DoD STTR Program Phase I Selections for FY13.A

DoD STTR Program Phase I Selections for FY13.A

Air Force Selections

Army Selections

DARPA Selections

Navy Selections


---------- AF ----------

21st Century Systems, Incorporated
11640 Arbor St, Ste 201,
Omaha, NE 68144
(402) 651-0235

PI: Amber Fischer
(808) 426-2527
Contract #: FA8750-14-C-0040
Missouri Univ of Science & Tech.
900 Innovation Drive, Ste 145,
Rolla, MO 65401
(573) 341-6725

ID#: F13A-T01-0106
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT01      Awarded: 10/24/2013
Title: Voxel-based Fusion (VOXION)
Abstract: In ISR applications, multiple sensors can be employed to achieve more accurate parameters of interest on targets, improving discrimination and detection. But, the proliferation of sensor systems has created a large volume of multi- sensor data across a number of physical spectra. These resulting measurements can be so disparate that traditional aggregation methods perform poorly given heuristics/assumptions required to map them into conventional algorithms. The team of 21st Century Systems, Inc. (21CSi) and the Missouri University of Science and Technology (MS&T) propose to develop an innovative multiphysics-based sensor fusion approach, called Voxel Fusion (VOXION). Applicable for improving target detection and discrimination in the ISR domain, VOXION maps the disparate sensor fields from a suite of EO/IR, RF and acoustic sensors into a single common multiphysics-based representation. Estimates on target parameters are then obtained directly from the unified physics field improving system accuracy, decreasing uncertainty, and achieving improved inferences more resilient to changes in the targets and environmental conditions as compared to classical fusion approaches. The innovative voxel-based concept; our diverse, well-qualified team; combined with 21CSi’s superlative, sustained record in SBIR/STTR commercialization; makes our team the right choice to improve multiphysics-based sensor fusion for the warfighter. BENEFIT: The VOXION multiphysics-based sensor fusion algorithm will be able to map the disparate sensor fields into a single common multiphysics representation that is needed to improve target detection and discrimination in the ISR domain. VOXION would generate estimates of target parameters from a unified physics representation of objects, improving system accuracy, decreasing uncertainty, and achieving improved inferences more robust to changes in the targets and environmental conditions. Thus, VOXION will markedly improve the fusion of data from disparate sensor types in order to improve situational awareness and sensor hand-offs. The VOXION technology has the potential of maturing into a cohesive multi-sensor fusion tool to assist in the traditionally manual processes of unlike sensor aggregation. This will not only improve the accuracy of the resulting situational awareness picture, but also allow for faster situation recognition and more rapid actionable intelligence. Bottom line...faster, better decisions.

ACTA Incorporated
2790 Skypark Drive, Suite 310,
Torrance, CA 90505
(310) 530-1008

PI: George Lloyd
(310) 530-1008
Contract #: FA8750-14-C-0038
Sandia National Laboratories
PO Box 5800,
Albuquerque, NM 87185
(505) 845-9190

ID#: F13A-T01-0012
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT01      Awarded: 10/23/2013
Title: Multiphysics-based Sensor Fusion
Abstract: ACTA and Sandia National Laboratories will develop and demonstrate advanced concepts for processing large and disparate data streams from multiple classes of sensors using multi-physics based mappings based upon stochastic non-linear networks. Fusion of incertitude will be demonstrated with algorithms based on KDE/ICA (kernel density estimator/independent component analysis) approaches which yield truncation-free and viable non-parametric applications of polynomial chaos expansions. ACTA is prepared to incorporate these multi-physics mapping algorithms into its existing embeddable sensor-fusion hardware design constructed around a tool called REASON to produce a working prototype of what it currently terms as Smart Remotes. REASON stands for Rule Extensible Arbitrary System of Networks, which was developed in part to avoid the pitfalls of monolithic knowledge-based systems, and also to incorporate “in-line” as much as possible modern computationally-oriented syntaxes and to utilize open-source data structures and storage formats. BENEFIT: Air Force mission readiness, tactical situation awareness, and weather forecasting are areas where the proliferation of sensor platforms can obviously augment existing capabilities, increase decision turn-around, and amplify or extend solider and pilot effectiveness. These goals are not achievable however without adequate algorithms to map the multi- physics suite of data into feature discrimination and change point detection estimates with corresponding joint densities in order to operate with acceptable false alarms and detection performance. It is vitally important that the multi-physics algorithms be based on a sound theoretical underpinning, and be able to be deployed across a wide variety of platforms. ACTA’s proposed technical approach will demonstrate that these benefits can be achieved.

AdValue Photonics Inc
3708 E. Columbia Street, Suite 100,
Tucson, AZ 85714
(520) 790-5468

PI: Shibin Jiang
(520) 790-5468
Contract #:
University of Arizona
1630 E. University Blvd.,
Tucson, AZ 85721
(520) 626-9871

ID#: F13A-T03-0218
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT03      Selected for Award
Title: High Power WDM Based Upon Mode Coupling
Abstract: AdValue Photonics and University of Arizona propose to demonstrate the capability of fabricating wavelength division multiplexers (WDM) for high-power fiber laser applications. It is based on AdValue Photonics’ unique fused fiber technology using large-mode-area (LMA) fibers. Both polarization-maintaining (PM) and non-PM LMA fiber WDMs will be fabricated. By the end of Phase I, two prototype units will be delivered to Air Force for test evaluation, which will expect to be able to handle 100W CW power at 1m. In the Phase II, power handling capacity of the proposed large-mode-area fiber-based WDM will be further increased by using pre-treated fibers. BENEFIT: High power fiber laser systems are usually limited by the unavailability of highly-reliable fiber-optic devices with high power handling capacity (>100W). High power WDM is an enabling device for some core-pumped applications, such as high-power Raman fiber lasers and amplifiers, two tone seeded lasers, all-fiber spectral laser beam combining, etc. It is not available on the current market. Our proposed technology will make it possible to commercialize the first kind of large-mode-area fiber based WDMs on the market, which are expecting to be very useful for high-power fiber laser applications.

Aptima, Inc.
12 Gill Street, Suite 1400
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 496-2443

PI: Brian Riordan
(937) 490-8003
Contract #: FA8750-14-C-0051
Universityof Massachussetts
Computer Science Building, 140 Governors Drive
Amherst, MA 01003
(413) 545-3067

ID#: F13A-T14-0093
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT14      Awarded: 10/22/2013
Title: GUARD: General Utility for Assessing Risk of Disclosure
Abstract: Information is a national asset that must be protected. To make effective use of this asset, information sharing is critical – between government agencies, with foreign government partners, and with the private sector. At the same time, in practice, balancing information sharing and information protection can be difficult. Tools are needed to address many challenges, including managing multiple, diverse criteria for sensitivity, assessing the sensitivity of information in context, and efficiently processing big data. GUARD (General Utility for Assessing Risk of Disclosure) is an integrated package of components that automatically assess disclosure risk. It combines a state-of-the-art probabilistic framework for risk assessment with advanced capabilities for unstructured information processing that leverage both document content and contextual and background information. GUARD’s disclosure risk assessment capability will facilitate the core tasks in information sharing, including classifying the sensitivity of information objects and deciding whether to share that information. BENEFIT: GUARD is designed to address the greatest challenges in information sharing. GUARD’s principal benefit is in enhancing human understanding of the complex information landscape, informing human judgment in sharing and safeguarding decisions. GUARD facilitates the rapid adjudication of documents at a large scale, reducing the need for manual review. GUARD reasons over the available data and over the knowledge of adversaries, tying together information beyond the capacity of human judges. It adapts notions of sensitivity for different domains, making it easily applicable to many information scenarios. GUARD’s flexible disclosure framework broadly applies to informing sharing in many applications, including enterprise data management and health record technology.

ATC - NY
33 Thornwood Drive, Suite 500,
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 257-1975

PI: Matthew Stillerman
(607) 257-1975
Contract #: FA8750-14-C-0036
Cornell University
373 Pine Tree Road,
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 255-5014

ID#: F13A-T08-0066
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT08      Awarded: 10/24/2013
Title: Pantograph: Secure, Cross-domain Object Models
Abstract: Most cross-domain information flows require some human intervention to ensure that the requirements for releasability are met. Such intervention is expensive and slow, and can form a bottleneck in operations. Unfortunately, fully automated sharing of information across security domain boundaries is also fraught with difficulties due to problems with identifying releasable information, and the need to control covert channels. The result so far has been automated information flows that are one-directional or point solutions. ATC-NY and Cornell will develop the Pantograph software suite to address this problem. Pantograph will enable the nearly routine authoring of secure cross domain applications—distributed applications with state that is seamlessly shared, in a sanitized form, between the two domains. Building on Fabric, Cornell’s compiler for distributed applications with provable enforcement information flow security, applications compiled with Pantograph will enforce information-flow security between domains. The internal Pantograph protocol will mitigate potential covert channels by sanitizing the protocol messages. A security analyzer will quantify residual covert channel risks inherent in the application. BENEFIT: Cross domain applications developed with Pantograph will provide a very practical way to share information between security domains with very high assurance that information flow policies in both domains are enforced. Inexpensive and straightforward authoring of highly secure cross-domain applications will have three main benefits: (1) Better, more fluid coordination of activities between domains, (2) reduced pressure to “upgrade” all related tasks to the highest sensitivity level, and (3) reduced pressure to allow unsafe sharing to “get the job done”. The primary market for Pantograph applications will be the many DoD and intelligence community installations with multiple security domains connected by guards. Critical infrastructure protection will be another market for Pantograph applications, potentially much larger, and with lower barriers to entry. Almost all of our national critical infrastructure is controlled by digital systems that are connected to corporate networks and are thus vulnerable to attack from the Internet. Pantograph applications can enable sharing of specific information between enterprise networks and critical infrastructure control systems, in both directions, with strong guarantees that spurious information flows cannot occur.

Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation
9950 Wakeman Drive,
Manassas, VA 20110
(617) 500-4892

PI: Paul Dahlstrand
(617) 500-4817
Contract #:
UMASS Lowell
1 University Avenue,
Lowell, MA 01854
(978) 934-2932

ID#: F13A-T09-0038
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT09      Selected for Award
Title: Novel Sacrificial Fibers for Microvascular Composites with Embedded Thermal Management Devices
Abstract: Aurora will demonstrate on our automated fiber placement (AFP) machine that we are able to lay up composite panels that contain sacrificial fibers that can be thermally decomposed to create a microvascular network of small cavities that allow the panel to act as a heat exchanger. The AFP machine is capable of producing composite parts from mold tools as large as 9’ high by 18’ wide by 56’ long. It lays down an 8” wide swath of composite material at 1500 inches per minute. UMass Lowell (UML) has developed a method to manufacture sacrificial fibers that is 10^5 times faster than prior demonstrations in the literature. These new fibers reduce removal times by 50% and do not require the expensive and toxic chemicals used in traditional manufacturing methods. The UML partners have produced fiber in a wide range of diameters with continuous lengths exceeding hundreds of feet. Aurora and UML will analyze various composite/fiber geometries for thermal and flow characteristics and then fabricate and test those geometries. BENEFIT: Aurora will ultimately have a unique automated capability to design and manufacture heat exchangers embedded within composite structure. Panels could be designed and fabricated as composite aircraft wing skins or fuselage panels that could be used to dissipate aircraft engine heat, payload sensor heat, or avionics heat. These heat exchangers will be lighter weight and lower cost than metallic heat exchangers traditionally used in aircraft. UMass Lowell will have the opportunity to further develop their manufacturing process to produce catalyst-impregnated polylactide filaments in production quantities, allowing their technology approach to be sold or licensed to the fiber extrusion industry.

Azure Summit Technology, Inc.
13135 Lee Jackson Highway, Suite 330,
Fairfax, VA 22033
(571) 308-1401

PI: Mark Sullivan
(571) 308-1402
Contract #: FA9453-14-M-0007
Virginia Polytechnic Institute
Bradley ECE, 432 Durham Hall (0350)
Blacksburg, VA 24061
(540) 392-9308

ID#: F13A-T05-0189
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT05      Awarded: 10/21/2013
Title: Security in Cyber-Physical Networked Systems
Abstract: A cyber-physical system (CPS) is a system that features a tight combination of, and coordination between, the system’s computational and physical elements. Today, a pre-cursor generation of cyber-physical systems can be found in areas as diverse as emerging and future combat systems, air-space-cyber activities, as well as smart buildings, bridges and other structures. CPS security must be fully understood and addressed before these types of systems can be fully trusted. Military CPS systems, in particular, are vulnerable to a variety of hostile RF attacks that include jamming, spoofing, and network intrusion. To improve robustness and security in CPS systems that utilize SATCOM as their wireless network, Azure Summit proposes to develop concepts and architectures for detecting, localizing, and mitigating RF attacks on the satellite communications portion of CPSs. Detection of these attacks is accomplished by analyzing the spatial signature of signals that arrive at the satellite and comparing them to pre-determined signatures. This Geo-Selective Authentication (GSA) enables the system to reject messages from rogue emitters that otherwise appear to be legitimate in every other way. BENEFIT: This effort will lead to improved security for military and commercial cyber-physical systems, particularly those that consist of a hybrid mixture of next-generation and legacy sensors and actuators.

Charles River Analytics Inc.
625 Mount Auburn Street,
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 491-3474

PI: Avi Pfeffer
(617) 491-3474
Contract #: FA8750-14-C-0021
University of Texas at Dallas
800 W. Campbell Road,
Richardson, TX 75080
(972) 883-2312

ID#: F13A-T11-0026
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT11      Awarded: 10/22/2013
Title: Representation and Inference for Developing Deep Language Engines (RIDDLE)
Abstract: Intelligence analysts need to process large amounts of text information to form an understanding of a topic of interest. The sheer amount of information can be overwhelming, so automated text analytics that assist with filtering, information extraction, and document understanding, can be highly beneficial. Deep natural language processing (NLP) applications require both structural knowledge of language and background knowledge of the domain. Statistical relational learning representations support reasoning about knowledge-rich domains under uncertainty, but joint inference in NLP applications is a challenging task due to the thousands of variables and millions of features. Charles River Analytics proposes to develop Representation and Inference for Developing Deep Language Engines (RIDDLE), which investigates advanced joint inference algorithms for NLP and the representational issues that are intimately tied to inference. In particular, we will develop three novel classes of inference algorithms, including both lifted and non-lifted algorithms, as well as structured representations of knowledge to support inference using probabilistic programming. We will perform a cross-cutting evaluation of representations and inference algorithms on a range of NLP tasks. BENEFIT: RIDDLE will benefit intelligence analysts by enabling them to filter and extract meaning from large numbers of text documents, thereby supporting more timely and effective intelligence. RIDDLE will also be beneficial to commercial applications of NLP systems, such as text analytics of medical databases. The algorithms developed under this effort will also extend to our commercial FigaroTM probabilistic modeling tool, enabling it to be applied to larger and richer domains.

Combustion Research and Flow Technology, Inc.
6210 Kellers Church Road,
Pipersville, PA 18947
(215) 766-1520

PI: William H. Calhoon, Jr.
(256) 883-1905
Contract #:
Sandia National Laboratories
Combustion Research Facility, 7011 East Avenue, MS 9051
Livermore, CA 94551
(925) 294-2648

ID#: F13A-T12-0059
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT12      Selected for Award
Title: Physical Sub-Model Development for Turbulence Combustion Closure
Abstract: The innovation proposed is a computationally-tractable, physics-based, portable turbulent combustion modeling strategy for application to a wide range of Air Force aero-propulsive systems, including augmentors, liquid rockets and scramjets. This modeling strategy will be implemented within an Application Programming Interface (API) library suitable for easy integration within Air Force CFD simulation codes. The significance of the innovation is that it will improve the predictive capabilities of these codes with regard to the interaction of highly-unsteady, turbulent flows with combustion processes. As a result, CFD simulations will be able to capture more accurately and in a cost effective manner the complex flow physics governing propulsion system performance and stability. This combustion model library will involve a multi-layered approach that includes a range of formulations applicable to different flame regimes and with varying degrees of computational costs. By providing a viable and accurate modeling strategy of lasting relevance applicable for routine analysis, the appropriate model may be chosen for a particular problem/scenario while minimizing computational cost. BENEFIT: In order to ensure portability and easy coupling with appropriate reacting CFD flow solvers, the proposed modeling strategy will be implemented within a portable library featuring a standardized multi-language Application Programming Interface (API). This API library represents a viable commercial product to be licensed to customers who require access to advanced turbulent combustion models in their CFD flow solver of choice. Combustion models available in the API library will be applicable to a wide range of military and commercial combustion applications, including gas turbines, augmentors, power generation systems, furnaces, incinerators, internal combustion engines, etc. The commercial opportunities for this standardized API library are enormous. CRAFT Tech will market this library for license to commercial customers as well as to other CFD flow solver development companies.

Combustion Science & Engineering, Inc.
8940 Old Annapolis Road Suite L,
Columbia, MD 21045
(410) 884-3266

PI: Richard Joklik
(410) 884-3266
Contract #:
Purdue University
155 S. Grant St.,
West Lafayette, IN 47907
(765) 494-6204

ID#: F13A-T04-0134
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT04      Selected for Award
Title: Nonequilibrium Plasma-Assisted Combustion-Efficiency Control in Vitiated Air
Abstract: The ability of plasmas to modify combustion has been known for more than 50 years. Recent advances in plasma generation technology and measurement diagnostics have led to extensive efforts to understand both the kinetics of the plasma-flame interaction and the enhancement of combustion properties such as ignition, extinction, flame speed and dynamics. Combustion Science & Engineering, Inc. proposes to develop a kinetic model of plasma-enhanced vitiated combustion for hydrocarbon fuels including JP-8 by coupling the existing CSE vitiated kinetics model with plasma-flame chemistry developed in the current work. In parallel with the model development, CSE will work with Purdue University to develop and apply a new optical diagnostic for absolute measurement of radical species: Two-Color, two-photon laser- induced Polarization Spectroscopy (TCPS). The overall goal of this work is the development and validation of a kinetic model of JP-8 plasma-enhanced combustion under vitiated (or augmentor relevant) conditions. Propane and ethylene have been chosen as the initial fuels for experimental convenience. In Phase II we will extend both the model and experiments to JP-8, and extend the TCPS diagnostic to O atoms. We will also make extinction and ignition measurements under plasma-enhanced vitiated conditions. BENEFIT: An important product from this project will be a comprehensive jet fuel surrogate kinetic model that includes the validated platform for modeling plasma-assisted combustion. This mechanism will be specifically targeted at conditions typical of augmentors, inter-turbine burners and diesel engines that use either vitiation or exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). In addition, an industrial partner is also interested in the current proposed work as it focuses on applications for small jet engines. We believe that this tool could readily lead to the design of a plasma-assisted combustion system suitable for use in augmentors or afterburners, where flame stability and relight issues can affect performance.

Combustion Science & Engineering, Inc.
8940 Old Annapolis Road Suite L,
Columbia, MD 21045
(410) 884-3266

PI: Esteban Gonzalez-Juez
(410) 884-3266
Contract #:
Georgia Institute of Technology
Georgia Tech Research Corporat, Office of Sponsored Programs
Atlanta, GA 30332
(404) 385-2080

ID#: F13A-T12-0088
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT12      Selected for Award
Title: Physical Sub-Model Development for Turbulence Combustion Closure
Abstract: Ramjets and scramjets are the preferred propulsion platforms for flight in the supersonic (3 < M < 5) and hypersonic (5 < M < 15) regimes, respectively. Combustion phenomena in ramjets and scramjets are highly unsteady and susceptible to compressibility effects. Also, this flow can have regions that are premixed and within the thin-reaction- zones (TRZ) regime or in the broken-reaction-zones (BRZ) regime of premixed combustion. These characteristics make the use of current turbulent combustion models questionable. Therefore, Combustion Science & Engineering, Inc. (CSE) and the Computational Combustion Lab at Georgia Tech (CCL) propose to analyze the underlying physical assumptions of current models for their use in simulations of ramjet and scramjet combustion. This analysis will pay particular attention to whether or not current turbulent combustion models can capture compressibility effects and, if not, how to modify them to capture such effects. Based on this analysis, new physics-based models will be initiated in Phase I, and then will be further developed and validated in Phase II. Preliminary simulations for this validation study will be conducted in Phase I. BENEFIT: The product developed in this work will be a useful tool for supersonic and hypersonic vehicle design applications for the U. S. Air Force. Discussions with engine design teams indicate that the capabilities of this project will greatly enhance current design tools in use by equipment manufacturers. Also the market for this product will include gas turbine designers and manufacturers for both military and civilian aircraft. The use of this tool will significantly reduce development costs by eliminating some design iterations and hardware testing, which is quite expensive and time- consuming. Because of the broad range of applicability of the model, it will be useful for other flight vehicle systems, such as interturbine burners, new concepts for high speed aircrafts. It will also be useful to predict blowout and ignition. Therefore, the potential market for this tool is fairly large and ranges over a number of different industries.

