research Services, 203 Holden Hall
Lubbock, TX 79409
(806) 742-3884

ID#: A10A-015-0010
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T015        Awarded: 9/29/2010
Title: III-nitride 1.5 Micron Photonic Devices on Si Substrates
Abstract: Research in silicon photonics has received much attention in recent years for its potential to utilize well developed silicon processing technology. A broad range of linear and nonlinear silicon photonic devices such as modulators, splitters, switches and detectors have been demonstrated. However, the most important challenge in silicon photonics thus far is the difficulty of making electrically pumped light sources and amplifiers. The objective of this project is to develop new types of optical emitters and amplifiers on silicon. The proposed approach is to utilize epitaxial growth of III-nitride semiconductors on Si substrate with in-situ erbium (Er) doping by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The approach is based on successful synthesizing of III-nitride UV/visible photonic structures on Si and Er-doped III-nitride photonic structures, achieved jointly by III-N Technology, Inc and Texas Tech University. These photonic structures predominantly exhibited the desired optical emission for optical communication at 1.5 micron. The technical aims are to (a) Further develop MOCVD growth technology for obtaining device quality InGaN on Si; (b) Optimize in-situ Er incorporation into III-nitride device structures; (c) Develop device fabrication technology for the realization of Er-doped nitride optical amplifiers and emitters active at 1.5 micron.

Infoscitex Corporation
303 Bear Hill Road,
Waltham, MA 02451
(781) 890-1338

PI: Will Hafer
(781) 890-1338
Contract #: W911SR-10-C-0078
The University of Texas at Austin
PO Box 7159, Sponsored Projects Award Admin
Austin, TX 78713
(512) 232-6545

ID#: A10A-023-0131
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T023        Awarded: 9/16/2010
Title: Narrowband Microbolometer Infrared Detectors for Chemical and Biological Sensing
Abstract: A narrow-band microbolometric detector is proposed to the address need for a low-cost, portable system to perform chemical and biological threat detection. An approach is shown to achieve a narrow-band bolometric detector whose response can be tailored to both a desired peak wavelength and bandwidth. The approach will enable the design of an array of detectors meeting the requirements for chemical and biological threat detection, and compatible with standard micro-fabrication methods. The Phase I investigation builds upon past work by the team developing spectrally selective microbolometers for imaging applications. An experimentally validated detector design is anticipated in Phase I, with a functional optical cell employing the narrowband microbolometer array demonstrated in Phase II. The resulting device will be compatible with low-cost production, portability, and use as a distributed or disposable sensor.

Infoscitex Corporation
303 Bear Hill Road,
Waltham, MA 02451
(781) 890-1330

PI: Thieu Truong
(781) 890-1338
Contract #: W81XWH-11-C-0005
Columbia University
1210 Amsterdam Avenue, 254 Engineering Terrace, MC220
New York, NY 10027
(212) 851-5856

ID#: A10A-026-0176
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T026        Awarded: 10/14/2010
Title: Portable Microfluidic Three Component Blood Separator
Abstract: Infoscitex and Columbia University propose to develop an automated blood component separation system that can quickly and automatically separate blood into three components for the US Army to use under field conditions. In this Phase I program, the team will prove the feasibility of separating whole blood into RBC, platelet rich plasma and acellular plasma using a high volume microfluidic technology which was developed by the Artificial Organ Research Laboratory at Columbia University for an artificial kidney. The artificial kidney was developed into a prototype in collaboration with Infoscitex and is currently under license with a medical device company. Given the relatively advanced stage of our artificial kidney research, the proposed STTR mechanism is ideal to confirm the transfer of the artificial kidney knowledge to a Blood Components Separation System and to develop it to a useable and field deployable product. In Phase I, the team will develop, build and demonstrate a proof of concept prototype to verify that RBC, platelets and plasma can be separated to the requirements of the US Army with low power requirements.

InnoSense LLC
2531 West 237th Street, Suite 127
Torrance, CA 90505
(310) 530-2011

PI: Thomas W. Owen
(310) 530-2011
Contract #: W911NF-11-C-0040
The Pennsylvania State University
Office of Sponsored Programs, 110 Technology Center Building
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 865-1372

ID#: A10A-010-0113
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T010        Awarded: 11/23/2010
Title: LOW-COST, PORTABLE AND AUTOMATED SMOKE POINT TESTING APPARATUS FOR MILITARY APPLICATIONS
Abstract: Fuels for Army use undergo rigorous analysis to determine many chemical and physical properties before they are used in Army vehicles. The property of fuels to produce smoke or soot is one such specification used to determine fuel quality. Smoke production of a diffusion flame produced by a kerosene fuel can be correlated to the chemical composition of the fuel. Unfortunately, the standard used to determine the smoke producing properties of kerosene fuels suffers from various drawbacks as noted in the topic description. InnoSense LLC (ISL) has teamed with a notable technical expert in the relevant area to develop a modern technique that satisfies the Army needs. In Phase I, two different approaches will be investigated to demonstrate the feasibility of an automated testing device that builds on the latest engineering knowledge. The results of Phase I will determine which one of the two approaches will be further developed to a form- factor prototype in Phase II. At the end of Phase II, the prototype will be delivered to the Army for further testing and evaluation. For commercializing the device, ISL has teamed with two partners. Their support letters are attached.

InnovaTek, Inc.
350 Hills Street, Suite 104
Richland, WA 99354
(509) 375-1093

PI: Qimin Ming
(509) 375-1093
Contract #: W911NF-11-C-0025
Indiana University
Office of Research Admin, 620 Union Drive, Room 518
Indianapolis, IN 46202
(317) 278-3473

ID#: A10A-009-0132
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T009        Awarded: 10/22/2010
Title: CATALYTIC MEMBRANE REACTOR FOR THE PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN FROM BUTANOL
Abstract: A compact and efficient fuel processor that provides clean hydrogen from a high energy density liquid fuel such as butanol will allow fuel cell technology to be realized in military and commercial markets for portable applications. InnovaTek, and its proposal partner Indiana - Purdue University, will build on their combined experience in catalytic reforming to develop catalysts that are optimized for a micro structured membrane reactor that converts butanol to hydrogen for use by a PEM fuel cell to generate electricity. A proprietary partial oxidation catalyst that resists sintering and coking will be developed to assure a long lifetime for the reactor. InnovaTek’s fuel reformer will be designed using hydrogen-permeable membrane technology developed in collaboration with Pall Corporation to offer unique characteristics, including compactness, extremely efficient heat transfer, and sufficient hydrogen purity for a PEM fuel cell. If successfully developed, the proposed technology would represent a significant advancement in one of the critical steps required to achieving portable power generation from renewable fuels.

Intraband LLC
200 N. Prospect Ave.,
Madison, WI 53726
(608) 239-3296

PI: Dan Botez
(608) 265-4643
Contract #: W911NF-11-C-0007
University of Wisconsin-Madison
1415 Engineering Drive,
Madison, WI 53726
(608) 262-3822

ID#: A10A-007-0152
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T007        Awarded: 10/13/2010
Title: On-Chip Passive Phase-Locking for High Coherent Power, Mid-IR Quantum Cascade Lasers
Abstract: The technical objectives of this proposal are: 1) the design of 8 micron-emitting active-photonic-crystal (APC) quantum-cascade (QC) lasers by using passive phase-locking in a monolithic structure in order to achieve multiwatt- range, diffraction-limited powers; and 2) the development of the key fabrication steps for realizing the proposed APC QC laser. Deep-well (DW) QC lasers will be used in the design since they suppress carrier leakage out of active regions, resulting in electro-optical characteristics much less temperature sensitive than for conventional QC devices; thus allowing for significant increases in average power and wallplug efficiency. At an emission wavelength of 8 microns the estimated increase in average power for a single QC laser is from 0.2 W to 0.5 W. For coherently scaling the power at the chip level, a novel type of APC-type structure is proposed whose elements are DW-QC lasers. The design will be for APC devices of built-in index step an order of magnitude higher than for conventional APC-QC devices, as to achieve stable-beam operation in quasi-CW or CW operation to high coherent powers with high wallplug efficiency. For 8 micron-emitting devices the design will be for usable average powers more than 3 W, delivered in diffraction-limited beams.

ITN Energy Systems, Inc.
8130 Shaffer Parkway,
Littleton, CO 80127
(303) 285-5129

PI: Russell Hollingsworth
(303) 285-5154
Contract #: W911SR-10-C-0086
Colorado School of Mines
1500 Illinois St,
Golden, CO 80401
(303) 273-3538

ID#: A10A-023-0148
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T023        Awarded: 9/20/2010
Title: Narrowband microbolometer arrays for infrared chemical sensing
Abstract: This Small Business Technology Transfer Research program will develop narrow band plasmonic resonant cavity filters with integrated microbolometer sensors operating in the long wave infrared (LWIR) atmospheric transmission band for IR absorption measurements of low concentration chemicals. IR spectroscopy can identify a wide range of contaminants, including chemical/biological warfare agents, explosives, natural toxins in drinking water, and waste products requiring environmental clean-up. Detailed performance predictions will be obtained through finite element modeling (FEM) of the harmonic Maxwell’s equations. The FEM provides detailed field information, including E field, B field, energy density, and time dependent information with subwavelength resolution, which greatly aids in understanding the underlying physical mechanisms. Test structures will be made using well established nanofabrication facilities, and characterized with spectral and polarization sensitive far field techniques.

JSJ Technologies, LLC
4700 Elmo Weedon Road, Suite 117,
College Station, TX 77845
(979) 412-1136

PI: Jeremy D. Steinshnider
(979) 575-3592
Contract #: W911NF-11-C-0019
Lamar University
P.O. Box 10613,
Beaumont, TX 77710
(409) 880-5768

ID#: A10A-011-0084
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T011        Awarded: 10/19/2010
Title: Activated Reactants to Reduce Fuel Cell Overpotentials
Abstract: The current produced in electrochemical galvanic cells is primarily dependent on the rate of the electrode reactions where the cell's anode is less negative, supplying less energy than thermodynamically predicted, and the cell's cathode is less positive, supplying less energy than thermodynamically predicted. Reduction of electrochemical overpotentials in electrochemical systems has been the prime objective of physical electrochemistry. A number of alternative approaches exist to potentially activate the reactant entering a fuel cell with the intent to lower overpotentials. These approaches include microplasmas, ultrasound, photonic irradiation, or use of chemical additives that promote activation of the reactants. Of these approaches, microplasmas through Dielectric Barrier Discharge appears to be one of the most promising routes. The approach proposed here involves activation of reactants using Micro Dielectric Barrier Discharge (MBDB) integrated directly into the internal components of a fuel cell stack.

L. C. Pegasus Corporation
225 Long Avenue, Building 15
Hillside, NJ 07205
(973) 923-3028

PI: Thomas Koscica
(973) 923-3028
Contract #: W911NF-11-C-0060
Ohio State University
Sponsored Research Office, 1960 Kenny Road
Columbus, OH 43221
(614) 292-5277

ID#: A10A-014-0080
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T014        Awarded: 9/14/2011
Title: Plasmonic Nanoantennas for Single-Molecule, Surface-Enhanced-Raman-Scattering Based Sensing
Abstract: This proposed project is concerned with the design, fabrication, and demonstration of a new class of plasmonic nanostructures for single molecule surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for biological and chemical sensing applications. A complete design of the plasmonic nanostructures with large local field enhancements (E/E0>100) will be formulated, and the fabrication procedures will be developed for at least one device implementation. The plasmon resonance frequencies and local field enhancements will be predicted as a function of the geometric and material parameters of the plasmonic nanostructures. We will execute fabrication experiments and benchmarking that demonstrate an adequate capability for the meeting the expected challenges. Specifically, feasibility of repeatable fabrication of less than 5nm gaps, precise placement of SERS molecules at the “hot-spots,” will be demonstrated.

L. C. Pegasus Corporation
225 Long Avenue, Building 15
Hillside, NJ 07205
(973) 923-3028

PI: Nicolai Panikov
(973) 923-3028
Contract #: W911SR-10-C-0061
Marshall University
401 11th Street, Suite 1400,
Huntington, WV 25701
(304) 696-4307

ID#: A10A-021-0083
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T021        Awarded: 9/20/2010
Title: DIPAIN based assay for the T-2 Toxin
Abstract: This proposed project is to develop a rapid assay for T-2 Toxin. Under this project we will develop DIPAIN-derivative based test-strips that indicate the presence of trace quantities of trichothecene mycotoxins in aqueous solutions. The T-2 toxin will be used as a test case for this effort. We will use of 2-(diphenylacetyl)-l,3-indanedione-l-hydrazone (DIPAIN II) and its derivatives as reagents on solid supports, using the property that DIPAIN derivatives undergo significant fluorescence enhancement in the visible range under UV excitation when in contact with trichothecene mycotoxins and that the presence of the toxin is indicated by the enhanced fluorescence of the DIPAIN derivative.

Luna Innovations Incorporated
1 Riverside Circle, Suite 400
Roanoke, VA 24016
(434) 483-4254

PI: Blaine Butler
(434) 220-2509
Contract #: W81XWH-11-C-0021
University of New Mexico
MSC01 1247, 1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
(505) 277-4186

ID#: A10A-025-0173
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T025        Awarded: 11/19/2010
Title: Multi-Enzyme Based Sensor for Water Contaminant Detection
Abstract: Luna Innovations collaborating with the University of New Mexico will determine the feasibility of developing a light weight handheld multi-enzyme sensor device that is capable of detecting a wide array of water contaminants, toxic industrial chemicals (TICs). The proposed multi-enzyme electrode technology will provide significant improvements in sensitivity, operational stability, and shelf life over existing technologies, resulting in an easy to operate, low power, field ready device. During Phase I Luna will demonstrate the performance of a multi-enzyme electrode sensor system by detecting the presence of 8 out of 12 TICs. Phase II will focus on increasing shelf life and operational conditions, extending the detectable TIC range, and constructing two prototypes for delivery to the U.S. Army. Concurrently, Luna will be working to adapt the encapsulated enzyme electrodes as sensor devices for other non-military applications, including water utilities at the state and local levels.

Lynntech, Inc.
7610 Eastmark Drive,
College Station, TX 77840
(979) 693-0017

PI: Anuncia Gonzalez-Martin
(979) 693-0017
Contract #: W81XWH-11-C-0015
University of New Mexico
University of New Mexico,
Albuquerque, NM 87131
(505) 277-2640

ID#: A10A-025-0070
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T025        Awarded: 10/29/2010
Title: Self-Powered Biosensor for Water Toxicity Monitoring
Abstract: Contamination of water supplies with toxic inorganic chemicals and toxic inorganic materials (TIC/TIMs) is a major concern for the U.S. military due to their worldwide prevalence and accessibility. Traditional, analyte-specific approaches are unfeasible to detect the approximately 70,000 potential TIC/TIM contaminants. Biologically-based sensor systems have the potential to provide general information on whether a source of water is contaminated and can be sensitive to a wide variety of toxicants. However, currently biologically-based sensors based on bioluminescence and other technologies suffer from several key disadvantages. For instance, current sensors suffer from poor sensitivity to a wide enough variety of toxins and are too large or unstable for practical field deployable devices. Lynntech proposes a novel sensing device using an enzymatic biofuel cell (BFC) as a self-powered biosensor for detecting toxins in water. The advantages of the BFC-based approach include the ability to detect a diverse variety of toxins, to operate simply, and to be implemented into a compact, low power hand-held device. Lynntech in collaboration with the University of New Mexico will utilize a novel enzyme immobilization approach to greatly extend the life of the BFC-based biosensors under harsh storage and operational conditions.

M4 Sciences LLC
1201 Cumberland Avenue Suite A,
West Lafayette, IN 47906
(765) 430-3655

PI: James Mann
(765) 430-3655
Contract #: W911W6-10-C-0062
Purdue University
Young Hall, 155 S. Grant Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907
(765) 494-3623

ID#: A10A-001-0145
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T001        Awarded: 7/28/2010
Title: Ultrafine Grained Steel and Nickel Based Alloy Manufacturing
Abstract: This STTR project seeks to develop a new manufacturing system for large-scale, low-cost production of bulk ultrafine grained (UFG) or nanostructured metals in plate, sheet or bar forms. These capabilities will be based on scale-up of a new class of machining-based processes called large strain extrusion machining (LSEM) that has been effective at creating high strength, nanoscale microstructures in a variety of alloy systems. Combining the strengths of M4 Sciences and Purdue University, the project will build on findings that hybrid machining-extrusion processes, based on LSEM constrained chip formation, offer a transformative approach for overcoming the limitations to large-scale production of UFG alloys by Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) processing. The new hybrid machining processes can impart the large levels of plastic strain needed to effect grain refinement under controlled conditions, while simultaneously providing unprecedented control of the resulting bulk form (size and shape). Based on a strong foundation of preliminary work and intellectual property development, the project seeks to demonstrate LSEM of 4340 steel alloy, integrating systematic processing studies, material characterization, and analysis of energy, cost and equipment requirements.

Materials Modification Inc
2809-K Merrilee Drive,
Fairfax, VA 22031
(703) 560-1371

PI: Kris Rangan
(703) 560-1371
Contract #: W911NF-11-C-0021
Gaston College
PO Box 1044, 7220 Wilkinson Blvd
Belmont,, NC 28012
(704) 825-3737

ID#: A10A-003-0450
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T003        Awarded: 10/19/2010
Title: Decontamination storage bags for chemical and biological warfare agents
Abstract: This STTR Phase I project will develop a novel toxic material storage bag with an inner liner capable of decontaminating chemical and biological warfare agents (CBWA’s).. The inner-liner technology would entail adsorption and decomposition of warfare agents without the release of toxic agents, and will result in a storage bag capable of being disposed of in an environmentally safe fashion. The storage container developed in the proposed Phase I effort will be used in a variety of situations, such as in warfare, acts of terrorism, accidental release of toxic agents, and in demilitarization operations

MESH, Inc.
114 Barnsley Road,
Oxford, PA 19363
(610) 932-7754

PI: Larry B. Grim
(610) 932-7754
Contract #: W911SR-10-C-0066
Temple University
Office of Technology Transfer, 1938 Liocouras Walk
Philadelphia, PA 19122
(215) 204-6761

ID#: A10A-022-0241
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T022        Awarded: 9/9/2010
Title: Cooperative Deployment of Next Generation Chemical Standoff Sensors
Abstract: MESH, Inc. has developed a method to take data from multiple fixed site standoff sensors and generate concentration maps using either triangulation or tomography. The programs that MESH has developed will be modified to allow standoff from moving platforms to be used in the data merging process. A simulation suite of tools, also developed by MESH, will be used to set the requirements on the accuracy of the platform position and the pointing accuracy which will meet the goal of 30m grid resolution. Since the next generation standoff equipment will be hyperspectral imagers, using inputs from this type of equipment will be included in the simulation. Because hyperspectral imagers generate images of enormous size, as compared to single pixel standoff sensors like the JSLSCAD, techniques to compress the images without affecting the quality of the 3-D threat profiles will be investigated. The goal of this effort is to design and build a system capable of generating high quality 3-D threat images just using inputs from standoff sensors on moving platforms. These sensors will be a mixture of hyperspectral and single pixel standoff passive infrared sensors.

Metron, Inc.
1818 Library Street, Suite 600
Reston, VA 20190
(703) 326-2838

PI: Stephen Ahearn
(703) 326-2830
Contract #: W911SR-10-P-0032
Stanford University
320 Panama Street, Bambi Modular
Stanford, CA 94305
(650) 724-6883

ID#: A10A-020-0280
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T020        Awarded: 9/27/2010
Title: Topological Data Analysis and Wide Area Detection of Chemical and Biological Contamination MP 39-10
Abstract: Metron, Inc. and Stanford University propose to design, develop, test and demonstrate topological data analytic algorithms to analyze hyperspectral imagery. We propose to adapt the topological data analytic techniques, including Stanford’s successful Mapper algorithm, to the hyperspectral imagery domain. Using these algorithms we will identify topological and geometric features and properties indicative of chemical and biological contamination. We will leverage Metron’s expertise in Bayesian filters to produce preliminary detection and classification results using the extracted features and properties.

Mimic Technologies
811 First Ave, STE 408,
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 923-3337

PI: Jeffrey Berkley
(206) 923-3337
Contract #: W81XWH-11-C-0011
Johns Hopkins University
Department of Computer Science, 121 CSEB, 3400 N. Charles St.
Baltimore, MD 21218
(410) 516-5521

ID#: A10A-029-0115
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T029        Awarded: 10/28/2010
Title: Automated Support for the da Vinci Surgical System
Abstract: Over 1,400 da Vinci systems are in use worldwide and the install base grows by more than 350 robots each year. While adoption has been rapid, there exists a wide variance in performance of surgical procedures, which has had a negative impact on care quality, cost and patient safety. This is due in part to inefficient training practices and limited mechanisms for objectively assessing surgical performance. To address the demand for improved training, Mimic Technologies has developed a da Vinci simulator in collaboration with Intuitive Surgical. This simulator collects and analyzes diverse performance data in order to highlight deficiencies in surgical skill. The simulator then recommends steps for addressing identified weaknesses. Conversely, Johns Hopkins University has created a Surgical Assistant Workstation (SAW) that collects data from the Surgeon's Console during dry lab training and surgery. After analyzing this data with advanced statistical analysis and machine learning techniques, improper surgical practices can be identified. Mimic Technologies and John Hopkins University propose to apply respective technologies and expertise to the develop of an automated support system for the da Vinci surgical robot. The proposed system will provide continuous surgical skills assessment and decision support throughout initial training and thereafter during surgery.

NanoScale Materials, Inc.
1310 Research Park Drive,
Manhattan, KS 66502
(785) 537-0179

PI: Shyamala Rajagopalan
(785) 537-0178
Contract #: W911NF-11-C-0016
Clemson Apparel Research
500 Lebanon Rd,
Pendleton, SC 29670
(864) 646-8454

ID#: A10A-003-0154
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T003        Awarded: 10/15/2010
Title: Chemical-Biological Forensic Evidence Container with Agent and Tamper Resistant Tools
Abstract: The proposed research incorporates several inventions to produce structural components that can be assembled into a highly enhanced chemical-biological (CB) forensic evidence container for transport and storage of contaminated articles. Bio-hazardous materials are frequently encountered in standard investigations, and currently used evidence bags are designed to handle the containment and preservation issues associated with those materials. However, when the incident scene is related to military actions or terrorist activity, the challenges for collection, transport, and storage of forensic evidence multiply. New forensic evidence bag systems provided with unique tamper and agent resistant features will be produced through a collaborative effort by NanoScale Corporation and Clemson University. The key feature of the proposed system is integration of NanoScale’s reactive nano materials and/or derived composites with down selected fabrics for enhanced CB protection. In Phase I, we will identify the most promising formulations for CB containment, define and design the optimum system configuration, and test the baseline system. Results will be leveraged into Phase II, where a detailed development and demonstration using actual CB agents will occur. The proposed work through Phase II and beyond will develop a novel product that will be used both in DoD and commercial applications.

NanoScale Materials, Inc.
1310 Research Park Drive,
Manhattan, KS 66502
(785) 537-0179

PI: Slawomir Winecki
(785) 537-0179
Contract #: W911SR-10-P-0034
University of Vermont
Cook Physical Science Building, 82 University Pl.
Burlington, VT 05405
(802) 656-0270

ID#: A10A-018-0073
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T018        Awarded: 9/29/2010
Title: High Surface-Area Metal Oxide Sorbent for Sampling and Infrared Detection of Water Contaminants
Abstract: Detection and identification of toxic chemical in water is vital for various military, environmental, and industrial applications. Specifically, the Joint Services have a need for rapid detection of trace levels of chemical contamination in water systems. This Small Business Technology Transfer Phase I project will focus on the development of a novel detection system for sampling and identification of toxic pollutants in water. The proposed system will be built around single use sensor tubes containing a high surface area metal oxide sorbent with dual purpose: (1) to adsorb, concentrate, and preserve chemical compounds from water passing through the tube, and (2) to allow Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy detection of adsorbed species with sufficient reliability and sensitivity. NanoScale Corporation is uniquely qualified to conduct the proposed program since it has successfully developed scalable and economical manufacturing methods and then commercialized nanocrystalline metal oxides for various applications. NanoScale products have demonstrated high effectiveness in the capture of numerous toxic compounds including chemical warfare agents. The proposed STTR Phase I will be a joint effort between NanoScale and Prof. Christopher Landry’s research group at the University of Vermont (UVM), who will serve as the research institution collaborator. Prof. Landry is an expert in synthesis of inorganic materials, including mesoporous sorbents.

New Jersey Microsystems, Inc.
211 Warren Street, Suite 215
Newark, NJ 07103
(973) 297-1450

PI: Bill Carr
(973) 297-1450
Contract #: W911NF-11-C-0008
North Carolina State University
2701 sullivan Drive Suite 240, Campus Box 7514
Raleigh, NC 27695
(919) 515-2444

ID#: A10A-004-0159
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T004        Awarded: 10/13/2010
Title: MEMS based thermopile infrared detector array for chemical and biological sensing
Abstract: New Jersey Microsystems proposes to develop an economical thermopile array with sensitivity maximum in the long wave infrared region (LWIR). Current infrared detectors are too expensive to be widely deployed in large numbers. The proposed MEMS technology is simpler, more manufacturable, and therefore less expensive than bolometer and ferroelectric devices with competitive D* sensitivity. The thermopile array is optimized with a detection time constant of 35 milliseconds or less permitting fast-scan response to airborne contaminates. The NJM device continues our R&D work developing highly sensitive infrared MEMS sensors and imagers. The target sensitivity level D* of 1 x 10^8 Jones for each pixel of the thermopile array is consistent with earlier MEMS infrared imaging projects at NJM producing an NETD of 10 millidegK. Based on experience gained with previous LWIR developments, the NJM team is proposing an important technology step forward beyond that developed for far infrared sensors at NJM in the past.

NP Photonics, Inc.
UA Science and Technology Park, 9030 S. Rita Road, Suite #120
Tucson, AZ 85747
(520) 799-7424

PI: Wei Shi
(520) 799-7413
Contract #: W911NF-11-C-0005
University of Dayton Research Inst.
Contracts and Grants Admin., 300 College Park
Dayton, OH 45469
(937) 229-2919

ID#: A10A-013-0216
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T013        Awarded: 10/13/2010
Title: Compact & Ultra-High Resolution Terahertz Spectroscopic/Fingerprint System
Abstract: NP Photonics proposes to develop a fiber-based, compact, tunable, THz spectroscopic/fingerprinting system that offers ultra-high resolution (< 1 MHz), high sensitivity and room temperature operation over the 1-3 THz range. This proposed system will provide high resolution molecular fingerprint information by leveraging NP Photonics high power and narrow linewidth fiber-based THz source, which is based on the newly developed THz crystal fiber converter and NP’s high power single-frequency pulsed fiber lasers at eye-safe wavelength ~1550 nm in master oscillator and power amplifier (MOPA) configuration. In this project, the external cavity enhanced fiber-based THz source will generate 1-10 mW narrow linewidth THz radiation while providing for 3-4 decades of dynamic range. For the THz detection, we propose an ultra-sensitive, room-temperature optical THz detection by using nonlinear parametric up-conversion. Terahertz radiation is mixed with pump light at ~1550 nm in the THz fiber converter to generate an optical up-converted wave that is coupled into optical fiber and detected using a Geiger-mode avalanche photo-diode (GM-APD). The noise equivalent power (NEP) of this proposed THz spectroscopic/fingerprinting system is expected to be ~ fW/Hz1/2.

Ocis Technology LLC
4427 E. Turquoise Ave,
Phoenix, AZ 85028
(602) 317-6249

PI: Michael Tischler
(602) 317-6249
Contract #: W911NF-11-C-0027
University of Wisconsin
Research and Sponsored Program, 21 North Park St. , Suite 6401
Madison, WI 53715
(608) 262-0237

ID#: A10A-013-0053
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T013        Awarded: 10/28/2010
Title: Compact & Ultra-High Resolution Terahertz Spectroscopic/Fingerprint System
Abstract: In this STTR program we will first develop a high power, very narrow linewidth (CW), tunable, compact, room temperature terahertz (THz) spectroscopic system and then use this to begin development of experimentally obtained THz spectra. The THz source is based on our previous simulation and initial experimental demonstration of a novel nested waveguide structure using difference frequency generation which has achieved a power- normalized conversion efficiency of 1.3 x 10-7 W-1, about 23X larger than the best previously reported results and with a spectral linewidth ~ 1- 2 MHz. In this work we expect to achieve a power- normalized conversion efficiency of at least 7 x 10-6 W-1, and an absolute output power approaching 1mW. The high conversion efficiency and output power results from the structure of the nested waveguide, which permits independent optimization of the optical pump and THz waveguides.

Omega Optics, Inc.
10306 Sausalito Dr,,
Austin, TX 78759
(512) 825-4480

PI: Alan Wang
(512) 996-8833
Contract #: W911NF-10-C-0122
the University of Texas at Austin
Room 9.144, Depart. Mech. Eng., 204 East Dean Keeton St.
Austin, TX 78712
(512) 471-5874

ID#: A10A-014-0272
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T014        Awarded: 9/23/2010
Title: Resonant Cavity Enhanced On-Chip Raman Spectrometer Array with Precisely Positioned Metallic Nano-Gaps for Single Molecule Detection
Abstract: In this program, Omega Optics and the University of Texas at Austin propose to develop an on-chip surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrometer array for single molecule detection. The sensitivity of the SERS spectrometer comes from the 5-nm gap between gold nanowires, which can achieve 108 enhancement factor (EF) for the Raman scattering signals. Especially, these gold nanowires are precisely positioned in the resonant cavity by an exquisite nano-entity manipulation technology --- electrical tweezers, a technique with which one can freely move metallic nanowires to predefined positions. Thus the hot-spots for SERS are obtained by a repeatable and controllable manner. Additionally, the proposed on-chip SERS spectrometer array is based on resonant cavity enhanced (RCE) polymer waveguides with extraordinary optical intensity enhancement. The resonant effect is capable of further increasing the sensitivity of the SERS by at least four orders of magnitude. With 1012 enhancement factor in total, the proposed on-chip SERS spectrometer array is expected to achieve single-molecule-detection capability even for those with very small Raman scattering cross sections. Comparing with conventional free space configuration, the fully packaged on-chip optical waveguide spectrometer array with fiber-optic connectors also offers other desired features, such as ease of use and remote sensing.

Orono Spectral Solutions Inc.
983 Stillwater Avenue,
Old Town, ME 04468
(866) 269-8007

PI: Luke Doucette
(866) 269-8007
Contract #: W911SR-10-C-0885
Univeristy of Maine
College Avenue,
Orono, ME 04469
(207) 581-1484

ID#: A10A-017-0371
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T017        Awarded: 9/30/2010
Title: Benign, Inexpensive Simulant for testing of Biological Standoff Sensors
Abstract: The goal of this Phase I proposal is to develop a synthetic, low cost, and benign simulant for biowarfare agents (BWA) to be used in the testing of standoff sensors. Orono Spectral Solutions Inc. (OSS) has performed preliminary work leading to the identification of benign ingredients that, when combined in a predefined mass ratio, mimic UV-Vis and infrared signatures of BG spores. This work was performed under an existing contract (DoD contract # W911SR-06-C- 0035). The objective of future investigation is to expand upon this work to 1) complete the development of a material package for a BG spore simulant, 2) develop similar material packages that mimic the same signatures of Erwinia herbicola and MS2 bateriophage and 3) develop a method for creating micron sized particles using the ingredients identified for our existing BG simulant.

Orono Spectral Solutions Inc.
983 Stillwater Avenue,
Old Town, ME 04468
(866) 269-8007

PI: Luke Doucette
(866) 269-8007
Contract #: W911SR-10-C-0084
University of Maine
College Avenue,
Orono, ME 04469
(207) 581-1484

ID#: A10A-018-0238
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T018        Awarded: 9/30/2010
Title: High surface-area, mesoporous oxide adsorbent sampling system.
Abstract: The overall goal of this Phase I project is to demonstrate the feasibility of an infrared transparent, micro-fluidic sampling system that will lead to a field-deployable detection system capable of detecting low ppb levels of chemical warfare (CW) agents in water. To accomplish this goal, the proposed detection system will combine high surface area, organically modified mesoporous oxide absorptive materials that are coated within a micro-fluidic sampling system for CW agent collection and concentration. Detection and identification of the concentrated CW agent will be accomplished by direct analysis of the micro-fluidic device via Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The main advantages of this approach are that it can operate in heterogeneous aqueous environments and will provide fast detection (< 10 min) and high sensitivity/selectivity to nonvolatile CW agents with minimal false alarms.

Physical Sciences Inc.
20 New England Business Center,
Andover, MA 01810
(978) 689-0003

PI: David R. Scherer
(978) 689-0003
Contract #: W911NF-11-C-0018
Duke University
2200 West Main Street, Suite 710
Durham, NC 27705
(919) 684-3030

ID#: A10A-008-0342
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T008        Awarded: 10/20/2010
Title: UV Beam Conditioner for Quantum Computing
Abstract: Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) and Duke University propose to develop a hybrid, multifunctional, ultraviolet (UV) beam conditioner intended for laser beam switching, deflection, and frequency shifting for quantum computing applications. The beam conditioner consists of three functional blocks, separating the technology for frequency control, fast amplitude control, and electronic beam shuttering into separate modules employing an Acousto-Optic Modulator, Electro-Optic switch, and MEMS mirror, respectively. During the Phase I program, we will demonstrate the critical functional components of the UV beam conditioner and assess the beam conditioner’s component performance with respect to switching time and power extinction. During the Phase II program we will integrate the functional blocks into a prototype UV beam conditioner that will be used and tested in Duke’s trapped ion quantum computing laboratory.

Physical Sciences Inc.
20 New England Business Center,
Andover, MA 01810
(978) 689-0003

PI: Michael A. Costolo
(978) 689-0003
Contract #: W911SR-10-C-0065
Western New England College
1215 Wilbraham Road,
Springfied, MA 01119
(413) 782-1223

ID#: A10A-016-0217
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T016        Awarded: 9/16/2010
Title: Fully Integrated System for Pathogen Concentration and Detection in Water Supplies
Abstract: Physical Sciences Inc. proposes an innovative, filter free approach to rapidly concentrate and detect bacterial spores from large volumes of flowing water for the purpose of early warning detection of contaminated potable water supplies against low concentration biological pathogens. Our approach builds on previous concentration work to study the feasibility of optimizing this approach and lays the foundation to build a fully integrated detection system in Phase II. We anticipate the following performance levels for the system: Single pass capture efficiencies of 50% or greater, concentration increase of >2000x, detection sensitivity to 1500 spores in water, total power consumption of <50W, no pressure drop across the filtration stage, no consumables or reagent costs, real-time notification, and an easily integrateable, flange-based housing design.

Physical Sciences Inc.
20 New England Business Center,
Andover, MA 01810
(978) 689-0003

PI: John D. Lennhoff
(978) 689-0003
Contract #: W911SR-10-C-0083
University of South Florida
3650 Spectrum Blvd., Suite 160,
Tampa, FL 33612
(813) 974-2897

ID#: A10A-017-0214
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T017        Awarded: 9/30/2010
Title: Formulation and Production of Biological Agent Spectroscopic Simulant Particles
Abstract: Physical Sciences, Inc. (PSI) proposes to demonstrate environmentally benign, low cost biological agent simulant particles that mimic the infrared, scatter, fluorescence and atomic absorption spectra of bacillus subtilis (BG), Erwinia herbicola (EH), and the MS2 Bacteriophage (MS2). These stimulant particles will be composed of materials that are commonly available foods or nutritional supplements. Spray drying will be used to mass produce the desired particle size and size distribution to match the agent size and its Mie scattering properties. An aerosol of BG simulant particles will be characterized using Infrared spectroscopy at PSI and using UV Laser Induced Fluorescence at the University of South Florida in the Laser Remote Sensing lab of Prof. Dennis Killinger. We will perform engineering design scale- up calculations to demonstrate a path to multi-Kg production quantities expected during a Phase II program.

Physical Sciences Inc.
20 New England Business Center,
Andover, MA 01810
(978) 689-0003

PI: Bogdan R. Cosofret
(978) 689-0003
Contract #: W911SR-10-C-0075
University of California, Davis
1850 Research Park Drive, Suite 300
Davis, CA 95618
(530) 754-8206

ID#: A10A-022-0203
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T022        Awarded: 9/30/2010
Title: Dynamic 3-D Threat Mapping Using a Sensor Constellation Deployed on Mobile Platforms
Abstract: Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) and its partners, Research Support Systems (RSI, a PSI-subsidiary) and Professor Thomas Strohmer of UC Davis, propose to develop an innovative approach that can be employed by an ‘on-the-move’ sensor constellation to determine the size (length, width, and height), absolute geo-location, and 3-D concentration distribution of chemical threat clouds released on battlefields. The available information from such a system will enhance the situational awareness of the warfighter. Through the development of a simulation environment, PSI and its academic partner will develop and demonstrate optimum triangulation and reconstruction algorithms that are robust to pointing uncertainties, noisy and limited projection data from uneven terrains, while at the same time minimizing reconstruction errors and reducing the computational load. A deployable prototype will be developed and demonstrated as part of a follow-on Phase II program. The system (2 or more sensors moving at ~30 mph) will be capable of 3-D cloud reconstructions accounting for total threat mass with less than 30% errors. Threat Center-of-Mass tracks will be accurate to better than 80% while the mobile sensors provide ~0.2º absolute pointing accuracy. 3-D threat reconstructions will be generated once every 90 seconds.

Pranalytica, Inc.
1101 Colorado Avenue,
Santa Monica, CA 90401
(310) 458-0808

PI: C. Kumar N. Patel
(310) 458-0808
Contract #: W911NF-11-C-0011
University of California
405 Hilgard Avenue,
Los Angeles, CA 90095
(310) 206-6865

ID#: A10A-007-0463
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T007        Awarded: 10/15/2010
Title: Coherent Beam Combining of Mid-IR Lasers
Abstract: Military applications, such as IRCM (Infrared Countermeasures) and stand-off sensing, require highly efficient optical sources with power outputs for room temperature continuous wave operation of several to a hundred watts in the 3-5 micron and 8-12 micron spectral bands. While quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have become the sources of choice in these spectral regions, the only realistic option to attain hundred-watt power levels with good beam quality is to coherently combine multiple QCL emitters into a single output beam. Leveraging advanced materials growth and fabrication techniques, Pranalytica will develop robust, compact, and cost-effective monolithic QCL beam combining solutions that will exceed the requirements of this solicitation, and provide the military with the required laser sources. Additional civilian applications, such as free space optical communications, are also envisioned.

SA Photonics
650 5th Street, Suite 505
San Francisco, CA 94107
(970) 921-3401

PI: Dave Pechner
(408) 781-7416
Contract #: W911NF-11-C-0010
Georgia Tech Research Institute
505 10th Street,
Atlanta, GA 30332
(770) 528-7933

ID#: A10A-005-0199
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T005        Awarded: 10/15/2010
Title: Multi-input Multi-output Synthetic Aperture Radar with Collocated Antennas
Abstract: SA Photonics and the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) are please to propose the development of MIMO SAR/GMTI techniques. The approach is to leverage the extensive amount of research that has been conducted in an academic setting and to assess the feasibility of the transition of these techniques into system of practical interest.

Silicon Informatics, Inc.
6500 Parnell Ave,
Edina, MN 55435
(612) 327-0682

PI: Rajendra V. Boppana
(210) 458-5692
Contract #: W911NF-11-C-0026
Univ of Texas at San Antonio
Office of Sponsored Programs, One UTSA Circle
San Antonio, TX 78248
(210) 458-4340

ID#: A10A-012-0292
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T012        Awarded: 10/26/2010
Title: Random Number Generation for High Performance Computing
Abstract: Highly scalable parallel random number generators (RNGs) will be developed, evaluated and implemented for use in high performance computing on thousands of multi-core processors and general purpose graphics processing units. The main contributions are: (a) design and implementation of new parallel test methods that capture the inter-stream correlations exhibited in practice and complement the currently widely used sequential test batteries, (b) development of new parallel RNGs that produce 100s of thousands of high quality individual random number streams and explicitly minimize inter-stream correlations, and (c) preliminary implementation of the new test methods and parallel RNGs. The proposed RNGs will also be evaluated and tuned to generate cryptographically-secure random number streams that resist cryptanalysis attacks by insiders and eavesdroppers when used in large-scale peer-to-peer and distributed security applications. The investigators have extensive experience in the applications of random number generators, the test methods for random number generators, and the implementation of Monte Carlo applications on large clusters of processors and graphics processing units. The proposed approach balances the theoretical research with the implementation efficiencies and the use in real applications.

SkEyes Unlimited Corporation
1660 McElree Rd.,
Washington, PA 15301
(724) 272-2709

PI: Omead Amidi
(412) 260-2625
Contract #: W81XWH-11-C-0012
Carnegie Mellon University
Robotics Institute, 5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 268-1161

ID#: A10A-028-0048
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T028        Awarded: 10/27/2010
Title: Perception-driven Casualty Manipulation to Enable Near-Autonomous Robotic Extraction and Evacuation
Abstract: Historically, the combat medic has had one of the most important yet life-threatening roles on the battlefield. They must find, assess, treat and extract fellow injured soldiers in extremely hazardous conditions, sometimes with little or no additional support. Because of this, medics and other first responders are often injured or even killed while attending to wounded soldiers. To properly address the problem of Robotic Combat Casualty Extraction, the team of SkEyes Unlimited Corporation and Carnegie Mellon University believes that a fundamentally new, patient-centric approach needs to be pursued. Namely, that robust sensor/perception-driven casualty assessment and manipulation is the key to successful development and deployment of a complete Robotic Combat Casualty Care system. For this STTR, we propose to use perception sensors and algorithms to accurately model casualty pose and status, and to couple those technologies with robust, yet compliant manipulators, to enable near-autonomous manipulation and handling of wounded soldiers throughout the spectrum of treatment–-from field assessment of injuries to final evacuation to primary care facilities. This extraction system will be Joint Architecture for Unmanned Systems (JAUS) compliant and will be interoperable with current and future DoD unmanned platforms.

Spectral Sciences, Inc.
4 Fourth Avenue,
Burlington, MA 01803
(781) 273-4770

PI: Xuemin Jin
(781) 273-4770
Contract #: W911NF-11-C-0014
University of California Irvine
Department of Physics,
Irvine, CA 92697
(949) 824-5943

ID#: A10A-006-0064
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T006        Awarded: 10/15/2010
Title: BRDF Analysis of LADAR-based Target Surface Characterization
Abstract: LADAR light reflection from a target is highly dependent of the spectral reflectivity and texture properties of the surface. Such dependencies could be exploited for target recognition based on surface characterization with appropriate imaging conditions and processing algorithms. Target surface light reflection is characterized by the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF), which is embedded in LADAR reflected returns. We propose to develop an extended LADAR capability for characterizing and classifying surface material and texture by exploiting multispectral polarimetric LADAR signatures based on the BRDF. The key innovation in this proposal is the comprehensive unified application of waveband spectra, polarization, tomographic reconstruction, and material science to LADAR-based remote target classification. The proposed system incorporating these advances is called LADAR-based Surface Analysis by Reflectance (LASAR). Key features of LASAR include BRDF modeling, a database of target and ground materials, range profile simulation, and material inversion algorithms. The results from Phase I will be used to define real-time algorithms for remote target recognition applications in Phase II.

Spi Surgical, INC
1533 Magnolia Way West,
Seattle, WA 98199
(602) 373-3708

PI: Thomas Lendvay
(206) 987-1461
Contract #: W81XWH-11-C-0010
University of Washington
Director, Office of Sponsored, 4333 Brooklyn Ave., N.E
Seattle, WA 98105
(206) 543-4043

ID#: A10A-029-0031
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T029        Awarded: 10/10/2010
Title: Automated Support of Robotic Surgical Training, Operations, and Outcomes
Abstract: Background: Surgical error reduction requires addressing rapid adoption of new surgical technology. We propose development of a networked surgical assessment platform able to collect performance and outcomes data from multiple surgical platforms and sites for dynamic metrics analysis. Goal: Provide surgical signature (“Surgome”) of each surgeon by delivering automated performance feedback to accelerate learning curves and deriving summative and statistically valid trends in data for comparative effectiveness of new technologies. Task 1: Algorithm Development Deliverables: 1) Documentation and implementation to mathematically define metrics for rating evaluation algorithms. 2) Validation of machine learning algorithm (Autoregressive Dynamic Bayesian Network) within framework. 3) Prototype software applying this algorithm to existing surgical performance datasets. Task 2:Server Design and Implementation Deliverables: 1) On-line server running open-source operating system and database engine for storing performance data. 2) Importing and generation of full metadata for three datasets. 3) Preliminary dynamic metrics analysis software able to compute performance scores from new surgical performance data sets.

System Dynamics
400 S. Woodlawn Ave, Suite 102
Kirkwood, MO 63122
(314) 724-8652

PI: Steven P. Smith
(314) 724-8652
Contract #: W911NF-11-C-0022
Washington University in St. Louis
One Brookings Drive,
St. Louis, MO 63130
(314) 935-4173

ID#: A10A-006-0178
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T006        Awarded: 10/21/2010
Title: LADAR Light Reflection Analysis for Target Surface Characterization
Abstract: This Phase I STTR effort develops and tests spectropolarimetric surface characterization algorithms for LADAR based remote sensing. A systematic approach is used which first defines the operational scenarios for which the algorithms are to work. These scenarios are then used to define requirements for LADAR hardware and algorithms which serves to focus the algorithm development effort. A library of surface material Mueller matrix measurements is used as the basis for a fundamental surface characterization investigation that will establish the ultimate potential to discriminate between different materials/classes of materials. The library used consists of existing measurement data from government and industry sources plus measurements made during Phase I to fill high priority gaps in the data library. A preliminary design of improved instrumentation (which would be built in Phase II) for measuring full Mueller matrix BRDFs will be made in order to address weaknesses in previous measurement data. Finally, a suite of algorithms will be developed to address the high priority scenarios identified at the beginning of the effort, and these algorithms will be tested on synthetic LADAR images created to represent these scenarios. Testing will be performed on SDI’s existing LEAP ATR application.

Traclabs, Inc.
100 Northeast Loop 410, Suite 520
San Antonio, TX 78216
(281) 461-7884

PI: Eric Huber
(281) 461-7884
Contract #: W56HZV-10-C-0443
Brown University
Department of Computer Science, Box 1910, 115 Waterman St.
Providence, RI 02912
(401) 863-7600

ID#: A10A-030-0110
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T030        Awarded: 9/22/2010
Title: Leader-Following for Mobile Robots
Abstract: TRACLabs Inc. has worked with NASA to create indoor/outdoor, vision-based leader-following systems for sparse, extra-terrestrial environments. Brown University's Robotics Group has demonstrated leader-following and gesture recognition in high-traffic, dynamic, indoor environments using active lidar sensing. We propose to combine our technologies in order to create a passive sensing system that will facilitate unmanned leader-following in novel, cluttered, and dynamic environments. We plan to accomplish this goal via the synthesis of TRACLabs' technologies for stereo-vision-based pursuit, safe 6-degree-of-freedom navigation, and multi-sensor object tracking with the Brown Robotics Group's innovative algorithms for gesture recognition and person-following. Our Phase I aims are 1) to demonstrate an initial leader-following prototype, using our existing technologies to achieve close-range, vision-based leader-following in cluttered and dynamic indoor/outdoor environments and 2) to provide a detailed assessment of the hardware and software extensions needed for the long-range Phase II system. In Phase II, we plan extend our system to long-range outdoor leader-following, including conveys of non-human leaders. We will focus on leader-following at human running speeds and on utilizing alternative passive sensing, like thermal sensing, to achieve robust tracking at long-range distances. Long-term, we expect to integrate our system with unmanned military robots, like PackBot, Talon, and MULE platforms.

Transition45 Technologies, Inc.
1963 North Main Street,
Orange, CA 92865
(714) 283-2118

PI: Edward Chen
(714) 283-2118
Contract #: W911W6-10-C-0063
Illinois Institute of Technology
10 W. 32nd Street, Building E1-202
Chicago, IL 60616
(312) 567-3780

ID#: A10A-001-0397
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T001        Awarded: 7/28/2010
Title: Ultra Fine Grain Steel Alloys by Severe Plastic Deformation
Abstract: This STTR program proposes to exploit the tremendous benefits that could be offered by the development of ultra fine grain steel alloys for application to the production of high performance components for military rotorcraft applications. A severe plastic deformation technology based on isothermal forging technologies will be explored here. The goal is to demonstrate a practical, production level manufacturing approach to producing bulk-sized steel alloy components with ultra fine grain microstructures. Ultra fine grain steel alloys would be particularly advantageous for higher performance transmission/power system, engine, and airframe structures and components needed for next generation military rotorcraft. The effect of different thermomechanical conditions to achieve the requisite microstructure-properties also needs to be understood to control recrystallization and grain growth, and modeling will be performed for this purpose.

Trident Systems Inc.
10201 Fairfax Boulevard, Suite 300
Fairfax, VA 22030
(703) 691-7794

PI: Howard Mendelson
(703) 359-5882
Contract #: W911NF-11-C-0020
University of Florida
P.O. Box 116550, University of,
Gainesville, FL 32611
(352) 392-9447

ID#: A10A-005-0345
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T005        Awarded: 10/20/2010
Title: Multi-input Multi-output Synthetic Aperture Radar with Collocated Antennas
Abstract: The enormous effort devoted to the data acquisition, signal processing, and automatic recognition of stationary targets has resulted in a generation of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems that are meeting the challenge of real-world conditions. However, in a practical battlefield, moving targets may pose a more severe threat than stationary targets. Many high value targets are only vulnerable while they are traveling and are generally invisible while in deep hide. Unfortunately, the attention paid to the ground moving target indication (GMTI) has been limited by the enormous challenges of acquiring and reliably processing the target location and target signatures. Multi-input multi-output (MIMO) radar is beginning to attract a significant amount of attention from researchers and practitioners alike due to its potential of advancing the state-of-the-art of modern radar. Herein we focus our attention on synergistic MIMO SAR and GMTI so that the tasks of the SAR imaging of stationary targets and background along with SAR based GMTI can be performed simultaneously by developing state-of-the-art MIMO SAR systems and focus on a MIMO radar scheme in which both the transmitting and receiving antennas are collocated (closely spaced) for coherent transmission and detection.

Ultimara
500 Mansion ct., suite 307
Santa Clara,, CA 95054
(858) 663-0081

PI: Salah Khodja
(858) 663-0081
Contract #: W31P4Q-10-C-0343
Stanford University
476 Lomita Mall,
Stanford, CA 94305
(650) 736-2152

ID#: A10A-002-0395
Agency: Army
Topic#: A10A-T002        Awarded: 9/15/2010
Title: Plasmonic Sensor Array
Abstract: The goal of this program is to develop devices that can detect small electric fields over large frequency ranges while being compact and power efficient. We propose an electro-optic resonant plasmon that enhances the electro-optic phase shift in a small volume (<80nm) as a near-field probe from few Hz and up to gigahertz microscopy. Frequency response of the plasmon resonant probe sensor is evaluated for different resonator designs. Why Plasmonic? Enables sub-diffraction-limit dimension allows for high operation speed, low power consumption and on-chip integration capability. Why resonance-based Plasmon? Resonance-based metallic Plasmon can be more efficient and require a short interaction channel in order to accumulate enough signal sensitivity.The proposed research effort will investigate a novel approach that enables revolutionary advances in science, devices, or systems. Existing electrical field detectors are very limited in their sensitivity, and only work at DC or low frequency. The use of a novel resonant plasmonic metallic nano-structure with efficient and fast electro-optical material will enable high resolution imaging of electric field in away that have never been done before. The electrostatic field plasmonic sensor array (EFPSA) resolution and scalability will be comparable to CMOS and CCD cameras.

---------- NAVY ----------

21st Century Technologies Inc.
4515 Seton Center Parkway, Suite 320
Austin, TX 78759
(512) 342-0010

PI: Chris Augeri
(512) 342-0010
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0288
CUBRC
PO Box 400, 4455 Genesee St
Buffalo, NY 14225
(716) 204-5137

ID#: N10A-040-0061
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T040       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: CEDAR (Complex Event Discovery, Analysis, and Ranking)
Abstract: 21CT and CUBRC propose CEDAR (Complex Event Discovery, Analysis, and Ranking), a robust framework to detect and analyze indicators of complex activities, such as an insurgent ambush observable via myriad of simple events in multiple sensor streams. CEDAR will provide a mapping from complex behavior, such as conducting an insurgent ambush or rebuilding trust in local communities, to simple event indicators detectable in intelligence, open-source, blue force, and population sensor streams. Examples of such events include increased chatter in blue or red force networks, changes in population sentiment, or curfew movement. CEDAR will also provide an integrated process to execute event queries that leverages our team’s abilities in performing approximate pattern matching over multi-dimensional data. This capability enables us to mine sensor feeds at scale, such as detecting motion in video, non-verbal audio cues, such as gunfire, sentiment in text sources, and changes in human network activity. Finally, CEDAR will provide a suite of event projections to facilitate discriminating aggregate events that indicate complex activity. By combining event projections with semantic event scoring, we can assess if detected events are progressing on a “good” or “bad” vector and exploit this information to choose actions to modulate complex event behavior.

Acellent Technologies, Inc.
835 Stewart Drive,
Sunnyvale, CA 94085
(408) 745-1188

PI: X. Qing
(408) 745-1188
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0311
North Carolina State University
Department of Mech and Aero, 1009 Capability Dr
Raleigh, NC 27695
(919) 515-5947

ID#: N10A-042-0385
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T042       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Advanced Data Processing, Storage and Visualization Algorithms for Structural Health Monitoring Sensor Networks of Naval Assets
Abstract: Acellent Technologies Inc. and Prof. F. G. Yuan at North Carolina State University (NCSU) are proposing to develop a Hybrid Distributed Sensor Network Integrated with Self-learning Symbiotic Diagnostic Algorithms and Models to determine materials state awareness and its evolution, including identification of precursors, detection of microdamages and flaws near high stress area or in a distributed region. The SMART Layer concept will be used as a basis for the development of the hybrid distributed sensor network. The nonlinear behavior of microstructure defects (called micro- defects hereafter), which is intentionally eliminated or simply disregarded in the current conventional ultrasonic diagnosis, will be served as the basis for the development of nonlinear diagnostics for materials state awareness. The Self-learning Symbiotic Diagnostic Algorithms will employ nonlinear acoustic interpretation and statistical data driven analysis. The approach will be based on the principal physics of nonlinearity of materials and its effect on macro scale sensor signals together with an intelligent self instructing data driven algorithm as a wrapper program. Once developed, the sensor network permanently integrated with the structure can be used to accurately and robustly detect the precursors to damages that occur in the structure during scheduled stops or during scheduled maintenance intervals.

Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc.
1046 New Holland Avenue,
Lancaster, PA 17601
(717) 295-6058

PI: Tapan Desai
(717) 295-6061
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0371
North Carolina State University
Department of Material Science,
Raleigh, NC 27695
(919) 515-1338

ID#: N10A-005-0657
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T005       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Methodology Development of Atomistically-Informed Chemical Kinetics Model for Rubber Composite Materials
Abstract: This Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Phase 1 project will develop a novel methodology to build atomistically-informed chemical kinetics models for oxidation and pyrolysis in particulate filled-rubber composite materials. In Navy operations, these materials are widely used in extreme temperature conditions and oxidizing environments. Accurate prediction of the material properties under these conditions is important to optimize their performances. Traditional chemical kinetics models often contain a large number of uncertainties in the rate parameters and their complexities increase rapidly with the number of chemically active species and possible reaction pathways. Information from atomistic-level simulations will help to accurately investigate the chemical reactions involved in these multi-component materials, and effectively select the most important reactions, thus enabling efficient model simplification. Reactive molecular dynamics simulations will be used to estimate the reaction pathways at nanosecond timescale. To capture the reaction events occurring at microsecond timescale, we will employ accelerated molecular dynamics techniques with reactive force-fields. Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) will be in collaboration with North Carolina State University (NCSU) on this project to develop an atomistically-informed chemical kinetics model and the associated methodology that are capable of accurately predicting reaction kinetics for diverse filled-rubber systems at high temperature and pressure conditions.

Advanced Dynamics, Inc.
1500 Bull Lea Road, Suite 203,
Lexington, KY 40511
(859) 699-0441

PI: Patrick Hu
(859) 699-0441
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0411
University of Oklahoma
865 Asp Ave., Felgar Hall Room 212
Norman, OK 73019
(405) 325-1749

ID#: N10A-003-0328
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T003       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Deterministic and Statistical Characterization of the Impact of Control Surface Freeplay on Flutter and Limit -Cycle Oscillation (LCO) using Efficient
Abstract: Research is proposed for the development and implementation of state of the art computational and experimental tools for the investigation of the impact of control surface freeplay on the flutter and limit cycle oscillation characteristics of two-dimensional and three-dimensional wings in subsonic and transonic flow. Highly efficient and accurate aeroelastic simulation tools will be constructed based upon the following novel concepts 1) reduced order in time models based upon the mathematical formalism of optimal prediction theory 2) high-fidelity aeroelastic simulation based upon the coupling of a particle-method based CFD method to a nonlinear finite element structural dynamics solver and 3) reduced order in spatial models based upon proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and Volterra theory. In addition, the proposed work will include the use of computational uncertainty quantification which will address, using a probabilistic approach, questions pertaining to the sensitivity of flutter and limit cycle oscillation with respect to possibly uncertain model input parameters such as the amount of freeplay and the freeplay stiffness. Legacy wind tunnel data along with new tests for the transonic regime will be used to validate and improve the computational models and to provide further insight into the complex phenomena of freeplay-induced flutter and limit cycle oscillations.

Advanced Dynamics, Inc.
1500 Bull Lea Road, Suite 203,
Lexington, KY 40511
(859) 699-0441

PI: Patrick Hu
(859) 699-0441
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0417
University of Missouri
310 Jesse Hall,
Columbia, MO 65211
(573) 882-2678

ID#: N10A-010-0369
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T010       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Multiscale Modeling and Analysis of Foreign Object Damage in Ceramic Matrix Composites with the Material Point Method
Abstract: This Small Business Technology Transfer Phase I project is aiming at developing and implementing a multiscale composite model to predict the ceramic matrix composite (CMC) response to the impact loading by foreign objects. In particular, the physics-based model will be applied to describe the multiscale foreign object damage (FOD) phenomena of CMCs due to the complex nature of impact dynamics coupled with the composite architectural/constituent complications at different scales. To catch the essential features of FOD of CMCs with the least computational costs, an effective multi-scale model-based simulation procedure is proposed within the framework of the material point method (MPM) so that the size, rate and thermal effects on the composite system response could be described in a single computational domain. The MPM, as an extension from computational fluid dynamics to computational solid dynamics, is chosen to overcome the mesh distortion and interpenetration problems associated with failure evolution in a multi-phase environment, and thus avoid the need for remeshing as required for the FEM and other Lagrangian based methods. The proposed multiscale model-based simulation procedure will be verified and improved with experimental data available, and a parametric study will be performed to explore the effects of various model parameters on the damage evolution of CMCs subject to foreign object impacts. This STTR effort will lead to a better understanding of the multiscale interaction effects on the CMCs system response so that the microstructures of CMC materials could be optimized to enhance the FOD resistance.