Composite Technology Development, Inc.
2600 Campus Drive, Suite D,
Lafayette, CO 80026
(303) 664-0394

PI: Robert Taylor
(303) 664-0394
Contract #: FA9453-14-M-0012
University of Colorado Boulder
LASP, 1234 Innovation Drive
Boulder, CO 80303
(303) 492-1326

ID#: F13A-T06-0111
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT06      Awarded: 12/4/2013
Title: Cost Effective Solar Array based on High Efficiency Thin-Film Technology
Abstract: This Phase I effort will involve the development of an ultra low cost, high specific power, modular and flexible solar array module using currently available thin-film solar cells, innovative interconnects, and flexible encapsulation. The high efficiency thin-film solar cells will enable high specific power and flexibility in the module. The interconnect scheme and encapsulation will allow low cost cell integration and can be easily adapted to different size panels. The resulting technology will be lighter and less expensive than state-of-the-art (SOA) nanosatellite solar arrays, and will be easily reconfigured for larger spacecraft arrays, UAVs or other platforms. CTD will work closely with our university partner, the University of Colorado’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP), to design, build, and test a proof- of-concept prototype during Phase I. The goal of Phase II will be to obtain flight heritage by flying a demonstration module on an upcoming LASP mission. BENEFIT: This new thin-film flexible module will provide higher specific power to nanosatellites at a lower cost. Both improvements are needed to provide the power for additional capabilities that are continuously being developed. Reduced weight and lower cost solar arrays will be beneficial to all sizes of spacecraft, including the largest that will require 30kW of power or more.

Corvid Technologies, Inc.
145 Overhill Drive,
Mooresville, NC 28117
(704) 799-6944

PI: Justin Foster
(704) 799-6944
Contract #:
Clemson University
210 Engineering Innovation Bld,
Clemson, SC 29634
(864) 656-6248

ID#: F13A-T12-0065
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT12      Selected for Award
Title: Physical Sub-Model Development for Turbulence Combustion Closure
Abstract: Corvid Technologies, in partnership with Clemson University’s combustion modeling group, is pleased to offer a physical sub-model evaluation and development plan for turbulent combustion applications relevant to the Air Force. We will leverage the computational resources and combustion modeling expertise from both parties to evaluate the current state of combustion modeling and then transition this effort into the development and implementation of a new model compatible with current Air Force CFD code architectures. The goals of Phase I include a critical evaluation of the current turbulent combustion closure methodologies as well as the initial development of the new model. BENEFIT: The proposal’s goal is to outline the process by which Corvid Technologies will initially evaluate the current state-of- the-art in combustion closure methodologies relevant to Air Force combustion applications and ultimately develop a new combustion model that improves the predictive capabilities of current Air Force CFD codes. This type of model evaluation/development has direct consequences to the overall design process of many military propulsion systems. Corvid will also leverage the model development to become highly competitive in future Air Force and other DoD combustion related proposals.

CU Aerospace
301 North Neil St., Suite 400
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 239-0629

PI: David L Carroll
(217) 239-1703
Contract #:
Univ. Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Board of Trustees, OSPRA, 1901 S. First St - Suite A
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-2187

ID#: F13A-T04-0141
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT04      Selected for Award
Title: Nonequilibrium Plasma-Assisted Combustion-Efficiency Control in Vitiated Air
Abstract: CU Aerospace (CUA) and team partner the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) propose to perform research, development and demonstration of experimental quenching free measurements of heat-release in a realistic highly turbulent plasma-assisted flame. Kinetics models will be correspondingly updated and detailed 3D multiphysics simulations will be validated by the measurements. Current diagnostic tools are difficult to implement for 2D measurements of intermediate species to support the modeling and physical understanding of these complex processes. To fill this technology gap, this proposal introduces innovations that will produce the higher precision diagnostic techniques and greatly enhance knowledge of these plasmadynamic and chemical kinetic phenomena. This SBIR effort will lead to aircraft engine design improvements that will provide enhanced combustion efficiency, reignition and flame holding for very high altitude, high-speed flight in Phase II of this program. These enhancements and understanding will have major implications for the expansion of aircraft mission envelopes, and our goal is to jointly develop with UIUC these diagnostic and software tools of choice for the industry. BENEFIT: The Phase I results will lay the foundation to develop a prototype diagnostic and modeling suite for comprehensive development and testing in the Phase II program. Incorporating the Phase I diagnostic techniques along with Air Force guidance for most desired features, the diagnostic and software suite will be enhanced and tested extensively in Phase II as a product demonstration unit. Applications of the developed approach include next generation warfighters capable of flying at higher altitudes and/or higher speeds, and technologies that would be used by engine manufacturers for the development of high-altitude propulsion systems, possibly enabling low-cost to space access via hybrid hypersonic launch. Commercial applications that utilize control of plasma enhanced combustion have the potential to fundamentally bring transformative changes to our combustion-based energy infrastructure by providing (1) the potential for flexible and broad integration of alternative fuels and plasma technology in our everyday lives; (2) more powerful and energy efficient combustion systems for power generation and transportation; (3) reduction of harmful pollutants in our environment; (4) improvements in national security from fuel blends with less dependence on foreign oil, and (5) a more sustainable and efficient energy infrastructure. Furthermore, plasma assisted chemistry could have broader impact in

CU Aerospace
301 North Neil St., Suite 400
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 239-1703

PI: Chris Mangun
(217) 239-1704
Contract #:
University of Illinois at U-C
Board of Trustees, OSPRA 1901 S. First St-Suite A
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-2187

ID#: F13A-T09-0005
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT09      Selected for Award
Title: Microvascular Composites for Novel Thermal Management Devices
Abstract: Living systems rely on pervasive vascular networks to enable a plurality of biological function, exemplified by natural composite structures that are lightweight, high-strength, and capable of mass and energy transport. In contrast, synthetic composites possess high strength-to-weight ratios but lack the dynamic functionality of their natural counterparts. CU Aerospace, with team partners the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), North Carolina State University (NCSU), and Lockheed Martin, propose to use a revolutionary microvascular technology developed at UIUC to build a composite counter-flow heat exchanger. This technology relies on 3D weaving of sacrificial fibers into a polymeric matrix, which are subsequently vaporized to obtain a uniform array of capillaries. By weaving these sacrificial fibers with a perpendicular array of carbon fibers and using computational modeling to optimize the design, this device can achieve good lateral thermal conductance while retaining very low axial conductance. Most Joule-Thomson heat exchangers are either metal finned-tube devices with limited surface area between the solid and gas streams, or etched-glass/silicon devices that allow relatively limited gas flow and cooling power. A micro-capillary array based heat exchanger offers the potential for both large surface area and large gas flow, with a manufacturing process that offers low-cost mass production. BENEFIT: Development of the sacrificial fibers to allow incorporation of microvascular networks in polymeric composites has tremendous potential. Multiple functionalities are achieved by distributing different fluids throughout the microvascular network, which can be seamlessly integrated into both rigid and flexible materials. By circulating fluids with unique physical properties, there is the capability to create a new generation of biphasic composite materials in which the solid phase provides strength and form while the fluid phase provides interchangeable functionality. Applications that have been examined include self-healing, thermal management, electromagnetic signature, electrical conductivity tuning, and chemical reactivity. The impact of this technology is extremely broad and far-reaching, while our initial efforts are focused on military and aerospace applications; fertile research opportunities exist across a broad cross-section of industries. Long-term strategic plans are to leverage our development efforts to foster spin-off technologies in related industries.

DECISIVE ANALYTICS Corporation
1235 South Clark Street, Suite 400
Arlington, VA 22202
(703) 414-5016

PI: Peter David
(703) 414-5009
Contract #: FA8750-14-C-0020
ICSI
1947 Center Street, Suite 600,
Berkeley, CA 94704
(510) 666-2888

ID#: F13A-T11-0048
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT11      Awarded: 10/22/2013
Title: STUDENT (SimulaTion and UnDerstanding of EveNts in Text)
Abstract: Although Natural Language Processing research has produced powerful techniques for parsing and data extraction, computers remain mostly oblivious to the meaning of the language they process. Computers cannot, in general, connect the words and phrases in language to a larger model of the world that permits reasoning about the implications of what is written or said. We propose an algorithm that analyzes text-based language data using a method of inference designed to match the way humans process and describe activities and events. Our approach to language understanding combines text with external knowledge encoded in a flexible and expressive structure called an X-net. X- nets, invented by DAC team member Dr. Srinivas Narayanan, act as abstract and computationally efficient simulation of activities, states, and events. Unlike other inference techniques, X-nets make it practical to perform inference on language describing complex, uncertain, and interrelated events that unfold over time. We will evaluate our text inference capability using the same evaluation measures used to assess reading comprehension in middle and high school. BENEFIT: If we are successful, the technology developed under this effort will represent a major step towards the development of algorithms that achieve human-like understanding of text. Computers will be able to find and react to language data based on its meaning and implications, rather than the surface form of the words used. Existing stores of language data will become enormously more valuable once we can extract information based on implications instead of key words. And general-purpose, meaning-aware language understanding algorithms will act as the foundation of a new generation of data analysis and human interaction tools. In Phase I of this project, we focus on understanding the language of the limited domain of disasters and disaster response. Humanitarian Aid / Disaster Relief (HADR) is important to many Government, NGO, and private organizations. The results of Phase I of this project will be immediately applicable to a number of our current and potential customers who need exploit text data generated from large-scale, rapidly evolving events such as natural disasters.

Eagle Harbor Technologies, Inc.
119 W Denny Way, Suite 210
Seattle, WA 98119
(206) 402-5241

PI: Timothy Ziemba
(206) 402-5241
Contract #:
University of Colorado, Boulder
Dept of Mechanical Engineering, 427 UCB, Engineering Center
Boulder, CO 80309
(303) 735-1003

ID#: F13A-T07-0182
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT07      Selected for Award
Title: A High Power and Repetition Rate Nanosecond Pulser with Variable Pulse Width Control
Abstract: High power nanosecond pulses provide unique capabilities for several applications relevant to defense, energy, materials science, medical applications and basic research. For the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) new compact and portable nanosecond pulsed electric systems could provide novel solutions for directed energy weapons, efficient combustion, and aerodynamic drag reduction. To be operationally relevant, the next generation pulser is required to generate high voltage (> 50 kV) pulses at high repetition rates (> 100 kHz), which presents a significant challenge for pulse power supply design. Eagle Harbor Technologies, Inc., in collaboration with the University of Colorado Boulder, proposes a unique pulser configuration that leverages existing EHT IGBT power module technology. The EHT Integrated Power Module (IPM) has demonstrated nanosecond pulse generation at megahertz repetition frequencies at high voltage (> 20 kV) and high peak power levels (> 1MW) for bursts up to several tens of milliseconds. The proposed Phase I work plan is to incorporate CU Boulders novel Thermal Ground Plane (TGP) technology to allow the pulser to operate continuously at high frequency. BENEFIT: The proposed work seeks to develop a novel IGBT high peak power nanosecond pulser system suitable for DOD applications and platforms. The benefits of the new system are many and include applications for improving combustion efficiency in both military and commercial vehicles and aircraft. Additionally, similar high voltage pulsers are utilized in excimer laser systems for both industrial and medical applications where the new capabilities of increasing pulse frequency to over 1 MHz may allow for new and unique solutions for these laser systems.

Frontier Technology, Inc.
75 Aero Camino, Suite A,
Goleta, CA 93117
(805) 685-6672

PI: Gary Key
(937) 429-3302
Contract #: FA8750-14-C-0023
University of Florida
339 Weil Hall, Box 116550,
Gainesville, FL 32611
(352) 392-9447

ID#: F13A-T01-0207
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT01      Awarded: 11/21/2013
Title: Multiphysics-based Sensor Fusion
Abstract: Frontier Technology, Inc. (FTI) and its research partners, University of Florida (UF) and Lockheed Corporation, propose to enhance fusion of multimodal (EO, IR, acoustic, radar, etc.) multisensor datastreams. Phase I will: (1) Determine physics models for apparent properties of targets and inherent properties of sensors; (2) Integrate target and sensor physics models to produce Multi-Physics Models (MPMs) for each application; (3) Enhance sensor fusion algorithms via semantic integration with MPMs, to increase probability of detection (Pd) and decrease false alarm rate (Rfa); (4) Test and validate MPM-enhanced sensor fusion algorithms including FTI/UF’s state-of-the-art Dynamically Adaptive Statistical Data Fusion (DASDAF) paradigm, to improve target classification; and (5) Analyze parallel processing architectures for real-time computation/application. Phase I will identify relevant technological applications, develop baseline MPMs encompassing selected measurement observables, derive multiphysics-based sensor fusion algorithms and demonstrate effectiveness using synthetic data. Phase II will further refine MPMs and companion MPM-based sensor fusion algorithms, and then conduct high fidelity performance demonstration/validation using finer grained simulations. Phase II will develop baseline embedded computing approaches for meeting tactical timeline requirements for chosen applications and quantify performance gains relative to conventional fusion algorithms. FTI will commercialize the resulting prototype software for Government and leading aerospace contractors. BENEFIT: If successful, the proposed research will constitute a breakthrough in the solution of problems related to sensor fusion and automated target recognition by using multi-physics models to optimize the fusion of datastreams from disparate modalities in multi-sensor networks. Our DASDAF data fusion methodology will be optimized by MPMs to combine results from multiple disparate sensors and modalities, with analysis (in Phase II) of numerical quality. This research and development applies to a wide variety of military applications, such as airborne, spaceborne and ground-based surveillance, remote sensing in support of battlefield surveillance, as well as domestic applications such as environmental assessment and monitoring applications for law enforcement. Frontier Technology will license or sell the

Global InfoTek, Inc
1920 Association Drive, Suite 200
Reston, VA 20191
(703) 652-1600

PI: Lance Forbes
(703) 652-1600
Contract #: FA9453-14-M-0005
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical Univ
600 S Clyde Morris Boulevard,
Daytona Beach, FL 32114
(386) 226-7701

ID#: F13A-T05-0128
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT05      Awarded: 10/1/2013
Title: Security in Cyber-Physical Networked Systems
Abstract: Global InfoTek, Inc. recognizes both the unique technical challenges associated with security in Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS), and the critical importance of such systems across the DOD. Our solution consists for four critical elements: 1. A permissive, kernel-level, whitelisting approach. This identifies unexplained changes to executable code in a target CPS, using an abstract system model, to support attention-focusing pattern learning, and anomaly detection. 2. A spatio-temporal pattern learning module that helps define “normal” behavior, thereby focusing attention on potential anomalies which may indicate a threat to the normal operation of the CPS. The resultant learned models can be used for anomaly detection. 3. A semantic taxonomy-based model of real-world behaviors, physical constraints, and threat models. This captures architectural knowledge of the CPS, enabling robust security solutions. 4. An intelligent anomaly detection module that learns, identifies, and alerts about anomalous activity that may indicate potential security threats in a CPS. This is done using a combination of statistical and model-based anomaly detection. These four elements will be brought together using notional satellite architecture based on AFOSR’s nanosatellite projects as the target CPS for research, development, and evaluation of our approach. BENEFIT: GITI intends to pursue a two-phase commercialization strategy. The first phase focuses on marketing the resultant technology to its existing Air Force customers. GITI will leverage existing activities GITI has in several Air Force programs that can quickly take advantage of this highly critical technology. GITI will also leverage has ongoing IR&D and partnership programs for the creation of new cyber

Guerci Consulting
2509 N Utah St,
Arlington, VA 22207
(703) 472-7990

PI: Joseph R Guerci
(703) 472-7990
Contract #: FA8750-14-C-0018
Georgia Tech Research Institute
7220 Richardson Road,
Smyrna, GA 30080
(404) 407-8274

ID#: F13A-T01-0163
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT01      Awarded: 10/22/2013
Title: Multiphysics-based Sensor Fusion
Abstract: A new approach to multisensor fusion is proposed that utilizes a knowledge-aided (KA) multi-physics model as the main fusion engine, as opposed to traditional purely statistical methods. The new Multi-Physics Sensor Fusion (MPSF) is enabled by advances in high performance computing, knowledge-aided (KA) processing, and new techniques in multi- physics modeling. Traditional sensor fusion output data products such as target track, ID, etc., are obtained by queries to the multi-physics model, rather than traditional fusion algorithms that translate sensor measurements to desired output products via usual statiscal methods such as an extended Kalman filter. BENEFIT: In addition to better multisensor fusion performance, the MPSF approach also provides a powerful design tool for mutli- sensor systems.

InfoBeyond Technology LLC
Suite 220, 10400 Linn Station Rd.
Louisville, KY 40223
(502) 742-9770

PI: Bin Xie
(502) 742-9770
Contract #: FA9453-14-M-0003
University of Louisville
501 East Broadway, Suite 200,
Louisville, KY 40202
(502) 852-8359

ID#: F13A-T02-0149
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT02      Awarded: 10/23/2013
Title: Decision Making under Uncertainty for Dynamic Spectrum Access
Abstract: Due to scarcity of spectrum, Dynamic Spectrum Access (DSA) becomes a needed technology to improve the utilization of electromagnetic spectrum for DoD satellite communication. However, current DSA approaches are developed for terrestrial communications without addressing the unique challenges for SATCOM environments such as error-prone spectrum sensing, high mobility, and large coverage. In this project, InfoBeyond advocates novel Efficient and Robust Dynamic Spectrum Access under Uncertainty (ERDSAU) algorithms. ERDSAU models the DSA in the SATCOM environment as a problem of Partially Observable Markov Decision Process (POMDP). Partial observation indicates that a LEO satellite is only able to sense a partial of spectrum channel. Under partial observation and imperfection awareness of channel, POMDP is an optimization problem that allows a LEO satellite to optimally take action on the spectrum channel. In a collaborative way, ERDSAU tracks each spectrum channel by a probability distribution over the set of possible states that is evaluated on a set of observations and observation probabilities and the underlying Markov decision process, providing high accuracy on decision making. Furthermore, ERDSAU prioritizes the LEO satellites in detecting spectrum holes to improve the resource allocation between multiple satellites. ERDSAU also provides computationally efficiency in response to change of spectrum status. BENEFIT: The ability to provide spectrum sensing and decision making under uncertainty environments increases the spectrum utilization and is proving useful for DoD SATCOM communication. However, the current approaches are very limited to offer such capability for SATCOM environment where sensing is error prone and satellites moves fast. Our proposed ERDSAU provides an innovative approach that provides the capability of spectrum sensing and access decision making under high uncertainty. ERDSAU represents a vital advance on the frontline of the cognitive SATCOM environments. Once it is developed as COTS/GOTS products, ERDSAU leads to several key business benefits. At first, ERDSAU can be deployed in the military SATCOM environments. The unique issues of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Satellites spectrum sensing are addressed such that the secondary users can optimally access the spectrum holes of the primary users without affecting to theirs normal transmission. The proposed ERDSAU utilizes the unused spectrum period of the primary users that significantly increase the system performance. These features are highly desirable in many military

InfoBeyond Technology LLC
Suite 220, 10400 Linn Station Rd.
Louisville, KY 40223
(502) 742-9770

PI: Bin Xie
(502) 742-9770
Contract #: FA8750-14-C-0041
Oregon State University
Property Services Bldg, 644 SW 13th St.
Corvallis, OR 97333
(541) 737-3470

ID#: F13A-T08-0150
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT08      Awarded: 10/23/2013
Title: Secure Efficient Cross-domain Protocols
Abstract: Coordinating and sharing information across multi-level security (MLS) networks are of great interest in many military applications. However, it is very challenging to accomplish those goals due to the heterogeneous security classifications of different network domains. The recent proposed cross-domain solutions (CDS) provide initial steps to make such applications possible. However, there are still several issues in the existing solutions, and some of them are: (i) inefficient authentication; (ii) privacy leakage; (iii) unlimited capacity covert channel. In this project, InfoBeyond advocates an Efficient, Secure, and Covert Channel Capacity Bounded (ESC3B) algorithms for the MLS cross-domain environments to address these challenges. First, ESC3B provides an efficient and secure fine-grained authentication scheme which requires each user to store only one key. The key can be used to authenticate several services across the networks. Secondly, an anonymous authentication protocol is provided to the users for service request. The service provider or other third parties cannot infer the user identity and other privacy information. Finally, ESC3B enables reliable communication between network domains by providing feedback channel. The capacity of potential covert channels created by the feedback channel is upper bounded by an arbitrary small value determined by the network designer. BENEFIT: The ability to provide data sharing and cooperation capabilities in MLS cross-domain environments is proving increasingly useful for many commercial and military applications. However, the current approaches are very limited to offer such capabilities without a risk of leaking sensitive information. Our proposed ESC3B provides an innovative approach that provides the cooperating and data sharing capabilities among the heterogeneous security domains. ESC3B represents a vital advance on the frontline of the future MLS environments. Once it is developed as COTS/GOTS products, ESC3B leads to several key business benefits. At first, it provides efficient and secure authentication across domains. ESC3B can be deployed in many commercial as well as military MLS environments in which the cooperation and information sharing across network domains are needed. The proposed framework ESC3B saves the key storage space at the users while simplifying the key management at the service provider. When a key or user is compromised, it requires no key update. These features are highly desirable in many military scenarios where

Intelligent Automation, Inc.
15400 Calhoun Drive, Suite 400
Rockville, MD 20855
(301) 294-5221

PI: Yi Shi
(301) 294-4268
Contract #: FA9453-14-M-0004
University of California, Davis
3165 Kemper Hall,
Davis, CA 95616
(530) 752-7390

ID#: F13A-T02-0162
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT02      Awarded: 10/23/2013
Title: RADIUS: Reliable and Adaptive Decision makIng under Uncertainty for Spectrum access
Abstract: Intelligent Automation Inc. proposes to design a robust decision making and dynamic spectrum access (DSA) system for satellite communications under uncertainty. Our system integrates various types of uncertainty caused by environment, regulation, uncontrollable user effects, and prediction. We will first develop methods to quantify the uncertainty by either individual observation or collaborative approach. This approach includes statistical modeling of spectrum dynamics and prediction under various sources of uncertainty in communications systems. We will then design reaction strategies that are robust or opportunistic to uncertainty, or can leverage uncertainty by anticipation. We will wrap these strategies in reliable DSA algorithms to manage and mitigate uncertainty, which can be based on either offline stochastic optimization or online algorithms. We will study the performance, complexity and overhead of the designed algorithms via in-depth analysis, simulation or emulation under realistic communications models. In particular, our approach will integrate uncertainty quantification and uncertainty mitigation in common system architecture. We will identify the optimal conditions and use cases for each algorithm and integrate them in an adaptive algorithm that switches between offline and online algorithms in the system. BENEFIT: We have identified the Air Force Satellite Control Networks, Air Force Space Networks, and Airborne Networks as the initial application/primary market for this technology. The proposed stochastic optimization and robust game theory approach enables holistic understanding of how to efficiently utilize the limited spectrum in a satellite network with uncertainty. Such insights will benefit various applications including space situational awareness, resource allocation, and network adaptation. The proposed solution has tremendous potential in military applications regarding space and airborne networks, such as Space Command, potentially supporting a number of major programs like Air Force Satellite Control Network (AFSCN), Airborne Networks Program, Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) program, Future Combat System (FCS), Wideband Global SATCOM (WGS), Transformational Satellite Communications System (TSAT), NASA Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN), Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR), Military Satellite Communications (MILSATCOM) program, UHF Follow-On (UFO) program, and Space-Based Infrared System (SBIRS) program. As a whole, the proposed effort has great potential to enhance DSA in satellite networks. Such

Intelligent Automation, Inc.
15400 Calhoun Drive, Suite 400
Rockville, MD 20855
(301) 294-5221

PI: Sohraab Soltani
(301) 795-4454
Contract #: FA8750-14-C-0048
Pennsylvania State University
Department of Statistics, 326 Thomas Building
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 863-4918

ID#: F13A-T14-0169
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT14      Awarded: 10/24/2013
Title: RADAR: Risk Assessment of Disclosure via Automated Reasoning
Abstract: We propose a comprehensive Risk Assessment of Disclosure via Automated Reasoning (RADAR) system. This system will leverage and advance various theoretical models in statistical inference (e.g., probe selection and posterior estimation) and information theory (e.g., entropy approach) to obtain a set of analytical tools for information disclosure analysis. These tools are integrated into a practical framework for agile, adaptive and yet general quantitative disclosure risk measurement for targeted applications. Our approach will apply to information disclosure, via information sharing or over malicious or accidental covert channels, with different types, formats, and security levels under various targeted applications. We will design, implement and test methods for automatic categorization of information according to the type of anticipated risk that will be quantitatively assessed. The proposed system will provide automated support for identifying, categorizing, quantifying, and reasoning of information disclosure risks by taking into account cumulative risk due to aggregated disclosure in a sequence of releases and the contextual information that enables domain- specific inference. We will develop practical software tools to automatically compute disclosure risk for each disclosure event with near real-time implementation. We will evaluate the performance of the proposed framework and the developed software tools using realistic information disclosure applications and demonstrate the effectiveness of our system for automated assessment of disclosure risk. BENEFIT: The proposed effort has tremendous application potential in military and commercial information systems to provide improved automated risk assessment for variety of information disclosure events. The proposed technology, RADAR, promises significant step toward automation of risk assessment over distributed systems with different information disclosure types and content. RADAR provides automated risk monitoring tools to strengthen privacy-preservation systems. Such tools are directly beneficial to various information systems with respect to intelligent information disclosure evaluation, information privacy and confidentiality through risk reasoning, and prevention of leaving secret data through risk aggregation. This effort also applies to commercial organizations and homeland security. An important group of commercial applications will be social networking privacy management and distributed cloud information protection, where our technologies can be used for assessing the risk of implementing new privacy rules or

Intelligent Fusion Technology, Inc
20271 Goldenrod Lane, Suite 2066
Germantown, MD 20876
(949) 596-0057

PI: Genshe Chen
(301) 515-7261
Contract #: FA9453-14-M-0001
George Mason University
School of Information Technolo, 4400 University Drive
Fairfax, VA 22030
(703) 993-1639

ID#: F13A-T02-0085
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT02      Awarded: 11/6/2013
Title: Decision Making under Uncertainty for Dynamic Spectrum Access in space application
Abstract: This Small Business Technology Transfer Phase I project develops collaborative spectrum awareness techniques that enable dynamic spectrum access (DSA) systems to make decisions with imperfect awareness. DSA technologies are emerging as a promising mitigator against spectrum congestion resulting from the explosive growth in commercial and Government wireless systems and services. DSA systems have demonstrated the potential for allowing increased spectrum access to greater numbers of users, assuming perfect system knowledge. Challenges still remain for widespread fielding of DSA systems, including the necessary ability to make decisions under uncertainty. The proposed effort seeks to develop, demonstrate, and implement the technical underpinnings and algorithms for DSA system operation in satellite communication environment under conditions of imperfect knowledge. It specifically proposes an integration of Bayesian game and decision-theoretic approaches to combine data from multiple collaborative sensing and static sources to increase awareness and spectrum utilization efficiency. Representation of uncertainty in the knowledge base is accomplished through probabilistic ontology and Bayesian reasoning technologies. The resulting capabilities allow DSA systems to evaluate and make trades among capacity gain, interference mitigation, and monetary cost in uncertain operating environments. BENEFIT: This effort will advance research into areas of spectrum awareness and sensing strategies for DSA networks with incomplete and imperfect knowledge. The proposed research will develop a combination of distinct innovative game, information, and Bayesian-techniques considering aspects affecting scalability with respect to the computation, communication, and complexity of the DSA in space communication environment, which are applicable to High data Rate Airborne Terminal and XG DSA2100. The proposed effort will produce generalized models, ontologies, algorithms, and theories for multi-modal information fusion to a wide range of collaborative sensing and awareness approaches. Furthermore, the effort will provide a quantitative and qualitative evaluation understanding of information utility (performance gain as a function of system resource expenditure) and scalability constraints for spectrum awareness in DSA systems. The technological developments will impact cognitive wireless network understanding, congestion mitigation, and reliable access with unprecedented applicability to critical decision-making problems in a wide variety of

Intelligent Fusion Technology, Inc
20271 Goldenrod Lane, Suite 2066
Germantown, MD 20876
(949) 596-0057

PI: Genshe Chen
(301) 515-7261
Contract #: FA8750-14-C-0043
Temple University
Dept. of Computer & Informatio, 1805 N. Broad St
Philadelphia, PA 19122
(215) 204-6973

ID#: F13A-T10-0086
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT10      Awarded: 10/25/2013
Title: HPC-MTT: High Performance Computing Enabled Multiple Target Tracking for Urban Surveillance Areas
Abstract: Advances in large scale visual sensors enable (near) real time acquisition of imagery data over wide urban surveillance areas. Data collected by such sensors, such as the wide area motion imagery (WAMI) systems, however poses computational challenges to existing visual analysis algorithms. Among many tasks, tracking multiple moving target indicators (MTI) is of fundamental importance since it bridges the low-level imagery input (e.g., WAMI data) and the high-level situation awareness (e.g., trajectory prediction and understanding). In this project, we plan to design and implement a novel high-performance-computing (PHC) enabled multiple-target-tracking (MTT) framework, named HPC-MTT, with focus on large scale MTI tracking in the context of WAMI understanding. The design of HPC-MTT will be from three inter-correlated viewpoints. First, from the MTT point of view, we plan to parallelize all steps in the MTT pipeline, including background subtraction, MTI detection and multiple-target-association (MTA). Second, from the HPC point of view, we plan to design WAMI-specified parallelization algorithms following the partition-communication- agglomeration-mapping (PCAM) paradigm. In particular, we will design spatial PCAM, temporal PCAM and algorithmic PCAM to capture respectively the spatial, temporal and algorithmic characteristics of WAMI tasks. Finally, from the HPC platform point of view, we will deploy the proposed HPC-MTT in various HPC infrastructures including multiple-core computation (e.g., GPGPU for on-board tasks) and cloud computing (e.g., Amazon E2C-based prototype for off-board tasks). BENEFIT: The proposed high-performance-computing (HPC) enabled multiple-target-tracking (MTT) architecture has tremendous applications potential in many military applications. In C4ISR the proposed technology can also be incorporated into the systems that help warfighters process more information with greater efficiency, for example in the counter-insurgency and counter-IED area. In addition, some relevant Defense Acquisition Programs within DoD are such as Distributed Common Ground Station-Navy (DCGS-N), DCGS-X (Air Force), DCGS Army (DCGS-A) system, and AFRL E2AT and PCPADX. For some of these programs we already have close connections and know considerable program details. The market for military is quite large and IFT has successfully transitioned research prototype for inclusion in DoD contractor research simulations. We can also see commercial application of this project with the

Lattice Technology Group, Inc.
19775 Belmont Executive Plaza, Suite ,
Ashburn, VA 20147
(703) 466-0488

PI: Robert Macior
(315) 339-2717
Contract #: FA8750-14-C-0026
Riverside Research Institute
156 Williams Street, 9th Floor,
New York, NY 10038
(212) 502-1766

ID#: F13A-T10-0037
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT10      Awarded: 10/22/2013
Title: Advanced Architectures and Data Exchange Standards for High Performance Computing (HPC) Application to Wide Area Motion Imagery (WAMI) Tracking
Abstract: The objective of this effort is to develop next-generation architectural and operational concepts, leveraging recent advances in High Performance Computing (HPC) technologies, to improve Wide Area Motion Imagery (WAMI) tracking capacity and performance. WAMI systems typically produce tens of thousands of moving target indicator (MTI) detections from city-sized urban areas at update rates greater than 12 Hz. As target densities and data volume expand, it becomes especially challenging for current generation tracking architectures to correctly and efficiently associate/correlate individual MTI detections. This effort provides the foundational capability to fully leverage HPC- based distributed processing to solve the high-density WAMI tracking problem. Specific tasks are: 1) Conduct a technology survey to establish current state-of-the-art and recent trends in HPC computing/processing platforms and software, WAMI systems (sensors and processing), DoD and NATO multi-intelligence tracking architectures and concepts of operation (CONOPs), and supporting data standards (e.g. STANAGs 4609, 4607, 4676, 4559, 4545); 2) Develop an overarching next-generation tracking architecture and common exchange format to support improvements to WAMI tracking mission performance via HPC technologies, including "big data" management concepts and cloud- based hosting; 3) Develop a CONOP that incorporates innovative tasking, collection, processing, exploitation, and dissemination (TCPED) concepts and includes new Track Management approaches. BENEFIT: The primary benefit of this Phase 1 activity is a common next-generation architecture with supporting data exchange standards, to enable the application of distributed HPC processing for dramatic improvements in high-density, "big data" WAMI tracking.

Longview International Inc.
180 2nd Street Suite B2,
Los Altos, CA 94022
(650) 996-1810

PI: Dr. Patrick Barkhordarian
(415) 595-7615
Contract #: FA8750-14-C-0022
West Forest University
School of Bio-Medical Engineer, CS dept, 1st floor Meads hall
Winston Salem, NC 27157
(336) 716-8430

ID#: F13A-T11-0017
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT11      Awarded: 10/22/2013
Title: Enhanced Text Analytics Using Lifted Probabilistic Inference Algorithms
Abstract: LVI proposes developing an advanced framework of lifted probabilistic inference algorithms for enhancing the scaling and accuracy of text analytics. In Phase I of this project, LVI proposes to explore the scalability of various lifted inference techniques for utilizing Markov Logic Networks (MLN) and the Tractable Markov Logic language in the Tuffy software package as a base platform. These techniques will be applied to the area of automated knowledge base construction from free text, using abductive reasoning to infer the optimal updates to the knowledge base. The MLN will use unsupervised joint inferencing techniques to combine record segmentation, co-reference resolution, and entity resolution in a single process, as opposed to a pipelined approach. Phase I will also include a cost-benefit analysis of utilizing ontologies as background knowledge as a method of bootstrapping MLN learning, using general-purpose models from Linked Open Data (LOD) Cloud sources such as DBpedia and YAGO. LVI's proposed solution is based on the company's extensive experience in developing tools utilizing Semantic Web based AI technologies, inference engines, and Linked Data applications. LVI brings deep experience in knowledge engineering, information extraction, data integration through statistical ontology alignment, machine learning, and online analytical processing (OLAP), and intelligent application development. BENEFIT: The algorithms for Lifted inference have a variety of applications. They include Social networks, object recognition, link prediction, activity recognition, model counting, bio-medical applications and relational reasoning and learning. Fundamental building block to improve current capabilities.

Lynntech, Inc.
2501 Earl Rudder Freeway South,
College Station, TX 77845
(979) 764-2218

PI: Ashwin Balasubramanian
(979) 764-2200
Contract #:
Texas Engineering Experiment Statio
400 Harvey Mitchell Parkway S, Suite 300
College Station, TX 77845
(979) 847-2200

ID#: F13A-T07-0035
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT07      Selected for Award
Title: Use of Micro Plasma Based Transistors for the Development of Compact High Frequency Power Supplies
Abstract: Pulsed power systems are utilized in several application platforms ranging from fuel reforming to biomedical applications. While significant advances have been made in development of solid state technology based power systems, the need for faster pulse rates as well as higher voltage requirements have resulted in a need for developing novel pulse power sources capable of pulsing at frequencies greater than 100 kHz and at voltages as high as 50kV. Lynntech, along with its STTR partner in Dr. David Staack of Texas A&M University proposes to develop a novel microplasma transistor based pulsed power system that is both durable and compact. The proposed technology will utilize specific instabilities related to plasma discharge to allow the proposed technology to achieve high current discharges required for real world applications loads. In Phase I, Lynntech will also fine tune the plasma discharge characteristics to minimize system frequency and thermal losses as well as package the proposed microplasma transistor technology into a ruggedized and military compatible platform. Once the scaled-up microplasma transistor system is successfully demonstrated in Phase II, further development efforts will focus on seamless integration and implementation of the plasma actuator across various military platforms in the Phase III. BENEFIT: Modern pulsed power supplies have been extensively researched since the 1960’s and in these systems, energy is accumulated over a relatively long period and then compressed in a short period to deliver very large power pulses to a given load. In this regard, pulsed power is an enabling technology that has allowed the development of several applications. Pulsed power systems can be used across a range of application platforms from charged particle beam diodes, and other primarily defense-related applications; to biological samples, water purification, removing effluents from combustion processes as well as environmental and biomedical applications.

MicroLink Devices
6457 Howard Street,
Niles, IL 60714
(847) 588-3001

PI: Noren Pan
(847) 588-3001
Contract #: FA9453-14-M-0014
Rochester Institute of Technology
85 Lomb Memorial Drive,
Rochester, NY 14623
(585) 475-4214

ID#: F13A-T13-0080
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT13      Awarded: 12/17/2013
Title: Quantum and Nanostructure Enhanced Epitaxial Lift-Off Solar Cells
Abstract: MicroLink and its collaborators, Rochester Institute of Technology and Magnolia Solar, will develop a high-efficiency, single-junction, epitaxial lift-off (ELO) GaAs solar cell by incorporating nano-scale features, such as quantum dots and optically functional textures, within the solar cell structure. The principal technical objective of the project is to increase the AM0 efficiency of a large-area single-junction GaAs solar cell to more than 30%. The major innovative aspect of the proposed work is the use of quantum dots to extend the photon collection wavelength range and to improve the coupling of infrared light into the cell. We will also include bandgap engineering solutions, such as introducing thick InGaAs quantum wells into GaAs base, to reduce dark current in the cell. The nano-scale structures will enhance the absorption and trapping of light by the solar cell. We intend to leverage existing quantum dot epitaxy processes developed by Rochester Institute of Technology and bandgap engineering developed by Magnolia Solar, and to combine these with MicroLink’s expertise in multi-junction cell growth and ELO technology. BENEFIT: During the proposed Phase I program we expect to develop large-area, quantum dot-enhanced, single-junction GaAs epitaxial lift-off (ELO) solar cells with efficiency >30% for 1-sun AM0 illumination. The addition of the quantum dots will substantially enhance the infrared response of the solar cell. Future Air Force applications involving autonomous vehicles and space platforms will benefit from the availability of solar cells that have higher efficiency and that are capable of harvesting energy over a broader wavelength range. Integration of quantum dots into ELO solar cells will result in a class of cells that have higher efficiency, are lighter, and have significantly lower cost than conventional triple-junction-on-germanium cells. Commercial applications of the quantum dot-enhanced ELO cells include spacecraft, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and terrestrial energy harvesting. Commercialization of the quantum dot-enhanced ELO solar cell will be enhanced by MicroLink’s expertise in this technology area: In the last few years, MicroLink has developed a manufacturing line for large-area ELO solar cells; the company has also developed a technology to encapsulate the cells to form lightweight, flexible, robust, high-efficiency solar sheets.

NanoSonic, Inc.
158 Wheatland Drive,
Pembroke, VA 24136
(540) 626-6266

PI: Hang Ruan
(540) 626-6266
Contract #:
Virginia Tech
122 Randolph Hall,
Blacksburg, VA 24061
(540) 231-7274

ID#: F13A-T15-0099
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT15      Selected for Award
Title: Semiconductor Nanomembrane based Sensors for High Frequency Pressure Measurements
Abstract: The Air Force Phase I program would develop and demonstrate semiconductor nanomembrane (NM) based sensors and arrays for high frequency pressure measurements, using SOI (Silicon on Insulator) NM technique in combination with our pioneering HybridsilTM copolymer nanocomposite materials. NanoSonic would work cooperatively with Virginia Tech to develop an improved mechanical and electrical model of semiconductor nanomembrane based sensor performance that will allow quantitative optimization of material properties and suggest optimal methods for sensor attachment and use for high frequency measurement applications. We will perform synthesis of sensor skin materials with optimized transduction, hysteresis and environmental properties, specifically for high Reynold’s number flow and also varying temperature use. We will fabricate patterned two-dimensional sensor arrays and internal electronics using optimized materials. NanoSonic and Virginia Tech will perform complete analysis of sensor cross-sensitivities and noise sources to allow optimization of signal-to-noise ratio and practical sensor sensitivity. Support electronics will be developed to acquire, multiplex, store and process raw sensor array data. NanoSonic and Virginia Tech will also experimentally validate sensor array performance through extended water and wind tunnel evaluation, and possible flight testing with Lockheed Martin Aeronautics, and produce a first-generation high temperature high frequency pressure sensor array and data acquisition electronics system for sale. BENEFIT: Primary customers would be university, government laboratory and aerospace industry researchers. Small, unmanned air vehicles large enough to carry the extra load associated with electronics and power, and operationally sophisticated enough to require air data sensors would be a likely first military platform use. Distributed pressure mapping on air vehicles as well as in biomedical devices and other systems may have merit. Further, the thin film shear sensor elements may be used as air flow or water flow devices in systems where either the low weight, low surface profile, lack of need for space below the flow surface, or high sensitivity at a low cost are needed.