Advanced Dynamics, Inc.
1500 Bull Lea Road, Suite 203,
Lexington, KY 40511
(859) 699-0441

PI: Nicholas Zabaras
(607) 225-9104
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0263
Cornell University
101 Frank H. T. Rhodes Hall,
Ithaca, NY 14853
(607) 255-9104

ID#: N10A-028-0433
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T028       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: STOCHASTIC MUTISCALE/MULTISTAGE MODELING OF ENGINE DISKS
Abstract: Turbine disks are amongst the most critical components in aero- and naval-vessel engines. They operate in a high pressure and temperature environment requiring demanding properties. Nickel-based supperalloys which have high creep and oxidation resistance at high temperatures are widely used as the material of turbine disks. The elevated- temperature strength of this supperalloy and its resistance to creep deformation significantly depend on the volume fraction, size and antiphase boundary energy of the ?’ phase as well as on the grain size and texture. Future propulsion systems will require turbine disks with an increased material temperature capability and with optimized dual microstructures presenting high creep resistance and dwell crack growth resistance in the rim region and high strength and fatigue resistance in the bore and web regions. In the proposed STTR project, a state of the art, multi- fidelity, and efficient multiscale and multistage process modeling and simulation methodology will be developed together with a computer software package for advanced dual microstructure nickel-base supperalloy turbine disks. The proposed methodology is based on an integration of realistic microstructure evolution modeling, dislocation dynamics, crystal plasticity theory, finite element deformation and thermal processing simulation, and probabilistic, statistical and statistic learning methodologies. The proposed developments significantly advance the science of multiscale modeling by connecting the microstructure uncertainties to macroscale processing control, and further, to the resulting variability of material properties. Innovative techniques in data-driven representation of microstructure uncertainties will be employed together with adaptive sparse grid collocation based techniques for modeling uncertainty propagation in multiscale materials simulations. Moreover, a validated model that optimizes the processing technology to produce complex gas turbine engine components with controlled microstructures, defect populations and desirable mechanical properties will be developed, thus providing reliable guidance for industrial manufacture.

Advanced Dynamics, Inc.
1500 Bull Lea Road, Suite 203,
Lexington, KY 40511
(859) 699-0441

PI: Patrick Hu
(859) 699-0441
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0253
University of California
2150 Shattuck Avenue, Suite 31,
Berkeley, CA 94704
(510) 642-8109

ID#: N10A-041-0438
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T041       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Meshfree-Based Fracture Evaluation and Design Tool for Welded Aluminum Ship Structures
Abstract: The aluminum alloys have low density, relatively high strength, and high strength-to-weight ratio, which brings some major advantages in marine structure design, fabrication, and operations. However, marine ships are subjected to a complex and severe loading, and the typical failure mode of aluminum under extreme dynamics loading such as wave slamming and high velocity impact is ductile fracture. Ductile fracture under extreme loading is different from fatigue under cyclic loading, it results from an excessive force applied to a metal such as aluminum, and the material undergoes large inelastic or plastic deformation before its final structural failure. The numerical simulation of ductile fracture has been a challenge in computational failure mechanics and materials science. Therefore, in the proposed STTR project, a state of the art, multi-fidelity, and efficient meshfree method for ductile fracture developed recently by Dr. Shaofan Li at University of California--Berkeley will be adopted and extended to the modeling and simulation of shear dominated ductile fracture of welded aluminum marine structures under extreme dynamic impact loading, and a corresponding computer software package and tookit will be developed at the same time. The novel methodologies in the proposed projects include 6 tasks: (1) Integrate the modified Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model into meshfree method for simulation of shear dominated ductile fracture; a corresponding constitutive law containing the welded effects on aluminum alloys will also be taken into account; (2) an efficient meshfree contact algorithm for shear dominated ductile fracture under impact and thermo-mechanical loading will be developed; (3) a new meshfree ductile crack nucleation and propagation will be developed; (4) a new three-dimensional meshfree ductile crack growth in thin shell structures will be developed; (5) a simulation of welding process will be developed that can take into account the welded material anisotropy and heterogeneity, rate dependence, and residual stress effects; (6) an example of ductile fracture in a welded aluminum ship structural component will be presented by using the finite element in the global level, and meshfree in the local level.

Advanced Powder Solutions, Inc
14102 Halprin Creek Drive,
Cypress, TX 77429
(240) 351-9505

PI: Dean Baker
(661) 373-1729
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0340
University of Texas IAT
3925 West Braker Lane, Suite 200
Austin, TX 78759
(512) 471-6424

ID#: N10A-025-0675
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T025       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Development of Improved High Strength, High Conductivity Refractory Materials for Rail Gun Launchers
Abstract: APS has assembled a world class team to address problems associated with rail gun launcher operation. APS has combined its unique processing experience with IAT's railgun design, testing and characterization experience to develop materials to improve rail gun performance. Phase I will be devoted to fabrication and testing of various samples in rail gun conditions. Phase II will focus on the manufacture of larger specimens for full scale rail gun testing.

Advanced Scientific Concepts, Inc.
135 E. Ortega Street,
Santa Barbara, CA 93101
(805) 966-3331

PI: Roger Stettner
(805) 966-3331
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0277
University Rhode Island
Department of Ocean Engineerin,
Narragansett,, RI 02882
(401) 874-6636

ID#: N10A-036-0764
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T036       Awarded:&nb 6/30/2010
Title: Mitigation of USV Motions via Wave Sensing and Prediction
Abstract: Advanced Scientific Concepts, Inc. (ASC) has teamed with the Department of Ocean Engineering at The University of Rhode Island to devise a sensor suite and computer algorithm to predict ocean waves to aid autonomous boat navigation in heavy weather. The centerpiece of the sensor suite is a Lidar designed by ASC that is adapted to image the ocean at glancing angles. It’s ability to acquire a 3D snapshot of an entire scene rather than scan the scene pixel by pixel will provide more accurate data on a wave tossed boat than conventional scanning Lidars. A simple algorithm to predict the waves is suggested for moderately heavy weather which is based on a coxswain’s handling of the situation. In heavily confused seas a simulation of the ocean has been devised.

Aerodyne Research, Inc.
45 Manning Road,
Billerica, MA 01821
(978) 932-0215

PI: Hsi-Wu Wong
(978) 932-0218
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0372
Northwestern University
Rebecca Crown Center 2-502, 653 Clark Street
Evanston, IL 60208
(847) 467-0541

ID#: N10A-005-0702
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T005       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Developing a Detailed Chemical Kinetic Model for C-SiC-SiO2-Rubber Composite Materials Exposed to High Temperature, High Pressure, Oxidizing Environme
Abstract: The objective of this proposed Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) effort is to develop an experimentally- validated, highly detailed chemical kinetic reference model of surface chemistry for C-SiC-SiO2 rubber composite materials exposed to high temperature, high pressure, oxidizing environments. This reference model will then be reduced into simplified reduced-order models that could be easily coupled with existing analysis tools for multicomponent materials design. We propose to accomplish this goal using a combination of detailed mechanistic modeling and computational quantum chemistry to comprehensively characterize surface chemistry for C-SiC-SiO2 rubber composite materials.

ALPHA STAR
5199 E. PACIFIC COAST HWY, SUITE # 410
LONG BEACH, CA 90804
(562) 985-1100

PI: FRANK ABDI
(562) 985-1100
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0419
UNIVERSITY OF AKRON
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING , ASEC RM 110
AKRON, OH 44325
(330) 972-7741

ID#: N10A-010-0626
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T010       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Analysis and Modeling of Foreign Object Damage (FOD) in Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs)
Abstract: A significant barrier to the insertion of ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials into advanced aircraft engines is their inherent lack of toughness under foreign object Damage (FOD) as well as post FOD. Our team will develop and demonstrate a physics-based model for FOD/post FOD in CMC’s. The model will incorporate physical mechanisms associated with impact for two different CMC systems: a) matrix-dominated system and b) fiber-dominated system. Our methodology will address impact and post-impact of both “as-built” and “as-is” CMC’s. It will account for architecture (2D/3D-nano) and CMC manufacturing (layered thickness, void shape/size, interfacial strength, micro-crack formation) taking advantage of the strength and toughness enhancing effect of different length scales of CMC structure. The model will be incorporated into our commercial progressive failure analysis software GENOA, that integrates commercial FEA and enhances their accuracy limitation. It will be validated using available CMC impact test data from NAVAIR SiC/SiC and Oxide/Oxide for a range of FOD tests. We will determine the feasibility for performing impact tests with Acoustic Emission/Electrical Resistance monitoring as damage assessment and health monitoring techniques that relates to damage model and life prediction. In Phase II high temperature impact testing will be conducted to further validate our model.

AMERICAN ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES CO
3825 Lizette Ln.,
Glenview, IL 60026
(847) 559-1408

PI: Igor Barsukov
(847) 414-6788
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0341
Georgia Institute of Technology
Manufacturing Research Center,, room 452
Atlanta, GA 30332
(404) 894-3270

ID#: N10A-025-0393
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T025       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: New and Improved Rail Material for Electromagnetic Launchers
Abstract: American Energy Technologies Co. (Glenview, IL) will partner with the Manufacturing Research Center at Georgia Institute of Technology (Atlanta, GA) in order to develop improved rail materials for the Naval electromagnetic railgun application. New rail matrix composites are proposed that will incorporate unique forms of carbon. When compared to existing rail materials (e.g., copper), the anticipated benefits will be reduced abrasion/wear, lighter weight, and minimal corrosion within the saline air environment. The rail surface will possess similar conductivity properties as copper with minimal rail-to-armature arcing. As a side benefit, with carbon being a natural lubricant, the proposed rail material may assist in increasing the launch velocity of an armature for the same input of energy.

Applied Nanotech, Inc.
3006 Longhorn Blvd., Suite 107
Austin, TX 78758
(512) 339-5020

PI: Richard Fink
(512) 339-5020
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0325
Univ.of Tennessee
Dept. of El. Eng, and Comp. Sc, 414 Ferris Hall
Knoxville, TN 37996
(865) 974-3461

ID#: N10A-021-0289
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T021       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Printed Wideband Metamaterial Antennas for Ballistic Panels
Abstract: The U.S. Navy has initiated a program to develop the next-generation Joint Counter Radio Controlled Improvised Explosive Device Electronic Warfare (JCREW) 3.3 system to detect and jam enemy improvised explosive devices (IEDs). The objective of this proposed effort is to develop the manufacturing processes and antenna designs needed to integrate a wideband metamaterial antenna within the ballistic panel composite materials of Navy platforms, such as ship superstructure or Marine Corps vehicles, through analysis, modeling, testing, and prototyping. Our approach will be to build a metamaterial antenna directly into the ballistic panel composite material, resulting in an efficient, low-profile antenna structure that will not compromise the ballistic resistance of the panel. The proposed team combines antenna design and characterization expertise at the University of Tennessee and Villanova University with the composite material and printed electronics expertise at Applied Nanotech, Inc, and Armortex (ballistic panel manufacturer).

Applied Nanotech, Inc.
3006 Longhorn Blvd., Suite 107
Austin, TX 78758
(512) 339-5020

PI: James Novak
(512) 339-5020
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0313
University of Texas at Austin
10100 Burnet Road, Bldg. 160,, Room 2.206E
Austin, TX 78758
(512) 739-0379

ID#: N10A-031-0630
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T031       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: High-Speed Method to Produce Flexible Pressure Sensors
Abstract: The promise of printed electronics can not be realized without high-speed manufacturing processes to drive the cost down for wide spread distribution. This proposal will outline the key points for rapid manufacturing of new electronic devices and systems and make recommendations for making them a reality. There are two main focus areas that encompass all the limitations to printed integrated circuits: (1) the materials issues of developing the optimal active semiconductor and conductive circuit connections and (2) the fabrication methods and material / substrate interactions that achieve the desired performance, print speed and provide robustness of the final product. ANI will utilize its high- quality nanoparticle based inks for high-speed production of an active electronic device. The concept entails using a state-of-the-art nanoparticle inks for electrical contact lines, soluble organic semiconductors and printable dielectrics all applied using high-speed ink-jet technologies.

Applied Physical Sciences Corp.
475 Bridge Street, Suite 100
Groton, CT 06340
(860) 448-3253

PI: Matthew Conti
(781) 861-2039
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0353
Pennsylvania State University
Applied Research Laboratory, PO Box 30
State College, PA 16804
(814) 863-3030

ID#: N10A-016-0316
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T016       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: External Pipe Sound Pressure Level Sensor
Abstract: Applied Physical Sciences (APS) and the Pennsylvania State University Applied Research Laboratory (ARL/PSU) will collaborate in the development of a novel sensor system to measure the low frequency acoustic pressures within a fluid- filled pipe. The proposed concept improves upon the Navy’s current Array Based Acoustic Measurement (ABAM) system for laboratory characterization of full-scale piping components. The initial trade study will consider a range of sensing options including discrete sensor arrays and conformal sensors consisting of film and fiber wraps. The trades will balance sensitivity to the acoustic pressures against rejection of non-acoustically driven response, structural response, weight, cost, and ease of application in a shipboard environment. The design effort will leverage the team’s significant experience with measurements and modeling of pipe structural-acoustic response, as well as experience developing sensors for many of the Navy’s most challenging applications.

Applied Physical Sciences Corp.
475 Bridge Street, Suite 100
Groton, CT 06340
(860) 448-3253

PI: James McConnell
(860) 448-3253
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0310
University of Maryland
Lee Building,
College Park, MD 20742
(301) 405-1959

ID#: N10A-020-0221
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T020       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Development of Magnetostrictive Energy Harvesting of Mechanical Vibration Energy
Abstract: Applied Physical Sciences and the University of Maryland propose to develop a magnetostrictive transducer that harvests electrical energy from shipboard machinery while simultaneously suppressing vibration to improve the ship’s stealth characteristics and thereby improving the performance of hull mounted sonar systems. Analysis performed during the Base Effort will provide an initial design specification for the transducer and associated energy harvesting circuit wherein the overall size, transduction mode, power level, and efficiency are specified in terms of the machine’s fundamental forcing frequency, power rating, and weight. A proof-of-concept experiment performed during the Option is expected to provide initial validation of the overall concept and lay a foundation for further development and experimentation during Phase II.

Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation
9950 Wakeman Drive,
Manassas, VA 20110
(617) 500-0536

PI: Nathan Fitzgerald
(617) 500-5045
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0434
Massachusetts Institute of Technolo
77 Massachusetts Avenue,
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-3906

ID#: N10A-008-0358
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T008       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Adaptive Turbine Engine Control for Stall Threat Identification and Avoidance
Abstract: Aurora Flight Sciences and MIT propose to develop a model-based adaptive health estimation and real-time proactive control to identify gas turbine engine stability risks and avoid them through control action. In this concept, the engine control system actively monitors sensors and actuators, compares them against physical models, and infers which components may be performing poorly and may need to be replaced. This estimation procedure will be based on Hidden Markov Model of the deterioration process. In addition, once a threat is identified, the control is given the ability to modify its behavior to avoid operations that increase the chance of compression system instability. Aurora intends to accomplish this through the development of model-based control based on the concept of Rapidly-Expanding Random Trees (RRTs). Using these techniques, maintenance personnel will have the ability to upload health tracking parameters from the control system, directly identifying component performance issues needing corrective action. The engine control system will also be able to adapt to changing deterioration conditions to ensure stall-free operation.

Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation
9950 Wakeman Drive,
Manassas, VA 20110
(617) 500-0536

PI: James Paduano
(617) 500-4807
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0347
Massachusetts Institute of Technolo
77 Massachusetts Avenue,
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-3906

ID#: N10A-039-0360
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T039       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Integration of PALACE and Touchdown Planning Methods for Landing CUAS at Unprepared Sites
Abstract: Aurora Flight Sciences and MIT have been developing tools and techniques that, together with existing 3D environment decision-making and navigation tools developed by AMRDEC in the PALACE program, are well-suited to the problem of autonomous vertical landing on unprepared landing sites. In this program, Aurora will team with MIT researchers and UC Santa Cruz (UCSC licenses PALACE technologies for AMRDEC) to combine hybrid-system rapidly-expanding random trees (RRTs), PALACE technologies, careful system engineering/integration, and Phase II experimental demonstrations. The result will be a general purpose, environmentally robust, autonomous vertical landing system for remote, unprepared/sloped landing sites with obstacles, environmental disturbances, and minimal ground crew support/training. System engineering will focus on creating a system which minimizes size, weight, power, and cost (SWAP-C) requirements for sensing and computation.

Barron Associates, Inc.
1410 Sachem Place, Suite 202
Charlottesville, VA 22901
(434) 973-1215

PI: Nathan Richards
(434) 973-1215
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0335
Virginia Tech
1880 Pratt Drive, Suite 2006
Blacksburg, VA 24060
(540) 231-5281

ID#: N10A-024-0514
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T024       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Demonstrated Environment/Harware Cooperation for Expanded Riverine Coverage
Abstract: The Barron Associates/Virginia Tech team believes that intelligent use of ambient riverine environmental factors together with novel drifter design and low-energy articulation is the key to enabling large non-overlapping river coverage. The proposed phase I research program focuses on (1) identifying key river characteristics which may be leveraged by riverine drifters, (2) fabricating a novel riverine vehicle with a motion control system which respects and cooperates with the river environment, (3) on-line learning to update a priori environment models with new information based on observations, and (4) in-river demonstration of the composite design. The overarching goal of the proposed program of research and development is to leverage known and learned characteristics of the riverine environment to demonstrate efficient non-overlapping river coverage through intelligent vehicle design, mission planning, and real-time reaction to unforeseen characteristics. The team believes that an approach that explicitly considers and cooperates with the riverine environment has the potential to significantly outperform a system that treats the environment as a disturbance. Also, the ability to learn and update a priori models enables the system to function efficiently in situations where the environment has changed significantly or situations where little or no a priori information is available.

BlazeTech Corp.
29B Montvale Ave.,
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 759-0700

PI: N. Moussa
(781) 759-0700
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0451
Sandia National Labs (Alb, NM)
P.O. Box 5800 - MS 1079,
Albuquerque, NM 87185
(505) 284-6701

ID#: N10A-011-0627
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T011       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Prediction of the Full-Scale Cook-off Response Based on Small-Scale Testing
Abstract: We propose to develop scaling relationships for reaction violence in the cook-off of energetic materials such as explosives or propellants. This will be accomplished by a coordinated effort consisting of data review and analysis. The anticipated results include key non-dimensional parameters that incorporate the thermo-physical, flow, thermodynamic, and kinetic properties of the material, the heating rate in terms of intensity and duration, the thermo-physical properties of the casing and liner (if any), and the strength and degree of confinement of the casing. Furthermore, scaling relationships will be developed for the violence of the reaction relating attributes such overpressure, vivacity, casing fragmentation, and travel distance of fragments to non-dimensional parameters. This scaling relationship will be used to identify practical means of compensating for the reduction of scale in the experiments. Key comparisons and success criteria will be identified to evaluate our scaling approach. The project will also identify data gaps and key tests and instrumentation to be performed in Phase II.

BUSA Engineering Consulting
3419 SW 93rd Way,
Gainesville, FL 32608
(352) 331-5408

PI: S. Balachandar
(352) 392-0961
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0429
University of Florida
339 Weil Hall,, Office of Engineering Research
Gainesville, FL 32611
(352) 392-9447

ID#: N10A-002-0458
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T002       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Development of a Computational Method for Prediction of After-Burning Effect
Abstract: This proposal is being submitted in response to the solicitation topic N10A-T002 (Development of a Computational Method for Prediction of After Burning Effect) by BUSA Engineering Consulting (Dr. Jianghui Chao) in collaboration with University of Florida (PI: Prof. S. Balachandar). The overall objective of the proposed effort is to contribute to national defense and security by advancing the state of the art in computational prediction of after-burning munitions. We propose to replace current empiricism by developing fundamental physics-based models of explosive driven dispersal of particles and droplets and their subsequent after-burn. The work plan for Phase I and Phase I option is assess the existing force, heat transfer and burn-rate models with focused attention to the problem of after-burn explosives/fuels and prepare the ground work needed to develop, validate and demonstrate advanced physics-based models and to integrate them in a versatile computational framework.

Busek Co. Inc.
11 Tech Circle,
Natick, MA 01760
(508) 655-5565

PI: Luis Velasquez-Garcia
(617) 253-0573
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0330
Massachusetts Institute of Tech
77 Massachusetts Avenue, Dept of OE-Rm 5-2047
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-3907

ID#: N10A-023-0575
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T023       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Photo Triggered Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Cathode for Free Electron Lasers
Abstract: Busek Co. Inc (Busek) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) propose to develop the design of a photon actuated, ultrafast carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission cathodes for high-power electron beam accelerator sources. The cathode will be based on massive arrays of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nano-Fibers (VA-CNFs) that are individually controlled by a vertical ungated field effect transistor (FET). These arrays would be activated using photons from a laser to achieve ultrafast current emission. The team will focus on designing a cathode based on massive arrays of VA- CNFs that is able to emit up to A/cm^2-level electron current, and on the design of a reflecting structure that concentrates photons from a common source on the surface of the VA-CNF tips. The proposed cathode will harness five important technologies that will enable current densities up to 10 A cm^-2, a total emission area of 25 mm^-2 or higher, and able to emit in 10 pico second level pulses: 1) Fabrication of uniform isolated VA-CNFs; 2) Individual ballasting of the field emitters using vertical FET; 3) Photon-enabled field emission for ultrafast cathode actuation; 4) High-pressure (>10^-3 torr) operation; and 5) Proximal electrostatic lenses to individually control the emission from each CNT tip.

C-2 Innovations, Inc
102 Peabody Dr,
Stow, MA 01775
(978) 257-4820

PI: Arnis Mangolds
(978) 257-4820
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0334
Draper Laboratory
555 Technology Square,
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 258-2208

ID#: N10A-024-0555
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T024       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Enhanced Riverine Drifter
Abstract: The proposed Autonmous Reactive Ferrrying Drifter (ARF-D) provides wide measured swath, autonomously maintains a buffer distance from close-shore snags, and by utilizing river flow provides a very low power approach to obtaining cross-river surveying, providing greater coverage with minimal power penalty. By randomizing the cross-river transit paths multiple ARF-D units will naturally overcome the same-path focus of passive drifters gaining greater coverage without the need for sophisticated and power intensive intra-drifter communication or formation keeping.

CFD Research Corporation
215 Wynn Dr., 5th Floor,
Huntsville, AL 35805
(256) 726-4884

PI: Debassis Sengupta
(256) 726-4800
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0373
The Pennsylvania State University
Office of Engineering Research, 101 Hammond Building
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 863-6185

ID#: N10A-005-0148
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T005       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Development of Surface Reaction Mechanism for C-SiC-SiO2-Rubber Composite Oxidation in Extreme Oxidizing Condition
Abstract: The purpose of this STTR is to develop comprehensive detailed kinetics for oxidation of C-SiC-SiO2-rubber in extreme oxidizing environment. This material is used as a coating on the outer surface of Navy weapon systems. In order to predict the fate of this material under extreme conditions and mitigate the degradation of the coating, a comprehensive oxidation mechanism is required. In Phase I, CFDRC, in collaboration with Penn State, will develop a detailed surface reaction mechanism for C-SiC-SiO2-rubber oxidation. We will use novel molecular modeling methods, such as reactive molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry in conjunction with reaction rate theories and literature reports to develop the rate parameters of a series of elementary reactions. In Phase I, feasibility of this approach will be demonstrated via computing reactions related to SiC oxidation. When complete, this mechanism can be used with any thermal analysis code to predict the oxidative degradation of the composite material. In addition, this will also help in designing novel composites with improved properties.

Charles River Analytics Inc.
625 Mount Auburn Street,
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 491-3474

PI: Terry Patten
(617) 491-3474
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0343
Cornell University
Office of Sponsored Programs, 373 Pine Tree Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 255-9817

ID#: N10A-029-0564
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T029       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Automated Linguistic Analysis Revealing Misrepresentation and Messaging (ALARMM)
Abstract: The proposed Automated Linguistic Analysis Revealing Misrepresentation and Messaging (ALARMM) system significantly advances the state of the art in detecting deception in unstructured data such as Web sites and chat messages. Our research focuses on automated techniques based on linguistic theory that can detect both misrepresentations and hidden messages. The proposed work draws on the field of sociolinguistics for advanced statistical techniques capable of leveraging a wide range of morphological, lexical, and grammatical features. Formal representations from sociolinguistics are used to capture generalizations across types of deceptive language. We propose innovative experiments to provide a quantitative, metrics-based evaluation of the proof-of-concept ALARMM system.

Charles River Analytics Inc.
625 Mount Auburn Street,
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 491-3474

PI: Marc Richards
(617) 491-3474
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0285
Boston University
Office of Sponsored Programs, 25 Buick Street
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 353-4365

ID#: N10A-038-0572
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T038       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: FreeSwim: Autonomous Behaviors for Undersea Sensors
Abstract: Future naval operations are expected to make extensive use of unmanned vehicles to support a range of operations, including intelligence gathering, mine warfare, force protection, and anti-submarine warfare. Current unmanned systems are typically controlled remotely by an operator who directly manipulates a control interface for the vehicle. The effectiveness of this approach is obviously limited in situations where high latency, low bandwidth, or frequently dropped connections will be experienced. Additionally, many autonomous control approaches that have shown promise in laboratory and experimental settings lack a rigorous formulation of behavior validation that is required to evaluate operational success. Our proposed effort, dubbed “FreeSwim”, addresses these challenges. FreeSwim enables intelligent autonomous behavior execution for unmanned subsurface vehicles by supporting remotely specified high-level mission control directives that are interpreted and executed by the unmanned vehicle depending on the constraints of the local dynamic environment. Behavior execution is validated relative to mission directive expectations by capturing and analyzing measures of performance and effectiveness. FreeSwim’s intelligent bandwidth utilization is designed for use in environments where remote human operation of the vehicle is unfeasible due to limited or unreliable communication capabilities.

Combustion Research and Flow Technology, Inc.
6210 Kellers Church Road,
Pipersville, PA 18947
(215) 766-1520

PI: Neeraj Sinha
(215) 766-1520
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0422
The Pennsylvania State University
College of Engineering, 111 Research Blg. East
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 863-6375

ID#: N10A-002-0225
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T002       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Development of a Computational Method for Prediction of After-Burning Effect
Abstract: The problem of interest is the development of a physics based model for conducting high-fidelity simulation of afterburning munitions, which are unique in that that they contain solid and/or liquid fuels that continue burning after the initial detonation to raise the temperature, enhance the overpressure, and strengthen secondary shock waves. From the standpoint of first-principles modeling, accurate depiction of dynamic mechanisms such as shock compression, multi- phase effects, stiff chemical kinetics, reactive heat release, etc., is a complex undertaking that challenges modeling efforts. This is due in large part to the very stiff spatio-temporal conditions inherent in these highly non-linear and very transient processes. Energy deposition can be spatially localized with a wide range of time scales (fluid dynamic, activation and reaction scales) whose numerical resolution requires extremely fine spatial and temporal discretization. A multi-phase CFD approach is proposed to model energy deposition scenarios of interest to the US Navy, with the model also finding utility in identifying the dominant physics, supporting the development of scaling laws and providing interpretation of test data. The modeling will be closely supported by fundamental experiments in a laboratory environment that will supply crucial data for characterization of key sub-models within the overall CFD model.

Corvid Technologies, Inc.
145 Overhill Drive,
Mooresville, NC 28117
(704) 799-6944

PI: Allen Shirley
(704) 799-6944
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0433
Sandia National Laboratory
PO Box 5800,
Albuquerque, NM 87185
(505) 284-6758

ID#: N10A-011-0240
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T011       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Prediction of the Full-Scale Cook-off Response Based on Small-Scale Testing
Abstract: The objective of this proposed effort is to continue the development of Corvid’s existing modeling and simulation framework to provide an innovative methodology used to predict the response of full-scale weapons systems to fast cook- off (FCO) and slow cook-off (SCO). Ammunition presents a special problem where no reliable and inexpensive sub or small scale testing capability has been identified. In order to provide critical insight into scaling relationships, this modeling framework will be supplemented by and aid in the design of novel experiments aimed at linking the violence of reaction seen in full-scale systems to small scale experiments. Our approach to this challenging problem is to utilize our M&S capabilities to evaluate scaling effects of heat transfer and thermal damage processes and expand the models based on first-principles-based reaction processes. Once some of these scaling effects have been established, an innovative experiment leveraging these known relationships will be designed to assess full-scale violence of reaction in a small- to medium-scale apparatus. This proposal includes the steps required to accomplish our goal and a discussion on the existing tools that have been developed to support this type of study.

Corvid Technologies, Inc.
145 Overhill Drive,
Mooresville, NC 28117
(704) 799-6944

PI: Allen Shirley
(704) 799-6944
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0242
Sandia National Laboratory
PO Box 5800,
Albuquerque, NM 87185
(505) 284-0610

ID#: N10A-018-0262
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T018       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Lightweight Layered Protection Systems for Missile Launchers and Canisters
Abstract: The objective of this proposed effort is to leverage state-of-the-art modeling and simulation tools to predict and assess the performance of a novel layered material system as protection for high-value missiles when deployed in launchers and canisters. The physics-based computational tools developed and used by Corvid allow for complex material interactions to be captured to provide an understanding of the synergistic effect of combining numerous light weight components together in the optimized thickness and order to provide maximum protection at the lowest areal density. Our approach is to utilize these existing M&S capabilities to evaluate composite light-weight ballistic protection concepts while identifying areas that require additional development to allow M&S tools to effectively supplement testing of new and novel concept, which will significantly reduce cost and schedule required to develop highly effective solutions.