Optoelectronic Nanodevices LLC
4248 Ridge Lea Rd., Suite 113,
Amherst, NY 14226
(716) 241-1875

PI: Nizami Vagidov
(716) 241-1875
Contract #: FA9453-14-M-0013
University at Albany, SUNY
257 Fuller Rd.,
Albany, NY 12203
(518) 437-8688

ID#: F13A-T13-0051
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT13      Awarded: 10/23/2013
Title: Broad-Spectrum PV Devices Based on Charged Quantum Dots
Abstract: This project addresses the need for high-efficiency broad-spectrum PV cells. The proposed original PV design is based on quantum dots with built-in charge (Q-BIC), where the dot charging is realized by selective doping of dot medium. The preliminary data demonstrate that the charged dots placed in a single p-n-junction strongly enhance harvesting and conversion of sub-bandgap photons and increase the light trapping and absorption of the above-bandgap photons. The charged dots provide effective tool for engineering of 3D nanoscale potential, management of photoelectron processes, and suppression of recombination losses. For the broad-spectrum conversion the Q-BIC devices employ broad-range distribution of dot sizes. Together with selective doping the charged dots allow for optimization of microscale potential profile in the entire PV device. Plasmonic effects in charged dot layers have a potential to provide enhancement of long-wavelength absorption. The proposed program starts with design, growth, and optimization of Q-BIC photovoltaic nanomaterials with the reduced wetting layer and vertically correlated quantum dots in blocks of dot layers. The program includes complex material characterization, design of PV devices, device processing, and electro-optic testing. The Q-BIC technology is a promising basis for cells capable of converting of 35% and above into electric power. BENEFIT: This project is aimed on the development of high-efficiency, broadband, radiation-resistant, light-weight, and relatively low-cost PV devices which can be used by residential users, industry, and military. A specific subset of the PV market where such cells have a large and immediate impact is concentrating photovoltaics (CPV). Whilst only 90 MW are estimated to be installed in 2012, installations are predicted to increase rapidly over the next four years. CPV units that are more efficient will require less material, less real estate, and therefore less cost. The Q-BIC solar cells have a potential to successfully compete with multi-junction solar cells on CPV market and can be used for various AFOSR missions. The Q-BIC PV devices are tolerant to the temperature variations and can operate under all-weather conditions providing strong harvesting and conversion of IR radiation. The benefits of development of Q-BIC PV devices are in: (a) product scalability; (b) manufacturing architecture consistent with current cell / semiconductor processing equipment with minimal modification to reduce new capital costs; (c) a combination of cost and performance that is materially better

PolarOnyx, Inc
2526 Qume Drive, Suites 17 & 18,
San Jose, CA 95131
(408) 573-0930

PI: Jian Liu
(408) 573-0930
Contract #:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab
P.O.Box 808,
Livermore, CA 94551
(925) 422-1100

ID#: F13A-T03-0070
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT03      Selected for Award
Title: Low Loss, High Average Power PM WDMs for Raman Fiber Lasers
Abstract: We propose a new fiber WDM fabrication method for single mode high power fiber laser. Our new approach will enable kW operation for both single mode fiber WDM and PCF WDM. At the end of Phase I, a proof of concept experiment will be demonstrated. In phase II, we will target at delivery of a reliable prototypes for both step index fiber WDM and PCF WDM. BENEFIT: The WDM is a key component for high power fiber laser. It can be used in many applications, such as antireflection windows, space, aircraft, and satellite applications of LADAR systems, countermeasures, and communications. PolarOnyx will develop a series of products to meet various requirements for military deployments. Other commercial applications include • Material processing. This includes (1) all types of metal processing such as welding, cutting, annealing, and drilling; (2)semiconductor and microelectronics manufacturing such as lithography, inspection, control, defect analysis and repair, and via drilling; (3) marking of all materials including plastic, metals, and silicon; (4) other materials processing such as rapid prototyping, desk top manufacturing, micromachining, photofinishing, embossed holograms, and grating manufacturing. • Medical equipment and biomedical instrumentation. The high power amplifier/laser can be applied to ophthalmology, refractive surgery, photocoagulation, general surgery, therapeutic, imaging, and cosmetic applications. Biomedical instruments include those involved in cells or proteins, cytometry, and DNA sequencing; laser Raman spectroscopy, spectrofluorimetry, and ablation; and laser based microscopes.

Q Peak, Inc.
135 South Road,
Bedford, MA 01730
(978) 689-0003

PI: Bhabana Pati
(781) 275-9535
Contract #:
University of Central Florida
PO Box 162700,
Orlando, FL 32816
(407) 823-4456

ID#: F13A-T03-0173
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT03      Selected for Award
Title: Novel Extended-Zone High Power WDM Couplers
Abstract: High power and low insertion loss WDM components will be developed. In manufacturing WDM components, solid core fibers in both polarization insensitive and polarization maintaining, will be pursued, along with photonics crystal fiber components. A range of fiber sizes and device specifications will be developed and commercially offered by Q-Peak. The component that we propose to develop in this Phase I program fulfills an important need as an enabling technology specifically for high-power fiber Raman lasers, and can be extended for use in high power fiber lasers in general. High- power Raman lasers, constructed through the combination of multiple fiber lasers, are one of the technologies that the Air Force is exploring for their next generation GuideStar applications. BENEFIT: Q-Peak will offer commercially available high power WDM components as a domestic supplier. Standard components will be offered for sale, along with the ability to offer custom component development and commercial sales of high power WDM components. These components are integral to the continuing development of high power fiber lasers for a range of markets and applications including defense, industrial machining, and select medical applications.

RAM Laboratories, Inc.
591 Camino de la Reina, Suite 610
San Diego, CA 92108
(619) 398-1410

PI: Robert McGraw
(619) 398-1410
Contract #: FA9453-14-M-0006
Auburn University
Department of Computer Science, 3101 Shelby Center
Auburn, AL 36849
(334) 663-6860

ID#: F13A-T05-0148
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT05      Awarded: 10/1/2013
Title: Security in Cyber-Physical Networked Systems
Abstract: Physical infrastructure is faced with a variety of security challenges including malicious insiders, hackers, and threats present within the supply chain. Hardware, sensors, and software residing in these environments may be captured or compromised by an adversary for the purpose of attacking or disrupting operations. Recent examples of attacks on such infrastructure can be found in Flame and Stuxnet attacks on foreign power systems. Technologies that promote secure and trusted transactions are required to detect and mitigate those threats. We propose to develop Cyber Physical (CP) Sentry, a solution that assesses the security and trustworthiness of sensors, applications and the hardware on which they reside. CP Sentry builds on the concept of a distributed trusted notary system by providing sensors that detect changes in system state, using distributed trusted notaries to independently evaluate the security of nodes using a variety of scoring criteria, and weighing notary responses in order to best detect the presence of an attack. Identifying the attack then sets the stage for administrator or automated mitigation response based on the type of attack detected. Our solution allows the CP Sentry itself to be protected against adversary attack by leveraging the use of trusted computing throughout our design. BENEFIT: This project will develop a solution for providing security for cyber physical infrastructure, including SCADA systems. Such systems can be subverted by malicious insiders, external hackers and/or supply chain threats. Examples of where such attacks have gained a recent foothold have included the Shamoon, Duqu, Flame and Stuxnet viruses that have been used to bring down foreign power generation and refining systems. CP Sentry will enable us to provide security solutions for today’s CP infrastructure to secure and protect deployed sensors, software and firmware throughout America’s infrastructure. The target market for CP Sentry is the power generation and refining markets. According to an ARC Advisory Group study, the SCADA market alone is projected to grow by 8.9% annually between now and 2016. Currently, the oil and gas section of the SCADA market is at $1.3B, while the power generation section of the SCADA market is at $930M and projected to grow to $1.5B by 2020. Within these sectors, there are several leading vendors that can utilize CP Sentry to protect their infrastructure. Leaders include ABB Ltd., Siemens AG, Schneider Electric SA,

SA Photonics
130A Knowles Dr.,
Los Gatos, CA 95032
(970) 921-3401

PI: Mark Carlson
(415) 971-2027
Contract #:
Virginia Polytechnic Institute
310 Durham Hall, Department of Mechanical Eng.
Blacksburg, VA 24061
(540) 231-2909

ID#: F13A-T15-0132
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT15      Selected for Award
Title: Precision high-frequency pressure measurements in ground and flight test
Abstract: SA Photonics is pleased to propose the development of the Micro Interferometer Pressures Sensor (MIPS). MIPS uses an innovative sensing head structure being developed by our research partner, Virgina Tech. The pressure sensing head is then coupled to SA Photonics’ high performance AccuSense photonic distance measurement system. AccuSense has demonstrated the capability of precision Fabry-Perot cavity length interrogation at rates greater than 100 kHz. The result of combining the unique sensing head with AccuSense is a very compact and robust pressure sensor with a sensitivity of better than 0.002 psi per rt-Hz and a high bandwidth of greater than 1 MHz. Furthermore, the unique Virginia Tech sensing head design enable robust operation in extreme environments of greater than 1300°C and exposure to corrosive materials. BENEFIT: The Air Force and DoD are investigating the next generation of hypersonic aerial vehicles. It is critical to have instrumentation to support theoretical modeling and wind tunnel testing of such vehicles. The MIPS sernsor will bring substantial pressure sensor performance improvement in a package that will be compact, robust, manufacturable ,and compatible wind tunnel and field testing. SA Photonics will utilize its AccuSense technology that was originally developed in an MDA Phase II and then refined under Phase III programs form primes. This allows the Air Force and the DoD to leverage past investment into this critical need area.

Securboration Inc
1050 W NASA Blvd, Suite 155
Melbourne, FL 32901
(919) 244-3946

PI: Bruce McQueary
(321) 591-7371
Contract #: FA8750-14-C-0042
Dartmouth College
Office of Sponsored Projects, 11 rope Ferry Road #6220
Hanover, NH 03755
(603) 646-3007

ID#: F13A-T14-0100
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT14      Awarded: 10/23/2013
Title: Automated assessment of disclosure risk
Abstract: Information systems continue to progress in terms of collecting, characterizing and assessing information. While this evolution has provided unprecedented intelligence capability to the U.S. and our allies, it has also raised unique challenges in the area of information security and disclosure risks. In particular, the intelligence community (IC) currently lacks the ability to understand how the continuous release of information through approved information sharing, intentional or unintentional leaks, or malicious, covert breaches risks divulging ‘secrets’ either directly or through inference. To address this gap Securboration Inc. proposes an innovative approach that combines and extends Securboration’s semantics-based text analytic summarization pipeline with machine learning and probabilistic reasoning. Our solution, referred to as RIQUEST (Risk Quantification and Estimation Toolkit), will compute the disclosure risk for a given piece of information with respect to a large number of secrets. RIQUEST includes a robust ontology-based model of disclosure risk categories, and quantifies risks within subsets of those categories. RIQUEST addresses the problem of disclosure through probabilistic inference, and takes into account the contextual information that enables inference. BENEFIT: The commercial potential for RIQUEST is significant. Big-four auditing firms are aggressively pursuing data loss prevention (DLP) as a business line for their established customers. The process of identifying an organization’s sensitive data and understanding the risk of its exposure is a critical first step in any DLP business model. RIQUEST’s ability to automate this process represents a significant improvement over the manual data classification exercises currently employed. Whether in commercial enterprises or the Air Operations Center, RIQUEST will provide cumulative, continuous assessment resulting in greater disclosure risk situational awareness which, in turn, leads to improved information sharing and the ability to focus security countermeasures in response to leaks.

Shared Spectrum Company
1593 Spring Hill Road, Suite 700
Vienna, VA 22182
(703) 462-6943

PI: Mark McHenry
(703) 462-6943
Contract #: FA9453-14-M-0002
HUME Center VT
VT Research Center, 900 N. Glebe Road, MC 0379
Arlington, VA 22203
(571) 858-3350

ID#: F13A-T02-0120
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT02      Awarded: 10/23/2013
Title: Decision Making under Uncertainty for Dynamic Spectrum Access
Abstract: SSC and VT develop algorithms and approaches to manage uncertainty in dynamic spectrum access (DSA) systems for small satellite constellations. We use various DSA rule sets such as sensing, database, and monitoring systems to reduce the uncertainty on a systems level. We investigate uncertainty modeling using Dempster-Schafer theory to build belief, disbelief and ignorance maps of spectrum usage. Finally, we use stochastic programming to perform optimization under uncertainty for real-time systems. We develop a DSA satellite scenario using a constellation of small satellites that are agile and cost-effective. BENEFIT: Dynamic spectrum access significantly increases the access to spectrum with harvesting and sharing through a flexible approach to spectrum access. SSC has focused on taking our initiatives developed for the DoD and transitioning them to both the DoD primes and to the commercial market. We are having success in both DoD and commercial sectors.

Solarmer Energy Inc.
3445 Fletcher Avenue,
El Monte, CA 91731
(626) 456-8089

PI: Yue Wu
(626) 456-8090
Contract #: FA9453-14-M-0010
University of California, Los Angel
OI Industry Sponsored Research, 11000 Kinross Avenue, Ste 200
Los Angeles, CA 90095
(310) 794-0135

ID#: F13A-T06-0062
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT06      Awarded: 12/4/2013
Title: Development of light-weight, low-cost and high specific power organic solar modules with high radiation hardness
Abstract: Solar arrays play a key role in the operation of spacecrafts and unmanned aerial vehicles. Traditionally, inorganic semiconductor based solar arrays have been used for space applications because of their highest efficiencies. However, these solar arrays have several major limitations like extremely high cost, low specific power and large stowage volume. Organic photovoltaic (OPV) modules offer a better alternative for space applications that need high specific power. OPV are low-cost, ultra lightweight, flexible, and can be made by a roll-to-roll process on flexible substrates. Also, due to their superior flexibility and rollability, OPV require a minimum of stowage space and can be inflated or unrolled for deployment. In this project, Solarmer Energy, in partnership with University of California, Los Angeles, and Analytical Mechanics Associates, proposes to develop lightweight, ultra-high power density OPV modules for space applications. At the end of the Phase I, the team will deliver flexible large area OPV modules (100 sq cm) with specific power density greater than 300 Watts/kg, module efficiency of 5%, and bend radius less than 1.5 inches. A deployment design will also be delivered for application of OPV modules in space. BENEFIT: This project will have significant educational, societal and scientific benefits. Solarmer’s collaboration with UCLA provides financial support for graduate students, and supports the development of clean energy technologies. Solarmer is a member of FlexTech Alliance, a center supported by the U.S. Army Research Lab, which is devoted to fostering the growth, profitability and success of the flexible, printed electronics supply chain. The U.S. currently lags behind Europe and Asia in deployment of printed electronics technology. The proposed project will accelerate the developments in OPV and will enable the manufacturing of the low cost solar cells leading to a homegrown clean energy manufacturing. One of the major societal benefits is the much needed jobs creation, especially in clean energy manufacturing. An OPV manufacturing plant will create about 100-200 new jobs, in addition to the hundreds of new jobs in related R&D, production development and system integration. Another important benefit of using OPV is the impact on the environment. Each 100 MW of installed OPV panels will save 80,000 tons of CO2 emissions per year. Each 100 MW of OPV will also replace 300 tons of batteries that are discarded from portable electronics. In the long term, OPV aim to achieve grid parity with conventional power by 2017 and will truly revolutionize U.S. power infrastructure.

Soluxra, LLC
UW Fluke Hall Box 352141, 4000 Mason Road, Suite 304
Seattle, WA 98195
(425) 417-1862

PI: Alex K-Y. Jen
(206) 543-2626
Contract #:
University of Washington
4333 Brooklyn Ave NE Box 35947,
Seattle, WA 98195
(206) 543-4043

ID#: F13A-T06-0082
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT06      Selected for Award
Title: High specific power and cost effective solar array for spacecraft, lighter than air vehicles, and UAVs
Abstract: The objective of this STTR proposal is to develop and demonstrate a radiation hardened organic-based solar array adaptable to nanosatellites which exhibits flexibility, variable topology, high specific power, and low cost. Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) represent a transformative technology with great potential for extremely high-throughput manufacturing at very low cost. They have the potential to serve as lightweight, flexible, conformal, and low-cost solid- state power sources for space applications. Prof. Alex Jen at the University of Washington will team up with Soluxra, LLC to develop a large-area flexible OPV module that is suitable for nanosatellite application with adequate radiation hardness and power/weight efficiency. There are three specific objectives in this program: 1) Develop novel interface materials and device structures to reduce interfacial charge recombination loss in order to circumvent the radiation- induced interfacial degradation in OPVs; 2) Develop a large-area fabrication process for ITO-free, flexible OPV module with over 7.5% module efficiency and demonstrate superior mechanical flexibility that is required for integrating with the nanosatellite system; 3) Design a deployment scheme for the OPV-based integrated nanostallite system taking into account of different parameters such as stow volume, module weight, and power/weight efficiency. BENEFIT: Soluxra is a technology innovation company that develops tailored functional materials and new device platforms for large-scale photonic integration and energy-related electronic applications to improve their performance and energy efficiency. The company designs and supplies leading edge and application-tailored electronic and photonic materials to the semiconductor, telecommunications, and clean energy industries. Soluxra's OPV technology is on track to serve as lightweight, flexible, conformal, and low-cost solid-state power sources for various types of applications. In addition to developing novel geometries, we expect to reduce solar electricity cost to a level that is competitive with the current fossil fuel based energy. The ultimate cost of electricity generated by organic photovoltaic technology is dependent on three critical parameters: 1) efficiency; 2) production cost and; 3) lifetime. The success achieved in this proposal will help advance all three parameters, which will strengthen Soluxra's patent-protected organic photovoltaic technology and give Soluxra a strong competitive edge over current technology. The availability of light-weight, flexible, low-cost and deployable solar cells will significantly benefit not only the space and military applications, but also the commercial

Sonalysts, Inc.
215 Parkway North, P.O. Box 280
Waterford, CT 06385
(860) 326-3652

PI: Margaret Bailey
(860) 326-3621
Contract #: FA8750-14-C-0015
University of Connecticut
265 ITE Building,
Storrs, CT 06269
(860) 486-4818

ID#: F13A-T08-0075
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT08      Awarded: 10/23/2013
Title: Secure Efficient Cross-domain Protocols
Abstract: The Sonalysts team proposes to develop a solution that facilitates the flow of data between different levels of classification while improving and ensuring both security and data integrity. Our approach involves a set of protocols that provide a unique and disruptive combination of multichannel data dispersion and multi-classification data management techniques to meet our objectives. We will develop application workflows for existing split-domain environments and evaluate existing cross-domain solutions. We will design a cross-domain information architecture based on a trusted automated guard and using a newly designed secure multi-layered data transmission protocol. We will provide a preliminary analysis of the security of the designed protocols. Finally, we will demonstrate with a proof-of- concept that the proposed design is innovative and technically feasible. BENEFIT: Current systems are burdened with air-gaps, over-classification, and “ad hoc” solutions necessitated by time- constrained work environments. The proposed ZIPRNET system will speed up cross-domain work flows while improving security. Sonalysts will use existing contacts at the 505th Command and Control Wing (CCW), Hurlburt Air Force Base to perform a Phase II prototype test at the 505 CCW AOC formal training unit. This solution will benefit all government agencies that use and create classified data. It also has the potential to benefit any organization that has sensitive data, with the medical and financial industries being prominent examples.

Spectral Energies, LLC
5100 Springfield Street, Suite 301
Dayton, OH 45431
(937) 255-3115

PI: Waruna Kulatilaka
(937) 901-6362
Contract #:
Ohio State University
Room E-445, 201 W 19th Avenue
Columbus, OH 43210
(614) 292-2736

ID#: F13A-T04-0184
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT04      Selected for Award
Title: Advanced Optical Diagnostics/Modeling Platform for Plasma Assisted Combustion in Vitiated Air
Abstract: Modern gas-turbine engines designs for the next-generation warfighter need to reduce exhaust gas temperatures to reduce effective thermal footprint thereby improving the mission capability. In such situations, high-altitude engine operation is often limited by the overall combustion efficiency, lean flame blow out (LBO) limit, and combustion instabilities that results in narrower operating window. One promising approach to increase the augmentor operational envelope is to utilize non-equilibrium plasma assisted combustion (PAC). Low-temperature plasma reactions can generate radical pools containing highly reactive species such as H, O, and OH in oxygen-depleted vitiated flow streams entering the augmentor. Achieving the full potential of PAC systems in vitiated air requires development of a more fundamental and detailed understanding of the basic chemistry and energy transfer processes, in particular temporal and spatial evolution of above key species and heat release rate. The current state-of-the-art, laser- spectroscopy-based plasma diagnostic tools are often plagued by laser-induced photochemistry, limited spatial dimensionality and slow data acquisition rates. We offer an integrated program in which a unique set of advanced diagnostics tools will be developed and utilized in order to produce a validated comprehensive plasma kinetics code for prediction of essential low temperature plasma properties in vitiated air streams. BENEFIT: The proposed research program will develop an advanced optical diagnostic/modeling platform for predicting of essential low temperature plasma properties in vitiated air streams, with unprecedented level of accuracy, spatial and temporal fidelity, and predictive capability. Such a unique toolkit will be a major step forward in implementing plasma- assisted combustion to new and existing augmentor design concepts, thereby, extending the operational envelop of gas turbine engines used in the modern warfighter. In particular, significant improvements are expected in both high- altitude, low-Mach number and low-altitude, high-Mach number operations with full afterburner operating conditions. The unique set of ultra-short-pulse laser-based revolutionary diagnostics techniques and cutting edge advanced plasma flow modeling capability in possession of the proposing research team is the key enabling technology for such breakthrough developments. In addition, the advancements of fundamental plasma studies proposed will have significant impacts in a wide array of applications related to national security and defense including, but not limited to, numerous

Tenet 3, LLC
5812 Batsford Drive,
Dayton, OH 45459
(937) 477-8883

PI: Jeff Hughes
(937) 477-8883
Contract #: FA9453-14-M-0008
Dartmouth College
Office of Sponsored Projects, 11 Rope Ferry Road # 6210
Hanover, NH 03755
(603) 646-3007

ID#: F13A-T05-0192
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT05      Awarded: 10/23/2013
Title: Security in Cyber-Physical Networked Systems
Abstract: This proposal is organized around a system decomposition (break the system down to understand and exploit) then composition (rebuild the system with improved defensive measures) methodology. The first step to understanding a system is gathering all associated documentation. Then based on that insight the system is decomposed by discovering susceptibilities (inherent weaknesses) and access points. The tools/techniques used by the threat to capably exploit the system are also analyzed. The total resulting system vulnerability based on the intersection of susceptibility, threat access, and threat capabilities is then determined. Finally, defensive measures to mitigate these vulnerabilities can be derived from a quantitative security metric analysis. This approach, based on the offerors' experience with system vulnerability analysis, red teaming, and development of threat mitigation technologies, will result in a scalable and cost effective CPS defensive mechanisms while protecting our national interests. BENEFIT: Many DoD cyber-physical systems are being networked into larger TCP/IP networks. If one defines system trustworthiness as consisting of safety, security, and reliability, then having a quantitative diagnostic capability is essential for ‘trust’. The concern about the trustworthiness of our desktop and laptop, and smart phones is increasingly shifting to concern about cyber-physical systems such as DoD's unmanned weapon systems that can have alarming impacts to our physical world if they become unsafe, insecure, or unreliable. Tenet 3, LLC, has been approached by several large DoD firms interested in assessing the more general trustworthiness state of the cyber-physical systems they are developing for the US Government. The DoD Primes desire improved safety, security and reliability for their systems but do not want to add significant additional hardware and/or impact performance. Our approach under this project has the potential to meet that need.

Transient Plasma Systems
323 Sierra St.,
El Segundo, CA 90245
(650) 269-2178

PI: Jason Sanders
(615) 424-1467
Contract #:
University of Southern California
920 Bloom Walk - SSC 502,
Los Angeles, CA 90089
(213) 740-4412

ID#: F13A-T07-0166
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT07      Selected for Award
Title: Highly Repetitive Power Modulators for Mobile Applications
Abstract: Recent experimental data from a number of DoD supported research programs have indicated that highly repetitive bursts of high peak power pulses are likely to enable or enhance important physical processes, such as combustion, boundary layer flow, and the generation of high power EM waves. Since many of these applications are mobile, the pulsed power source needs to be sufficiently compact and reliable. Overall system efficiency is a major bench mark in order to increase average power (i.e. repetition rate) while minimizing overall size and weight. For this reason, a major component of this proposed effort is to use existing and improved models, as well as experimentally measured data, to maximize overall system efficiency. This approach will be applied in Phase I of this program to develop a prototype system capable of produce 20 kV, 100 A pulses with a pulse width of 25 ns at a repetition rate of 20 kHz. This prototype will serve as a proof of concept from which we will learn and report important design constraints that will inform the design approach for the Phase II system, which will operate at significantly higher peak power and average power. BENEFIT: Nanosecond pulsed power technology is the core of products addressing a spectrum of markets in both the military and commercial sectors. The compact nanosecond pulsed power systems developed during this effort will be designed with the intention of retrofitting different airborne and ground-based systems to improve fuel efficiency and reduce emissions and IR signatures, to reduce drag using plasma assisted flow control. It is anticipated that this STTR program will bring the technology from TRL 4 to TRL 5. TPS will work with strategic partners to bring the technology to TRL 9. Effort will be focused on validation testing in airborne and ground-based platforms with a strategic partner. The goal of this stage is to establish generality for a different range of platforms and applications. TPS has developed relationships with aerospace companies such as Northrop Grumman and General Atomic for this type of testing. One of the target markets is the Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) market. The UAV market is exploding, with a worldwide estimated market of $5B and compounded growth projections of > 12%/year for the next decade. One of the near term needs is to extend the range, loiter time, and payload; an urgent, high-priority objective of the Department of Defense. Nanosecond pulsed power technology provides an avenue for realizing that objective through retrofits of existing vehicles.

UltraHiNet, LLC
709 SW 80th Blvd,
Gainesville, FL 32607
(352) 281-2867

PI: Mark Schmalz
(352) 335-6765
Contract #: FA8750-14-C-0047
University of Missouri
301 Jesse Hall,
Columbia, MO 65211
(573) 882-7560

ID#: F13A-T10-0196
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT10      Awarded: 10/23/2013
Title: Next Generation Tracking Architectures for Urban Surveillance Areas
Abstract: UltraHiNet, LLC (UHN) proposes to develop a prototype next generation tracking architecture which exploits wide area motion imagery (WAMI) systems and leverages projected heterogeneous high performance computing (HPC) architectures for on-board and ground-based processing of vehicle and dismount targets for urban surveillance. Our research team will focus on the following goals: 1. Develop parallel GPU-based implementations of compute intensive video processing algorithms for dense object tracking that are close to the sensor for on-board processing of WAMI, and 2. Develop parallelized multitarget tracking using novel computational data association algorithms for producing reliable tracklets that can be further processed to long tracks in cluttered urban environments. Visual information using salient object features will enable persistent tracking through complex scenes with visual distractors, large object motion displacements, long occlusions, noisy detections, and shadows. Appearance-based matching and feature fusion methods will be investigated to track moving vehicles by fusing multiple appearance features such as intensity, edges, shape, texture, spatial and temporal context to resolve data association ambiguities within dense collections of movers. We will analyze parallel processing architectures for real-time computation/applications, to determine the fastest processor with best numerical quality, and the number of processors in a cluster necessary for real- or near-real time execution. Finally, we will address issues related to optimal utilization of limited on-board resources through proper load balancing, data driven regular recursive image tiling and adaptive program structures. Thus, we will effectively demonstrate the feasibility of our algorithm(s) in meeting Air Force Research Lab needs and provide a Phase II development plan with performance goals and key technical milestones. BENEFIT: If successful, the proposed research will constitute a significant breakthrough in the solution of problems related to multiple hypothesis multitarget tracking by using modern parallel computing architectures. Our methodology will be optimized for execution on highly parallel multicore processors such as multicore CPUs, manycore graphics

VectorSum, Inc.
18 Technology, Suite 139
Irvine, CA 92618
(949) 679-3950

PI: Hugh Cook
(949) 679-3950
Contract #: FA9453-14-M-0009
Colorado State Univ.
601 Howes Street, Room 408
Ft. Collins, CO 80523
(970) 491-5104

ID#: F13A-T06-0011
Agency: AF
Topic#: AF13-AT06      Awarded: 12/4/2013
Title: High specific power and cost effective solar array for spacecraft, lighter than air vehicles, and UAVs
Abstract: Space solar power systems range in size from the International Space Station with 8 solar arrays producing 84,000 watts all the way down to body-mounted single wafers on individual cubesats. The current state-of-the-art relies on multi-junction gallium arsenide or inverted metamorphic cells affixed to rigid structural panels. The need for a low- mass, high energy output solar array for space applications is evident. Of the numerous technologies showing promise to reduce space solar power system cost and weight, thin film technologies show the most promise, specifically thin-film devices made from Organic Photovoltaic (OPV) materials. VectorSum and Colorado State University (CSU) have teamed up to investigate a large number of the latest candidate OPVs, substrates, and up-scaling methods. Along with a concept for a novel deployment system, the team will provide an OPV solar array capable of generating 200W at 12V in a pre-launch storage volume of less than 1U cubesat volume (6cm x 10cm x 10cm) and < 0.5kg. The solar array design is a unique solution of deployable folding substrates, laser welding, proprietary pultruded carbon rods, all deployed using simple clock springs, and mounted on a gimbaled platform for solar tracking. BENEFIT: The significance of the Phase I results is that we will create a catalog of numerous organic material combinations, and characterized their susceptibility to the space radiation environment. Using this information, we will design a high fidelity ground test unit representative of a flight system for Phase II.

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Agnitron Technology Inc.
14530 Martin Dr., Suite B
Eden Prairie, MN 55347
(952) 937-7505

PI: Andrei Osinsky
(952) 937-7505
Contract #: W911NF-13-P-0024
North Carolina State University
Physics Department, Box 7518
Raleigh, NC 27695
(919) 515-3225

ID#: A13A-006-0279
Agency: Army
Topic#: A13A-T006   Awarded: 9/26/2013
Title: Solar Blind MgZnO Photodetectors
Abstract:   This Phase I program is focused on enhancement of the performance of MgZnO based solar blind detectors. MgZnO alloys have superior optoelectronic properties with bandgaps suitable for solar blind detection. Issues related to doping and miscibility will be addressed. This will involve the use of advanced MOCVD and MBE growth techniques and consideration of both Schottky and p-n junction devices. Novel doping strategies will be explored as well as the use of nearly lattice matched oxide substrates. Optimal device design will be achieved with the aid of simulation software. Detectors will be fabricated to demonstrate the feasibility of the technology. These robust, compact devices are sought as replacements for photomultiplier tubes in current use.

Applied Mathematics, Inc.
1622 Route 12, Box 637,
Gales Ferry, CT 06335
(860) 464-7259

PI: William J. Browning
(860) 464-7259
Contract #: W911NF-13-P-0017
North Carolina State University
Research Administration/SPARCS, Admin Services III, Box 7514
Raleigh, NC 27695
(919) 515-2444

ID#: A13A-009-0030
Agency: Army
Topic#: A13A-T009   Awarded: 8/12/2013
Title: Near Real-Time Quantification of Stochastic Model Parameters
Abstract:   Mathematical models of physical and biological systems contain parameters that need to be estimated from measured data. Models with parameters distributed probabilistically require the estimates of a probability measure over the set of admissible parameters. We propose to use frequentist-based approaches for non-parametrically estimating probability measures that describe the distribution of parameters across all members of a given population in the case where only aggregate longitudinal data are available.We will investigate least squares method combined with delta function approximation methods or linear spline approximation methods or other plausible approximation methods in order to achieve the convergence required for near real-time estimation. Project tasks are to survey existing techniques and select non-Bayesian candidate methods for near-real-time estimation of probabilistic parameters; develop theoretical and computational ideas to validate capability for describing near-real-time parameters; develop general methodology for near-real-time quantification of stochastic model parameters; analyze proposed methodology to include bias and convergence properties of estimators; conduct proof-of-concept 3D computations of the proposed methodology; and prepare final report and periodic progress reports.

Computational Sciences, LLC
8000 Madison Blvd., Suite D102-351,
Madison, AL 35758
(256) 270-0956

PI: Edward J. Kansa
(256) 270-0956
Contract #: W911NF-13-P-0020
North Carolina State University
2701 SullivanDrive Admin III,, Admin III, Suite 240
Raleigh, NC 27695
(919) 515-2444

ID#: A13A-008-0125
Agency: Army
Topic#: A13A-T008   Awarded: 9/13/2013
Title: A universal framework for non-deteriorating time-domain numerical algorithms in Maxwell’s electrodynamics
Abstract:   The project will remove a key difficulty that currently hampers many existing methods for computing unsteady electromagnetic waves on unbounded regions. Numerical accuracy and/or stability may deteriorate over long times due to the treatment of artificial outer boundaries. We propose to develop a universal algorithm and software that will correct this problem by employing the Huygens’ principle and quasi-lacunae of Maxwell’s equations. The algorithm will provide a guaranteed error bound, uniform in time (no deterioration at all), and the software will enable robust electromagnetic simulations in a high-performance computing environment. The methodology will apply to any geometry, any scheme, and any boundary condition. It will eliminate the long-time deterioration regardless of its origin and how it manifests itself. Dr. Tsynkov who co-invented this method is the Academic partner on the project.Phase I includes development of an innovative numerical methodology for high fidelity error-controlled modeling of a broad variety of electromagnetic and other wave phenomena. Proof-of-concept 3D computations will be conducted and verified against benchmarks, to demonstrate efficiency of the proposed approach.In Phase II our algorithms will be implemented as robust commercial software tools in a standalone module that can be combined with existing numerical schemes in computational electromagnetic codes.

Creare Inc.
P.O. Box 71,
Hanover, NH 03755
(603) 643-3800

PI: Jay C. Rozzi, Ph.D.
(603) 643-3800
Contract #: W911W6-13-C-0040
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
1 Bethel Valley Road, PO Box 2088
Oak Ridge, TN 37831
(865) 574-4351

ID#: A13A-001-0219
Agency: Army
Topic#: A13A-T001   Awarded: 9/16/2013
Title: An Advanced Electrochemical Grinding System
Abstract:   The high-quality, burr-free finishing of complex, advanced metallic parts with hyper-smooth surface finishes (<1 microinch) is required for military applications to enhance the performance of key systems needed by the warfighter. A potential operation to remove material, achieve the desired surface finish, and enhance part quality is electrochemical form grinding (ECG). While the benefits of ECG are well known, the process is prone to grinding inaccuracies due to insufficient and inconsistent distribution of the electrolyte fluid within the wheel-workpiece interface. Insufficient and inconsistent electrolyte delivery create variation in material removal, which lead to part inaccuracies that are unacceptable for these high-dimensional tolerance applications. For a typical ECG operation, the electrolyte fluid is issued from a single nozzle or an array of nozzles. Our approach to address this issue is to develop the novel Through- Wheel Electrochemical Grinding System (TWGS). By delivering the electrolyte directly to the interface, we increase dimensional tolerance, maximize the material removal rate, and minimize wheel wear. In Phase I, we will establish the foundation for further development and technology transfer at the completion of Phase II.

Fulcrum Bioscience
615 Arapeen Dr.,
Salt Lake City, UT 84108
(801) 581-4701

PI: John Watkins
(801) 792-0652
Contract #: W911NF-13-P-0027
University of Iowa
E331 Chemistry Building,
Iowa City, IA 52242
(319) 335-1720

ID#: A13A-007-0101
Agency: Army
Topic#: A13A-T007   Awarded: 9/26/2013
Title: Bioelectrocatalyzed Nitrogen Fixation under Standard Conditions
Abstract:   The synthesis of ammonia through nitrogen fixation is a vital component to all plant life and the world economy as a fertilizer and commodity chemical. The global industial production of ammonia exceeded 140MM tons in 2009 and is expected to grow to 160MM tons by 2020. Most ammonia, >90% is synthesized through the Haber-Bosch processThe Haber-Bosch process produces more than 90% of the industrial ammonia in the world and is energy intensive requiring high temperatures and pressures. Fulcrum Bioscience proposes to develop an electrosynthetic process to produce ammonia that uses electrocatalyzed biofilms of mutated cyanobacteria at 1 atm and 25°C. This process has been demonstrated at a laboratory-scale to increase ammonia production above basal rates.

InferLink Corporation
2361 Rosecrans Avenue, Suite 348,
El Segundo, CA 90245
(310) 383-9234

PI: Greg Barish
(310) 944-4813
Contract #: W81XWH-13-C-0158
Univ of California at Los Angeles
11000 Kinross Ave, Suite 211, Contract Admin (MC 951406)
Los Angeles, CA 90095
(310) 794-0236

ID#: A13A-018-0172
Agency: Army
Topic#: A13A-T018   Awarded: 7/22/2013
Title: Mobile Health Application for Family and Behavioral Health Provider Communication
Abstract:   Clinical monitoring of mental health status has not evolved much from the routine meeting between patient and clinician, which suffers from a lack of quantification, irregular and anecdotal reporting, and does not necessarily include input from caregivers. This is unfortunate given today's technology, where people routinely volunteer to track their own health related behavior, such as exercise and sleep, via smartphone. This same technology could be used by clinicians to improve the timeliness, accuracy, and quality of care - in part by leveraging input from family, as well as patients. To address this opportunity, we propose SupportTeam, a mobile application that collects, analyzes, and monitors the input about the status and behavior of patients suffering from PTSD/TBI. SupportTeam is novel because it includes input from family and caregivers, as well as patients, and uses statistical techniques to better understand behavior and focus treatment. To process the data, SupportTeam will leverage statistical techniques to classify, predict, and analyze the data submitted. Data and results will be securely transmitted and available to the clinician at any time. We plan to build SupportTeam upon an established open source mobile client/server stack that is aimed at supporting the mHealth development community.

Lumilant, Inc.
51 East Main Street, Suite 203, 51 east main street suite 203b
Newark, DE 19711
(302) 456-9003

PI: Ahmed S Sharkawy
(302) 456-9003
Contract #: W911SR-13-C-0072
University of Delaware
140 Evans Hall,
Newark, DE 19716
(302) 831-4241

ID#: A13A-016-0370
Agency: Army
Topic#: A13A-T016   Awarded: 9/26/2013
Title: Advanced Spectrally Selective Materials for Obscurant Applications
Abstract:   As infrared (IR) electo-optical sensors improve in both availability and quality a strong need exists to have comparable improvements in the performance of military obscurants within the IR band. Conventional approaches for creating effective IR obscurants have relied primarily on shaped metal particles with high aspect ratios (e.g. rods, flakes). While efficient it is difficult to create very wideband or spectrally complex responses when using surface plasmon based metal particles. In this effort we will take a completely different approach towards the design of IR based obscurants. Instead of using metal particles we intend to explore the development of all dielectric obscurants that exploit the properties of photonic crystals with integrated nanocavities. We believe this approach can create highly reflective obscurant particles within an entire IR band. Moreover, by introducing defect modes we will show that it is possible to create single or multiple transparent windows within a wideband obscurant band. The all dielectric approach is also amenable to current nanofabrication methods as well as scalable nano-imprinting techniques that can be used to fabricate large quantities of obscurant at a reasonable cost.

Materials Modification Inc
2809-K Merrilee Drive,
Fairfax, VA 22031
(703) 560-1371

PI: Krishnaswamy K. Rangan
(703) 560-1371
Contract #: W911QY-13-P-0472
Gaston College Textile Technology C
7220 Wilkinson Blvd,
Belmont, NC 28012
(704) 825-3737

ID#: A13A-020-0425
Agency: Army
Topic#: A13A-T020   Awarded: 9/26/2013
Title: Multifunctional Textile Coating of Military Fabrics
Abstract:   This STTR Phase I project will develop a novel multifunctional coating to combat a wide range of threats in a variety of complex situations for the warfighter. Military combat uniforms currently use NYCO fabrics (Nylon/cotton 50/50). The US Army is seeking new coating technologies that will impart multifunctional properties such as antistatic, conductive, flame resistance, improved abrasion resistance, and ballistic/stab protection to existing NYCO fabric clothing systems. Fire resistant fabrics are expensive because they are made using special fibers. Imparting fire and heat resistance property to the NYCO fabrics by simple FR coatings is a cost-effective approach. This can also help extend their use in other advanced military textile applications such as tents, tarpaulin covers and flight gear. Recent studies have shown that ionic liquids have excellent thermal and fire resistant properties. Since ionic liquids contain charged species they can also exhibit excellent antistatic properties. In the proposed Phase I effort, a new multifunctional coating based on ionic liquids will be developed for military fabrics. MMI has significant experience in the development of ionic liquids for specific end applications. The multifunctional NYCO fabrics treated in Phase I will be tested for vertical flame resistance, antistatic testing, mechanical durability and launderability. In the Phase II effort, the coating composition and process will be optimized for producing multifunctional fabrics for specific military gear that will be field tested.

Nevada Nanotech Systems, Inc. (NNTS)
1315 Greg Street #103,
Sparks, NV 89431
(775) 972-9816

PI: Ben Rogers
(775) 972-9816
Contract #: W9132T-14-C-0005
University of Nevada, Reno
University of Nevada, Reno, Mailstop 325
Reno, NV 89557
(775) 784-7053

ID#: A13A-017-0061
Agency: Army
Topic#: A13A-T017   Awarded: 1/9/2014
Title: Autonomous Broad Spectrum Environmental Sentinels
Abstract:   We propose a platform for aerial environmental monitoring based on the integration of two advanced technologies for the first time: a lightweight, flying robotic platform capable of hovering and swarming, and a compact, low-power chemical sensor platform called the Molecular Property Spectrometer™ (MPS™): a robust, low-cost, silicon-chip-based micro- electro-mechanical system (MEMS) that has been used for detection and identification of chemicals and trace (parts- per-trillion) levels of explosives vapor and particles in defense applications. The MPS™ sensor’s orthogonal analysis capability, low power consumption, small size, light weight and near-imperviousness to high g-force trauma (from drops, hitting the ground, etc.) all combine to make it highly suitable for a flyable chemical sensor module. The University of Nevada, Reno quadcopter design employs four independently controlled rotors with advanced onboard sensors to fly autonomously. The system will be capable of inter-unit communication and self-powering. Utilizing the real-time data collected and analyzed by the MPS™, the unit will be capable of swarming with other units during the 90- minute surveillance flight, collecting data once per minute over a given area to localize and profile a contaminant source.

NEXGEN COMPOSITES LLC
2000 COMPOSITE DRIVE,
KETTERING, OH 45420
(937) 416-8185

PI: Rob Banerjee
(937) 321-5035
Contract #: W56HZV-13-C-0363
University of Dayton
300 College Park,
Dayton, OH 45469
(937) 229-2113

ID#: A13A-021-0009
Agency: Army
Topic#: A13A-T021   Awarded: 9/13/2013
Title: Low Cost Fabrication of Armor Protection Systems for Military Tactical Vehicles
Abstract:   There is a great need and opportunity to develop lower cost manufacturing process for ceramic tile-based composite armor system for military tactical vehicles. The threat levels encountered by the military tactical vehicles, particularly due to the Improvised Explosive Devices (IED) pose an ever-increasing need for more lightweight and effective vehicle armor system at an affordable cost. A low-cost composite ceramic armor system will enable wider adoption of lightweight armor in military tactical vehicles, thus providing increased mission capability and improved mobility and survivability to our war-fighters. NexGen Composites, Fiber-Tech Industries and CerCo have collaborated to develop a novel, low-cost manufacturing process for ceramic tile-based composite armor system for military tactical vehicles. Based on the preliminary projections, it is estimated that this new manufacturing process, called NexArmor™ process, can potentially reduce the cost of the ceramic composite armor system by about 50 % and can reduce the manufacturing cycle-time by about 75% compared to the current composite armor manufacturing process. This new agile and flexible NexArmor™ manufacturing process with significantly lower cycle time will also greatly increase the surge production capability to respond in a short turn-around time.