Creare Inc.
P.O. Box 71,
Hanover, NH 03755
(603) 643-3800

PI: Bruce Pilvelait
(603) 643-3800
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0255
National Renewable Energy Lab
1617 Cole Blvd.,
Golden, CO 80401
(303) 275-3000

ID#: N10A-014-0374
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T014       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: A Battery Pack Risk Assessment Tool
Abstract: When many Lithium-ion battery cells are integrated into a large pack, the possible outcomes resulting from individual cell faults are complex and difficult to predict. Consequently, there is great interest in developing design tools to aid in the optimization of pack performance as well as to understand and mitigate the effects of individual cell failures from propagating to other cells or even the host platform. During this program, we will determine the feasibility of developing a software-based Battery Pack Risk Assessment Tool to accomplish these goals. Our previously developed Lithium-ion battery pack predictive algorithms include three-dimensional, coupled electro-chemical, electrical, and thermal physical models which encompass a multitude of failure mechanisms and provide broad state-of-health awareness. During Phase I we will adapt these algorithms and develop a user interface to allow the designer to assess the overall impact on battery pack and host platform for a cell-level fault. During Phase II we will work with our commercialization partners to conduct laboratory testing, validate the models, and extend the tools to allow analysis of multiple configurations.

Creare Inc.
P.O. Box 71,
Hanover, NH 03755
(603) 643-3800

PI: Jed Wilbur
(603) 643-3800
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0351
Boston University
110 Cummington Street, Room 420
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 353-4846

ID#: N10A-016-0185
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T016       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: A Non-Contact Displacement Sensor for Estimating Sound Pressure Level in Pipes
Abstract: The presence of noise in piping systems often serves as an early warning of mechanical problems such as faulty or cavitating pumps and valves, or boiling in cooling lines. Additionally, in many Naval environments, especially submarines, minimizing noise radiated from vibrating pipes is highly desirable. The ability to quantify the sound pressure level in fluid-filled pipes with an external sensor is needed. Creare proposes to develop an easy-to-use, modular optical displacement sensor to estimate the sound pressure level inside a pipe by monitoring the outer wall vibrations. The sensor will be sensitive to sound pressure levels between 100 and 120 dB relative to 1 micro-Pascal at all frequencies between 10 and 3,000 Hz. In Phase I we will optimize our existing models of sound propagation in fluid- filled pipes and optical displacement sensors for pipes and fluids of interest to the Navy, perform a simple benchtop experiment to demonstrate the feasibility of our approach, and use the results of the models and experiments to refine our estimate of system sensitivity. By the completion of Phase II we will have developed a fully fieldable sensor system consisting of one universal control module and at least two pipe interface modules of different sizes.

Creare Inc.
P.O. Box 71,
Hanover, NH 03755
(603) 643-3800

PI: Bruce Pilvelait
(603) 643-3800
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0303
University of Dayton Research Inst.
300 College Park,
Dayton, OH 45469
(937) 229-2919

ID#: N10A-020-0314
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T020       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: A Magnetostrictive Energy Harvester for Shipboard Mechanical Vibration Sources
Abstract: There are many efforts underway to develop distributed shipboard health monitoring sensors. These devices face strong opposition by fleet maintainers unless the requirements for power supply cabling and/or battery maintenance are eliminated. Consequently, methods for harvesting energy from local environmental conditions using heat, solar, and vibration are of great interest. As opposed to piezoelectric and electromagnetic energy harvesting devices which tend to be either fragile or large and inefficient, magnetostrictive energy harvesting devices offer reliability, excellent conversion efficiency, and low cost. We propose to determine the feasibility of developing a magnetostrictive energy harvesting device for shipboard distributed health monitoring sensors using vibration as the energy input. During Phase I, we will develop the concept described in this proposal and build and evaluate a prototype. During Phase II, we will fabricate several prototype systems and demonstrate performance on large scale platforms.

Creare Inc.
P.O. Box 71,
Hanover, NH 03755
(603) 643-3800

PI: Anthony Dietz
(603) 640-3800
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0244
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology
Office of Sponsored Programs, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Bldg. E
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-3906

ID#: N10A-022-0540
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T022       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Multi-Stage Current Leads for Superconducting Power Transmission Cables
Abstract: Legacy power distribution cables will not be able to meet the future requirements of Navy electric ships. While power distribution systems employing high temperature superconductors (HTS) have the potential to meet this need, further development work is required to improve the performance and increase the technology readiness level of key system components. The proposed work focuses on the current leads used to connect the cryogenic HTS cables to ambient temperature generators and loads. For ship-scale transmission currents and transmission lengths, the thermal loads due to the current leads dominate the system cooling requirements to the extent that a system with a single-stage conduction-cooled current lead would have higher losses than the equivalent copper cable. Careful optimization of both the current lead and the cryocooler is required to reduce the system power requirements. Creare and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have teamed together to develop a multi-stage current lead designed on the basis of a system-level optimization to minimize the power required, size, weight, and cost of the HTS power transmission system. In Phase I, we will complete the optimization and design the current lead and cooling system. In Phase II, we will fabricate and test a prototype system.

Creare Inc.
P.O. Box 71,
Hanover, NH 03755
(603) 643-3800

PI: Weibo Chen
(603) 643-3800
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0246
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Research and Sponsored Program, 21 N. Park St., Suite 6401
Madison, WI 53715
(608) 262-4880

ID#: N10A-026-0151
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T026       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Performance Enhancement for 4 K Pulse Tube Cryocoolers
Abstract: Future military communication systems will utilize advanced superconductor digital electronics that will require efficient cooling at low temperatures near 4 K. We propose to improve the efficiency of pulse-tube cryocoolers by addressing the two primary performance limitations. These are operation in adverse orientations and performance of the regenerator at low temperatures. We will develop (1) a CFD model to quantify the losses associated with gravity-induced flow; and (2) an advanced regenerator that uses an innovative non-rare-earth material to achieve a very high volumetric specific heat and a novel configuration for high thermal and fluid performance. The regenerator’s large heat capacity, small void volume and low flow restriction will substantially improve the thermal efficiency of low temperature pulse-tube cryocoolers. The regenerator significantly increases a cryocooler’s net cooling and thus minimizes the impact of parasitic losses in a pulse tube at an adverse gravity orientation. In Phase I, we will analyze the performance of a pulse tube cooler at different gravity orientations, optimize the regenerator design, and identify a fabrication approach for the regenerator.

Creare Inc.
P.O. Box 71,
Hanover, NH 03755
(603) 643-3800

PI: Darin Knaus
(603) 643-3800
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0248
Mass Institute of Technology
77 Massachusetts Avenue, Bldg. E19-750
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-3906

ID#: N10A-027-0410
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T027       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Light Field Imaging for Dense Sprays
Abstract: The performance of modern combustion systems used in propulsion devices (e.g., gas turbine main combustors, augmentors, rockets, etc.) is largely dependent on the mixing of fuel and oxidizer (e.g., compressor air, vitiated air, and oxygen). This mixing process, usually involving a liquid jet emanating into a gaseous flow followed by subsequent breakup and atomization, is critically important to many performance metrics including thrust, efficiency, static stability, dynamic stability, observability, and emissions. Despite the importance of jet breakup and atomization, the process is poorly understood and design approaches are largely based on correlations, yielding mixed results. Our poor understanding of liquid jet dynamics is partly due to the fact that the diagnostic tools currently available to study liquid jet behavior have a limited ability to visualize the dense core region of the jet. In the proposed effort, Creare and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) will investigate applying a new flow visualization technique to this problem called Light Field Imaging (LFI). In Phase I, we will conduct a proof-of-concept experiment where we will apply LFI to a representative liquid jet-in-cross-flow. We will compare LFI with other techniques. In Phase II, we will optimize the LFI setup and conduct tests at representative flow conditions.

Creare Inc.
P.O. Box 71,
Hanover, NH 03755
(603) 643-3800

PI: Odile Clavier
(603) 643-3800
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0268
University of Northern Colorado
Gunter Hall, Campus Box 140
Greeley, CO 80639
(970) 351-2734

ID#: N10A-032-0457
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T032       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Wireless, Wide Frequency Band Otoactoustic Emissions Probe
Abstract: The nature and requirements of military operations lead to high noise levels, exposing military and civilian personnel to the possibility of noise-induced hearing loss. Otoacoustic emission (OAE) probes can assess the health of the inner ear by testing the response of the cochlea to various types of stimuli. The measurement of emissions at high frequency has the potential to detect noise-induced damage to the outer hair cells before it affects hearing function (as measured with traditional pure tone audiometry). Unfortunately, existing OAE probes are not designed for high frequency measurements or high quality measurements in typical field settings. Creare, in collaboration with the University of Northern Colorado, proposes to develop an innovative OAE probe for the detection of OAEs at frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 16 kHz. Creare’s proposed concept will reduce several noise sources on existing designs and improve the in ear fit of the probe tip. Creare will work closely with the University of Northern Colorado to design a probe that is easy to fit and provides a repeatable and comfortable probe fit when used by audiologists and trained technicians.

CU Aerospace
2100 South Oak St., Suite 206
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-8274

PI: Christian Mangun
(217) 333-8279
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0424
Univ. Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Board of Trustees of Univ. of, OSPRA 1901 S. First St-Suite A
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-2187

ID#: N10A-007-0050
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T007       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Self-Healing Non-Catalytic Multifunctional Composite Structures
Abstract: Multifunctional materials would alleviate longstanding problems in composite structures associated with multiple types of damage mechanisms such as mechanical/thermal fatigue, microcracking, and impact. CU Aerospace (CUA) proposes an innovative hybrid self-healing composite consisting of a two-part healing agent that is stored in microcapsules and hollow glass fibers (HGF), which are released whenever the matrix is damaged. The healing agents then mix and flow into the cracks where they polymerize in place, effectively sealing the cracks and allowing the material to recover structural function. Repair of damage is accomplished automatically and without human intervention, improving performance and service-life. The team of CUA and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will develop this self-healing system for epoxy based structural composites. In addition, although epoxy will be the matrix of interest for Phase I, CUA will investigate the possibility of utilizing other self-healing matrix materials including cyanate esters, polyimides, and bismaleimides.

Daniel H. Wagner, Associates, Incorporated
40 Lloyd Avenue, Suite 200
Malvern, PA 19355
(757) 727-7700

PI: W. Monach
(757) 727-7700
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0276
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
4800 Oak Grove Drive,
Pasadena, CA 91109
(818) 354-5794

ID#: N10A-036-0264
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T036       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Wave Detection, Prediction, and Reaction System (WDPRS)
Abstract: In this project Daniel H. Wagner Associates (DHWA), with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and MARK Resources, Inc. (MRI) as our subcontractors, will develop a lightweight, low-cost Wave Detection, Prediction, and Reaction System (WDPRS) that is designed to reduce the hazard of foundering and/or the violent shocks, pitches, and rolls resulting from improper handling of a small craft in elevated seas.

Daniel H. Wagner, Associates, Incorporated
40 Lloyd Avenue, Suite 200
Malvern, PA 19355
(610) 644-3400

PI: Scott Brown
(610) 644-3400
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0283
George Mason University
Center of Excellence in C4I, 4400 University Drive
Fairfax, VA 22030
(703) 993-2297

ID#: N10A-038-0313
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T038       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Translation of Mission Directives to Behaviors Including Thresholds in Autonomous Undersea Search Sensor Elements of Distributed Sensing Systems
Abstract: Autonomous unmanned distributed sensing systems are in the process of revolutionizing undersea military search. The importance of search to military operations is greatest in the environment where detection is the most difficult, i.e. undersea operations. Now distributed sensing systems promise an order of magnitude reduction in search times for enemy undersea targets. In order to realize the potential of distributed sensing systems, this project will design a decentralized methodology function which will control thresholds and other settable parameters of distributed sensing systems to carry out the intent of the warfighters’ mission control directives in an environment where communication is severely limited. Our methodology will apply to a wide range of distributed sensing systems. It will allow these systems to utilize available intelligence on undersea targets, utilize environmental data, react to emerging events, and deal with failures of individual system components in a distributed manner.

Data Flux Systems Inc.
986 Cragmont Ave,
Berkeley, CA 94708
(510) 527-7183

PI: Vason Srini
(510) 527-7183
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0365
University of California
BWRC, 2108 Allston Way
Berkeley, CA 94704
(510) 666-3100

ID#: N10A-039-0101
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T039       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Autonomous Landing at Unprepared Sites for a Cargo Unmanned Air System
Abstract: We propose to design, develop, implement, simulate, and demonstrate an autonomous control and sensing system for the safe vertical landing of autonomous aerial cargo delivery system (ACDS). The landing site is expected to be unprepared mountain sides with slopes up to 15 degrees and rough terrain containing rocks and brush. We also plan to reduce the amount of ground equipment required to operate the system, overall weight and power requirements of the control and sensing system, and estimate probability of hard landing. During Phase I we will develop two approaches for sensing systems using FMCW radar and 3D Flash Ladar in selecting the landing site from a distance of 75 m and estimate the cost, weight, volume, computing requirement for processing raw sensor data and running control algorithms, and the total power needed for sensors and computers. We will also simulate the control and sensing algorithms on the RIPTIDE environment using the vehicle dynamics model of Yamaha RMAX and Boeing's A160T. We will develop metrics to evaluate the performance of the control algorithms and sensing approaches and provide an initial set of results using the simulation environment. During Phase II we will perform a detailed implementation of the control algorithms and sensing approaches. We will simulate performance using 6-degree of freedom models for RMAX and Boeing's A160T and tune the control algorithm and sensing approaches. At the end of Phase II we will do a demonstration of landing using the RMAX on a hill side.

Desert Star Systems
3261 Imjin Road,
Marina, CA 93933
(831) 384-8000

PI: Marco Flagg
(831) 236-7750
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0274
Scripps Institution of Oceanography
9500 Gilman Drive, Marine Physical Laboratory
La Jolla, CA 92093
(858) 822-3101

ID#: N10A-034-0638
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T034       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Naval Special Warfare (NSW) Underwater Secure Text Messaging and Diver Locater
Abstract: Small combat dive teams require a situational awareness capability that combines robust, low probability of detection (LPD) communication with navigation/tracking functions. The project will result in a compact terminal for underwater acoustics based communication, navigation and tracking. The Diver Messaging and Navigation Terminal (DMNT) will be rugged and easy to use, warranting a description of ‘off-the-shelf’ in the sense that a diver can pick up the device and learn its basic operation in minimum time. Recognizing that high-performance technologies often fail when conditions turn adverse, DMNT will include multiple ‘step-back’ features that take over and assure high availability of essential capabilities. A S&T issue of the project is the choice of optimal waveforms and transmission schemes that have LPD. The phase-1 prototype will include a homing capability and use precision synchronized clocks for accurate ranging without any diver transmissions. With Desert Star’s field-proven frequency hopping spread spectrum technology (FHSS) establishing baseline performance, advanced LPD waveforms will be explored in the phase-1 option. Desert Star’s extensive capabilities and COTS/MOTS product line accelerate the project. In phase-1, we will build a prototype and conduct field testing of the proposed technologies, the results guiding the development of a production ready capability in phase-2.

DR Technologies, Inc.
9431 Dowdy Drive,
San Diego, CA 92126
(858) 587-4200

PI: John Marks
(858) 587-4200
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0322
Arizona State University
P.O. Box 873503,
Tempe, AZ 85528
(480) 965-4841

ID#: N10A-021-0716
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T021       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Metamaterial Antennas Imbedded with Ballistic Armor (PDRT10-006)
Abstract: The proposed STTR will demonstrate how magnetic meta materials based antennas are ideal for integration into composite structures where the graphite composite backplanes can be integrated with dielectric ballistic protection materials that surround, yet do not interfere with the antenna. In ongoing research we have shown such antennas can approach the theoretical Gain-Bandwidth Product (GBWP) limit for radiators limited to a surface. (The two-dimensional equivalent of the well know three dimensional Fano-Chu limit.) A feature of the design of these antennas is the ability to trade-off the permeability of the material against the cross section required to attain the desired GBWP and minimize weight and cost of the metamaterial while maximizing gain and bandwidth.The instantaneous bandwidth of the antenna is critical in applications where the same radiator is to be used over a very broad band of frequencies. We will demonstrate the capabilities of this technology in the form of a broadband radiator operating from 20MHz up, integrated into a structure suitable for a side panel of a vehicle performing an anti-IED. This conformal design eliminates visual signature cues that could identify the vehicle carrying this panel as an anti-IED vehicle.

Engine Research Associates, Inc.
12108 Burning Tree Rd.,
Fort Wayne, IN 46845
(260) 485-3752

PI: Jeffery Erickson
(260) 338-1010
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0437
Purdue University
610 PURDUE MALL, HOVD RM 328B,
WEST LAFAYETTE, IN 47907
(765) 494-1063

ID#: N10A-001-0528
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T001       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Advanced Materials for the Design of Lightweight JP5/JP8/DS2 Fueled Engines for UAVs
Abstract: Develop a high power to weight, compact, heavy fuel MCC engine using advanced high strength materials. This new MCC engine design will also offer high durability and high efficiency with an extremely low acoustic and IR signature for use in future small UAVs. The overall objective of this Phase I development program is to develop a JP-5, JP-8 or DS2 MCC engine using advanced high strength to weight materials. This new design will offer a power to weight ratio between 1.1 to 1.5 HP per pound and a minimum service life over 600 hours. It will have a BSFC greater than 0.5 lb/hp- hr at all power outputs. This design will be developed for extreme operational environments including starting temperatures of 0 degrees F and above and operating temperatures from -50 degrees F to 130 degrees F. This MCC engine design can be scaled and/or stacked to cover an output range from 2 HP to 150 HP. The MCC engine is the only engine capable of full expansion which gives it an extremely quiet exhaust even without a muffler.

Engineered Coatings, Inc.
P.O. Box 4782,
Grand Junction, CO 81503
(970) 243-8828

PI: Frank Kustas
(970) 243-8828
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0339
Institute for Advanced Technology
101 E. 27th St., Suite 4.300
Austin, TX 78713
(512) 471-6424

ID#: N10A-025-0647
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T025       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Graded-Composition Refractory Coatings for Protection of Cu-Rails for Electromagnetic Launchers
Abstract: The Navy is developing an electromagnetic (EM) launcher for long-range naval surface-fire-support. Severe operating conditions of the EM system place stringent requirements for materials, including high current and magnetic fields, high temperatures, contact with liquid metals, high stress/gouging from balloting contacts and high-speed-sliding electrical-contact with an Al armature. Engineered Coatings Inc., Southwest Research Institute, and the Institute for Advanced Technology, University of Texas, will demonstrate thick Plasma-Enhanced Physical Vapor Deposited coatings to protect copper rails with: 1) graded composition Cu-refractory metal (e.g., Ta, W or Cr) coatings; 2) solid- lubricating nanomultilayer nitride coatings (e.g., TiAlCrN / TiN bilayers); and 3) nanostructured (nm crystal size) nitride coatings. Basic coating properties; electrical resistivity/conductivity, indent-adhesion/toughness, hardness after thermal exposure, oxidation resistance, and sub-scale rail gun experiments, will be determined for these coating groups. A down-selected coating will have additional rail-gun tests in the Phase I option to assess coating reliability and reproducibility.

Enterprise Sciences, Inc.
14817 Silverstone Drive,
Silver Spring, MD 20905
(301) 699-0097

PI: Andrew Mostovych
(301) 699-0097
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0362
Univ of Maryland School of Medicine
Dept of Pathology, MSTF Bldg., 10 South Pine St., Rm 7-00
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 706-1759

ID#: N10A-043-0347
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T043       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Miniature, Portable, Device to Detect and Monitor Coagulopathy
Abstract: The objective of this proposal is to demonstrate the feasibility of a new thromboelastograph (TEG)-like instrument that has the same basic capabilities as the TEG – that is to say, capabilities of monitoring in vitro the kinetics, strength, and stability of clot formation in blood samples that are clot induced – but which is miniaturized, highly portable, rugged, and insensitive to adverse environmental conditions. Because current TEG devices use fundamental technology that is difficult to miniaturize and make robust, our approach will incorporate completely different technology and physical processes to measure comparable blood clotting parameters; it will furthermore provide various more advanced testing features.

Etrema Products, Inc.
2500 N. Loop Drive,
Ames, IA 50010
(515) 296-8030

PI: Eric Summers
(515) 296-8030
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0318
Ames Lab - Iowa State University
111 TASF,
Ames, IA 50011
(515) 294-8425

ID#: N10A-020-0412
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T020       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Development of Magnetostrictive Energy Harvesting of Mechanical Vibration Energy
Abstract: Energy harvesting devices utilizing magnetostrictive materials are a logical choice for harvesting the high impedance (high force, low displacement) vibrations found aboard Navy ships. Force-based devices, enabled by magnetostrictive materials, can harvest energy over an extremely large bandwidth, approximately ±35 and ±70 Hz currently, making them more desirable in situations aboard Navy ships were transient vibration conditions created by varying ship speeds is present. This broader bandwidth also means easier installation of the devices without the need for exact placement on the vibration source and eliminating tuning requirements typical of the displacement based devices. The robustness and formability that Galfenol alloys exhibit allow 1-dimensional (1D), 2-dimensional (2D), and 3-dimensional (3D) energy harvesting devices to be developed and optimized for the identified need and vibration coupling scheme. A 1D Galfenol device could consist of wire(s) bundled together to form an energy harvesting cable that could be wrapped around a vibrating column; a 2D Galfenol device could consist of a single Galfenol sheet attached to a vibrating panel; and a 3D Galfenol device could consist of structural support on-which the vibration source is mounted. The proposed work will investigate 1D and 2D Galfenol energy harvesting devices in Navy ship environments.

Etymotic Research, Inc.
61 Martin Lane,
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
(847) 228-0006

PI: Jonathan Siegel
(847) 491-2454
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0267
Northwestern University
Office for Sponsored Research, 633 Clark Street
Evanston, IL 60208
(847) 491-3300

ID#: N10A-032-0396
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T032       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Insert ear-probe assembly for high-quality otoacoustic-emission (OAE) measurements in adults
Abstract: Current otoacoustic emission probes used for diagnostic evaluation of the middle and inner ear components of hearing can not produce well-calibrated, high-quality acoustic stimuli that cover the upper frequency range of human hearing that is most easily damaged by ototoxic drugs, noise and the normal process of aging. The microphones in these devices are also not calibrated to allow accurate presentation of acoustic stimuli or measure the acoustic emissions generated by the inner ear. Through a large-scale NIH-sponsored translational study at Northwestern University we have developed a prototype research-quality instrument that already satisfies nearly all of the specifications of the present call for proposals, but is also providing strong evidence that such measurements are likely to be of great diagnostic value. In partnership with Etymotic Research, Inc., we propose to create a practical and robust otoacoustic emission probe that satisfies the stated performance criteria. Although we already have a strong basis in experiments and theory to think about how to achieve this goal, we also understand how to thoroughly test components of the new probe, separately and in combination, to be able to propose a solution that will be virtually certain to work as specified.

Frontier Technology, Inc.
75 Aero Camino, Suite A,
Goleta, CA 93117
(805) 685-6672

PI: Gary Key
(937) 429-3302
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0441
Northeastern University
360 Huntington Ave,
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 373-3817

ID#: N10A-008-0586
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T008       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Adaptive Learning for Stall Pre-cursor Identification and General Impending Failure Prediction
Abstract: Frontier Technology, Inc. (FTI) and Northeastern University propose to investigate and develop an innovative approach to predict stall events of aircraft engines prior to occurrence and in sufficient time to allow the FADEC controller to adjust engine variables. The team will utilize vector quantization and neural network techniques to develop accurate models of engine behavior that will be used to detect and predict the stall. Vector Quantization and transfer function models will be used to create the models that estimate engine current conditions. These conditions and in-situ sensor readings are provided to a Neural Network (NN) to predict the occurrence of a stall. Engine data will be provided from GE Aviation will be sued perform both the vector quantization and to train the NN model. The research team has extensive experience working with engine data to detect and diagnose faults and to predict impact on engine performance. Northeastern University has performed a GE-sponsored project to predict engine stalls and other fault events that is closely related to the proposed technology. This effort extends FTI’s research into engine failure detection and prediction analysis which has been performed in support of the US Navy and US Air Force.

G2 Software Systems, Inc.
4250 Pacific Highway, Suite 125
San Diego, CA 92110
(619) 222-8025

PI: Anthony Padua
(619) 888-9014
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0364
University of Nevada
University of Nevada, Reno, /0171 Reno
Reno, NV 89557
(775) 784-4315

ID#: N10A-045-0380
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T045       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Development of Navy Wave Rich Collaboration for Command and Control
Abstract: G2 Software Systems (G2SS) proposes to explore all features of Google Wave to develop practices and extensions to support Navy Command and Control (C2) processes. The C2 practices and extensions include tools for collaborative problem analysis, collaborative planning, knowledge sharing, knowledge awareness (searching and registering for critical information requirements), knowledge context (including versioning as well as embedding waves in web documents, and C2 applications inside Waves), instant messaging, status monitoring, and query-and-response applications (such as to learn the readiness status of a Navy platform). As part of its innovative approach, G2SS proposes to utilize the latest PMW-150 Software Development, Testing, and Configuration Management, processes and procedures to help the determine the cost and time to market in deploying the cutting edge technologies such as the Navy Wave while still meeting Information Assurance requirements. The objective of this proposal is to demonstrate that G2SS and its team members present a valuable and innovative approach to the investigation of a Navy Wave solution for (PMW)-150.

Giner Electrochemical Systems, LLC
89 Rumford Avenue,
Newton, MA 02466
(781) 529-0504

PI: Han Liu
(781) 529-0531
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0295
Purdue University
Young Hall, 155 South Grant Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907
(765) 494-1055

ID#: N10A-030-0014
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T030       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: High Energy Density Hydrogen Delivery System
Abstract: This NAVY Small Business Technology Transfer project is directed toward the development of a novel hydrogen generator that employs nanostructured metal foam catalysts. Special coating and form factor will also be employed to the hydrogen generating materials to ensure the safety of storage and transportation, while maintaining very high packing density compared with conventional powder packing.

Global Engineering and Materials, Inc.
11 Alscot Drive,
East Lyme, CT 06333
(609) 356-5115

PI: Jim Lua
(609) 356-5115
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0254
The University of TX at EL PASO
Dept. of Mechanical Engineerin, 500 W. University Ave.
EL Paso, TX 79968
(915) 747-6900

ID#: N10A-041-0527
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T041       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Fracture Evaluation and Design Tool for Welded Aluminum Ship Structures Subjected to Impulsive Dynamic Loading
Abstract: A software tool for fracture evaluation and load deflection prediction of welded aluminum ship structures subjected to impulsive loading will be developed by enhancing and integrating an existing extended finite element method (XFEM) for dynamic fracture of thin shells in Abaqus. The software package will be able to model arbitrary crack paths as dictated by the physics of the scenario, completely independent of the mesh. This will be accomplished by adding discontinuous displacement and velocity fields arbitrarily within the shell elements via two superposed elements with a set of phantom degrees of freedoms. Explicit time integration with one point quadrature scheme and an hourglass control will be implemented to further simplify the treatment of cracked elements and provide consistent history variables for nonlinear material models. A modified Johnson-Cook model coupled with a nonlocal fracture criterion will be implemented to capture an anisotropic and rate dependent nonlinear material behavior and its associated damage initiation. Global Engineering and Materials, Inc. (GEM) has secured commitments for technical support from the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) and Professor Ted Belytschko from Northwestern University (NWU). Dr. Belytschko will provide GEM his stand alone explicit dynamic XFEM tool for shells.

Global Strategic Solutions LLC
22375 Broderick Drive, Suite 140
Sterling, VA 20166
(703) 466-0500

PI: Michael Mullins
(703) 466-0500
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0435
Vanderbilt University
2015 Terrace Place, Room 209
Nashville, TN 37235
(615) 343-6204

ID#: N10A-009-0391
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T009       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Dynamic Physical/Data-Driven Models for System-Level Prognostics and Health Management
Abstract: Prognostics and health management (PHM) systems are critical for detecting impending faults and enabling a proactive decision process for maintenance or replacement of avionics systems before actual failures occur. A PHM system is essential to enhancing aircraft systems reliability and maintaining a high level of mission readiness and affordability. Current PHM advancements are focused on aircraft structures and electro-mechanical components. There is a need to address the unique PHM system-level design characteristics for avionics systems. This effort investigates the development of a toolset to enable the integration of data, models and algorithms for system-level prognostics and health management of avionics systems. The effort researches and characterizes a systematic framework for the integration, processing, and distribution of health state data from onboard monitoring systems to off-board Automatic Test Systems (ATS). This includes investigating the application of the latest Condition Based Maintenance (OSA- CBM), MIMOSA, ISO and IEEE ATS-related standards to provide a standard, common model (structure) for exchange of health state data and information across the maintenance infrastructure. Including assessment of data analysis and modeling techniques to enable system-level health assessment and performance life remaining predictions. A technology development plan and a desktop proof-ofconcept demonstration for a small target system are part of this effort.