NextGen Aeronautics
2780 Skypark Drive, Suite 400
Torrance, CA 90505
(310) 626-8384

PI: ROBERT BORTOLIN
(310) 626-8389
Contract #: W15P7T-14-C-A205
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA,
5171 California, Suite 150,
Irvine, CA 92697
(949) 824-1749

ID#: A13A-012-0080
Agency: Army
Topic#: A13A-T012   Awarded: 11/25/2013
Title: Embedded Self-repairing Antenna Composite (ESAC)
Abstract:   The goal of the proposed research is to develop self-healing embedded communication antennas to be used in transparent armor—i.e., ground vehicle windows. Embedded antennas are known to delaminate from their host structures after impact; this allows an empty space to form around the antenna and as a result detunes the antenna. A sandwich structure will be designed, fabricated, and tested whereby the antenna is embedded in a self-healing transparent armor. Upon delamination the antenna will reform its seal the armor materials. This effort will demonstrate that these near-kissing joint interfaces will heal after they have delaminated. NextGen Aeronautics will team with the University of California, Irvine to co-develop this innovate damage-resistant self-healing transparent antenna. We will deliver a self-healing antenna sandwich structure (nominally 4”x4”) for eventual transition into transparent armor—including bulletproof windows and self-repairing armor composites. We will consult with armor manufacturers to ensure full compatibility with existing bulletproof and ballistic glass laminates

Phoebus Optoelectronics LLC
12 Desbrosses Street,
New York, NY 10013
(718) 484-7033

PI: David Crouse
(646) 334-7764
Contract #: W31P4Q-13-C-0201
City College, CUNY
Convent Avenue at 138th Street, Shepard Hall, Room 16
New York, NY 10031
(212) 650-7904

ID#: A13A-002-0323
Agency: Army
Topic#: A13A-T002   Awarded: 8/13/2013
Title: Metasurface Enhanced Solar Blind Ultraviolet Photodetector
Abstract:   This project will develop plasmonic films that perform the dual functions of optical filtering and electrical conduction for solar-blind ultraviolet radiation (UV) detectors. Two types of plasmonic structures will be investigated, namely nano- hole arrays in an aluminum film atop UV radiation detecting semiconductors. These two similar plasmonic structures support different types of surface plasmons in the UV spectral range, namely localized or non-localized surface plasmons. The films will block visible and infrared light and allow UV light to be transmitted to any UV detecting substrate, and the film will then conduct the photo-generated electrical current. The benefit of a single layer structure that performs both optical filtering and electrical conduction is that it allows for lower cost, more robust, lighter weight solar-blind UV detectors that can be designed to address numerous UV sensing markets and applications. The structures will be designed towards eventual use in the detection of missile plumes, and the large commercial markets of water and food purification systems, and flame sensors. In Phase I, the plasmonic structures will be designed and modeled, fabricated and tested. The project team includes Phoebus Optoelectronics, the National Science Foundation’s Center for Metamaterials at the City University of New York, and Raytheon.

Physical Sciences Inc.
20 New England Business Center,
Andover, MA 01810
(978) 689-0003

PI: Bogdan R. Cosofret
(978) 689-0003
Contract #: W911SR-13-C-0077
Colorado State University
601 South Howes Street, 408 University Services Center
Fort Collins, CO 80523
(970) 491-6355

ID#: A13A-015-0349
Agency: Army
Topic#: A13A-T015   Awarded: 9/26/2013
Title: Compressive Spectral Video in the LWIR
Abstract:   Physical Sciences Inc. and Colorado State University will develop an innovative sensor that enables low-cost infrared hyperspectral imaging though the use of novel sampling algorithms which provide real-world chemical plume detection capability with compressed data and a hardware configuration which enables high frame rate capture of full 2D spatial and 1D spectral data.Compressive sensing techniques will be used to capture complete hyperspectral data cubes at video frame rates without the need for a costly Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) Focal Plane Array. PSI’s experience in chemical plume detection and Colorado State University’s expertise in reduced order modeling of large data sets will be used to move beyond the standard compressive sensing techniques employed in visible imaging to detect the low thermal contrast signatures of chemical clouds. The proposed system will provide standoff (less than or equal to 5 km) wide-area detection of these clouds for dramatically decreased size, weight, power consumption, and cost compared to current LWIR imaging systems.In Phase I, a compressive LWIR sensor will be designed and modeled, a trade study and down-select of key components performed, relevant algorithms prototyped, and risk-reduction experiments conducted. In Phase II, a TRL 5 prototype system will be developed, integrated, and tested in relevant environments.

Platypus Technologies, LLC
5520 Nobel Drive, Suite 100
Madison, WI 53711
(608) 237-1274

PI: Bharat R. Acharya
(608) 237-1270
Contract #: W911NF-13-P-0030
University of Wisconsin-Madison
21 N. Park St., Suite 6401,
Madison, WI 53707
(608) 262-3822

ID#: A13A-004-0268
Agency: Army
Topic#: A13A-T004   Awarded: 9/27/2013
Title: Liquid Crystal-based Sensors for Detection of Airborne Toxic Chemicals for Integration with Unmanned Robotic Systems
Abstract:   We aim to develop lightweight and rugged liquid crystal (LC)-based sensors suitable for integration into small unmanned vehicles, including hand-launched UAVs and throwable robots. For Phase I proof of concept, we propose to develop sensors that detect DMMP, H2S, NO2 and NH3. These gases include simulants of chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals, selected for their relevance to DoD and civilian security. The sensors will be fabricated and tested through a collaboration between Platypus Technologies LLC and University of Wisconsin. We will (i) optimize the design of chemically functionalized surfaces to enable sensitive LC-based detection of the target gases; (ii) perform infrared spectroscopy to advance our understanding of the intermolecular interactions that underlie the response of the LC sensors to the targeted gases, so that we will be better able to design further improvements and broader detection capabilities in Phase II; and (iii) design and fabricate simple microstructures that host LCs in a manner suitable for fabrication of LC sensors for deployment in small UMVs. Benefits of these sensors include their robustness and uniquely low power and weight parameters, which facilitate their use in small UMVs. Commercial applications extend to civilian markets such as monitoring gas pipelines, wells, mines.

QmagiQ, LLC
22 Cotton Road, Unit H, Suite 180
Nashua, NH 03063
(603) 821-3092

PI: Mani Sundaram
(603) 821-3092
Contract #: W909MY-13-C-0032
MIT - Lincoln Laboratory
244 Wood Street,
Lexington, MA 02420
(781) 981-1602

ID#: A13A-014-0354
Agency: Army
Topic#: A13A-T014   Awarded: 9/27/2013
Title: VLWIR SLS Digital FPA and Camera for Imaging Spectroscopy
Abstract:   QmagiQ and MIT-LL propose to partner to develop a very longwave infrared (VLWIR) digital focal plane array (DFPA) and camera for imaging spectroscopy applications. The DFPA will be based on Type-II InAs/GaSb strained layer superlattice (SLS) photodiodes with > 13 micron cutoff, hybridized to a 640x480 digital readout integrated circuit (DROIC). In Phase I , QmagiQ will develop a 13 micron cutoff detector with the goal of high quantum efficiency and a low dark current that drops to acceptable levels on cooling to ~ 45K. Performance will be demonstrated on test devices and on MIT-LL's 256x256 DROIC which permits better-passivated pixels and which can tolerate higher dark currents while yielding good signal-to-noise. MIT-LL will characterize the DFPA. In Phase II, QmagiQ will increase array format to 640x480 and work with MIT-LL to package the DFPA into a compact digital camera that will be delivered to DOD for evaluation. The camera may be particularly useful in an infrared hyperspectral imaging system for the stand- off detection of homemade explosives.

Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc.
44 Hunt Street,
Watertown, MA 02472
(617) 668-6800

PI: Harish B. Bandari, Ph.D.
(617) 668-6800
Contract #: W909MY-13-C-0034
Illinois Institute of Technology
3101 South Dearborn Street, Life Sciences Building - 156
Chicago, IL 60616
(312) 567-3388

ID#: A13A-013-0213
Agency: Army
Topic#: A13A-T013   Awarded: 9/30/2013
Title: Conformal Passivation of High Aspect Ratio HgCdTe Surfaces by ALD Using a Novel Cd-Precursor
Abstract:   The goal of the proposed program is to identify an effective passivation material and develop a capable passivation methodology to protect highly reticulated HgCdTe surfaces. The proposed passivation material and technique using highly conformal atomic layer deposition (ALD) will allow the DOD to develop high-performance infrared focal plane array detectors that can operate under wider operating conditions, using lower-cost processes. Specifically, we propose to develop a novel ALD inorganic precursor that will enable highly conformal coatings of passivation material with excellent chemical and electrical passivation to HgCdTe surfaces. Initial testing of the proposed passivation material will be performed on planar devices, where studies will be conducted to evaluate the role of interfacial reaction in dark current noise reduction. Current standard processes for manufacturing HgCdTe detectors have serious yield and reliability issues due to lack of effective passivation techniques. The proposed developments will address these issues, thereby helping improve process yield and product reliability, while simultaneously reducing process cost.

Scalable Algorithmics USA
2400 Huntscroft Ln, Apt 203
Raleigh, NC 27617
(848) 467-6686

PI: Pankaj K. Agarwal
(919) 660-6540
Contract #: W911NF-13-9-0018
Duke University
Department of Computer Science, Box 90129
Durham, NC 27708
(919) 660-6540

ID#: A13A-005-0266
Agency: Army
Topic#: A13A-T005   Awarded: 9/27/2013
Title: Construction of 3-D Terrain Models from BIG Data Sets
Abstract:   The objective of this proposal is to design, analyze, and implement scalable algorithms for analysis-driven construction of high-resolution 3D terrain models from BIG terrain data sets, and to build a software infrastructure for making analysis-prepared terrain models available to data consumers on multiple platforms. Analysis-driven modeling means that the construction of the model is influenced by, and adapted for, the specific analysis that the terrain model will be used for by data consumers. The algorithms for constructing terrain models will be capable of handling heterogeneous and dynamic data. To handle large volumes of terrain data efficiently, the computational techniques will optimize both the CPU running time and the data communication cost. Models and algorithms will be developed that can construct hierarchical models at different levels of detail. Analysis-driven denoising algorithms, using techniques from persistent homology and machine learning, will be developed to handle noise in the data, and probabilistic models will be developed to handle uncertainty in data and to attach confidence levels to various features computed by the algorithm. Finally, computational methods and software infrastructure will be developed to make terrain models prepared for analysis available to data consumers on multiple different platforms.

Sciperio, Inc.
12151 Research Pkwy. Suite 150,
Orlando, FL 32826
(407) 275-4720

PI: Kenneth Church
(407) 275-4720
Contract #: W911NF-13-P-0026
Georgia Institute of Technology
801, Ferst Drive,
Atlanta, GA 30332
(404) 894-9348

ID#: A13A-010-0406
Agency: Army
Topic#: A13A-T010   Awarded: 9/16/2013
Title: Additive Manufacturing of Multifunctional Nanocomposites
Abstract:   Sciperio with team members Georgia Institute of Technology and Centecorp have teamed up to develop an Additive Manufacturing Composite using nano and micro fillers. The team will develop multi-scale models that are supported by experimental characterization for advanced 3D Printable materials. Inelastic response of high strength hierarchical structures composed of engineered materials and specifically polymers and plastics that are loaded with a controlled nano and/or micro particles, strings, rods, tubes or flakes will be investigate the. Phase I will produce models and AM composite materials which will be used to 3D Print a specifically designed structure with high tensile and compression strength.

SI2 Technologies
267 Boston Road,
North Billerica, MA 01862
(978) 495-5302

PI: Erik Handy
(978) 495-5326
Contract #:
Drexel Nanotechnology Institute
3141 Chestnut Street,
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 895-6446

ID#: A13A-003-0320
Agency: Army
Topic#: A13A-T003   Selected for Award
Title: Printed, Flexible Ultracapacitors Based on Novel, High-Performance Carbon Nanomaterials (1000-262)
Abstract:   SI2 Technologies, Inc. (SI2) proposes to develop printed, high-performance ultracapacitors to meet the Army’s need for lightweight energy storage. SI2 will leverage its demonstrated expertise in ink jet printing and our partner’s expertise with carbon nanoparticle synthesis to develop low-cost, flexible, printed ultracapacitors. SI2 has considerable experience in the roll-to-roll deposition of conductive ink patterns. These patterns are printed directly from a computer file in an ambient environment without any tooling, masks, etc. In Phase I, SI2 and its partner will screen several new ink recipes with regard to their ability to meet energy storage requirements, and a printed ultracapacitor demonstrator will be produced. Manufacturing of the most promising ultracapacitors will be scaled-up in Phase II, and advanced testing will be performed to simulate the harsh environments to which the devices will be exposed in the field.

Staib Instruments, Inc.
101 Stafford Court,
Williamsburg, VA 23185
(757) 565-7000

PI: Philippe Staib
(757) 565-7000
Contract #: W911NF-13-P-0021
Univ of NY at Stony Brook
Dept. of Elec. & Comp. Eng., 273 Light Engineering
Stony Brook, NY 11794
(631) 632-8397

ID#: A13A-011-0305
Agency: Army
Topic#: A13A-T011   Awarded: 9/26/2013
Title: Chemical Analyzer System for In Situ and Real Time Surface Monitoring for Composition Control During Synthesis of Compound Semiconductor Films
Abstract:   The overall objective of this proposal is to evaluate the new in-situ growth monitoring system, Auger Probe, in an MBE environment for reliable and reproducible, highly precise results. State-of-the art data manipulation techniques will be used without impacting the growth process (MBE in this case). Using Auger Electron Spectrometry (AES), the Probe system will be used for in situ, real time analysis and control of surface elemental compositions during MBE growth of compound semiconductor materials. Demonstrations will be performed on III-V compounds [such as (Al,In,Ga)(As,Sb)], but the methods will be developed in such a way that they could be adapted to other materials systems.

TDA Research, Inc.
12345 W. 52nd Ave.,
Wheat Ridge, CO 80033
(303) 940-2300

PI: Silvia D. Luebben
(303) 940-2317
Contract #: W81XWH-13-C-0157
University of Pittsburgh
5057 Bioscience Tower 3, 3501 Fifth Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
(412) 383-6672

ID#: A13A-019-0258
Agency: Army
Topic#: A13A-T019   Awarded: 7/22/2013
Title: Soft and Elastomeric Intramuscular Electrode with Therapeutic Delivery Capability
Abstract:   Approximately 5-6% of military injuries involve some form of major peripheral nerve injury with little chance of spontaneous healing. Currently these injuries lead to major impairment of voluntary muscle function in the limbs and extremities, making tasks of walking, reaching, grasping, etc. very difficult or impossible for many patients. It is not enough to focus therapeutic treatment on the segmental nerve injuries alone, new methods to treat and stimulate the distal neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) must be developed to maintain muscle responsiveness and welfare while the slow process of axonal regeneration continues at the proximal injury site. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) and our partners at the Univ. of Pittsburgh (UP) propose to develop a soft, flexible, neuromuscular electro-stimulation (ES) electrode prosthetic with elastic composite wires and controlled release of neurotransmitters and growth factors to maintain healthy muscle function and promote reinnervation at the NMJs.

---------- DARPA ----------

Adaptive Micro Ware Inc.
6917 Innovation Blvd,
Fort Wayne, IN 46818
(260) 489-0046

PI: Robert Kniskern
(260) 489-0046
Contract #: W911QX-13-C-0130
Purdue University
610 Purdue Mall, Hovde Hall,
West Layfayette, IN 47907
(765) 496-6638

ID#: D13A-004-0048
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: ST13A-004      Awarded: 7/3/2013
Title: A Flexible and Extensible Solution to Incorporating New RF Devices and Capabilities into EW/ ISR Networks
Abstract:  "There are many different RF devices used in military networks. It is highly desirable to have scalable networks, where new devices can be readily installed without hardware or software changes elsewhere in the network. It is known that achieving this goal requires a language that describes both the capabilities of RF components and their current operational status. This language must have formal, computer-processable semantics. We address the question what is the minimum set of parameters that should be described. To answer this question we study the hardware/software architecture of a “RF device”. We advance an open architecture for wireless devices. Rather than pursuing complex algorithms, which may not be implementable due to SWAP considerations, we provide a scalable solution. Furthermore the proposed solution is entirely compatible with standards for EW/ISR. We demonstrate seamless incorporation and use of the descriptions of RF components and their status by the network infrastructure."

Applied Optronics
2008 Eastpark Blvd,
Cranbury, NJ 08512
(908) 753-6300

PI: Dennis Tishinin
(908) 753-6300
Contract #: W911QX-13-C-0124
Cornell University
373 Pine Tree Rd,
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 255-7877

ID#: D13A-002-0032
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: ST13A-002      Awarded: 7/2/2013
Title: Compact Integrated Silicon Nitride Microresonator Accelerometer
Abstract:  To solve the DARPA need for high-performance MEMS-based optomechanical accelerometers, Applied Optronics proposes to develop a Compact Integrated Silicon Nitride Microresonator Accelerometer (OPTIMA), which is based on a combination of a high-Q silicon nitride mechanical oscillator for detecting the force, and a sensitive optical cavity for reading out the displacement of the oscillator’s proof mass. We expect that a fully developed OPTIMA sensor will reach high acceleration sensitivity (0.1 µg/Hz1/2) and fast data acquisition rate (10 kHz). All components of the OPTIMA will be made of conventional semiconductor materials using common fabrication techniques and therefore will be amenable for miniaturization and integration on a chip. The assembled OPTIMA accelerometer will include all sensing, readout, and control components in the same package (for example, a common HHL laser package with dimensions 45x32x18 mm) and provide purely electrical output to the user, preferably in a digital data format. In Phase I, we will demonstrate the feasibility of the OPTIMA approach through extensive modeling and proof-of-concept experiments, and expect to reach TRL-3 at the end of Phase I. During Phase II, we will further develop individual aspects of the OPTIMA technology and demonstrate a TRL-5 integrated accelerometer prototype.

Applied Technology Associates
1300 Britt SE,
Albuquerque, NM 87123
(505) 767-1214

PI: Brian Homeijer
(505) 285-8962
Contract #: W911QX-13-C-0125
Sandia National Laboratories
PO Box 5800,
Albuquerque, NM 87185
(505) 845-7829

ID#: D13A-002-0029
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: ST13A-002      Awarded: 6/28/2013
Title: Nano-Optomechanical Massive MEMS Accelerometer (NOMMA)
Abstract:  Inertial navigation systems (INS) are a critical asset to the DoD in environments where GPS is either denied or unavailable. At the heart of these systems are precision acceleration and rotation sensors. Recently, MEMS-based accelerometers have found widespread use in INS owing to their small size and ease of fabrication. However they still lack the sensitivity and bandwidth required for accurate long-distance navigation. Applied Technology Associates, with our teammate, Sandia National Laboratories, proposes to design the Nano-Optomechanical Massive MEMS Accelerometer (NOMMA), a robust, packaged MEMS accelerometer with high sensitivity optical readout approaching the standard quantum limit for displacement measurement.

Cornerstone Research Group, Inc.
2750 Indian Ripple Road,
Dayton, OH 45440
(937) 320-1877

PI: Bradley Doudican
(937) 320-1877
Contract #: W911QX-13-C-0135
University of Dayton
300 College Park,
Dayton, OH 45469
(937) 229-2919

ID#: D13A-006-0018
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: ST13A-006      Awarded: 7/12/2013
Title: Limit State Design of Composite Aerospace Structures
Abstract:  Federal Aviation Administration Advisory Circular 20-107B provides guidance on the achievement of compliance with Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations regarding airworthiness type certification requirements for composite aircraft structures necessitating a well-understood building block approach to component certification. CRG , Pegasus, and UD will obtain the objectives of this program by identifying a low-level, stochastically verified, composite structural toolset geared towards expediting aircraft design and development. The proposed effort will seek to establish the foundation for a design architecture that employs the limit state approach for common aerospace boundary conditions (design loads), establishes a database of allowable designs for parametric geometries of heuristically-chosen shapes, and is predicated upon the ability to account for and track variability and uncertainty. The proposed effort will define a known subset of the greater advanced composites design space with sufficient specificity to permit more rapid parametric design of aero-structures, employing a limit state design approach that is adaptable to continuous extension and refinement in materials, processes, and design details.