GrammaTech, Inc
317 N. Aurora Street,
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 273-7340

PI: Denis Gopan
(608) 827-0657
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0251
University of Wisconsin
1210 West Dayton Street,
Madison, WI 53706
(608) 262-2091

ID#: N10A-035-0544
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T035       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Mathematically Rigorous Methods for Determining Software Quality
Abstract: Software is rarely written entirely from scratch. Typically, third-party commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components are integrated into larger software systems used both in the commercial sector and in critical infrastructure. Third-party components often come in binary form, e.g., as dynamically linked libraries, Active X controls, or plain executables. That is, the source code for those components is typically unavailable and the debug information is stripped. Additionally, to hamper reverse-engineering attempts, the binaries of those components are often further protected with anti-tamper techniques and obfuscations. The lack of source code for third-party components prevents most existing security- analysis tools from exposing the vulnerabilities and malicious behaviors harbored by those components themselves, as well as by software systems that integrate those components. We propose to design and build a tool that will conduct rigorous analysis of machine code to assess its quality. The tool will automatically identify vulnerabilities in third-party components and will assist security analysts in spotting unexpected and potentially malicious behavior in the third-party code. The proposed tool will integrate with existing GrammaTech source-code-analysis tools to boost their effectiveness in dealing with third-party components and libraries.

H&R Technology, Inc.
179 Bear Hill Road,
Waltham, MA 02451
(781) 890-5900

PI: Joshua Rabinovich
(781) 890-5900
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0309
Georgia Institute of Technology
813 Ferst Drive, MARC 452, Manuf. Research Ctr., Room 452
Atlanta, GA 30332
(404) 894-3270

ID#: N10A-025-0001
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T025       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Development of Refractory Coatings on High Strength, High Conductivity Substrates
Abstract: The objective of this Project is to explore and develop refractory coatings on high strength, high electrical conductivity copper alloy, to enable damage resistant electromagnetic launcher. An electromagnetic launcher consists of two parallel copper rails, and a moving armature. High electrical currents passing through the rails and armature result in strong magnetic fields, high temperatures, chemical interactions and strong lateral forces on the rails and armature in the launcher bore. The NAVY is looking for a coating technology that can provide improved performance for its EM Railgun rails working at high temperatures and pressures. For this demanding application the main demand for coating technology is the production of metallurgical-bond coating with consistent quality while eliminating of coating dilution, reducing undesirable chemical reactions, and preventing negative metallurgical transformations in the base metal of the rail. These requirements are mutually exclusive for conventional metallurgical-bond fusion processes that require substrate melting during the performance of welding/coating. H&R Technology’s LaserForge™ solid-state welding/coating process promises to overcome the above-mentioned limitations of conventional fusion coating processes and permit the production of a strong, metallurgical-bond coating of these highly dissimilar metals while improving performance and service life of electromagnetic launcher.

Harmonia, Inc.
2020 Kraft Drive, Suite 1000,
Blacksburg, VA 24060
(540) 951-5915

PI: Marc Abrams
(540) 951-5901
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0363
Virginia Tech
2202 Kraft Drive, Office 213,
Blacksburg, VA 24060
(540) 231-3475

ID#: N10A-045-0495
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T045       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Coupling Collaboration to SOA Services and Decision Support for the Warfighter via Navy Wave
Abstract: Collaboration between Navy warfighters at the Operational Level of War is essential. In the Navy today collaboration to achieve Commander’s Control Actions is done ashore and on large deck afloat platforms with video teleconferencing and voice over IP. But only those platforms have sufficient bandwidth, and even then available bandwidth drop during mission critical times. Meanwhile the only ubiquitous methods for situations with limited bandwidth are based on chat and file transfer. To create a superior method to build knowledge collaboratively among warfighters, we propose using Google Wave, which are distributed, collaborative documents allowing concurrent and low latency updates. We adapt the Google Wave code base to an ashore/afloat environment with disconnected, intermittent, and limited bandwidth communication. We will examine reducing lifecycle costs for collaborative tools by using Google’s application programming interfaces to remain compatible with commercial developments for Google Wave that can be exploited to increase the capabilities in the future. We explore systematic hardening of the Google code against vulnerabilities common to collaborative applications: network volatility, security exploits by attacking entities, and unexpected API evolution in the C2 service oriented architecture (SOA) services to which the solution may connect. We construct C2- specific Wave clients, gadgets, and robots.

HemoSonics, LLC
745 Walker Square, Suite 3C,
Charlottesville, VA 22903
(434) 962-2269

PI: Francesco Viola
(434) 409-6281
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0360
The University of Virginia
OSP 1001 North Emmet Street, PO Box 400195
Charlottesville, VA 22904
(434) 924-4270

ID#: N10A-043-0364
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T043       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Miniature, Portable, Device to Detect and Monitor Coagulopathy
Abstract: Trauma is a leading cause of both military and civilian mortality, accounting for roughly 10% of all deaths worldwide. Coagulopathy (disturbance of the physiologic balance between bleeding and clotting) is observed in 25% to 36% of trauma patients and significantly increases mortality. Trauma-related coagulopathy typically involves dysfunction or depletion of coagulation factors, platelets, fibrinogen, and fibrinolysis. Each of these defects requires specific treatment to correct, while improper treatment consumes time, money, and limited resources, and worsens outcomes. Proper trauma treatment requires the rapid assessment of hemostatic state. The ideal test is performed at the point of care, is robust to environmental vibration, takes only a few minutes to perform, specifies the exact hemostatic defect(s), is easy to use, and presents easy to interpret results. Unfortunately, no commercially available test or combination of tests meets these criteria. Under this proposal HemoSonics will test the applicability of its proprietary Sonorheometry technology to assess coagulopathy at the point of care. We will assess potential technical barriers and validate our approach to this critical health care problem. Success in Phase I will pave the way to a Phase II award and product commercialization.

Impact Technologies, LLC
200 Canal View Blvd,
Rochester, NY 14623
(585) 424-1990

PI: Patrick Kalgren
(585) 424-1990
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0415
Montana State University
Department of Computer Science, EPS 363
Bozeman, MT 59717
(406) 994-4835

ID#: N10A-009-0292
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T009       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Dynamic PHM Modeling
Abstract: Impact Technologies and Montana State University propose to develop a Dynamic Prognostic and Health Management (PHM) modeling capability and related test, validation, and support toolsets that will enable standardized approaches to model representation, information exchange, and PHM system support, providing for improved integration, interoperability and reuse of developed and emerging capabilities for electronic system health management. Building on device, component, sub-system, and system level condition monitoring and failure progression modeling techniques from physics-based, data driven, and usage realms, and providing support to integrate multiple techniques across multiple levels of instantiation for improved coverage and reduced uncertainty, the Impact – MSU team will leverage existing failure progression data sets to demonstrate feasibility and validate the meta-modeling approach. Results will support the extension and development of industry standards to foster broader acceptance and implementation of open data exchange for system health management.

Impact Technologies, LLC
200 Canal View Blvd,
Rochester, NY 14623
(585) 424-1990

PI: Matthew Watson
(814) 861-6273
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0356
The Pennsylvania State University
Applied Research Laboratory, P.O. Box 30
State College, PA 16804
(814) 863-3859

ID#: N10A-013-0005
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T013       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: An Advanced Undersea Lithium Ion Management System (U-LIMS)
Abstract: Impact Technologies, in collaboration with Penn State Applied Research Laboratory, proposes to develop an advanced Battery Monitoring and Management System (BMMS) for lithium-ion battery packs that ensures adequate, safe, and reliable operation. This system will focus on real time diagnostics, prediction of catastrophic failure, and risk assessment for individual cells in high power applications. Intelligent cell monitoring will be developed to automate the cell interrogation based on risk and time to failure estimates. Phase I will strive to demonstrate the ability to detect failure modes, predict when they will reach condemning limits at the cell/module level in real time, and respond to such conditions by taking the appropriate module offline to prevent damage. The architecture for intelligent cell monitoring will also be designed based on the host platform and target battery. Phase II will then extend these developments for full size cells and multi-cell modules and develop a prototype system to regulate cells during charge and discharge cycles. In Phase III, we will conduct shipboard testing and suitability analysis of the modeled system. Commercialization and transition plans will be developed for full scale implementation along with user manuals, training guides, and support plans.

Impact Technologies, LLC
200 Canal View Blvd,
Rochester, NY 14623
(585) 424-1990

PI: Matthew Watson
(814) 861-6273
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0260
Georgia Institute of Technology
School of Chemical & Biomolecu, 311 Ferst Drive, NW
Atlanta, GA 30332
(404) 894-2898

ID#: N10A-014-0006
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T014       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Advanced Software Tools for Lithium Ion Battery Risk Assessment (LIBRA)
Abstract: Impact Technologies, in collaboration with the Georgia Tech Center for Innovative Fuel Cell and Battery Technologies, proposes to develop tools for Lithium Ion Battery Risk Assessment (LIBRA). These tools will allow the Navy to analyze proposed Li-Ion battery designs and assess the overall risk to the platform in the event of failure in a single cell. The tool will also predict the effects of a casualty if one does occur. The proposed approach features physics-based multi- domain models, probabilistic fault propagation models, and an open interface to allow evaluation of any design that adheres to the specification. During Phase I, a prototype tool will be developed and demonstrated. Phase II will mature the underlying models and produce a full software application for naval use. Laboratory destructive testing will also be performed, with the aim of quantifying the likelihood of developing internal shorts and other failures. Assessments of battery weight, volume, energy content, and cost will also be performed, and the tool will indicate the overall cost-risk- benefit ratio of the battery module under consideration. In Phase III, we will work to transition the technology into military and commercial applications.

Impact Technologies, LLC
200 Canal View Blvd,
Rochester, NY 14623
(585) 424-1990

PI: Carl Palmer
(585) 424-1990
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0302
Clemson University
Mechanical & Manufacturing Sys, 204 Fluor Daniel Building
Clemson, SC 29634
(864) 656-7417

ID#: N10A-020-0137
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T020       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Magnetostrictive Vibration Energy Harvester (MAVEN)
Abstract: Impact Technologies, in cooperation with Dr. Mohammed Daqaq from Clemson University, propose to develop a magnetostrictive materials based device for harvesting energy from mechanical vibration. The energy harvesting device will harness power from ship-hull vibrations in order to power sensing devices. This technology will be a key enabler for improved structural and machinery health management. Key innovations of the approach include creation of a device using magnetic levitation to soften natural frequencies inside the harvester to allow the harvester to be tuned to very low excitation frequencies. The key tasks of Phase I include: characterizing the vibration spectrum of the application (initially an Arleigh Burke class destroyer); deriving analytical models for quantifying the device’s output power for various vibration spectral profiles; designing, modeling, and creating energy harvesting prototypes; and demonstrating the harvesting system in a laboratory environment.

Infoscitex Corporation
303 Bear Hill Road,
Waltham, MA 02451
(781) 890-1338

PI: Andrew DeCarlo
(781) 890-1338
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0442
Western Michigan University
1903 W Michigan Avenue,
Kalamazoo, MI 49008
(269) 276-3802

ID#: N10A-006-0032
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T006       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Innovative Approaches to Resource Virtualization over Ad-Hoc Wireless Networks
Abstract: Resource virtualization concepts are in heavy commercial use for optimizing the performance of distributed applications. Resource virtualization allows resources to be allocated and adapted on-the-fly, and enables a wide range of distributed computing, networking, and sensing applications. However, resource virtualization has traditionally been developed for fixed, stable networks, and cannot adequately function over mobile ad-hoc networks (MANETs). MANETs are highly variable, highly dynamic, unstable, and lacking in infrastructure, and pose additional challenges for resource virtualization. The Navy requires novel techniques for extending the benefits of resource virtualization to the challenges of MANETs. Infoscitex proposes opportunistic resource utilization networks (Oppnets). Oppnets are MANETs consisting of a seed network that temporarily recruits resources such as sensors, computers, lightweight clients, and networks. The Oppnets coordinate the capabilities and resources of diverse networks, sensors, and computational resources in a way that optimizes resource utilization across multiple hops.

Infoscitex Corporation
303 Bear Hill Road,
Waltham, MA 02451
(781) 890-1338

PI: James Goldie
(781) 890-1338
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0319
University of California Los Angele
BOX 951406, 11000 Kinross Bldg, Ste 200
Los Angeles, CA 90095
(310) 983-3408

ID#: N10A-020-0361
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T020       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Development of Magnetostrictive Energy Harvesting of Mechanical Vibration Energy
Abstract: The Navy seeks devices that can provide power to maintain charge in batteries for shipboard sensors. The transduction materials proposed for most energy harvesting devices under development are either too brittle to endure significant loading or are too compliant to extract significant energy from the small amplitude vibrations present on ships. Terfenol- D (in a composite form) and Galfenol each provide a rugged magnetostrictive transduction material that is a good mechanical impedance match with shipboard structures, and can, therefore, be used in energy harvesting devices to extract significant power from the vibration present. Broadband magnetostrictive harvesters can be included in the mount of rotating machines (e.g., pumps, motors, shafts, etc.) or as part of reaction mass devices. Infoscitex has assembled a distinguished team to address this proposal. In conjunction with our university research partner, we will develop the methodologies for arriving at optimum magnetostrictive harvester designs, identify candidate shipboard sources of vibration, define harvester designs and their anticipated performance, and conduct proof-of-concept prototype construction and test to both verify our models and demonstrate magnetostrive-based energy harvesting.

IngeniumTechnologies Corp.
4216 Maray Drive,
Rockford, IL 61107
(815) 315-9271

PI: David Chaudoir
(815) 399-8803
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0292
Drexel University
3141 Chestnut Street,
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 895-6446

ID#: N10A-030-0447
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T030       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Powder Reactant Delivery System for Air Independent Fuel Cell
Abstract: An air independent fuel cell fuel delivery system that is based on the reaction of aluminum and water with a unique additive package that promotes and controls the rate of hydrogen generation and heat released. The fuel delivery system features a unique design that controls the introduction of fuel to the user, yet allows for rapid refueling between missions. The fuel mixture is packaged in an inexpensive modular approach that facilitates the fueling and defueling process without leakage or packaging failures. Operation of the fuel delivery system features a readily controlled process where only the needed fuel required to operate the platform is provided at the inlet conditions of a PEM fuel cell. As the rate of fuel delivery drops, additional fuel mixture is exposed to water allowing the flow rate to the fuel cell to remain constant. Start-up of the system is rapid and fuel delivery process can be stopped and restarted without any manned intervention. Flow delivery can be varyed thoughout the mission operating scenario from about 2% to 100% of flow requirements.

Innovative Design & Research Inc.
338 W. Lafayette,
Rushville, IL 62681
(217) 322-3907

PI: Daniel Meyer
(217) 322-3907
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0454
Western Illinois University
1 University Circle,
Macomb, IL 61455
(309) 298-1459

ID#: N10A-001-0126
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T001       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Advanced Materials for the Design of Lightweight JP5/JP8/DS2 Fueled Engines for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs)
Abstract: The XS-Air engine should provide the highest power density with both diesel and gasoline piston engines, especially in smaller engines in where turbos or blowers are impractical. The XS-Air engine can solve the aviation industry problem of the potential phasing out Av-gas. The spark ignition XS-Air engine should be able to burn pump gas and still generate extreme power densities, due to its two stroke operation, constant boosting pressures, large working stroke, and the reduction of parts and weight of the engine. The SI XS-Air engine is highly boosted during start up and idle and its boost will not change when reaching full rpm. This allows the built in compression ratio to be preset for a low enough final compression ratio to eliminate the necessity of using extremely high octane fuels.

Intelligent Automation, Inc.
15400 Calhoun Drive, Suite 400
Rockville, MD 20855
(301) 294-5221

PI: Kyung Kwak
(301) 294-4763
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0443
University of Maryland
Department of Computer Science, University of Maryland, Baltim
Baltimore, MD 21250
(410) 455-2590

ID#: N10A-006-0453
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T006       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: An adaptive and scalable SOA-based network resource virtualization framework for MANET
Abstract: The key innovation of this proposal is to develop an adaptive and scalable network resource virtualization framework. The framework employs simple yet efficient mechanisms to deliver a comprehensive network resource virtualization solution through network virtualization, service discovery/advertisement, and service differentiation in mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs). It uses local caching to facilitate cross platform collaborations, service discovery, and resource virtualization. In addition, it requires each node to identify neighbors with high link quality to minimize flooding storms and guarantee a certain level of Quality of Service. We also propose to use our unique service evaluation and differentiation model to provide a resource virtualization by comparing and evaluating discovered services. Furthermore, we propose to use semantic service descriptions associated with a set of novel protocols to further enhance the performance. The key innovation of the approach lies in the following aspects: 1) Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) based adaptive and scalable framework; 2) semantically-rich service descriptions; 3) selective caching and dissemination of service advertisement; 4) service evaluation and differentiation model.

Intelligent Automation, Inc.
15400 Calhoun Drive, Suite 400
Rockville, MD 20855
(301) 294-5221

PI: Xiong Liu
(301) 294-4629
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0344
Cornell University
Office of Sponsored Programs, 373 Pine Tree Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 255-4452

ID#: N10A-029-0533
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T029       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: The Deceptive Language Processing Framework: Fusing Top-Down and Bottom-Up Approaches to Deception Discovery
Abstract: The exponential growth of text-based communication associated with the Internet has lead to a vast increase in the amount of unstructured messages that open source intelligence needs to process. This increase has lead to the need to develop methods for facilitating the detection of deception in various forms of text-based messages, from chat rooms, emails, weblogs, to text messaging. Methods are required to discover hidden messages, hostile disinformation, and author misrepresentation. To address the critical need of marrying theoretical and computational approaches to deception detection, Intelligent Automation, Inc. (IAI) proposes to develop a novel Deceptive Language Processing (DLP) framework for deception analysis of large-scale quantities of text. DLP synthesizes social and psychological theory with computational techniques (e.g., natural language processing, data mining) for modeling the relationships between discourse and deception in its various forms.

Intelligent Automation, Inc.
15400 Calhoun Drive, Suite 400
Rockville, MD 20855
(301) 294-5221

PI: Renato Levy
(301) 294-5241
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0284
The Pennsylvania State University
329 Reber Building,
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 865-6377

ID#: N10A-038-0383
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T038       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Real-time In-situ Adaptation of Decision Parameters for Undersea Target Tracking in a Sensor Field
Abstract: Network-centric command and control of complex military missions (e.g., anti-submarine warfare, collaborative mine hunting, etc.) calls for cost-effective designs that can dynamically tradeoff multiple conflicting objectives. Often these optimizations have to be carried out at a higher level, and the associated control directives have to be disseminated down to a distributed system, thereby, influencing its behavior. The key innovations in the proposed effort are twofold: 1) mathematical formulation and algorithm development of real-time in-situ decision-parameter adaptation for undersea target tracking in a sensor field, and 2) development of an enhanced composable cross-layer simulator for realistic undersea communication to validate the proposed algorithms. This research will be jointly conducted by Penn State University and IAI under the technical direction of Prof. Asok Ray of Penn State University. Penn State University will lead the research on formulation of multi-objective-optimization and language-measure-theoretic decision tools and the associated software development at the preliminary stage. These software tools will be developed and modified by IAI for implementation on the simulation test-bed; the software development efforts will address emulation of communication problems in the undersea network environment.

Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation
2363 Calle Del Mundo,
Santa Clara, CA 95054
(408) 565-9004

PI: Behzad Moslehi
(408) 565-9004
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0352
Georgia Institute of Technology
Georgia Institute of Technolog,
Atlanta, GA 30332
(404) 894-3235

ID#: N10A-016-0353
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T016       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: A Fiber-Optic-Based External Pipe Sound Pressure Level Sensing System
Abstract: Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) and Georgia Tech propose a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) integrated sensor system capable of measuring the pipe wall "breathing mode" in order to infer the fluid-borne sound pressure level (SPL) in a pipe. The proposed new measurement technique makes it possible to externally measure the fluid-borne sound level in a noisy piping system. The state-of-art FBG sensors will be capable of measuring vibrations of the pipe wall external surface for monitoring SPL in real-time with high sensitivity and high degree of accuracy. IFOS-Georgia Tech innovation is to develop and implement such FBGs as SPL sensors to be surface-mounted on pipelines in a removable configuration facilitating installation and operation in the field. Advanced signal processing and SPL calculation algorithms as well as computer models will be applied for simulation purposes. Potentially, the solution could evolve into an autonomous onboard monitoring system to inspect and perform Non-Destructive Evaluation and piping system, valves and pumps health monitoring.

Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation
2363 Calle Del Mundo,
Santa Clara, CA 95054
(408) 565-9004

PI: Richard Black
(408) 565-9000
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0300
University of Florida
University of Florida,
Gainsville, FL 32611
(352) 846-0665

ID#: N10A-042-0486
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T042       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: End-to-end Naval Asset Damage Detection System
Abstract: IFOS will demonstrate the feasibility of a minimalistic, yet powerful, distributed network of piezoelectric actuators and ultrasonic wave detecting fiber optic Bragg grating (FBG) sensors interrogated by a high frequency parallel processing FBG interrogator together with innovative mathematical and computational algorithms to process, store and visualize (via damage index maps) massive amounts of data generated from said system to enable quantitative structural health monitoring of Naval assets (ships and aircraft). The goal is development of a complete and detailed assessment of the material or structural condition well before any visible signs of deterioration develop by using a permanently installed network of FBG sensors and actuators and interrogating them only during scheduled stops or during scheduled maintenance intervals. The initial focus will be on material state accuracy rather than computational speed. In Phase I, IFOS will develop a lab bench prototype material state awareness distributed network of sensors and actuators. In Phase II, IFOS will scale up the system to enable interrogation of structures with much greater size and with much more diverse structural details such as structural ribs, stiffeners and bulkheads as well as complex composite construction such as sandwich core or rib stiffened structures.

Iris Technology Corporation
PO Box 5838,
Irvine, CA 92616
(949) 975-8410

PI: Carl Kirkconnell
(949) 975-8410
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0247
Georgia Institute of Technology
School of Mechanical Engineer,
Atlanta, GA 30332
(404) 894-3746

ID#: N10A-026-0431
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T026       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Tactical 4 K Cryocooler: Study and Architecture Definition
Abstract: Iris Technology, in collaboration with Georgia Tech and Raytheon, proposes to perform advanced 3D CFD modeling to guide the architecture selection for a tactical 4K Cryocooler. Iris will lead the System Design and Program Management efforts. Georgia Tech is the lead organization on the Analysis. Raytheon is providing the underlying mechanical cryocooler technology. The preliminary technical baseline is a three stage Raytheon hybrid Stirling / pulse tube cryocooler. The first stage is a Stirling stage, which provides gravitational insensitivity, high efficiency, and operational adjustability. The second and third stages are pulse tubes to avoid the cost and complexity of moving cryogenic seals that additional Stirling stages would require. CFD and other modeling techniques will be pursued to either show that the baseline provides the best technical solution or to select an alternative, probably all pulse tube, design.

JEM Engineering, LLC
8683 Cherry Lane,
Laurel, MD 20707
(301) 317-1070

PI: David Auckland
(301) 317-1070
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0326
University of Delaware
Research Office, 210 Hullihen Hall
Newark, DE 19716
(302) 833-2136

ID#: N10A-021-0232
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T021       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Wideband Metamaterial Antennas Integrated into Composite Structures
Abstract: A broadband antenna, having more than a 100:1 bandwidth,is integrated with a high impedance surface that is compatible with the manufacturing processes associated with with Navy topside panel constructions and marine vehicle armor. The high impedance surface (also known as an artificial magnetic conductor, or AMC) can be tuned to discrete frequency bands using voltage-variable capacitors and the operating range of each band maintained using newly developed magnetic materials.

JM Harwood, LLC
3054 Leeman Ferry Rd., Suite D,
Huntsville, AL 35801
(636) 459-8398

PI: Michael Harwood
(256) 489-0086
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0271
U of A Huntsville
S225 Technology Hall,
Huntsville, AL 35899
(256) 824-7200

ID#: N10A-033-0113
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T033       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Miniature Electronic DFI for 5-20 Hp HFE
Abstract: JM Harwood, LLC, and UAH Propulsion Research Center propose the development of an electronic miniature Direct Fuel Injection (DFI) system for 5-20 hp heavy fuel engines. This highly integrated Very Small Injection Technology (V- SInTech) DFI system will be capable of (a) multiple injections per cycle, (b) variable injection timing, (c) variable spray penetration depth, (d) real-time closed loop modification of injection timing to account for fuel properties, and (e) multi- fuel operation over a broad range of operating conditions. The proposed Phase I will expand the capability of a baseline V-SInTech DFI and ECU previously demonstrated. The V-SInTech DFI will produce fine atomization and precise control of the injection timing / fuel metering even at part-throttle conditions. The target engine for the Phase II demonstration of the V-SInTech DFI system is a heavy fuel, bolt-in replacement for the 3W-56 currently used in Honeywell’s g-MAV UAV. The proposed Phase I will conduct four tasks. These will include (1) quantifying the relationship between critical control parameters, design parameters, and injector performance; (2) characterizing the baseline injector’s spray; (3) updating the baseline injector design, and (4) identifying required additions to the ECU architecture.

JP Accelerator Works, Inc.
2245 47th Street,
Los Alamos, NM 87544
(505) 690-8701

PI: James Potter
(505) 690-8701
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0328
Los Alamos National Laboratory
P.O. BOX 1663,
Los Alamos, NM 87545
(505) 667-5657

ID#: N10A-023-0711
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T023       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Development of High-Efficiency, High Power Electron Beam Accelerator Technologies
Abstract: This research investigates the feasibility of improving operational readiness, reliability and availability of high current cryogenic rf linear accelerators using a cryogenic compatible resonant coupling technique to couple all of the accelerator sections together, including any room temperature portion. This technique guarantees a single resonant frequency for the system insuring rapid turn on. The accelerator field amplitudes and phases are locked together without any critical tuning of individual components. This approach also makes the system inherently an ideal rf power combiner and allows operation even if an rf unit is off line.

KAB LABORATORIES INC.
1110 Rosecrans Street, #203,
San Diego, CA 92106
(619) 523-1763

PI: John Helewa
(619) 523-1763
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0291
University of California, San Diego
Department of Mechanical and A, 9500 Gilman Drive
La Jolla, CA 92093
(858) 822-3477

ID#: N10A-044-0725
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T044       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Adaptive Fleet Synthetic Scenario Research
Abstract: Synthetic scenario-based training of Navy personnel in the use of Navy SIGINT/IO systems has helped to reduce training costs, and it has enabled the personnel to be trained in an environment that sufficiently approximates real-world situations that could not otherwise be accomplished within the class room. However, scenario development is highly complex and involves a great deal of human effort and domain knowledge, discouraging the modification of existing scenarios to keep them current in an ever-changing threat environment. This problem is exacerbated when the scenario represents a combination of multiple data sources. The proposed research will show that the use of static models and companion correlation modules during scenario creation will reduce the complexity of scenario development and reduce the domain knowledge required. Static models can be devised to encapsulate domain knowledge for a particular data source, and correlation can be used to fuse the output from each static model to produce a cohesive scenario. To enable autonomic generation and regeneration of multi-source scenarios, the proposed research will also address service composibility and data heterogeneity among the participating static models and correlation modules. Finally, the proposed research will investigate human-computer interfaces for guiding the scenario developer through the autonomic process.

Kapteyn-Murnane Laboratories Inc.
1855 South 57th Court,
Boulder, CO 80301
(303) 544-9068

PI: Daisy Raymondson
(303) 544-9068
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0240
Colorado School of Mines
1523 Illinois St.,
Golden, CO 80401
(303) 273-3405

ID#: N10A-012-0689
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T012       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: High Efficiency Gain Media for Eye-Safer 1.55 µm Ultrafast Fiber Amplifiers
Abstract: We propose to design a high average power Er:Fiber ultrafast laser system which is pumped at 14xxnm, and at the same time solve other problems related to ultrashort pulses in fiber lasers. The advantage of using 14xxnm pumping is the reduction of the standard quantum defect from 37% to 5%, thus greatly reducing the thermal load on the system, which makes it inherently more efficient. We also intend to construct an Er:fiber oscillator based on a new potentially rugged modelocking mechanism, which includes the positive dispersion regime known to reduce adverse non-linear effects in the gain medium. From this, and research into new fiber materials (Nufern), we will design a full amplified ultrafast laser system for implementation in Phase II.

Kinetic BEI, LLC
2197 Brookwood Dr.,
South Elgin, IL 60177
(616) 837-8975

PI: Mike Boruta
(847) 628-4709
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0270
Southwest Research Institute
6220 Culebra Road,
San Antonio, TX 78238
(210) 684-5111

ID#: N10A-033-0067
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T033       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Development of Electronic Controlled Fuel Injector and Pump Suitable for 5-20 Horsepower Diesel Cycle Engines
Abstract: Kinetic BEI intends to design an electronically controlled, common rail, heavy fuel injection system suitable for application on engines in the 5-20 Hp range. The system will feature a Micro Fuel Injector and Micro Pump that are currently under development. This Phase I STTR will focus on developing the complete heavy fuel injection system, complete with an electronic controller. It will also facilitate development of higher pressure micro injectors and pumps, and fund the exploration of piezo actuation for better injector performance. This additional research and development effort will ultimately increase the odds of success, and speed up the timeline for application of this technology on current and future small engine development programs. The opportunity to expand the research and development of this miniature/micro fuel injection system through a Phase I STTR program will have far-reaching implications in both the military and commercial engine development programs.

Kitware
28 Corporate Drive,
Clifton Park, NY 12065
(518) 371-3971

PI: Jeffrey Baumes
(518) 371-3971
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0342
UC Irvine
Office of Research Admin,
Irvine, CA 92697
(949) 824-3428

ID#: N10A-029-0416
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T029       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Using Stylistic Topic Models to Detect Deception Through Unusual Linguistic Activity
Abstract: Analysts are faced with the challenge of sifting through enormous quantities of documents, blog posts, communications, etc. to find deceptive behaviors. We propose novel techniques for efficiently and automatically detecting deception on large data with high accuracy by using methodologies from both stylometry and topic modeling. This combined approach will learn models of authors and will detect unusual behavior based on their unconscious writing style or their topical content, or a combination of both. A comprehensive system will make the algorithmic results accessible through a web service to an intuitive user interface with search, drill-down, and cross-referencing with custom visualizations. This will allow analysts to quickly see the current big picture activity and also to discover particular events or trends of interest. The text analysis expertise of University of California Irvine and the software and visualization expertise of Kitware will provide the correct skill set to build these tools. Phase I will assess the feasibility of the algorithmic and visualization techniques needed for this system.

Los Gatos Research
67 East Evelyn Ave., Suite 3
Mountain View, CA 94041
(650) 965-7772

PI: An-Dien Nguyen
(650) 965-7772
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0312
Arizona State University
Arizona State University,
Tempe, AZ 85287
(480) 965-9342

ID#: N10A-042-0343
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T042       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: An Integrated Physics-Based Framework for Detecting Precursor to Damage in Naval Structures
Abstract: Aging aircraft commonly suffers from several types of degradation including fatigue cracking and lack of bonding. It is virtually impossible to predict degradation in structural performance or when a component or structure will fail due to the inability to test new material systems under all loading conditions and under all environmental conditions. A material state awareness system using minimalistic, powerful, distributed network of sensors and actuators needs to be developed to provide precise material state condition specification before any visual sign of damage develops. In this proposal, we propose to develop a quantitative structural health monitoring system based on a fiber-optic strain and Lamb waves interrogation technique combined with a multiscale modeling algorithm to predict damage precursor and perform crack detection and monitoring in aircraft and shipboard components with high accuracy and high sensitivity. During the Phase I and Phase I Option periods of this project, we will demonstrate the feasibility of developing a compact optical fiber-based structural health monitoring system combined with an integrated physics-based framework for detecting precursor to damage in Naval structures.

Mainstream Engineering Corporation
200 Yellow Place, Pines Industrial Center
Rockledge, FL 32955
(321) 631-3550

PI: Joesph Homitz
(321) 631-6335
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0272
University of Wisconsin
21 N. Park Avenue, Suite 6401
Madison, WI 53715
(608) 262-3822

ID#: N10A-033-0740
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T033       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: A Fast-Response, Electronically Controlled Fuel Injection System for Small Heavy Fuel Engines with Multi-Fuel Capabilities
Abstract: Advances in electronically controlled injection technologies for diesel engines have provided a method to improve medium- to heavy-duty engine performance through increased injection pressures, multiple injections, and injection rate shaping. Although these injection systems have been primarily limited to larger engines, the ability to rapidly and precisely meter fuel for smaller engines is particularly important for small ground-based and UAV engines. With small ground-based and UAV engines, electronically controlled fuel injection could be used to improve fuel efficiency, increase power density, reduce noise, and/or reduce emissions. The ability to meter fuel rapidly would allow precise control of small UAV engines at high rpm. Mainstream proposes to develop a fast-response, electronically controlled fuel injection system (including the injector, pump, and control system) for engines in the 5-20 hp range through innovative improvements to existing technology. The system will have multi-fuel capability and will be packaged to allow retrofitting to existing engines. In Phase I, Mainstream and the University of Wisconsin, a leader in the field of internal combustion research, will carry out an experimental evaluation to prove the feasibility and value of the proposed improvements. In Phase II, the team will fabricate and evaluate an integrated system with an operational engine.

Mainstream Engineering Corporation
200 Yellow Place, Pines Industrial Center
Rockledge, FL 32955
(321) 631-3550

PI: Thomas Lasko
(321) 631-3550
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0282
Florida Institue of Technology
150 West University Blvd,
Melbourne, FL 32901
(321) 674-7239

ID#: N10A-037-0752
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T037       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Innovative Passive Magnetic Thrust Bearings for High-Speed Turbomachinery
Abstract: In miniature gas turbines for UAV applications, traditional bearings exhibit a typical lifetime of only 25 hours due to excessive axial loading. Mainstream proposes to use a passive, permanent magnet thrust bearing to alleviate this problem and increase service life to over 1000 hours. Since this type of bearing is non-contacting, it can operate at very high rotational speeds with minimal heat generation and extended operating life. Mainstream has already performed a preliminary design for this thrust bearing which is small, lightweight, and requires no power or active control. The bearing geometry has already been optimized for size and weight and our simulations have shown that the bearing achieves the required 200 N bidirectional force capacity while maintaining an axial tolerance of ± 0.1 mm and a size that is competitive with traditional bearings. The design also provides a mechanism for passive damping to mitigate vibrations in the axial direction. In addition, this novel geometry lends itself well to mass production and is flexible enough to easily allow scaling to different sizes and capacities. In Phase I, Mainstream and Florida Institute of Technology will design, fabricate, and test a prototype thrust bearing and prepare for Phase II integration and production.

Materials & Electrochemical Research (MER) Corp.
7960 S. Kolb Rd.,
Tucson, AZ 85756
(520) 574-1980

PI: Vladimir Shapovalov
(520) 574-1980
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0436
Southwest Research Institute
6220 Culebra Road,
San Antonio, TX 78238
(210) 522-5698

ID#: N10A-001-0440
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T001       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: AHigh Power Density Rotary Engine for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
Abstract: Internal combustion engines with power-to-weight ratios significantly higher than 1 Hp/lb which operate on low flash point fuels are enabling for powering Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Conventional Otto, Diesel and Wankel cycle engines even if constructed in advanced light-weight materials cannot meet the required power-to-weight and volume ratios and have high cost. A breakthrough in engine design, operational simplicity and ability to efficiently burn heavy fuels (JP-5, JP-8, DS2) has been demonstrated in a small 2 Hp engine exhibiting 1.1 Hp/lb which has been termed VS- engine. This patented VS-engine when constructed in advanced light-weight materials can be projected to produce power-to-weight ratios in the 1.5 – 2.5 Hp/lb, power-volume ratio approximately 7.5 Hp/in3, power density of 200 – 300 Hp/ft3, and produced at approximately ½ the cost of an Otto engine. In a joint program with Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), the VS-engine will be modeled utilizing advanced materials to define performance potential, and an engine will be produced in advanced materials and operated with heavy fuels to demonstrate exemplary performance.

Materials & Electrochemical Research (MER) Corp.
7960 S. Kolb Rd.,
Tucson, AZ 85756
(520) 574-1980

PI: James Withers
(520) 574-1980
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0306
Institute for Adv. Technology
University of Texas at Austin, 3925 West Braker Lane
Austin, TX 78759
(512) 471-6424

ID#: N10A-025-0248
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T025       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: A Plasma Process to Apply Refractory Metal Coatings to Continuous Lengths of Copper Alloy Rails
Abstract: High strength copper alloys are preferred as the base rails for railguns due to their combination of strength and electrical and thermal conductivity, but suffer damage due to high current densities, arcing, gouging, and exposure to molten aluminum armatures. A refractory metal/alloy coating on the copper base alloy is an attractive approach for increasing rail life if the refractory metal coating remains adherent and withstands the thermal transients and other phenomena that usually limit shot life. A plasma process can apply the refractory metal/alloys from a molten state that provides a functionally graded interface resulting in adhesion at least equivalent to the base copper alloy strength. The plasma coating process can produce the refractory metal/alloy-copper base in continuous length, and with arbitrary cross-sections. In a team with the University of Texas (UT), the plasma refractory metal/alloy process will produce rail coupons for railgun testing at UT and demonstration that continuous lengths are producible.

MATERIALS TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION
57 MARYANNE DRIVE,
MONROE, CT 06468
(203) 874-3100

PI: Serkan Ozbay
(203) 874-3100
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0447
Georgia Institute of Technology
270 Ferst Drive,
Atlanta, GA 30332
(404) 894-8201

ID#: N10A-003-0664
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T003       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Characterizing the Impact of Control Surfaces Free-Play on Flutter
Abstract: Free-play nonlinearity of the control surfaces has a direct impact on aircraft’s dynamic stability characteristics. . It is impossible to design and manufacture a control surface with zero free-play. As control surface free-play increases, tighter limits must be imposed on the aircraft mission capability. Typically, researchers have utilized an oversimplified piecewise-linear torque-rotation relationship to assess the impact of control surface free-play on flutter. This simplistic approach fails to consider the effects of complex dynamic phenomena, such as intermittent contact and friction between surfaces, that occur as control surface moves from free-play region to non-free-play region and vice versa. Materials Technologies Corporation and Georgia Tech propose an advanced structural analysis tool for characterizing the impact of control surfaces free-play on flutter based on the nonlinear multibody dynamics analysis concept. In our approach, the complete hardware of the wing structure, including the mechanism that results in free-play, are modeled as individual dynamic elements; capturing the complex dynamic phenomena occurring at the transition region of free- play. Phase I concept feasibility of our multibody dynamics based approach will be demonstrated through comparisons between the numerical predictions and subsonic wind tunnel test results for horizontal tails. Proposed approach will be further refined and validated in Phase II with transonic and supersonic wind tunnel tests. Once developed, our innovative tool will provide a quick construction of the structural model, and accurate prediction of the stability behavior of control surfaces with free-play.

M-DOT Aerospace
3418 South 48th Street, Suite 3,
Phoenix, AZ 85040
(480) 921-4128

PI: Bryan Seegers
(480) 752-1911
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0280
University of Texas at Arlington
Box 19018 500 W. First Street, Woolf Hall 213
Arlington, TX 76019
(817) 272-7620

ID#: N10A-037-0216
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T037       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Low-Cost Ball/Air/Magnetic Hybrid Bearing System for Extended-Life Micro Gas Turbine Engines
Abstract: The Team of M-DOT Aerospace and University of Texas, Arlington propose to analyze, construct and test a 40 mm foil thrust bearing featuring a unique bump foil concept and top-foil profile designed by Dr. Daejong Kim. The design is simple, affording low production cost in high quantity. The design can be adapted for use on small gas turbines, small turbochargers and any small rotating machine that requires extreme speed, long life and suitable axial load capacity. The Phase I Base effort involves analyzing, building and testing a foil thrust bearing with 200N axial thrust capacity in either direction with estimated life exceeding 1000 hours at 100,000 rpm. A Phase II test engine will be selected and Phase II program planned. The Option effort involves preliminary modeling and analysis of an 8mm bore, hybrid bearing system suitable for use on the Phase II test engine. The Option effort will help alleviate potential Phase II hardware lead time issues. M-DOT is fully capable of mass producing the bearing in high quantity and has numerous products that will benefit from the development of this bearing including: microturbojets, turboalternators, micro turbochargers and small high-speed electric blowers for SOFC use.

Metis Design Corporation
10 Canal Park, Suite 601
Cambridge, MA 02141
(617) 661-5616

PI: Seth Kessler
(617) 661-5616
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0301
U.C. San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, Mail Code 0934
La Jolla, CA 92093
(858) 534-0247

ID#: N10A-042-0344
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T042       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Impedance-based Sensing Optimization & Algorithms for Visualization of Ship Hull Structural Health Monitoring Data
Abstract: The implementation of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems into naval applications has been hindered due to component quantity, including sensors, power/communication cables, and acquisition/computation units, as well as data quality. Particularly for large-area applications such ship hulls, complexity of implied system infrastructure can be impractical, and data can be worthless with attenuation and EMI pickup on long analog cables. The payoff of reliable real-time SHM would be the ability to detect/characterize in-situ damage for condition-based maintenance, thereby greatly reducing overall life-cycle costs. Metis Design Corporation (MDC) has demonstrated point-of-measurement datalogging and digital sensor-busing during prior Phase II SBIR work, which minimizes SHM infrastructure and EMI susceptibility. During the proposed STTR effort, MDC will further exploit this SHM architecture to satisfy Navy mission requirements. Phase I will have 2 main research thrusts: optimization of an impedance-based damage characterization method, and development of diagnostic visualization tools. UCSD will adapt their piezo-impedance method to be compatible with MDC hardware, optimize size/placement, and develop/calibrate diagnostic algorithms. MDC will facilitate the UCSD detection method with their mature SHM infrastructure, and provide a state-of-the-art graphical interface for visualization of diagnostic results in support of blind validation testing. Phase II would extend this tool to include prognostics.

MetroLaser, Inc.
8 Chrysler,
Irvine, CA 92618
(949) 553-0688

PI: James Trolinger
(949) 553-0688
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0249
The Regents of the U of CA-Irvine
Office of Research Admin., 300 University Tower
Irvine, CA 92697
(949) 824-2644

ID#: N10A-027-0016
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T027       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Probing Dense Sprays with Gated, Picosecond, Digital Particle Field Holography
Abstract: This is a proposal to develop a unique, robust, fieldable, gated, picosecond, digital holography system for characterizing dense particle fields under harsh conditions. Many powerful imaging methods have failed to fulfill this requirement because noise from multiple scattering buries the signal needed to acquire a useful image. Solutions to this limitation are very expensive, hard to implement, and not ideal candidates for field experiments. The proposed innovation applies digital holography and picosecond gating to limit the amount of noise sufficiently to enable high resolution, 3D imaging, effectively generalizing existing pseudo-ballistic imaging systems that have been demonstrated in dense fields. State of the art components in multiple fields are combined to produce a new sensor concept that will be extremely useful in the experimental study of dense sprays and other particles fields. Digital holography of this form can provide a detailed look at the structure of all of the particles in an essentially unlimited three dimensional sample volume.

Mimosa Acoustics, Inc.
335 N. Fremont St.,
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 359-9740

PI: Patricia Jeng
(217) 359-9740
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0269
University of Illinois
Office of Sponsored Programs, 1901 South Florida St Suite A
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-2187

ID#: N10A-032-0763
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T032       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Insert ear-probe assembly for high-quality otoacoustic-emission (OAE) measurements in adults
Abstract: Recently there has been a push to get otoacoustic emission (OAE) testing into adult hearing-conservation programs, because the early stages of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), and susceptibility to NIHL, can be detected with OAEs. OAEs are sounds made by healthy inner ears in response to acoustic stimulation and are measured in the ear canal with a miniature microphone. One impediment to OAE testing on a large scale, such as in military HCPs, is the lack of a high-quality, reliable, and cheap ear-probe, which houses the miniature microphone and sound transducers. The technical merit and feasibility of a new OAE ear probe will be evaluated, and technical specifications drawn up. The new probe will perform at least as well, if not better, than the leading ear probes (ILO and ER10C) on a wide range of acoustic and ergonomic properties important to OAE testing. The trade-offs among various acoustical properties will be evaluated, allowing for the best choice of parameters for use in HCPs. The new probe will also have characteristics necessary for pure-tone audiometry screening and middle-ear reflectance, both of which are necessary - along with OAEs - for an all-in-one HCP screening system.

MZA Associates Corporation
2021 Girard SE, Suite 150
Albuquerque, NM 87106
(505) 245-9970

PI: DeLesley Hutchins
(505) 245-9970
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0250
University of California Santa Cruz
1156 High Street,
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-5375

ID#: N10A-035-0312
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T035       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Mathematically Rigorous Methods for Determining Software Quality
Abstract: Current software development and testing methodologies are inadequate for validating software in mission-critical applications. As Dijstra famously stated: "testing can be used to show the presence of bugs, but never to show their absence." When lives and national security is at stake, there is a need for mathematically rigorous techniques that can verify the absence of bugs. We propose to develop a framework for software verification and validation using the technique of type-based static analysis. Type theory, and static analysis using types, has been extensively studied in the academic literature, but most of that research has not yet been used to build real-world tools for software verification. Type-based static analysis is both powerful and mathematically rigorous, and offers significant advantages in terms of scalability and modularity over competing techniques. Our proposed framework will be capable of analyzing code written in C, C++, Java, C#, and other languages, and will be able to analyze both source code and compiled binaries. The framework will use automatic type inference to derive appropriate safety properties for common programming patterns, but will also allow the user to supply annotations that guide the analysis algorithms when proving more difficult properties.

N&R Engineering
6659 Pearl Road, Suite #201
Cleveland, OH 44130
(440) 845-7020

PI: Vinod Nagpal
(440) 845-7020
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0420
University of Arizon
1130 N. Mountain,
Tucson, AZ 85721
(520) 621-6113

ID#: N10A-010-0559
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T010       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Analysis and Modeling of Foreign Object Damage (FOD) in Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs)
Abstract: The Phase I deliverable will be a physic-based model which represents a CMC gas turbine component concomitantly at the material level and the structural level. This model will be probabilistically analyzed to account for the uncertainties in material properties and the uncertainties in the size and impact velocities of possible foreign objects (FOD). A ceramic material must display sufficient capability to withstand the degrading effects that arise from external events such as FOD impacts. In addition to withstanding impact events, the CMC must be able to resist crack propagation through the thickness resulting from FOD induced surface flaws. Further issues of concern: 1) the possibility of impacting materials scratching off the environmental barrier coating (EBC) coating and the subsequent consequences. 2) Given constant environmental attack of a CMC combustor liner due to the vaporization of salty air/water, the rate and sizes of EBC debris that loosen and then impact on turbine nozzle guide vanes. The delivered phase I tool will provide the means to cost effectively investigate and resolve these issues in a phase II effort. An application demonstration problem is specified, such as a rotor blade or a vane.

NanoMason
610 The Parkway,
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 220-8807

PI: Norimasa Yoshimizu
(607) 216-8263
Contract #: N00014-11-M-0361
Cornell University
118 Phillips Hall, Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14853
(607) 255-9374

ID#: N10A-043-0816
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T043       Awarded:&nb 10/18/2010
Title: Miniature, Portable, Device to Detect and Monitor Coagulopathy
Abstract: Conventional coagulation tests use an isolated portion of the blood coagulation cycle to assess blood function by activating pathways of the cycle via chemical additives. Thromboelastography (TEG) is an effective tool for monitoring the entire coagulation cycle as a whole from a physical standpoint i.e. from the clot formation to fibrinolysis. Information about the quality and dynamics of clot formation can also be derived. However, current TEG devices are large and bulky which require up to 30 minutes for estimating critical coagulation parameters. Also, activating coagulation by precise rotation of its cuvette is a delicate process, and there is significant data processing to extract the reaction and clot formation times, and maximum amplitude to finally determine the coagulation index. Therefore, there is a need for a fast, low cost, portable, and rugged device to monitor blood coagulation during blood component therapy in remote sites for treating traumatic injuries. We will develop a technology to monitor fluid viscosity and shear-dependent viscosity by using longitudinal and flexural modes of microfabricated silicon probes. These devices will enable real-time monitoring of whole blood coagulation without the addition of anticoagulants.

Nanotrons, Co
15 Cabot Road,
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 935-1200

PI: Je Lee
(781) 935-1200
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0314
University of Massachusetts Lowell
Office of Research Administrat, 600 Suffolk Street, 2nd Floor
Lowell, MA 01854
(978) 934-4723

ID#: N10A-031-0434
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T031       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Low Cost High-rate Manufacturing of Flexible Explosive Detection Sensor
Abstract: Nanotrons Corporation, in collaboration with Professor Byungki Kim at NSF Nanomanufacturing Research Center at the University of Massachusetts Lowell (UML), proposes to develop the low-cost high-rate manufacturing technique for flexible explosive detection sensors to significantly increase sensitivity of detection of trinitrotoluene (TNT) explosives. The new approach combines cutting-edge nanomaterial development and manufacture at Nanotrons with the extensive experience in sensors and detector and nanomanufacturing within the UML team. By dispersing chemically converted graphene into interdigitated electrode arrays, novel explosive-material detection sensors will be fabricated. The resulting sensors can detect very low concentrations of vapor components of TNT such as nitrogen oxides (NO2) and 2,4,-dinitrotoluene (DNT) indicating their ideal application for threat detection (i.e., suicide bomb, roadside bomb, and landmines) sensors. Nanotrons’ proposed sensors can be economically manufactured on flexible polymeric substrates by using large-scale and low-cost roll-to-roll production processes. The production of these sensors also can be monitored and controlled in real time using integrated in-line quality assurance system. Additionally, since these sensors can detect chemical warfare agents (i.e., HCN, CEES, DMMP) and ammonia gas (NH3), their application can be extended to many military and commercial gas detection applications. This Phase I will demonstrate the feasibility of our proposed approach.

Nastec, Inc.
5310 W. 161st Street- Suite G,
Brookpark, OH 44142
(216) 464-8388

PI: Robert Fusaro
(440) 826-1693
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0281
University of Toledo
Nitschke Hall 4005,
Toledo, OH 43606
(419) 530-8210

ID#: N10A-037-0678
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T037       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Low-Cost Ball/Air/Magnetic Hybrid Bearing System for Extended-Life Micro Gas Turbine Engines
Abstract: A unique type of air lubricated thrust bearing called a Wave Bearing is proposed to assist a rolling element bearing to carry the thrust load and to improve the bearing’s life when used in a micro gas turbine engine. The Wave Bearing technology will provide improved reliability, safety and life compared to rolling element bearings used alone, as well as to allow simplification of engine design and reduced costs. When compared to its alternatives, the Wave Bearing has distinct advantages. It is much simpler than a Magnetic Bearing and it is less prone to wear than a Foil Bearing. In the proposed Phase I program, computer codes developed by Dr. Dimofte, will be used to adapt the Wave Bearing to the design requirements relevant to the micro gas turbine engines. Test conditions will be thrust loads to 200N, speeds to 100,000 rpm and durations sufficient to prove the demo. The Wave Bearing will be developed and tested in Phase I to assure with reasonable engineering certainty that it is a viable candidate for use in a micro gas turbine engine and the testing will verify that more extensive testing should be conducted in Phase II.

NextGen Aeronautics
2780 Skypark Drive, Suite 400
Torrance, CA 90505
(310) 626-8384

PI: Rob Bortolin
(310) 626-8389
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0324
Sn Diego State University
Sponsored Research Development, 5250 Campanile Dr
San Diego, CA 92182
(619) 594-5938

ID#: N10A-021-0299
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T021       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Wideband Metamaterial Antennas Integrated into Composite Structures
Abstract: A team led by NextGen Aeronautics Inc., and working with San Diego State University proposes the development of redundant wideband antennas that are embedded in composite armor structures The planned work builds upon the team’s extensive prior experience in conformal load-bearing antenna structures (CLAS), antenna design, and metamaterials. The proposed antenna is a combination of concepts that have already been designed and tested for different purposes, and have proven their capacity to operate under the determined conditions while meeting solicitation requirements. At the end of Phase I base period, we will have simulations of various antenna designs, configurations, and materials pointing to a combination that works optimally with the baseline composite structure chosen, as well as a list of different materials and their impact on the design. This research will also determine the frequencies, bandwidth and waveforms to which this technology is most applicable. Further efforts in the Phase I option will include fabricating and testing a mockup antenna.

NextGen Aeronautics
2780 Skypark Drive, Suite 400
Torrance, CA 90505
(310) 626-8384

PI: Cesar delSolar
(310) 626-8365
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0315
University of Illinois, Chicago
Department of Mechan, University of Illinois at Chic
Chicago, IL 60607
(312) 413-5196

ID#: N10A-031-0290
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T031       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: High-rate Manufacturing of Structural-state Sensors (MOSS)
Abstract: The goal of the proposed research is the development of a high-volume, low-cost manufacturing along with a novel deposition process that enables fabrication of a structural-state electronic system-on film. This hybrid electronic system contains a multifunctional sensor suite that can measure a structure's static (such as deformation, stress and strain) and dynamic state (such as slow or under acceleration). This electronic system consists of SSM patches that have been populated with sensors that have been solution-processed onto a flexible substrate. During the 7-month base Phase I effort, NextGen and UIC will develop (1) a high-volume manufacturing process, (2) a novel deposition approach for fabricated high-performance sensors, and (3) an electronic system on film. During Phase II, the design, fabrication, and testing of an array of organic strain sensors will be accomplished. Whereas in Phase I, the structural state sensing device or strain sensor was a laboratory test article, the Phase II product will be a strain sensor prototype array with more specific application performance requirements. The Technology Readiness Level (TRL) during Phase I will be elevated from a 2 to a 3. A Phase II effort would increase all three technologies to a TRL of 5.

Northwest UAV Propulsion Systems
2717 NE Bunn Road,
Mcminnville, OR 97128
(503) 539-9370

PI: Chris Pellegrino
(503) 434-6845
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0456
Oregon State University
Industrial and Manufacturing,
Corvallis, OR 97331
(541) 737-8272

ID#: N10A-001-0475
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T001       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Advanced Materials for the Design of Lightweight JP5/JP8/DS2 Fueled Engines for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs)
Abstract: Northwest UAV Propulsion Systems proposes using our purpose built heavy fuel engine designed and built in the USA for small unmanned aerial systems in the tier 2 & 3 class. We will be adding a lightweight ceramic material set combined with FEA (Finite Element Analysis) and heavy fuel atomizer (IRAD Project) to create a lightweight engine for a SUAS or STUAS class UAVs. The Ceramic material set is added to portions of the NWUAV 34cc engine to take advantage of performance enhancements like the ability to retain heat and operate at high temperatures. We propose using materials such as silicon nitride and enhancing the processing characteristics and properties of Si3N4 by using nanoparticle additions to micron-sized powders in polymer suspensions. Work will be performed by Oregon State University with engineering assistance and testing to be performed by NWUAV.

NP Photonics, Inc.
UA Science and Technology Park, 9030 S. Rita Road, Suite #120
Tucson, AZ 85747
(520) 799-7424

PI: Dan Nguyen
(520) 799-7419
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0298
University of Arizona
Sponsored Projects Services, PO Box 3520
Tucson, AZ 85722
(520) 626-6000

ID#: N10A-017-0330
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T017       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Optical Cooling of RF systems using an All Optical Fiber Approach
Abstract: We propose an all-fiber approach to heat removal from devices such as high-power RF amplifiers. In our approach, the cooling fiber segment, the pump fiber laser, and the optical fiber used for photon waste removal are all integrated into a single fiber configuration. NP Photonics' high efficiency thulium-doped fiber lasers are used to pump high purity thulium-doped glass fibers, which provide the cooling action on the affixed heat source. Our system has several key advantages compared to conventional bulk glass systems. Its cooling power benefits from high optical confinement in the thulium-doped fiber core. Second, heat removal and waste photon piping into the fiber occur in the same location (the cooling fiber segment), increasing the fraction of heat that can be dumped at a remote location. Fiber Bragg gratings, which are transparent to the waste photons and thus minimize fluorescence reabsorption, will be used for enhancing pump absorption. In Phase I, cooling fibers are based on germanate host glass, but in Phase II other host glasses such as ZBLAN and telluride can also be investigated. Theoretical modeling of optical cooling in our cooling fiber and thermal modeling of the entire fiber cooler will be performed in parallel with the experiments.

ObjectVideo
11600 Sunrise Valley Drive, Suite # 290
Reston, VA 20191
(703) 654-9314

PI: Gaurav Aggarwal
(703) 654-9300
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0296
University of Arizona
1040 E. 4th Street, Gould-Simpson Building
Tucson, AZ 85721
(520) 621-4632

ID#: N10A-019-0065
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T019       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Multi-Modal Knowledge Acquisition from Documents
Abstract: Images with associated text are now available in vast quantities, and provide a rich resource for mining for the relationship between visual information and semantics encoded in language. In particular, the quantity of such data means that sophisticated machine learning approaches can be applied to determine effective models for objects, backgrounds, and scenes. Such understanding can then be used to: (1) understand, label, and index images that do not have text; and (2) augment the semantic understanding of images that do have text. This points to great potential power for searching, browsing, and mining documents containing image data. To this end, this STTR effort proposes a pipeline-based framework that focuses on the difficult task of text-image alignment (or correspondence). The proposed pipeline will take images and associated text to reduce correspondence ambiguity in stages. The framework will include both feed-forward and feed-back controls passing partially inferred information from one stage to another, leading to information enrichment and potential to provide inputs towards learning and understanding of novel objects and concepts. Ideas from both stochastic grammar representations and (joint) probabilistic representations will be investigated to facilitate modeling of text-image associations and visual modeling of objects, scenes, etc.

ObjectVideo
11600 Sunrise Valley Drive, Suite # 290
Reston, VA 20191
(703) 654-9314

PI: HIMAANSHU GUPTA
(703) 654-9373
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0287
George Mason University
4400 University Drive, MS 1G5
Fairfax, VA 22030
(703) 993-4106

ID#: N10A-040-0092
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T040       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Complex Event Detection in Video and Communications
Abstract: This Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Phase-I project will constitute design of algorithms, toolsets, and interfaces to detect and visualize complex events from video and communications data. Our proposed system would be based on a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) which will allow users to integrate services and data from multiple sources and operate in a networked environment. The key innovations in the proposed effort are: 1) automated detection of rule-based and unusual events that may span multiple sensors, 2) detection of network anomaly and intrusion detection from communications data, 3) reliable complex event and anomaly detection using data from multiple cameras and network services using a detection oriented Complex Event Processing (CEP) engine that allows fusion of data from various SOA-based client services, 4) enhanced user interface based on NASA's WorldWind geo-browser plug-in for wide area situational awareness of the operator. In addition, metrics for complex activity detection will be investigated and a thorough performance analysis of the proposed innovation will be carried out to ensure robustness. This will ensure that a scalable and robust baseline complex event detection system is developed by the end of Phase I.

Oceanit Laboratories, Inc.
Oceanit Center, 828 Fort Street Mall, Suite 600
Honolulu, HI 96813
(808) 531-3017

PI: Suthee Wiri
(808) 531-3017
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0257
National Renewable Energy Lab
1617 Cole Blvd,
Golden, CO 80401
(303) 275-3000

ID#: N10A-014-0203
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T014       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Platform Li-Ion Battery Risk Assessment Tool
Abstract: Modern warfare is becoming increasingly dependent on high technology and the means to power it. Lithium-ion batteries are a popular power choice due to high energy density and long charge hold. Unfortunately Lithium-ion batteries also have some distinct disadvantages including the possibility of catastrophic failure. This is of significant importance when the battery failure may take place in close proximity to explosive or propellant such as in a missile system or in a confined space such as the battery compartment of a diesel-electric submarine. A single cell that ruptures and catches fire may disrupt adjacent cells and cause a runaway effect through a battery bank that becomes uncontrollable. There exists a need for a tool to assess the risks of Li-ion battery casualty at the cell, pack, and system levels. In order to safely utilize Lithium-ion battery technologies, we propose a tool to fill the unmet need of risk assessment by modeling the potential of a cell level casualty and the consequent effects that would have on the surroundings. We will utilize the expertise at Oceanit and NREL to create a tool based on software specialized for simulating high speed, energetic expansion for the failure modes of Li-ion batteries.