Dog Star Technologies LLC
6600 Roswell Rd, Suite K-2
Sandy Springs, GA 30328
(404) 236-2150

PI: Gregory Berns
(404) 727-2556
Contract #: W911QX-13-C-0102
Emory University
Office of Sponsored Programs, 1599 Clifton RD, NE, 4th fl.
Atlanta, GA 30322
(404) 727-2503

ID#: D13A-001-0011
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: ST13A-001      Awarded: 6/28/2013
Title: FMRI Optimization in Awake Service and Working Dogs
Abstract:  Having demonstrated the feasibility of fMRI in awake dogs, we are now ready to move forward with a program aimed at extending this technology to the point that a reliable training regimen can be deployed to a wide range of service and working dogs. The advantages of such a training program will allow for fMRI-evaluation of dogs early in their training careers as either working or service dogs. To be able to perform widespread fMRI evaluation of dogs, an efficient and reliable training program must be developed. For Phase I of the STTR program, we will achieve the following objectives, which will lay the foundation for Phase II work: 1) Optimize parameters for fMRI of large dogs up to 70 lbs and feasibility for dogs up to 90 lbs; 2) Using a wider variety of dog breeds and temperaments, we will assess the subject suitability for fMRI and the degree to which structural, temperamental, and aptitude differences can be accommodated by a single protocol; 3) Develop analysis methods to accommodate the wide range of canine brain size and morphology.

Florida Turbine Technologies, Inc.
1701 Military Trail, Suite 110
Jupiter, FL 33458
(561) 427-6337

PI: Frank Huber
(561) 427-6245
Contract #: W911QX-13-C-0131
University of Florida
PO BOX 116250,
Gainesville, FL 32611
(352) 392-6132

ID#: D13A-005-0006
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: ST13A-005      Awarded: 6/28/2013
Title: Modeling and Optimizing Turbines for Unsteady Flow
Abstract:  Pressure gain combustion has the potential to significantly improve the specific fuel consumption for gas turbine engines by realizing a pressure rise through the combustor as opposed to a pressure drop. One drawback to this form of combustion is the cyclic unsteady loading of the downstream turbine in such an engine. This STTR attempts to address this issue by creating design tools to improve and optimize a turbine to operate behind such a combustor. The goal is to analyze and to design the turbine to operate efficiently behind such a combustor and maintain a higher average efficiency during the entire cyclic nature of the pressure gain combustor exit conditions.

HyPerComp, Inc.
2629 Townsgate Road, Suite 105
Westlake Village, CA 91361
(805) 371-7556

PI: Ramakanth Munipalli
(805) 371-7500
Contract #: W911QX-13-C-0132
University of Connecticut
191 Auditorium Road, Unit 3139,
Storrs, CT 06269
(860) 486-2966

ID#: D13A-005-0026
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: ST13A-005      Awarded: 6/28/2013
Title: Modeling and Optimizing Turbines for Unsteady Flow
Abstract:  Pressure gain combustion (PGC) offers means to a more efficient energy use in propulsion and power generation devices. Integrating PGC concepts in gas turbine engines often results in highly unsteady flow conditions at turbine inlet. Further, the backpressure and wave reflection from the turbine can have strong bearing on the PGC process. Conventional turbine concepts are non-optimal in such flow conditions and may also present safety and stability concerns, thus calling for new design and configuration strategies. The objectives of this project are to (a) develop and verify software utilities to study the PGC-turbine hybrid engine, including cycle analysis and full CFD, and (b) to use this capability to investigate design options leading to device development. We seek to address a sufficiently broad design space for interfacing detonation based (pulsed and continuous detonation-type) combustors with (axial and radial) turbine components, and evolve guidelines for mutual compatibility. Analysis tools for unsteady PGC thermodynamic cycles will be developed to enable rapid evaluation of design concepts. HyPerComp Inc. will team with the Mechanical Engineering department of the University of Connecticut in this research. The team has extensive experience in the analysis, design and simulation of PDE and CDWE engines and other propulsion systems.

iK9, LLC
PO Box 213,
Columbus, GA 31902
(706) 566-4725

PI: Gopi Deshpande
(334) 844-1854
Contract #: W911QX-13-C-0123
Auburn University
310 Samford Hall,
Auburn, AL 36849
(334) 844-8569

ID#: D13A-001-0051
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: ST13A-001      Awarded: 6/28/2013
Title: Functional Imaging to Develop Outstanding Service-Dogs (FIDOS)
Abstract:  iK9, LLC, and Auburn University shall collaborate in the development of prototype procedures for conducting cognitive neuroscience studies employing fMRI imaging of the brains of unrestrained dogs while they are in an awake and responsive state. IK9 is an international leader in innovative working dog training, handler instruction, and K9 team operations and management. Auburn’s Canine Detection Research Institute (CDRI) has been a principal resource for detector dog related research and development for over 20 years. Auburn’s MRI Research Center has state-of-the-art MRI instrumentation and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) capabilities. Auburn is engaged in the imaging of unrestrained, awake dogs to investigate cognitive aspects of olfaction. In Phase 1 of this project we shall: Extend and refine training procedures for fMRI brain imaging of awake, unrestrained dogs; develop transmissible protocols for applying these training procedures; explore the feasibility of cognitive neuroscience and imaging experimental procedures for examining qualities indicative of a dog being an exemplary candidate for working tasks and TBI/PTSD therapeutic roles, and; examine the feasibility of adapting experimental/imaging procedures as well as continue development of a custom canine head coil for Auburn’s 7T MRI instrument.

IllinoisRocstar LLC
60 Hazelwood Drive, P. O. Box 3001
Champaign, IL 61826
(217) 417-0885

PI: Bono Wasistho
(256) 542-8123
Contract #: W911QX-13-C-0133
University of Cincinnati
Sponsored Research Services, University Hall, Suite 530
Cincinnati, OH 45221
(513) 566-5885

ID#: D13A-005-0045
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: ST13A-005      Awarded: 7/5/2013
Title: Modeling and Optimizing Turbines for Unsteady Flow
Abstract:  We propose a combined modeling and experimental program to analyze and optimize a turbine behind a pulse detonation combustor/engine (PDC/PDE). In Phase I, a discontinuous-Galerkin, harmonic balance code from the University of Cincinnati (UC) will be implemented and enhanced for efficient and accurate frequency domain analysis of unsteady oscillatory flow from a PDE. A 3-D blade geometry builder will be advanced in a package coupled to the DAKOTA optimizer from Sandia National Laboratories. The analysis and optimization processes, including pre- and post-processing, will be driven by an automated script code at the system level. Experimental data from UC will be employed for validation. Phase II will implement a full 3-D, high fidelity, CFD code. The UC Pulse Detonation Engine Test Facility will be used to perform tests on the optimized turbine. Williams International, an engine manufacturer, will provide guidance in the finite element analysis and in determining particularly manufacturing constraints used in the design optimization in both Phase I and Phase II, and will actively participate in Phase II. Combining the data gained from modeling with full-engine experiments will lead to a robust database of information, process insights, and performance efficiencies that can be achieved with PDE-based turbine engines.

Materials Sciences Corporation
135 Rock Road,
Horsham, PA 19044
(215) 542-8400

PI: Jaco Schutte
(215) 542-8400
Contract #: W911QX-13-C-0137
Wichita State University
Research & Technology Transfer, 1845 Fairmount St.
Wichita, KS 67206
(316) 978-6169

ID#: D13A-006-0030
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: ST13A-006      Awarded: 7/30/2013
Title: Novel Extensible Design Approaches for Advanced Aircraft Composite Structural Architectures (MSC P4135)
Abstract:  Among the factors that inhibit the use of composite materials in both general aviation aircraft and DoD platforms are the high cost of engineering and the cost of certification. Unless manufacturers can control risk when introducing new materials and processes, the potential benefits of advanced materials will be lost to the industry. In the commercial industry the problem is compounded by the use of low-cost fabrication processes that cannot rely on the existing experience base for graphite/epoxy pre-pregs, and the finite engineering resources of many manufacturers. It is proposed to address these problems by the use of a standardization concept at the structural element level, which would allow for a parametric design catalog of structural elements to be created. These structural elements will have the opportunity to gain a pre-approval, or conditional approval from the FAA or other certifying agency for a bounded design space. Probabilistic design concepts, such as the Bayesian methodology, will be used to isolate and quantify uncertainty in the materials, processing, and design elements. This will allow for the combined failure probability of the parametric standardized structural element to be calculated for any design permutation, while at the same time reducing the number of tests required for certification.

Mide Technology Corporation
200 Boston Avenue Suite 1000,
Medford, MA 02155
(781) 306-0609

PI: Marthinus C. van Schoor
(781) 306-0609
Contract #: W911QX-13-C-0134
University of Colorado, Boulder
University of Colorado,
Boulder, CO 80309
(303) 492-0555

ID#: D13A-005-0044
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: ST13A-005      Awarded: 7/5/2013
Title: Modeling and Optimizing Turbines for Unsteady Flow
Abstract:  "The Midé/University of Colorado - Boulder team is proposing to use Boulder’s modeling capabilities to model the unsteadiness of the pulse generated pressures, temperatures and swirl to provide the flow information needed to optimize the turbine stages for pressure gain combustion engines. Boulder will provide simulations that will identify the spatial and temporal variations of the pressure gain combustion generated flow, whether it is a pulse detonation engines or a rotary detonation engines. Midé will develop reduced order models of the flow characteristics using assumed modes. Approximate 2D models, of the performance of turbine blades in unsteady flow will be used to model the performance of the turbine stage(s) and be used to optimize the geometry of the turbine and its blades. The University of Colorado - Boulder’s efforts are needed to tackle the combustor/turbine optimization effort as a coupled systems problem. In Phase I Midé’s and Boulder’s will develop an analytical software tool capable of modeling and optimizing turbine components in unsteady flow. In Phase II, the team will continually improve the analytical tool but also use the tool to design and manufacture an optimized first stage high pressure turbine and test it in an operationally relevant environment."

NextGen Aeronautics
2780 Skypark Drive, Suite 400
Torrance, CA 90505
(310) 626-8384

PI: Shiv Joshi
(310) 626-8360
Contract #: W911QX-13-C-0138
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN
2001 Soto Street, USCDepartment of Contracts and
LOS ANGELES, CA 90089
(323) 442-2396

ID#: D13A-006-0010
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: ST13A-006      Awarded: 7/12/2013
Title: Parametric Higher Order Abstract Structural Element for Aircraft Design (PHAST-AID)
Abstract:  NextGen Aeronautics (NextGen) and University of Southern California (USC, RI) team of experienced composite materials, structural design, and analyses personnel are responding to the opportunity to develop stochastically verified composite structural design toolset to expedite aircraft design and enhance airframe assurance. Aircraft structural components are made up of basic structural elements efficient in transferring predominantly one type of loading, e.g. bending, torsion etc. These basic elements are combined to create more complex load carrying elements e.g. parts of wing and fuselage. Process of designing them, from material selection to geometric parameter selection, is needlessly repeated by structural aircraft designers. A way to expedite this design process is to create higher order abstract composite structural elements that can be parameterized and properties as well as design allowable can be correlated backward and forward to optimize the design and assign uncertainty value. In Phase I, NextGen team will design a set of basic components and define robust approach for uncertainty characterization and tracking. In Phase II, NextGen will demonstrate parametric element application, uncertainty quantification, stochastic verification, design application, process verification, and representative simulation in a certification process flow.

Other Lab Inc.
3101 20th St,
San Francisco, CA 94110
(808) 782-0628

PI: Saul Griffith
(808) 782-0628
Contract #: W911QX-13-C-0136
MIT
E15 411, 20 Ames St
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-0392

ID#: D13A-006-0020
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: ST13A-006      Awarded: 7/5/2013
Title: Automated Assembly of Deformable Digital Composite Airframes
Abstract:  Carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite materials are light and strong, however the development of composite aerostructures has been expensive and slow. Custom tooling is required for each part produced, significant capital investment is required to wind the fibers and cure the resins, and the design and qualification of each component is unique. This proposal is based instead on "digital" composites, constructed by the out-of-tool assembly of reversibly- linked composite fiber loops in sparse space-filling structures. This approach has been shown by the team to offer the highest modulus for an ultralight material, and the ability to integrate control surfaces in structural deformations. The research goal is to be able to effectively print a composite airframe, with final assembly the only assembly. Phase I will have two tasks: showing that the assembled structural properties can be predicted from measurements and modeling of a small set of discrete digital composite components, and showing that an automated process can place and join these components. A Phase I option will produce a prototype of the assembler mechanism. These will be followed in Phase II with the development and operation of a programmable assembler and the production of digital composite aerostructures.

SciX3, LLC
6154 McLendon Court,
Alexandria, VA 22310
(201) 232-6958

PI: JT Thomas
(703) 868-9372
Contract #: W911QX-13-C-0126
George Mason University
4400 University Drive, MS 4C6,
Fairfax, VA 22030
(703) 993-2297

ID#: D13A-003-0053
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: ST13A-003      Awarded: 6/28/2013
Title: Development of Gravitational Radiation Technology for Military Applications
Abstract:  Gravitational radiation is detected by its effect of rotating the polarization vectors of a high number N of entangled photons exhibiting quantum nonlinear geometric phase and the Klyshko effect for NOON states in a Michelson interferometer. The gravitational wave generator uses strong electromagnetic oscillations in a modified Grishchuk configuration to produce colliding gravitational waves in a focal/interaction region, and re-collides the gravitational waves to focus and amplify them. The signal may be improved by using squeezed vacuum states for the photons in the detector and parametric amplification of the gravitational waves in the generator.

Shared Spectrum Company
1593 Spring Hill Road, Suite 700
Vienna, VA 22182
(703) 462-6943

PI: Filip Perich
(703) 761-2818
Contract #: W911QX-13-C-0129
Georgia Tech Research Institute
250 14th Street NW,
Atlanta, GA 30332
(404) 407-6525

ID#: D13A-004-0034
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: ST13A-004      Awarded: 7/5/2013
Title: A Flexible and Extensible Solution to Incorporating New RF Devices and Capabilities into EW/ ISR Networks
Abstract:  The scientific/technical objective is to develop a language that will allow for seamless insertion of new RF devices and capabilities into EW/ISR networks. We achieve these requirements by employing subject matter experts that include former EW officers for defining terms, properties, relations, constraints, and rules for cross-layer service configuration. We ground the proposed domain-specific language ontologies and rules in the W3C OWL 2 RL, RIF, and OWL-S standards. Additionally, we develop use cases and advanced CONOPs based on retrospective analysis of past operations like Operation IRAQI FREEDOM in order to show how introducing multi-functional service oriented ontologies address previously identified challenges with focus on advanced EW systems exploiting state-of-the-art commercial off-the-shelf digital and RF hardware in a scalable, flexible, open architecture.

SLS, LLC
5939 Wood Drive,
Oakland, CA 94611
(510) 420-1322

PI: Raymond Chiao
(510) 420-1322
Contract #: W911QX-13-C-0127
UC Merced
5200 N. Lake Road,
Merced, CA 95343
(209) 228-4049

ID#: D13A-003-0017
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: ST13A-003      Awarded: 6/28/2013
Title: Generation and amplification of gravitational waves for military communications
Abstract:  We propose a gravitational-radiation military communications system which is based on quantum-mechanical parametric amplifiers, oscillators, and transducers. In the transmitter at a remote site A, a parametric amplifier using a Planck-mass-scale, moving superconducting membrane placed inside a positive feedback loop consisting of a high-Q superconducting microwave resonator, is operated above threshold as a parametric oscillator which generates gravitational radiation at microwave frequencies. Amplitude modulation of the resulting parametric oscillator used as the source of this kind of radiation, could then be accomplished by modulating its microwave pump power source. In the receiver at a remote site B, another parametric amplifier could be used for first-stage amplification, which could then be followed by a second-stage transducer consisting of a moving, charged superconducting membrane inside another resonator, that can convert the amplified gravitational microwaves into easily detectable electromagnetic microwaves. We propose to construct, and to test, such a system in our dilution refrigerators at UC Merced.

VIStology, Inc
5 Mountainview Drive,
Framingham, MA 01701
(508) 277-0242

PI: Jakub Moskal
(508) 788-5088
Contract #: W911QX-13-C-0128
Northeastern University
360 Huntington Avenue, 960RP,
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 373-5600

ID#: D13A-004-0028
Agency: DARPA
Topic#: ST13A-004      Awarded: 6/28/2013
Title: A Flexible and Extensible Solution to Incorporating New RF Devices and Capabilities into EW/ ISR Networks
Abstract:  VIStology, Northeastern University and BBN are proposing a standards-based solution to seamless insertion of new RF devices and capabilities into multifunction Electronic Warfare (EW)/Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) networks without requiring software changes in the network. The solution leverages the Cognitive Radio Ontology (CRO) and extends it into the EW/ISR domain. The CRO was developed by Modeling Language for Mobility (MLM) Working Group of the Wireless Innovation Forum. The ontology provides machine-processable semantics for the RF device characteristics, which means that no human is needed for their interpretation. The ontological extensions developed in this project will cover concepts and relationships suitable for expressing device capabilities, device operational status, and the EW/ISR domain in general. This project will also develop initial prototypes of tools that will use the ontological descriptions and demonstrate seamless integration of new RF devices and capabilities into existing EW/ISR networks. Such tools will be easy to deploy on the WALDO operating system.

---------- NAVY ----------

Accacia International Inc
One Tech Plaza, 2113 Wells Branch Parkway, Suite 6900
Austin, TX 78728
(512) 782-8218

PI: Chitra Wendakoon
(512) 782-8218
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1182
Texas A and M University
400 Harvey Mitchell Parkway S, Suite 300
College station, TX 77845
(979) 845-2672

ID#: N13A-013-0374
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T013      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Probiotics for Maintaining Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) Health and the Readiness of the U.S. Navy’s Marine Mammal Systems
Abstract:   Marine mammals like bottlenose dolphins are maintained by US Navy's Marine Mammal Program to protect harbors and detect underwater mines. The maintenance and betterment of health of these dolphins in captivity is a priority in order to improve the fitness and readiness of these animals for defense missions. Accacia International proposes to develop probiotic pharmaceuticals to treat and prevent gastrointestinal diseases in dolphins. Preliminary results related to the indigenous commensal microbes, including potential probiotic strains obtained from our University research partner has enabled Accacia to get a headstart on the project. We will isolate candidate probiotic bacteria from the indigenous commensal bacteria present in dolphin fecal and oral samples and determine their antimicrobial activity against gastrointestinal (GI) pathogens. The immunomodulatory effects of the selected probiotic strain on cytokines like TNF and TGF-ß will also be evaluated. The selected probiotics will be microencapsulated and freeze-dried to facilitate dosage and delivery. The viability of the microencapsulated probiotic bacteria during delivery and after release in simulated digestive tract conditions will be tested to ensure efficacy of the probiotic. In addition to US Navy, marine theme parks employing dolphins for recreational purposes will also benefit from the superior-quality probiotics developed by Accacia International.

Adaptive Methods, Inc
5860 Trinity Parkway, Suite 200
Centreville, VA 20120
(703) 968-6110

PI: Rob Blanchard
(703) 968-6127
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1168
APL University of Washington
1013 NE 40th Street,
Seattle, WA 98105
(206) 543-4043

ID#: N13A-026-0045
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T026      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Improving the Physics of Applied Reverberation Models
Abstract:   We propose to enhance the capability of ASTRAL/ASPM by adding to it a treatment of several physical phenomena. Several methods enabling these new features have been developed and tested in recent years and are mature enough for transition. Efforts will be made to ensure the enhancement will not come with significant loss of efficiency. The Phase I effort consists of incorporating into ASTRAL/ASPM the surface loss model TOTLOS, which takes into account surface forward scattering in its effect on both propagation and reverberation. A Phase I Option is also proposed and consists of developing a strategy for incorporating more physically-based bottom loss models into ASPM reverberation modeling, testing the strategy for a specific environment, and comparing the results to the current bottom loss models used in ASPM as well as parabolic equation and mode codes. Potential Phase II efforts include: (a) incorporate tested models, where appropriate, into ASPM; (b) use ONR TREX13 data sets along with full environmental inputs, to evaluate the improved version of ASTRAL/ASPM, and demonstrate its efficacy; (c) test the resulting code on other data sets, including those of NAVO; (d) help guide the ASPM enhancements through the OAML process.

Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc.
1046 New Holland Avenue,
Lancaster, PA 17601
(717) 295-6092

PI: Tapan Desai
(717) 295-6817
Contract #: N68335-13-C-0343
Florida State University
600 W. College Avenue,
Tallahassee, FL 32306
(850) 644-7060

ID#: N13A-007-0144
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T007      Awarded: 8/15/2013
Title: Development of Atomistically-Informed Peridynamics Framework for Corrosion Fatigue Damage Prediction
Abstract:   Corrosive environments together with cyclic loading can lead to the formation of localized corrosion pits and corrosion fatigue cracks, which can significantly deteriorate the structural integrity of aircraft components. The exact nature of corrosion fatigue damage is dependent on the competing multi-scale processes resulting from complex interactions between the structural material, its environment, local microstructure and mechanical variables. In order to assess the durability and integrity of aircraft components (especially of aging fleet) there is a need to develop new theoretical models which can predict corrosion fatigue damage by accounting the interactions between the multi-scale phenomena. In this work, ACT together with Florida State University proposes to develop a Peridynamics framework which could accurately predict the corrosion fatigue processes across different length scales. The modeling approach is based on novel coupling methodologies between atomistic process, microstructural changes and Peridynamics theory. The resulting computational framework will enable prediction of corrosion fatigue life in naval aircraft components exposed to different corrosive environments during their service life.