Oceanscience Group
4129 Avenida de la Plata,
Oceanside, CA 92056
(760) 754-2400

PI: Jochen Klinke
(760) 754-2400
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0331
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology
77 Massachusetts Avenue, Building E19-750
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-5727

ID#: N10A-024-0629
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T024       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Enhanced Riverine Drifter
Abstract: Existing riverine drifters are passive devices designed to capture, store and transmit river flow and bathymetry information. Problems inherent with passively drifting devices include the inability to maintain uniform cross-stream spatial coverage and lost drifters due to unintentional grounding and entanglement with various hazards present in a typical river environment. This proposal outlines a path to explore hardware and software solutions to improve overall system performance associated with the deployment of a small swarm of “intelligent” drifters. Modifications including propulsion, steering, river boundary detection and swarm navigation are presented and discussed. By leveraging this team’s extensive experience with the design, fabrication and operation of remotely operated and autonomous marine vehicles, a systematic approach to evaluating all available commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware and software solutions is presented. Improved deployment efficiency will be gained through better spatial coverage due to an ability to rely on inter-nodal range detection and cluster navigation achieved through complex swarm behaviors as previously employed by this team on other autonomous marine platforms.

Omega Optics, Inc.
10306 Sausalito Dr,
Austin, TX 78759
(512) 996-8833

PI: Harish Subbaraman
(512) 996-8833
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0317
The University of Texas at Austin
Pickle Research Center,, 10100 Burnet Rd
Austin, TX 78758
(512) 471-7035

ID#: N10A-031-0214
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T031       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Low-cost, high rate, roll-to-roll manufacturing of organic solar cell powered high frequency flexible communication system
Abstract: Having realized the bottlenecks in electronic systems-on-film manufacturing, Omega Optics and the University of Texas at Austin propose to develop a low-cost, high rate, roll-to-roll manufacturing process for hybrid electronic systems on flexible substrates. Roll-to-roll fabrication of hybrid systems enables the utilization of the combined advantages of organic, inorganic and other material systems on the same substrate in addition to reducing the production cost. In this program, inorganic and organic material inks will be developed and characterized for our specific processes. In our proposed technique, the high rate manufacturing comes from the utilization of a computer controlled multi-stage digital ink-jet printer capable of printing different materials simultaneously. In order to maintain high alignment accuracy of

Photonic Systems, Inc.
900 Middlesex Turnpike, Building #5
Billerica, MA 01821
(978) 670-4990

PI: Gary Betts
(760) 839-8211
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0299
John Hopkins University
W400 Wyman Park Center, 3400 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21218
(410) 516-8668

ID#: N10A-017-0534
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T017       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Optical External and Intrinsic Fiber Cooler for GaN Microwave Amplifier
Abstract: In this STTR program, Photonic Systems Inc. and Prof. Jacob Khurgin at Johns Hopkins University propose novel optical external and internal fiber cooling approaches to efficiently cool the high power GaN microwave amplifier. The external cooler is a single end, square-shape, Yb:ZLAN fiber with high reflection (HR) coated surface which can attach to the amplifier surface and create a cold spot at the vicinity of the drain area where the amplifier hot spot is located. The internal Raman cooling approach, consisting of a photonic crystal resonant structure and pump-collect fiber pair, suppresses the hot optical phonon directly by using Raman scattering in GaN with resonance enhanced anti-Stokes and mitigated Stokes processes.

Physical Sciences Inc.
20 New England Business Center,
Andover, MA 01810
(978) 689-0003

PI: Francesca Scappuzzo
(978) 689-0003
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0262
Worcester Polytechnic Institute
100 Institute Road,
Worcester, MA 01609
(508) 831-5359

ID#: N10A-015-0737
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T015       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Reduction of Mutual Coupling between E and B Field Antennas in SQIF Arrays
Abstract: Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), in partnership with the Electrical Engineering Department of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), proposes to compute and reduce mutual coupling between E-field antennas (in Transmit mode) and SQUIDs magnetic loops (in Receive mode) for improved signal reception in SQIF arrays. For the computation of the mutual coupling in the near field PSI and WPI will use an exact quasi-analytical model based on Pocklington integral equation (Method of Moments - MoM). The selected electric antenna design will include a PSI patent pending antenna technology that has recently demonstrated excellent performance in antenna arrays for directed energy applications. The proposed research has direct applications to novel antenna technologies for Electronic Warfare (EW, SEWIP), Military Satellite Communications (MILSATCOM), and Signal Intelligence (SIGINT).

Progeny Systems Corporation
9500 Innovation Drive,
Manassas, VA 20110
(703) 368-6107

PI: Tom Baldasarre
(508) 828-9800
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0355
Univ. of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Office of Research Admin., 285 Old Westport Rd.
Dartmouth, MA 02747
(508) 999-8942

ID#: N10A-016-0270
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T016       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: External Pipe Sound Pressure Level Sensor
Abstract: Stealth is a primary consideration in design and operation of ships and submarines in the Navy fleet. Noise in hydraulic systems and piping is one source of unwanted noise. A method to measure and monitor this noise is essential to controlling and eliminating these noise sources. With the assistance of UMASS Dartmouth we will present a method to externally measure the fluidborne sound pressure level in noisy piping systems. This will involve developing a novel sensor approach that is capable of measuring fluid sound pressure levels as low as 80 dBRMS//1uPa/Hz when attached externally to the pipe. Modeling and simulation will be developed to predict the performance and characteristics of the sensor design and technique. Models will be used to determine if the concept is technically feasible and will also be used to predict the radial mode and other structure modes of the specified pipe configurations.

Qualtech Systems, Inc.
100 Great Meadow Rd., Suite 603,
Wethersfield, CT 06109
(860) 761-9362

PI: Sudipto Ghoshal
(860) 761-9341
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0444
University of Maryland
Office of Res. Adm & Adv., 3112 Lee Building
College Park, MD 20742
(301) 405-6276

ID#: N10A-009-0524
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T009       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Dynamic Physical/Data-Driven Models for System-Level Prognostics and Health Management
Abstract: The proposed effort leverages the capabilities of data-driven and physics of failure (PoF) based prognostic techniques for electronic systems by combining them within a hybrid approach. Data-driven and PoF-based techniques both have shortcomings; combining them into a hybrid framework allows using their capabilities in a complementary fashion, and thereby providing a reliable way of prognostics and health management in electronic systems (e-PHM). The approach will not only estimate the remaining useful life (RUL) and forecast the performance and health condition of electronic systems, but will also identify the potential source(s) of degradation or failure that might impact their future health (and consequently, performance and RUL). The approach will result an e-PHM solution that complies with the standards and software development environment of DoD’s Automatic Test Systems (ATS) and Navy’s Consolidated Automated Support System (CASS). Therefore, it can be easily incorporated into a Test Program Set (TPS). Such incorporation capacity provides very wide scope of application of the solution across electronic systems used by Navy and other DoD agencies. For obtaining CBM+ decision support, faster maturation, and easier incorporation into a TPS, the envisioned prognostics solution will be implemented on QSI’s TEAMS diagnostic design and analytic platform.

QuesTek Innovations LLC
1820 Ridge Avenue,
Evanston, IL 60201
(847) 425-8211

PI: Herng-Jeng Jou
(847) 425-8221
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0421
Northwestern University
Materials Science and Eng., 2220 Campus Drive
Evanston, IL 60208
(847) 491-2444

ID#: N10A-010-0060
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T010       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Analysis and Modeling of Foreign Object Damage (FOD) in Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs)
Abstract: Silicon (Si) based ceramic matrix composites (CMC) are one of the leading candidates for structural components in next generation gas turbine engines. There are several driving forces behind the introduction of ceramics in the hot- structure zone in jet engines including (i) the demand for higher operating temperatures, (ii) reduction in CO emissions, and (iii) significant weight savings. A key performance limiting issue in CMCs is foreign object damage (FOD). Ballistic impact of debris ingested during service causes spallation and damage to the surface of the structural component often exposing the bulk to harsh environment and creating macro-notches that serve as crack nuclei. The primary focus in this STTR program will be towards developing high fidelity models to quantify damage in CMCs. The effects of FOD on CMCs have been experimentally investigated and to certain extend characterized. However, physics based models to characterize and quantify the severity of the damage caused due to ballistic impact in CMCs have been limited. Under the proposed STTR program, QuesTek Innovations LLC, a leader in the field of materials design, will partner with Prof. Katherine Faber (Northwestern University, Evanston, IL) to develop a robust and comprehensive modeling scheme to quantify FOD in CMCs.

Raydiance, Inc.
2199 S. McDowell Blvd, Suite 140
Petaluma, CA 94954
(707) 559-2105

PI: Tim Booth
(707) 559-2124
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0239
University of Arizona
University of Arizona,
Tucson, AZ 85721
(520) 621-4649

ID#: N10A-012-0165
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T012       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: High Efficiency Gain Media for Eye-Safer 1.55 µm Ultrafast Fiber Amplifiers
Abstract: Compelling applications of infrared ultrafast lasers—ranging from ship self defense and aircraft self defense, to medical and micromachining applications—have defined a critical performance point at about one millijoule per pulse from a reliable and robust portable laser system with high average power. Increasing amplifier efficiency is a critical need in order to reach high average powers needed to ensure a system capable of meeting Navy application needs. This program aims to develop novel specialty fibers to be used in amplification schemes which will operate at substantially higher efficiencies that the current state of the art. Increased efficiency will reduce waste heat produced by the amplifiers, substantially reducing the thermal management burden and leading to a variety of size and weight advantages for a packaged fiber ultrafast laser system utilizing the fibers developed under this program.

Reaction Engineering International
77 West 200 South, Suite 210,
Salt Lake City, UT 84101
(801) 364-6925

PI: David Swensen
(801) 364-6925
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0418
University of Buffalo
402 Crofts Hall,
Buffalo, NY 14260
(716) 645-2593

ID#: N10A-002-0107
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T002       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: A Multiscale Modeling and Simulation Framework for Predicting After-Burning Effects from Non-Ideal Explosives
Abstract: The primary objective of the proposed effort is to develop a validated computational tool to predict the afterburning of non-ideal munitions containing metal and hydrocarbon fuels. The activities outlined devise a well-coordinated collaboration among researchers from Reaction Engineering International (REI) and the State University of New York at Buffalo (UB). The activities proposed will build on the previous collaboration between REI and UB in modeling and simulation of advanced computational frameworks for abnormal thermal and mechanical environments. The modeling strategy proposed includes several unique features that are important for understanding and predicting the ignition of compressible multiphase flows. These effects include both heterogeneous and homogeneous particle reactions, particle compressibility, and a turbulence modeling approach that naturally includes effects of group combustion. The modeling will be housed into a new supervisory simulation framework pioneered by REI for examining blast environments. A development plan is presented that will allow for the systematic development of this new tool starting from 2D single room (phase I) to multi-room (phase I extension) and finally to 3D configurations using a variety of explosives (phase II). It is anticipated that the final tool will be commercialized for both military and non-military customers to either design or better understand the blast loads from non-ideal explosives.

Rocky Mountain Geophysics, Inc.
167 Piedra Loop,
Los Alamos, NM 87544
(505) 412-2841

PI: Steven Taylor
(505) 412-2841
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0432
University of California, San Diego
Marine Physical Laboratory, Sc, University of California
San Diego, CA 92093
(858) 534-7768

ID#: N10A-004-0723
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T004       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Characterization of Diffusive Noise Fields Using Ambient Noise Interferometry, Spatial Gradients and Acoustic Bright Spots
Abstract: We propose to conduct a feasibility study for utilizing broadband sampling of the diffusive noise field in a dynamic environment. In ambient noise studies, the ability to resolve a wavefield is proportional to its time-bandwidth (TB) product. In a dynamic environment such as in the atmosphere or ocean, the nature of the impinging wave field is changing rapidly so that only short time segments can be used to model the ambient wave field thereby reducing the TB product. One way to counter the effect of a reduced time window is to increase the bandwidth of measurement. Our approach is to broaden the frequency spectrum used to characterize diffusive noise fields in dynamic environments by addition of Intensity Level Differences (ILD) caused by diffraction around a shadowing object to the more commonly used interferometric phase delay methods. Diffraction around a shadowing object can create acoustic bright spots that are easily detected. As an experimental test, we will use ambient noise data from existing infrasonic arrays and characterize the dynamic wavefield using passive interferometry and spatial gradiometry techniques. For spatial gradient techniques, the required sensor footprint is smaller and the wavefield can be mapped at higher resolution at closer ranges.

Safety Management Services, Inc.
1847 West 9000 South, Suite 205,
West Jordan, UT 84088
(801) 567-0456

PI: A. Butcher
(801) 567-0456
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0452
Institute for Clean and Secure Ener
University of Utah, 155 S 1452 E Room 380
Salt Lake City, UT 84112
(801) 585-1233

ID#: N10A-011-0636
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T011       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Prediction of the Full-Scale Cook-off Response Based on Small-Scale Testing
Abstract: The objective of this project is to develop a methodology for predicting reaction violence of full-scale munitions in either a fast or slow cook-off scenario. This methodology will use a combination of existing heat transfer models and thermal stimulus simulation tools coupled with an empirical model to be developed from data collected from various lab and subscale experimental hardware. Hardware may include but will not be limited to the NAWC Controlled Heat Flux Device, the US DOT Koenen test and the NAWC small scale cook-off bomb. The methodology will be based on a hierarchical approach to validation/uncertainty quantification (V/UQ) to achieve quantified error bounds on the predicted response quantity of interest, the kinetic energy or container fragments and/or the overpressure. The hierarchical approach will also help identify where deficiencies exist that might have a first order impact on the response quantity of interest. Steps can then be taken in Phase II of the project to eliminate these deficiencies through a combination of modeling and experimental quantification. The testing matrix required for the development of the empirical model (including experimental conditions, parametric studies, instrumentation, etc.) will be outlined in this phase of the project and a few scoping tests will be run. However, the majority of the required testing will be conducted in Phase II.

Scientific Forming Technologies Corporation
2545 Farmers Drive Suite 200,
Columbus, OH 43235
(614) 451-8320

PI: Wei-Tsu Wu
(614) 451-8322
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0264
Carnegie Mellon University
5000 Forbes Avenue,
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 268-3177

ID#: N10A-028-0201
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T028       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Probabilistic Prediction of Location-Specific Microstructure in Turbine Disks
Abstract: While there are established methods available in determining the fatigue life of critical rotating components, there is still room for improvement for better understanding and prediction of life limiting factors. Improved risk assessment of jet engine disk components would require probabilistic modeling capability of the evolution of microstructural features, residual stresses and material anomalies as the disk components undergo thermo-mechanical processing. Currently, the integrated process modeling system DEFORM can only predict the evolution of microstructure deterministically during thermo-mechanical processing. Scientific Forming Technologies Corporation is teaming with Carnegie Mellon University in this project. The objective of this project is to develop a probabilistic modeling framework that enables probabilistic prediction of microstructure evolution and bulk residual stresses due to thermo-mechanical processing. The probabilistic modeling framework in DEFORM will enable the user to systematically analyze the variabilities and uncertainties associated with the processing conditions, boundary conditions, material properties and incoming starting grain size distribution of the billet material, thus providing a probabilistic location specific microstructure response which can be used as an input to the probabilistic lifing model. At the end of phase I, we intend to demonstrate a proof of concept models for probabilistic grain size evolution and residual stresses as a result of thermo-mechanical processing. Our team will work closely with a major jet engine OEM, GE Aviation to develop an implementation and a validation plan. It is envisioned that the implementation and validation of probabilistic modeling of microstructure evolution will be undertaken in the phase II of this project.

Scientific Systems Company, Inc
500 West Cummings Park - Ste 3000,
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 933-5355

PI: Eric Wemhoff
(781) 933-5355
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0332
UC Berkeley
642 Sutardja Dai Hall, CITRIS Building
Berkeley, CA 94720
(510) 642-2468

ID#: N10A-024-0695
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T024       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Buoyant Active Sensor System (BASS) for Riverine Mapping
Abstract: There is need for fast, easy-to-operate, and low-risk methods for mapping geography, velocity, and bathymetry of rivers. River charts can be nonexistent or inadequate because of changes in water volume, tides, sediment transport, flooding, and other events. This is a hindrance and a hazard for navigation and other operations. Currently, procedures to map rivers involve navigating surface vessels into regions with significant uncertainty, which can be labor-intensive and dangerous. A better alternative is possible using low-cost sensors that float downstream, collecting data. Passive "drifters" have proven useful to research groups mapping ocean currents. However, faster flows and more constricted morphology in rivers present challenges. Passive floating sensors converge to similar streamlines and thus geographic coverage is limited, and can also get trapped or damaged by river features. In this program we will combine SSCI's technical and algorithmic expertise in autonomous vehicles, planning and decision making, and bathymetric mapping, and UC Berkeley's practical hands-on experience with self-propelled floating riverine sensors, for river modeling and mapping. We will design a system of collaborative, autonomous, self-propelled sensor vehicles and core strategies that will optimize the time, effort, cost, and risk necessary to successfully map rivers.

Scientific Systems Company, Inc
500 West Cummings Park - Ste 3000,
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 933-5355

PI: Ranga Narayanaswami
(781) 933-5355
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0275
Northeastern University
409 Dana Building,
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 407-2889

ID#: N10A-034-0709
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T034       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: iDiver: Underwater Text Messaging and Locating System for Divers
Abstract: Diver communication is vital for the US Navy while carrying out strategic underwater missions. Diver-to-diver communication and diver-to-vehicle communication can allow the sharing of information as it is discovered and also enable performing cooperative maneuvers. Emergency situations can also benefit from such communication. In addition to the communication capability, it would be useful to know the location of all the divers relative to the deployment vehicle during the mission. Such capability will allow operators on the deployment vehicle to guide the divers in their maneuvers and also provide immediate assistance during emergencies. Underwater acoustic communication presents unique challenges due to frequency selective fading, Doppler spread and multipath. A wearable underwater text messaging and location system (iDiver) based on multi carrier code division multi access (MC-CDMA) is proposed. The MC-CDMA protocol will help counteract intersymbol interference a key limitation in underwater acoustic communication. Location estimation will be performed using a combination of direction of arrival determination and inertial measurement units (IMUs). SCCI is collaborating with Prof. Stojanovic at Northeastern University, a leading expert in underwater communication. Phase I research will investigate the applicability of MC-CDMA to a network of divers. Phase II research will focus on hardware prototype development.

Scientific Systems Company, Inc
500 West Cummings Park - Ste 3000,
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 933-5355

PI: Jovan Boskovic
(781) 933-5355
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0345
Brigham Young University
Department of Mechanical Eng.,
Provo, UT 84602
(801) 422-6537

ID#: N10A-039-0710
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T039       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Autonomous Landing at Unprepared Sites for a Cargo Unmanned Air System
Abstract: Scientific Systems and Brigham Young University will develop and test an autonomous helicopter landing system using vision-based navigation and control.

SI2 Technologies
267 Boston Road,
North Billerica, MA 01862
(978) 495-5300

PI: Patanjali Parimi
(978) 495-5300
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0323
Southern Research Institute
Engineering Research Center, 757 Tom Martin Drive
Birmingham, AL 35211
(205) 581-2392

ID#: N10A-021-0376
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T021       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Structurally Integrated Wideband Low Profile Metamaterial Antenna (1000-161)
Abstract: SI2 Technologies, Inc. (SI2) proposes an innovative solution to the Navy’s need for wideband antennas to support naval ships and Marine Corps’ vehicle communications, electronic warfare (EW), and radar functions. SI2 will develop efficient, broadband, metamaterial antennas for operation in the VHF-UHF frequency range. These antennas will initially be designed for integration with the composite topside structure of ships and tactical armored vehicles. SI2 has teamed with a non-profit corporation to develop the embedded antenna and a prime contractor for commercializing the technology. During Phase I, the wideband metamaterial antenna concepts will be refined using high fidelity numerical modeling and simulation tools. The performance of the antenna systems will be simulated and validated through the manufacture and testing of a coupon level hardware demonstrator. The structurally integrated antenna will be fabricated using Direct Write technology. A full scale prototype will be fabricated in the follow-on Phase II program. The prototype will be tested on a representative platform to demonstrate the antenna’s RF performance.

SkEyes Unlimited Corporation
1660 McElree Rd.,
Washington, PA 15301
(724) 272-2709

PI: Omead Amidi
(412) 260-2625
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0358
Pennsylvania State University
Office of Sponsored Programs, 110 Technology Center
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 865-2032

ID#: N10A-039-0071
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T039       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Autonomous Landing at Unprepared Sites for a Cargo Unmanned Air System
Abstract: Cargo helicopters, such as the Marine Corps CH-47 "Chinook," can lift large payloads and can fly fast to rapidly transport and deploy troops, fly wounded home, or replenish critical supplies. They must do this day and night, in bad weather, and under enemy fire. It is not surprising that of the 750 or so Chinooks delivered to the US Air Force and Army, about 300 (40%) have been lost. Because piloting these cargo craft is dangerous, there is a strong case for developing capable unmanned versions which can, at a minimum, take over the critical delivery and resupply missions. What is needed is the capability for such cargo UAS to carry out resupply missions without advanced knowledge of a specific landing zone and without relying on pre-placed ground landing devices and/or human assistance, and to do so safely on a 15 degree slope in 25 knots winds. For this proposal, we have formulated the problem as one to develop and integrate the technology to: 1. Fly to the vicinity of the desired landing zone. 2. Scan and collect data from the landing zone. 3. Analyze the collected data to identify the hazards and ground characteristics. 4. Select landing coordinates within the desired landing zone. 5. Integrate the trajectory and desired coordinates into the autopilot to land.

SMD Corporation
4821 Shippen Court,
Virginia Beach, VA 23455
(407) 448-0744

PI: Curtis Mitchell
(407) 448-0744
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0367
Virginia Polytechnic Institute
Office of Sponsored Programs, 460 Turner Street, Suite 306
Blacksburg, VA 24060
(540) 231-9373

ID#: N10A-016-0077
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T016       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: PVDF Wire Sensor for External Monitoring of Piping Sound Pressure Level
Abstract: In this project we propose to demonstrate the feasibility of an external pipe sensor for measuring sound pressure levels in submarine piping systems. The sensor consists of flexible PVDF wire wrapped a number of integral turns around the pipe exterior. The charge/voltage output of the sensor can be shown to be directly proportional and highly sensitive to the amplitude of the contained fluid pulsation wave. Previous work by one of key team members of the proposal has both analytically and experimentally demonstrated the potential of PVDF wire sensors for measuring low level interior sound pressures in piping systems. These low level sound pressure induced motions are undetectable to the desired sensitivity and accuracy with traditional accelerometers. In Phase I, analytical simulation tools will be developed to model the fluid filled piping system and externally attached PVDF wire sensor. The model will be used to determine the optimum sensor arrangement, design sensitivity, accuracy and SNR. Finite Element models will investigate the influence of realistic piping characteristics on sensor performance. Optional tasks for constructing a basic piping test rig and preliminary testing of a PVDF wire sensor are also included.

Soar Technology, Inc.
3600 Green Court, Suite 600
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
(734) 327-8000

PI: Robert Bechtel
(734) 327-8000
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0286
Wayne State University
4815 Fourth Street,
Detroit, MI 48202
(313) 577-3296

ID#: N10A-040-0658
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T040       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Complex Event Detection in Video and Communications
Abstract: We will demonstrate the feasibility of detecting tactically meaningful complex events in sensor input streams using an efficient pattern matching technology embodied in the Soar cognitive architecture. Our focus in Phase I will be on video streams, such as those that might be produced by unattended ground sensors or unmanned aerial systems. To reduce risk, we propose devoting a portion of our effort to the problem of reliably producing simple or atomic event markers from the video stream, so that our complex event detection capability has a solid foundation of input data.

Solute, Inc.
4250 Pacific Highway, Suite 211
San Diego, CA 92110
(619) 758-9900

PI: Robert Wong
(619) 758-9900
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0308
UCLA
3532 E Boelter Hall,
Los Angeles, CA 90095
(310) 893-0986

ID#: N10A-045-0037
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T045       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Development of Navy Wave Rich Collaboration for Command and Control
Abstract: The SOLUTE team’s Phase I technical approach consists primarily of a feasibility study assessing the viability of a Navy implementation of the algorithms, standards, and protocols that comprise Google's Wave technology. Of specific concern is Wave’s ability to handle varying bandwidth and DIL communications channels associated with Navy platforms. While computer science research in the field of operational transform theory points positively toward a viable Navy implementation of the Wave Federation Protocol, detailed examination of the specific algorithms in collaboration with Wave project engineers at Google is required. Phase I includes assessment of Wave’s capability to fully handle the functionalities and capabilities required by Navy C2 needs. Our research will investigate this from a general perspective, conducting a thorough analysis of baseline functionality requirements for web-based applications. Additionally, our research will specifically explore wave gadgets and robots for supporting rich collaborative mapping and rich collaborative chat applications. Lastly, the Wave client in its current form neglects robust security measures. This research will include identification of minimum security and role based permissions required to support the Navy C2 hierarchy.

Sonalysts, Inc.
215 Parkway North, P.O. Box 280
Waterford, CT 06385
(860) 326-3787

PI: James McCarthy
(860) 326-3792
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0290
University of Central Florida's IST
12201 Research Parkway,
Orlando, FL 32826
(407) 823-3778

ID#: N10A-044-0263
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T044       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Adaptive Fleet Synthetic Scenario Research
Abstract: Together with our research institution partner, the University of Central Florida (UCF) Institute for Simulation and Training (IST), Sonalysts is pleased to submit this proposal to investigate the feasibility of creating a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) framework for correlation and fusion algorithms that drive scenario generation across many information domains (communication, imagery, tracking, etc.) in order to minimize the need for manual scenario creation. Fundamentally, Sonalysts understands that this topic is about ensuring that Fleet Synthetic Training (FST) scenarios present sailors with the same depth of intelligence-generated platform, multi-source event, data, and information as real-world operations have. During Phase I, our team will lay the foundation for an SOA-based scenario generation service by defining the data architecture on which the scenario generation service will rest and by developing a concept of operations for that service. During the Phase I Option period, our team will begin the transition to a Phase II SOA scenario generation prototype by conducting a preliminary requirements analysis. During Phase II, Sonalysts and UCF IST will prototype the envisioned service.

Spectral Labs Incorporated
12225 World Trade Drive, Ste. H,
San Diego, CA 92128
(858) 451-0540

PI: Eric Ackermann
(858) 451-0539
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0366
Regents of the U of Ca,Davis
Office of Research, Sponsored, 1850 Research Park Dr. Ste 300
Davis, CA 95618
(530) 754-7700

ID#: N10A-013-0129
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T013       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Advanced Real Time Battery Monitoring and Management System
Abstract: Although many off-the-shelf and semi-custom Battery Management Systems (BMS) are available, the Navy recognizes with this STTR Topic, and recent history illustrates, that a safety system with the required reliability and performance for mission critical applications has not been demonstrated. This proposal will detail the Spectral Labs Incorporated (SLI) and University of California, Davis (UCD) team’s proposed method for significantly improving Li-ion Battery Monitoring to detect the onset of cell degradation that could lead to catastrophic failure of a battery pack and providing a means to prevent such an event. It involves an innovative sensor architecture and associated diagnostic analysis algorithms based on detailed tracking of the behavior of Li-ion cells throughout their charge and discharge use cycles.

Spectral Sciences, Inc.
4 Fourth Avenue,
Burlington, MA 01803
(781) 273-4770

PI: Brian Gregor
(781) 273-4770
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0359
Boston University
255 Commonwealth Ave,
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 353-2969

ID#: N10A-043-0004
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T043       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: A Rugged and Miniaturized Optical Coagulation Monitor
Abstract: A team consisting of Spectral Sciences Inc., Boston University, Boston University Medical School, Radcliffe Consulting and Brighton Consulting will collaborate to develop and validate a novel optical device for the monitoring and evaluation of blood coagulation. In this proposal we describe a novel optical blood coagulation monitoring instrument. The instrument has no moving parts, uses very small blood samples, and will be compact enough to be handheld. Due to its all optical nature and temperature controlled sample stage the instrument will be usable in a wide array of environmental conditions and be suitable for use in medical facilities in military field deployments. In Phase I the concept will be validated using an existing tabletop version at Boston University and the results characterized for the development of a prototype in Phase II.

Stottler Henke Associates, Inc.
951 Mariner's Island Blvd., STE 360,
San Mateo, CA 94404
(650) 931-2700

PI: Terrance Goan
(206) 545-1478
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0304
The University of Washington
4333 Brooklyn Avenue NE, Box 359472
Seattle, WA 98195
(206) 543-4043

ID#: N10A-029-0105
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T029       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Automating the Application of Deception Detection Heuristics to Unstructured Data
Abstract: We propose to construct a deception detection system which will exploit scaffolding provided by a collection of largely domain-independent deception detection heuristics. These heuristics, integrated through a novel evidential reasoning system, will provide the proposed system, called Skeptic, with a significant advantage over purely inductive methods by allowing it to exploit the adversarial nature of the problem. Whereas previous systems have only provided coarse level judgments regarding the deceptive text communications, Skeptic will employ a mix of lightweight natural language processing and information extraction techniques to allow for the detection of misleading information present in otherwise truthful communications. Further, Skeptic will adapt over time, which means it can be deployed early, and mature as the understanding of the different operational contexts matures. In this work we will exploit our team’s substantial software assets and experience in the areas of text analysis and machine learning, as well as our very- specifically related experience developing a system for detecting a particular class of deception called “stock pumping.” Given this foundation we are able to propose an aggressive work plan that will result in a proof-of-concept demonstration against multiple existing datasets.

Strategic Insight, Ltd.
241 18th Street, South, Suite 511
Arlington, VA 22202
(703) 413-0700

PI: John Croghan
(703) 413-0700
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0426
Lawrence Livermore National Lab
P.O Box 808,
Livermore, CA 94551
(925) 423-0252

ID#: N10A-002-0244
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T002       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Development of a Computational Method for Prediction of After-Burning Effect
Abstract: The research objective is to develop a fully functional computational method for prediction of the after-burning effect of different fuels in a wide range of temperature, pressure, and turbulence regimes. Achievement of the objective requires understanding and modeling of key phenomena including (a) post-detonation response of the fuels, (b) near-field coupling of detonation products with particulates, (c) compressibility influences on dispersal of fuels, (d) gas-particle instability mechanisms and turbulent mixing, and (d) diffusion-limited and kinetics-limited ignition, burn and quenching mechanisms for elevated temperature, pressure and cross-flow. A predictive capability would be useful to a broad spectrum of military and non-military applications, including warhead design and lethality/vulnerability assessments. An important commercial application is avoidance of dust explosion accidents causing deaths, injuries and property damage/loss in industries as diverse as mining, agricultural grain storage and wood and plastics processing.

Strategic Insight, Ltd.
241 18th Street, South, Suite 511
Arlington, VA 22202
(703) 413-0700

PI: Tom McCants
(540) 663-2380
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0241
Sandia National Lab
P.O Box 8500,
Albuquerque, NM 87123
(505) 844-7788

ID#: N10A-018-0246
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T018       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Lightweight Layered Protection Systems for Missile Launchers and Canisters
Abstract: The research objective is to develop Modeling and Simulation (M&S) tools to accurately predict the performance of new state-of-the-art material systems as protection for high value missiles deployed in their launchers or canisters. The focus is on adapting multi-layered novel and non-traditional material technologies to improve protection against penetration and fragment impacts, focused detonation hazards and fires (slow and fast heating coupled with penetration). Predictive M&S and underlying damage and ignition response assessment capabilities will be used to: characterize trade-offs in layered material penetration and thermal resistance; predict the degree and extent of damage from penetration threat and predict altered heat transfer paths and thermal response of a layered protection system; and quantify the uncertainty related to the protection system with respect to avoiding violent reaction. The outcome is a M&S- based methodology for design of lightweight layered protection systems that will benefit sea- and land-based missile high value missile systems against ballistic and fragment impacts and focused detonation hazards (specifically, RPGs) during operational use or transportation in hostile environments.

Stratton Composite Solutions
865 Chestnut Lake Dr,
Marietta, GA 30068
(404) 840-3530

PI: Robert Stratton
(404) 840-3530
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0243
University of Nevada Las Vegas
4505 South Maryland Parkway,
Las Vegas, NV 59154
(702) 895-1357

ID#: N10A-018-0583
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T018       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Lightweight Layered Protection Systems for Missile Launchers and Canisters
Abstract: A major objective in the design of Navy missile systems is to protect its high value missile and ship assets and lives of personnel from an explosion of the missile due to threats during transportation and storage. The Navy is developing the advanced SM-6 missile, which is transported and stored in a canister and then installed and launched in a vertical launch system on borne ships. The canister is designed to provide the missile with an environment that is safe for transport and storage while serving as the missile launch rail within the launcher. During transportation of the missile and canister in the theater environment, threats will include thermal threats such as jet fuel fires and ballistic impact threats from armor-piercing bullets, high speed fragments from Improvised Explosive Devices, and shaped charge fragments from Rocket Propelled Grenades. The missile must be protected from these threats to avoid degradation and possible catastrophic detonations of the motor case propellant and loss of the missile, adjacent missiles, equipment, and lives. Lightweight protection systems for the canister are needed to protect the missile and its propellant from these threats. Past approaches for development and evaluation of threat protection concepts has been based largely on costly and time-consuming experimental and empirical methods to evaluate all of the possible variables such as materials, thicknesses, geometry, and threat conditions. Modeling & Simulation tool (M&S) capabilities have advanced to a state where they can be cost-effectively used to evaluate threat conditions and develop protection systems. A novel lightweight layered concept is proposed for ballistic impact, blast and thermal threats. A program will be conducted to define and develop the lightweight layered protection system for the Navy high value missile canister application using state of art M&S tools for assessment of current designs and optimization of new designs.

SUNS-Tech Corp.
82 Lakewood Circle,
San Mateo, CA 94402
(408) 528-5482

PI: Patricia Luna
(650) 867-0161
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0455
UC Santa Cruz
1156 High Street,
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2778

ID#: N10A-006-0739
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T006       Awarded:&nb 7/28/2010
Title: Novel Approaches to Service Virtualization in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks
Abstract: A clean-slate approach is needed for the design and implementation of wireless networks that self organize and can scale with the number of users, devices, and information objects and services that network users wish to share. This project will develop a new architecture and protocols for wireless networks in which naming, addressing, routing, and channel access are redefined to take into account: (a) the multihop nature of channel access over wireless links, (b) the inherent interoperation between transmission scheduling and routing, (c) the dynamic nature of wireless networks, and (d) the need to transport multimedia traffic over such networks.

Superconductor Technologies Inc.
460 Ward Drive,
Santa Barbara, CA 93111
(805) 690-4539

PI: Brian Moeckly
(805) 690-4690
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0329
MIT/Lincoln Laboratory
244 Wood Street,
Lexington, MA 02420
(781) 981-7409

ID#: N10A-023-0614
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T023       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: MgB2-Coated RF Cavities for Free Electron Laser
Abstract: Free electron lasers (FEL) made from Nb cavities offer high performance, but they are complex, bulky, and expensive. For Navy FEL applications, where footprint, power consumption, and cost are severely constrained and reliability is of great importance there is a critical need for an alternative to Nb. MgB2 is a recently discovered superconductor with a high critical temperature and critical field. These and other favorable materials properties suggest that MgB2-coated RF cavities have the potential to outperform Nb-based cavities in terms of operating temperature, size, cost, and complexity. This program’s objective is to produce a conceptual design for an MgB2 thin film vacuum deposition chamber to enable fabrication of a proof-of-principle, MgB2-coated, pillbox-shaped cavity. In phase II of this program we will implement the design, and a suitable deposition chamber will be constructed. MgB2-coated pillbox cavities fabricated in this system will be tested at temperatures from 4.2 K to Tc and at high power. In this manner the feasibility of depositing non-flat high-quality MgB2 thin films on the inside of curved surfaces will be demonstrated, which is a crucial step in the implementation of the MgB2-RF-cavities concept for FEL applications.

Symplectic Engineering Corporation
2901 Benvenue Ave.,
Berkeley, CA 94705
(510) 528-1251

PI: Shmuel Weissman
(510) 528-1251
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0266
University of California, Berkeley
6131 Etcheverry Hall, University of California
Berkeley, CA 94720
(510) 642-3358

ID#: N10A-028-0028
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T028       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Probabilistic Prediction of Location-Specific Microstructure in Turbine Disks
Abstract: Turbine efficiency improves with increased operating temperature. Consequently, the rim zone of disks operates at high temperatures where creep is the main concern. The bore and web zones operate at lower temperatures, where strength is the driving design criterion. Procedures to produce disks that can meet both demands include dual heat-treatment and hybrid disks. A thin transition zone forms in disks produced with either of these technologies, which is characterized by location-specific three-dimensional microstructure and residual bulk stresses. The objective of this project is to enable the optimization of advanced nickel-base superalloy turbine disks by developing probabilistic modeling and simulation methods to predict location-specific microstructure and bulk residual stresses. Symplectic Engineering is proposing to develop a multi-scale model to meet this objective. The global (disk) scale will be represented as a coupled thermal- mechanical system, approximated by a three-dimensional finite elements model. A number of models will be combined to produce the local-scale representation including gamma-prime coarsening and grain growth. The two scales will interact independently at each Gauss point of the global-scale finite element mesh. The performance of the proposed model will be demonstrated by simulating the forging of a dual heat-treated disk, and contrasting the prediction with experimental data.

Synetics Systems Engineering Corp
22605 La Palma Ave, Suite 519
Yorba Linda, CA 92887
(714) 692-1772

PI: SIMON BOURNE
(714) 692-1772
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0346
JET PROPULSION
M/S 198-235, 4800 OAK GROVE DRIVE
PASADENA, CA 91109
(818) 354-1857

ID#: N10A-039-0643
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T039       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Autonomous Landing at Unprepared Sites for a Cargo Unmanned Air System
Abstract: A rapid prototyping simulation for the Autonomous Rotorcraft Land & Take-Off (ARLTO) system will be developed to analyze and evolve requirements for the landing and take-off of a Rotary-wing Autonomous Air Vehicle (RAAV) from unprepared terrain. The simulation is based upon the Task-Pilot-Vehicle modeling system and features a UH-60 configured with a Sliding Mode Control (SCM) inner loop closure. The baseline image sensing subsystem is a state- of-the-art electro-optic/infrared subsystem featuring color CCD TV, low light ECCCD TV and a laser rangefinder. The mission design is based upon the covert drop-off/pickup of cargo at a specified location accomplished in a GPS denied environment using a-priori geophysical digital elevation information and other data when available. The system uses passive sensing to minimize detection. Technical staff of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) will assess the feasibility of interfacing the image sensor system with existing JPL image processing capabilities for terrain relative navigation and hazard detection and avoidance in the landing task. The ARLTO simulation is extensible to include a range of rotorcraft including twin rotor and tilt rotors. The SCM controller structure has the potential of providing robustness to disturbances and the ability to compensate for obstacles around the unprepared landing site

Systems Engineering Solutions, Inc. (SESI)
2301 Gallows Road, Suite 200
Dunn Loring, VA 22027
(703) 573-4366

PI: Anthony Watkins
(202) 438-2775
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0307
Old Dominion University Res.
4111 Monarch Way, Suite 200
Norfolk, VA 23508
(757) 683-4293

ID#: N10A-045-0738
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T045       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Development of Navy Wave Rich Collaboration for Command and Control
Abstract: Collaboration, always the bane of effective operations, has seen numerous advances towards providing solutions for concurrent action, immersion within the domain, knowledge mining within a common perspective, and inculcation of stakeholder’s defined robots. Google Wave is at the forefront for making these capabilities available all within a web environment, and Systems Engineering Solutions, Inc (SESI) is the first and only company listed as a contributor to the Google Wave protocol for this groundbreaking technology. Partnered with Old Dominion University SESI provides the solution for integrating Wave into the Navy’s Command and Control Architecture. A SESI developed Wave tool-set will change how Naval Commanders in the AOR construct and interact with a traditional Common Operating Picture by: a) allowing naval stakeholders to connect and disconnect from the collaboration network as needed but still contributing to the COP while offline, b) allow documents and media to be incorporated into the COP inline, allowing for the consistent context of the surrounding conversation to always be apparent, and c) allowing robots to take part in a conversation acting as their creators define, adding value and context to the COP automatically.

Tai-Yang Research Company
9112 Farrell Park Lane,
Knoxville, TN 37922
(865) 250-0237

PI: W. Marshall
(865) 805-7261
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0245
Florida State University
Ctr for Advanced Power Systems, 2000 Levy Avenue
Tallahassee, FL 32310
(850) 645-1183

ID#: N10A-022-0365
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T022       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Low Loss High Power Current Lead for Cryogenic Applications
Abstract: The Tai-Yang Research Company, in partnership with the Center for Advanced Power Systems at Florida State University, proposes to develop a novel solution for reducing the high heat load at the warm-to-cold electrical terminations of a high temperature superconducting cable configured for Navy ship power distribution systems. The termination design will be constrained to meet unique Navy requirements for shipboard cryogenically cooled systems. The termination will be be a compact, modular, factory built, "plug and play" component designed for maximum ruggedness and reliability.

TDA Research, Inc.
12345 W. 52nd Ave.,
Wheat Ridge, CO 80033
(303) 940-2300

PI: Stephen Paglieri
(303) 940-2335
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0305
University fo Nevada, Reno
Sponsored Projects/MS 325,
Reno, NV 89557
(775) 784-4477

ID#: N10A-025-0511
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T025       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Refractory Metal Coating for Electromagnetic Launcher Rails
Abstract: Electromagnetic launchers or rail guns are a key component of the Navy’s all-electric ship of the future, but they lack the durability required for repeated firings. TDA Research and the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) are developing a tough, durable and conductive refractory metal coating that will protect the copper alloy conductors (rails) from the extreme heat and wear conditions inside the barrel. Our thin, continuous coating will be cost effective to apply to large components and will greatly increase the effective lifetime of rail gun components, one of the key challenges that today prevent the shipboard deployment of rail gun systems.

Technology Service Corporation
3415 S. Sepulveda Blvd, Suite 800
Los Angeles, CA 90034
(812) 558-7100

PI: Eric Adams
(812) 558-7050
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0357
Purdue University
560 Oval Drive,
West Lafayette, IN 47907
(765) 494-6625

ID#: N10A-013-0259
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T013       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Advanced Real Time Battery Monitoring and Management System
Abstract: TSC and Purdue University will demonstrate a lab prototype of software and hardware capable of doing high speed monitoring of a Lithium-Ion cell. This monitoring needs to be specifically designed to predict failures. When a predictive failure is indicated a defensive countermeasure needs to be implemented. Our specific project goals are to: 1) Select a Lithium-Ion battery that consists of multiple cells. 2) Develop a list of common failure modes for Lithium-Ion cells specific to the selected battery. 3) Develop a list of specific data that needs to be collected that would allow the prediction of failure modes for this battery. 3) Develop a defensive countermeasure for each listed failure mode. 4) Develop a hardware monitoring architecture that will be attached to a Lithium-Ion cell/battery to monitor the desired points. 5) Develop a hardware safety architecture that will be attached to a Lithium-Ion cell/battery to implement when a failure mode is predicted. 6) Create a software program on a PC that controls the monitoring hardware and can then trigger the appropriate defensive countermeasure. 7) Analyze the hardware and software that have been designed and determine the method to scale to a deployable state

Texas High Energy Materials
13012 Appaloosa Chase Drive,
Austin, TX 78732
(512) 670-6182

PI: Aureliano Perez
(512) 670-6182
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0446
Texas State University - San Marcos
601 University Drive,
San Marcos, TX 78666
(512) 245-2314

ID#: N10A-007-0461
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T007       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Self-Healing Non-Catalytic Multifunctional Composite Structure
Abstract: Areas of research relating to self-healing composites structures have been undertaken by well-known and respected institutions under the auspices of the Department of Defense. Patent literature and public technical communiqué describe their novel engineering approaches using microencapsulated systems that release polymeric healing agents through suitable mechanisms. While these approaches have merit, the choices of polymer materials used in this design are limited. Our unique expertise has allowed us to correctly identify reaction kinetics and manufacturing processes that presently restrict the use of eminently more suitable polymer systems for this application. We propose revolutionary treatments of encapsulant shells and core healing agents. A team of polymer chemists and polymer engineers, coupled with commercial micro-encapsulation experts, will conduct novel monomer, co-monomer and prepolymer syntheses, and introduce polymer engineering processes that will enable the long-awaited employment of compounds which, to date, have not been successfully encapsulated. Our insight into aspects of physical polymer chemistry, chemical synthesis, and polymer engineering principals will allowed us to implement and develop our novel concept to circumvent long- standing challenges. We will prove feasibility and practicality of our approach, and use those results to introduce a new process and new materials to the microencapsulation and composite industries.

The Friedland Group, Inc.
330 SW 43rd St., Suite K #489,
Renton, WA 98057
(206) 760-9487

PI: Noah Friedland
(206) 760-9487
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0297
University of Rochester
518 Hylan Building, Box 270140
Rochester, NY 14627
(585) 275-4031

ID#: N10A-019-0357
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T019       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Multimodal Knowledge Acquisition and Management
Abstract: Related information, particularly in the real word, can come in many forms, like text, images, video, and more. Exploiting that information will require a multimodal approach. The Friedland Group, which led Project Moebius at DARPA, is joined by The University of Rochester and Prof. David Forsyth - respective leaders in knowledge acquisition from text and images, to create a new framework for mutlimodal knowledge acquisition and management (MKAM). MKAM utilizes and expands Episodic Logic (EL), a highly expressive logical representation and reasoning framework that has been successfully applied to model complex events and situations. Capturing multimodal knowledge in EL will make it integrable, inference and unification capable. It will also enable the improvement of knowledge acquisition capabilities in individual modalities by providing more context and reducing ambiguities. Our Phase I work will demonstrate the feasibility of our approach through the development of several concrete examples, utilizing data produced by existing knowledge extraction systems, to show how EL can meld knowledge from different modalities while improving acquisition from individual modalities.

Toyon Research Corp.
6800 Cortona Drive,
Goleta, CA 93117
(805) 968-6787

PI: Eric Sandoz
(805) 968-6787
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0336
Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
Office of Research, 3227 Cheadle Hall
Santa Barbara, CA 93106
(805) 893-4036

ID#: N10A-024-0468
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T024       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Enhanced Riverine Drifter
Abstract: The Navy has need of assessing the river environment including bathymetry, flow velocity profile, and navigational obstructions. While improvements in measurement fidelity and reduction in cost have come about by the use of multiple drifters, measurement quality is lost due to convergent drifter trajectories, and cost/risk remains high due to personnel effort required for deployment. An autonomous river measurement system capable of self deployment and of detecting and evading collisions with floating debris is desired. Toyon proposes to assess the feasibility of its proposed Wapter autonomous system (water-helicopter): a combination of a ducted fan hovering UAV coupled with a unique multi functional trimaran hull well-suited to stream measurement.

UES, Inc.
4401 Dayton-Xenia Road,
Dayton, OH 45432
(937) 426-6900

PI: Yoon-Suk Choi
(937) 426-6900
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0265
The Pennsylvania State University
248 Deike Building,
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 865-7650

ID#: N10A-028-0087
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T028       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Probabilistic Prediction of Location-Specific Microstructure in Turbine Disks
Abstract: Thermo-mechanical processes of turbine disks have been progressively improved to meet microstructural requirements tailored for advanced, sustainable high temperature performances. However, the chemistry of typical Ni-base turbine disk alloys is very complex, and yields a variety of phases and microstructural anomalies under different thermo- mechanical heat treatments. These microstructural heterogeneities and anomalies often limit thermo-mechanical behaviors of turbine disks. The proposed Phase I program will focus on the development of multi-physics based computational tools and approaches for the prediction of HT-processing dependent microstructures, the characterization of their statistical features/anomalies and the corresponding mechanical responses, and the identification of the critical microstructural feature that may limit the performance life. A conventional Ni-base polycrystalline superalloy IN718 was chosen as a target material for the proposed work because of its most common usage for the turbine disk application and the large amount of data available from various resources. Due to the microstructural complexity of IN718, the property prediction requires rigorous numerical approaches to account for microstructural heterogeneities. The successful completion of Phase I efforts will bring microstructure-sensitive computational tools and approaches for the evaluation of differently processed IN718 disk alloys.

Vector Controls Inc.
3 Bridge St, Suite B100
Newton, MA 02458
(617) 527-8600

PI: Robert Mrovillo
(617) 527-8600
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0278
MIT
Center of Ocean Engineering, Dept of Mech Engr, Rm 5-321
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-6823

ID#: N10A-036-0550
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T036       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Mitigation of USV Motions via Wave Sensing and Prediction
Abstract: A boat’s coxswain is adept at analyzing the wave environment, adjusting the craft’s propulsion system and control surfaces to mitigate its motions and reduce the chance of capsizing. There is a significant predictive component in the coxswain’s control decisions. Unmanned surface vehicles (USVs) lack the benefit of a highly trained coxswain reading and predicting oncoming waves - existing autonomous control systems are not aware of the wavefield, nor are they capable of combining near and far wave field information with current information about the craft in order to make adjustments to the propulsion system and control surfaces. This makes the USV susceptible to excessive shocks and motions, which may degrade mission performance, or capsizing. The proposed effort will develop a motion mitigation system including wave sensing and characterization, USV motion prediction, and vessel control for USVs. The system builds upon successful past and current research and development in using wave sensing data, advanced hydrodynamics for wave field reconstruction and vessel dynamics, and vessel control systems in improving steering and motion control of USVs in high sea states.

Versatilis LLC
488 Ridgefield Rd,
Shelburne, VT 05482
(802) 985-4009

PI: Ajaykumar Jain
(650) 380-4763
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0316
Lehigh University
Office of Sponsored Research, 526 Brodhead Avenue
Bethlehem, PA 18015
(610) 758-4402

ID#: N10A-031-0222
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T031       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: High-rate Manufacturing of Electronic Systems-on-Film
Abstract: This STTR seeks to develop a high-throughput, low-cost enabling technology for the manufacturing of electronic systems-on-film. It posits a novel concept of introducing percolation networks into semiconducting “inks” to increase by at least an order of magnitude the very low carrier mobilities (

VSI Aerospace Inc.
2716 SE5th St., Suite 3
Ames, IA 50010
(515) 257-2335

PI: Jerald Vogel
(515) 257-2335
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0416
Iowa State University
1138 Pearson Hall,
Ames, IA 50011
(515) 294-2859

ID#: N10A-003-0352
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T003       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Development of Tools and Methods for Characterizing the Impact of Control Surface Free-Play on Flutter
Abstract: The aerodynamic performance of aircraft is significantly impacted by the aero-elastic dynamics of its control surfaces. In particular, the dynamics of flutter - an unstable self-excitation of structure due to undesirable coupling of structural flexibility and aerodynamics - has critical impact on the stability and performance of aircraft. The control surface flutter characteristics are affected by the unavoidable free-play which is inherent in the control surface due to manufacturing imperfections. There are no systematic methods to predict free-play effect on flutter. The proposed research will develop a comprehensive tool-suite which will: (a) provide state-of-the-art capability for stability and performance analysis of any generic control surface configuration, (b) allow modeling of control surface dynamics with varying degrees of fidelity using combination of analytical, computational, and experimental identification methods, (c) provide new analysis techniques to enable accurate prediction of stability/performance boundaries for existing platforms, and (d) provide optimal design capability for design of control surfaces for new platforms. The Phase 1 of the project will develope essential elements of the proposed tool-suite to prove the feasibility of the approach and demonstrate the capabilities by using 1950's WADC test data for all-movable un-swept horizontal tail.

Wave Computation Technologies, Inc.
1800 Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway, Suite 204
Durham, NC 27707
(919) 360-6475

PI: Tian Xiao
(919) 419-1500
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0261
Duke University
Office of Research Support, 2200 W. Main Street
Durham, NC 27705
(919) 681-8689

ID#: N10A-015-0255
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T015       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Development of Co-Mingled E and B Field Antennas
Abstract: Wave Computation Technologies and Duke University will develop minimally coupled, co-mingled E and B field antennas through numerical and experimental investigations based on both phenomenological and first-principle theories. The project objectives are to (a) develop the simulation capability for modeling superconducting quantum interference filter devices and the related B field antennas, (b) make appropriate designs of co-mingled E and B antennas, and (c) experimentally verify and improve these designs. The numerical simulation will also include the superconducting and quantum mechanic effects in the B field antennas; thus, this project will provide a new tool to determine the optimal configurations of individual E and B field antennas and the arrays formed by such antennas. In Phase 1, we will develop an initial simulation capability for both electric and magnetic field antennas in the near field based on our enhanced new commercial electromagnetic field software package Wavenology EM. With this tool we will determine the mutual coupling and isolation levels from a variety of combinations of E field and B field transmitters/receivers, and the dependence on scanning parameters such as the scan angle. By the end of Phase 1, we will have several candidates for the co-mingled E and B field antennas.

Weidlinger Associates, Inc.
375 Hudson St FL 12,
New York, NY 10014
(202) 649-2444

PI: Pawel Woelke
(212) 367-3000
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0252
Harvard University
29 Oxford Street, Pierce Hall 208
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 496-3072

ID#: N10A-041-0223
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T041       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Fracture Evaluation and Design Tool for Welded Aluminum Ship Structures Subjected to Impulsive Dynamic Loading
Abstract: Aluminum as a structural material for naval applications has a number of advantages over steel, owing mainly to significant weight reductions which translate to higher speed and range attainable by aluminum vessels. A comprehensive study of research needs for aluminum structures conducted under the ONR program identified the key research areas, which included material behavior and fracture evaluation and design of welded aluminum structures subjected to dynamic loading. In order to meet the Navy’s needs for a lightweight, high speed aluminum vessels, a new, accurate and efficient analysis and limit state based design methodology for welded aluminum ship structures is proposed. The proposed methodology accounts for anisotropic, nonlinear and rate dependent behavior of aluminum sheets, subjected to dynamic loads causing fracture and failure of structural components. A comprehensive analysis and design toolkit will be developed, allowing for better estimates of the ultimate strength and design safety factors. Substantially more efficient, accurate and rational design of high speed aluminum ships will result, which could lead to great savings in military and commercial applications.

Xdot Engineering and Analysis, PLLC
124 Commonwealth Cir,
Charlottesville, VA 22901
(434) 296-6094

PI: Erik Swanson
(434) 296-6094
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0279
Widener University
One University Place, Office of the President
Chester, PA 19013
(610) 499-4156

ID#: N10A-037-0168
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T037       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Low-Cost Ball/Air/Magnetic Hybrid Bearing System for Extended-Life Micro Gas Turbine Engines
Abstract: Micro gas turbine engines with state-of-the-art ultra-compact recuperators could be a real game-changer for small unmanned air vehicles and portable power generation. A key enabling technology for these engines is a low-cost, high speed bearing system that has long life, while operating without either a separate lubrication system, or oil in the fuel. For this Phase I STTR effort, Xdot Engineering and Analysis will evaluate the feasibility of a novel non-contact oil-free thrust bearing. This thrust bearing is particularly well suited for a hybrid arrangement where grease-lubricated rolling element bearings provide the radial support for a small, very high speed shaft. This thrust bearing is expected to have load capacity, stiffness and life suitable for these gas turbine applications. The bearing combines high levels of performance with very low production costs, even for small production volumes. The Phase I evaluation effort will include high speed testing of a prototype bearing, as well as an analytical evaluation of a self-contained thermal management strategy. The Phase I Option focuses on analysis/design tool development, and a potential way to further decrease the production cost.

Yotta Navigation Corporation
3365 Mauricia Avenue,
Santa Clara, CA 95051
(408) 930-5048

PI: William Deninger
(408) 242-7026
Contract #: N00014-10-M-0273
The Ohio State University
470 Hitchcock Hall, 2070 Neil Avenue
Columbus, OH 43210
(614) 292-8787

ID#: N10A-034-0070
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T034       Awarded:&nb 6/28/2010
Title: Naval Special Warfare (NSW) Underwater Secure Text Messaging and Diver Locater
Abstract: Yotta Navigation and The Ohio State University propose to develop a complete diver text messaging and locator system. The system will securely transmit preformatted and free-text messages, and will be able to accurately determine range and bearing, at distances of up to 1000 meters. This system consists of two major components. An ultrasonic cylindrical array, mounted on a swimmer delivery vehicle or similar platform, serves as a central node. This central node both communicates with and determines the location of individual divers on the system’s acoustic data network. Individual divers carry a small portable device which contains an integrated miniature inertial navigation system, an ultrasonic transducer for communication, as well as a full-color graphical user interface. The system will build on previous research and development work conducted by Yotta Navigation, and will take advantage of the substantial modeling, simulation, and test capabilities developed by Ohio State University. As a result, an initial prototype system can be developed by the conclusion of Phase I.

Zel Technologies, LLC
54 Old Hampton Lane,
Hampton, VA 23669
(757) 722-5565

PI: Oleg Godin
(303) 497-6558
Contract #: N68335-10-C-0414
The Universtiy of Colorado
Office of Contracts and Grants, 572 UCB 3100 Marine St, Rm 481
Boulder, CO 80309
(303) 492-2695

ID#: N10A-004-0274
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N10A-T004       Awarded:&nb 7/30/2010
Title: Ambient Noise Interferometry for Passive Characterization of Dynamic Environments
Abstract: Non-invasive, stealthy nature of passive remote sensing combined with its low cost make passive techniques a promising supplement or replacement of traditional active remote sensing techniques. Coherent processing of diffuse wave fields has a proven potential for remote sensing of stationary environments. The proposed research extends noise interferometry to characterization of dynamic environments. We will develop “acoustic daylight” and “radio wave daylight” techniques for retrieval of information about targets and their surroundings from the ambient acoustic noise and the background radio waves; and determine which environmental parameters and types of targets can be effectively monitored through ambient noise interferometry. During Phase I we propose to demonstrate experimentally the feasibility of passive acoustic measurements of sound speed and flow velocity in a moving fluid and to evaluate necessary noise averaging times and receiver network geometry for detection of targets and achieving desired accuracy of passive acoustic measurements of environmental parameters. In case of positive results of Phase I, the efforts of Phase I optional part and Phase II will be directed toward extension of the interferometric approach to ambient acoustic noise in the ocean and to electromagnetic ambient noise in the microwave band in the atmosphere as well as to optimization of the data acquisition geometry, frequency band, and data processing algorithms to improve accuracy of passive travel time measurements and sensitivity to weak, transient environmental perturbations.