Advanced Systems & Technologies, Inc
23 Mauchly #109,
Irvine, CA 92618
(949) 733-3355

PI: James Kilpatrick
(949) 733-3355
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1210
University of California, Irvine
916 Engineering Tower,
Irvine, CA 92697
(949) 259-3629

ID#: N13A-011-0210
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T011      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Conformal Array Laser Imager for Bondline Evaluation & Repair (CALIBER)
Abstract:   The NAVY solicits new non-destructive inspection (NDI) methods to address detection and evaluation of kissing bonds and bondline integrity in aerospace composites since no currently accepted standard exists. In response AS&T Inc. propose, the Conformal Array Laser Imager for Bondline Evaluation and Repair (CALIBER), designed expressly for this purpose. The novelty of the proposed approach lies in the integration of a new sensor technology developed by AS&T with a new NDI method, both of which have been independently developed well beyond the conceptual stage. The development of CALIBER will provide an NDI sensor whose output images reveal bondline adhesive strength and the lower threshold which qualify as kissing bonds. In form and function, CALIBER is geared towards field deployment. Founded on a previously successful NDI sensor developed for detection of hidden delaminations, disbonds and crushed core damage in composites, this effort therefore builds upon and broadens the applicability of a new NDI technology. The proposed development is anticipated to lead to a portable, non-contact inspection instrument for rapid detection and evaluation of kissing bonds in aerospace composites in addition to a broader range of flight-line composite NDI tasks.

Agave BioSystems, Inc.
P.O. Box 100,
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 272-0002

PI: John Ramsey
(607) 272-0002
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1172
Mote Marine Laboratory
Marine Microbiology Program, 1600 Ken Thompson Parkway
Sarasota, FL 34236
(941) 388-4441

ID#: N13A-013-0201
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T013      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Probiotics for Maintaining Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) Health and the Readiness of the U.S. Navy’s Marine Mammal Systems
Abstract:   Agave BioSystems, with their academic partners at the Mote Marine Laboratory, proposes to develop probiotic pharmaceuticals from indigenous commensal microbes to enhance gastrointestinal health in the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus). The dolphin gastrointestinal microbiome will be characterized by 16S rRNA deep sequencing, and culturable commensals will be isolated by plating dolphin gastric and fecal samples on a range of media. Cultured microbes will be tested for their ability to inhibit pathogen growth using a panel of known dolphin infectious agents, while qPCR assays will be developed to confirm the presence of the selected probiotic candidates in a sample dolphin population. A process for encapsulation of probiotic candidates will be developed to extend shelf life and confer resistance to degradation in gastric and bile environments. A Phase II plan will be developed to demonstrate the safety of the probiotic and evaluate its efficacy in the treatment of gastrointestinal disease in dolphins. Candidate probiotics will be characterized for colonization and adhesion and for their ability to modulate the host inflammatory response. Agave BioSystems will work with the US Navy Marine Mammal Program in the Phase II to demonstrate the performance of the probiotic at colonizing the dolphin intestine and promoting gastrointestinal health.

ALPHA STAR
5150 E. PACIFIC COAST HWY, SUITE # 650
LONG BEACH, CA 90804
(562) 961-7827

PI: FRANK ABDI
(562) 961-7827
Contract #: N68335-13-C-0349
UNIVERSITY OF AKRON
302 EAST BUCHTEL AVENUE,
AKRON, OH 44304
(330) 972-7741

ID#: N13A-008-0073
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T008      Awarded: 8/15/2013
Title: Interlaminar Mode I and Mode II Fracture Toughnesses in Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs)
Abstract:   Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC)’s are highly susceptible to interlaminar shear failure at elevated temperatures. Therefore, interlaminar properties, critical design limitation of CMC should be assessed accurately with appropriate test methods to ensure overall structural reliability/integrity of components in Naval gas turbine engines. AlphaSTAR proposes to develop rigorous, precise, and innovative test methods, and validated FEM based Fracture Toughnesses (FT) methodology, that guides tests, and assist customization of the standardized delamination growth CMC test methods. To address the need a comprehensive/systematic approach is proposed that involves the application of the latest advanced FT analysis/modeling and experimental techniques. The focus in Phase I is on:1) room/elevated temperatures modeling of technically sound and marketable testing technique for accurate characterization of delamination resistance such as crack tip micro-cracks; crack growth resistance (Mode I/II, mixed mode), as well as predicting high temperature FT when only tests are available at room temperature; and 2) to identify/implement modifications to ASTM test methods working with OEM design engineers. Following the initial redesign of test method and testing in Phase I, further development, data generation on one or more specific materials, and efforts for standardization of procedures will be pursued in Phase II.

Aptima, Inc.
12 Gill Street, Suite 1400
Woburn, MA 01801
(781) 496-2443

PI: Nathan Schurr
(781) 935-3966
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1191
Colorado State University
601 South Howes Street, 408 University Services Center
Ft Collins, CO 80523
(970) 491-5574

ID#: N13A-020-0164
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T020      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: CUPID: Cognitive-service Utilized for Proactive Intelligent Decision-support
Abstract:   The Navy’s mission success increasingly relies on complex decision support systems and automation. Navy command and control systems must provide the users with the right information, at the right time, depending on the context in which they are operating, and must do it in a proactive manner. Today, massive quantities of data are passed blindly between nodes, with no ability to adapt the delivery or presentation of information to suit users’ needs. To address these challenges, Aptima, with the support of Colorado State University (C.A.P. Smith) and consultant Krishna Pattipati, proposes to develop a Cognitive-service Utilized for Proactive Intelligent Decision-support (CUPID). The Aptima team will ensure success by leveraging a three pronged effort including: 1) groundbreaking theoretical design approach and metrics; 2) rapid prototyping of a tangible Cognitive Service middleware; and 3) pursuing a clearly identified transition environment, the Distributed Common Ground System-Navy (DCGS-N). The Aptima team believes that the CUPID Cognitive Service will offer unique benefits to C2 system designers and users by enabling productive, proactive user interactions.

Arete Associates
P.O. Box 2607,
Winnetka, CA 91396
(520) 770-6099

PI: Paul Lundquist
(520) 571-8660
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1173
University of Arizona - Optical Sci
1630 E. University Blvd.,
Tucson, AZ 85721
(520) 621-2892

ID#: N13A-023-0208
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T023      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Solid-State Fundamental Mode Green Laser for Ocean Mine Detection
Abstract:   Areté proposes the development of Q-switched semiconductor lasers that can be scaled to produce high output peak powers within the blue/green wavelength band. The proposed system will utilize nanostructure quantum wavefunction engineering for gain material designs having extended excited state lifetimes and suppressed non-radiative processes to enable energy storage for high-peak-power optical pulses. Short excited-state lifetimes have previously been a fundamental limitation on semiconductor lasers. This limitation had been circumvented through the use of the Diode Pumped Solid-State (DPSS) laser architectures where diode efficiency and rare-earth crystal upper-state-lifetimes are used together to obtain high-peak-power pulses in Q-switched cavities. By engineering nanopartical heterojunctions to lengthen radiative lifetimes and suppress non-radiative processes, energy storage capability can be increased in semiconductor materials, enabling high peak powers without the use of DPSS architectures. Initial efforts will provide theoretical guidance for material fabrication based on material and laser system analysis.

Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation
9950 Wakeman Drive,
Manassas, VA 20110
(617) 500-4892

PI: Konstantine Fetfatsidis
(617) 229-6818
Contract #: N68335-13-C-0347
Univ of California, Santa Barbara
UC Santa Barbara, 552 University Road
Santa Barbara, CA 93106
(805) 893-8699

ID#: N13A-008-0159
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T008      Awarded: 8/15/2013
Title: Parametric Analysis of Various Test Configurations for Measuring the Interlaminar Fracture Toughness of CMCs using LayerSlayer and Abaqus
Abstract:   The low weight, excellent durability and heat resistance of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) make them attractive materials for use in aircraft engine hot sections, where improved overall engine efficiency can be realized. Nevertheless, the interlaminar properties of CMCs must be well understood before CMCs can realistically replace metallic superalloys in engine hot sections, and no standardized test methods for determining interlaminar fracture toughness of CMCs currently exist. During this Phase I effort, Aurora Flight Sciences (AFS) will work closely with experts in CMC fabrication, testing, design, and analysis at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) and the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) to develop analytical concept models on interlaminar fracture toughness test methods. A finite element code developed at UCSB, LayerSlayer, will be used in conjunction with the commercially available finite element analysis software, Abaqus, to ascertain stresses, energy release rates and mode mixities in CMCs while conducting parametric studies of various test configurations and geometries feasible for measuring Mode I and Mode II interlaminar fracture toughnesses. Preliminary experiments on CMC specimens will be conducted to evaluate the feasibility of the concept models developed, in preparation for comprehensive testing of several CMC coupons during Phase II.

Cambridge Electronics, Inc.
22 Centre St. Unit 4,
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 304-4254

PI: Natalia Palacios
(617) 304-4254
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1165
MIT
77 Massachusetts Avenue,
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 452-2882

ID#: N13A-025-0254
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T025      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Gallium Nitride (GaN)-based High Efficiency Switch/Transistor for L-Band RF Power Amplifier Applications
Abstract:   This project is focused on the development of a new generation of GaN-based transistors with breakdown voltages in excess of 1kV that can be used in the demonstration of power amplifiers operating at 1 GHz with power added efficiencies in excess of 90%. To achieve this performance, this project will develop new approaches to increase the breakdown voltage of GaN high electron mobility transistors, advanced epitaxial structures with minimum current collapse, and improved fabrication technology to reduce the parasitic capacitances of these devices. The device development will be closely coupled to circuit design and simulation to ensure the required record circuit-level performance.

CFD Research Corporation
215 Wynn Dr., 5th Floor,
Huntsville, AL 35805
(256) 726-4884

PI: Alexey Vasenkov
(256) 726-4886
Contract #: N68335-13-C-0345
Sandia National Laboratories
1444 P.O. Box 5800, MS-1322 Sandia National Labora
Albuquerque, NM 87185
(505) 844-3973

ID#: N13A-007-0005
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T007      Awarded: 8/15/2013
Title: Multi-scale modeling of corrosion fatigue damage using peridynamics theory
Abstract:   The overall objective of this effort is to identify, and validate a suitable methodology and the associated multi-scale computational technique for predictive assessment of corrosion fatigue damage in Naval aircraft. Annual costs for corrosion inspection and repair of military aircraft are estimated to exceed $1B. Predictive modeling of corrosion fatigue damage is challenging since it has to capture the interactions between cyclic loading and electrochemistry across disparate time and length scales. Several approaches ranging from atomistic Molecular Dynamics, kinetic Monte Carlo, and Density Functional Theory to continuum mass transport were reported. However, the coupling of these methods to address multi-scale nature of corrosion problem has fundamental problems and requires intensive computational resources and time requirements. CFDRC teamed with Sandia National Laboratories in this STTR project to develop alternative multi-scale computational technology using peridynamics theory for predicting assessment of corrosion fatigue damage from the first principles. Key chemical reactions in proposed technology will be modeled using ab initio-based ReaxFF approach introduced by Prof. van Duin. During Phase I, we will (1) assemble preliminary software and (2) demonstrate the feasibility of our software for selected case studies. The Phase II work will produce the final software implemented in a continuum code and a library of demonstration and validation cases for damage prediction in simulated service conditions.

Clear Science Corp.
PO Box 233, 663 Owego Hill Road
Harford, NY 13784
(607) 844-9171

PI: Henry Carlson
(607) 844-9171
Contract #: N68335-13-C-0377
University of Texas at Austin
Office of Sponsored Projects, Post Office Box 7726
Austin, TX 78713
(512) 471-6424

ID#: N13A-001-0021
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T001      Awarded: 8/15/2013
Title: Naval Platform Aero-Optic Turbulence and Mitigation Methodology
Abstract:   Clear Science Corp. and the University of Texas at Austin will develop and demonstrate technology that accurately quantifies aero-optical distortion associated with high-energy laser (HEL) weapons on rotorcraft and will utilize the information in designing adaptive optics (AO) systems to maximize HEL system performance over the full range of flight conditions. Aero-optical distortion arises from vortical structures in the downwash flow during hover and in the wake during forward flight. Our team will utilize state-of-the-art rotorcraft wind tunnel facilities and computational models to develop and evaluate AO software and hardware. Flow simulations and direct measurements of aero-optical effects in the wind tunnel will provide data for statistical analyses of the flow dynamics and system specifications that match feedback algorithms, sensor and actuator bandwidths, and on-board processor speeds with the relevant temporal and spatial time scales. Candidate AO systems will be designed to minimize sensing, processing, and actuation latencies and compensate for measurement errors due to platform vibrations, sensor misalignment, and other disturbances. The objective is a robust, closed-loop adaptive optics system, providing optimal, reliable performance over the full range of helicopter operating conditions.

CMSoft, Inc.
566 Glenbrook Drive,
Palo Alto, CA 94306
(650) 898-9585

PI: Goeric Daeninck
(650) 614-1101
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1198
University of Washington
Dept. of Applied Mathematics, Box 352420
Seattle, WA 98195
(206) 484-3889

ID#: N13A-009-0112
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T009      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: High Efficiency Computation of High Reynolds Number Flows via Anisotropic Adaptive Mesh Refinement
Abstract:   This STTR Phase I project aims to design, implement, and demonstrate a rigorous, practical, fast, and re-usable anisotropic mesh adaptation software module for enabling the efficient computation of high Reynolds number flows in large computational domains. To this effect, it focuses on developing: (a) a set of portable and cache-friendly dynamic data structures that ease the implementation in a hydrodynamic code of fast mesh refinement and coarsening operations, (b) a set of algorithms and corresponding numerical software for performing anisotropic mesh adaptation in general, and isotropic adaptation in particular, (c) a robust, order of accuracy preserving, and computationally efficient treatment of the problem of non-conforming mesh interfaces resulting from mesh adaptation, and (d) optimization strategies for maximizing the efficiency of adaptive implicit flow computations. Because mesh adaptation inherently destroys load balance, this STTR project also focuses on the development of a measurement-based approach for assessing workload unbalance, and a set of smart and portable algorithms for transferring data across cores or processors to evenly redistribute the computational workload in order to achieve maximum scalability on a given massively parallel processor.

Cognionics
8445 Camino Santa Fe, Suite 205
San Diego, CA 92121
(619) 302-8686

PI: Yu Chi
(469) 951-2227
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1208
University of California, San Diego
200 W. Arbor Dr., #8465
San Diego, CA 92103
(619) 543-7765

ID#: N13A-021-0212
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T021      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Body-worn Wireless Neurophysiological Monitoring Network
Abstract:   This project will develop a wireless, body-worn neurophysiological monitoring suite. The system comprises of multiple 'patches' designed to cover the body for ECG, EEG and EMG acquisition along with auxiliary sensors for temperature and motion capture. The core of the Phase I project will focus on demonstrating the feasibility of the device for EEG and evoked applications due to the high technical challenge and stringent signal quality requirements compared to the 'simpler' ECG and EMG modes. A prototype EEG system will be built that consists of a slim and unobtrusive patch covering the scalp positions Fp1, Fp2, C3, Cz, C4, O1, O2, A1 and A2. Novel sensor designs will be evaluated to enable high quality recordings through hair. A miniaturized electronics data acquisition system will be built that supports the 8 signal channels with a novel ultra-low power wireless protocol to allow enable live streaming over a 48 hour period while operating on a tiny coin cell. The end result of the Phase I project will be an evaluation device that demonstrates the key features of the neurophysiological monitoring suite.

ColdQuanta
1600 Range Street, Suite 103
Boulder, CO 80301
(303) 440-1284

PI: Steven Hughes
(303) 440-1284
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1197
University of Colorado - Boulder
440 UCB, University of Colorado
Boulder, CO 80309
(303) 735-3171

ID#: N13A-018-0046
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T018      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Compact robust testbed for cold-atom clock and sensor applications
Abstract:   As strontium and other alkaline-earth metals become increasingly attractive for ultracold-atom applications, there is a growing need to develop compact, robust systems for cooling, trapping, and studying these elements. In this proposal, ColdQuanta will team with Dr. Jun Ye at JILA and the University of Colorado at Boulder to develop a portable, turn-key system that can produce, utilize, and optically trap ultracold strontium atoms. The resulting system will serve as the foundation for a strontium-based optical clock or gravimeter that is field-deployable for DoD missions.

Combustion Research and Flow Technology, Inc.
6210 Kellers Church Road,
Pipersville, PA 18947
(215) 766-1520

PI: Neeraj Sinha
(215) 766-1520
Contract #: N68335-13-C-0382
University of Mississippi
National Center for Physical A, 1 Coliseum Drive
University, MS 38677
(662) 915-3190

ID#: N13A-001-0176
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T001      Awarded: 8/15/2013
Title: Naval Platform Aero-Optic Turbulence and Mitigation Methodology
Abstract:   Phase I of the STTR program will be a collaborative research effort between high fidelity computational simulations and experimental testing. The primary aim of this initiative will be to measure laser beam distortion, using aero-optic metrics, due to flowfield turbulence. The results from the computational simulations and experimental test will be compared to ensure agreement between the two. Initial measurements of the beam distortion will be conducted for a turbulent flow over a flat plate containing an aperture through with the laser beam is emitted. Following this, a more realistic turret geometry with a conformal aperture will be used for the remainder of the Phase I simulations and tests. The turret permits a larger field of view for the beam emission and the distortion of the beam with changes in the emission angle will be measured. In the option period of Phase I, a flow control methodology, using boundary layer suction upstream of the laser emission aperture, will be implemented in order to reduce the beam distortion. The effectiveness of this flow control technique will be examined using computational simulations and experimental testing in order to calculate and compare the relevant aero-optic metrics.

Creare Inc.
P.O. Box 71,
Hanover, NH 03755
(603) 643-3800

PI: Anthony Dietz
(603) 643-3800
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1201
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology
77 Massachusetts Avenue, Building E19-750
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-3907

ID#: N13A-015-0184
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T015      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Ship Airwake Measurement System
Abstract:   Measurement surveys of full-scale ship airwakes are needed to validate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of these wakes. Airwake computations guide the design of ship superstructures, improve the fidelity of flight simulators, and save time and reduce risk during flight tests to define launch and recovery envelopes for ship and aircraft combinations. Current full-scale test techniques involving mast mounted anemometers are costly and time-consuming, and they do not extend to the critical region aft of the ship’s stern. We propose an autonomous ship airwake measurement system that is man-portable and may be set up and operated by a single person. Detailed measurements of the air velocity vectors above the flight deck and far into the wake region aft of the ship’s stern are possible with this system. In Phase I, we will demonstrate the feasibility of our proposed approach with tests of critical aspects of the system both in our laboratory and in the field. In Phase II, we will develop, test, and validate a complete prototype of the system and demonstrate its performance and value in a field test. The system will then be ready for use by the Navy to map ship airwakes.

Creare Inc.
P.O. Box 71,
Hanover, NH 03755
(603) 643-3800

PI: Richard Kaszeta
(603) 643-3800
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1189
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology
77 Massachusetts Avenue, Building E19-750
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-3906

ID#: N13A-017-0196
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T017      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: High-Temperature, Metallic Alloy, Stabilized, Radiative Emitters for Thermophotovoltaic Power Sources
Abstract:   Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power systems offer an attractive approach for compact, simple, and reliable energy conversion needed in applications such as portable power systems and unmanned aerial vehicles. A key challenge with TPV energy systems is achieving a high-energy conversion efficiency, and one of the critical aspects of the energy conversion process is creating spectral emissions from the high-temperature emitter that are well matched with the bandgap of the photovoltaic cells. On this project, Creare and our research institution partners at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) will further the development of metallic photonic crystal emitter technology that can provide thermal emissions specifically tailored to a given photovoltaic cell and a given emitter operating temperature. These engineered metamaterials will enable significant improvements in overall system efficiency. In Phase I, we will we will identify the best substrate material for the emitter, develop improved photonic crystal designs for these substrates at a range of operating temperatures, and fabricate a sample photonic crystal. The performance of this sample will be fully characterized in a laboratory TPV facility. We will also develop a preliminary system design and optimize the photovoltaic cell specifications, both of which are necessary emitter design inputs.

Creare Inc.
P.O. Box 71,
Hanover, NH 03755
(603) 643-3800

PI: Jeffrey Breedlove
(603) 643-3800
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1171
Dartmouth College
Thayer School of Engineering, 8000 Cummings Hall
Hanover, NH 03755
(603) 646-2230

ID#: N13A-028-0223
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T028      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Advanced Generator/Motor System with Ultra-High Power Density
Abstract:   Generator and motor systems with high power density are needed as watercraft, aircraft, and land vehicles evolve toward more electric designs. In response, we propose to develop a system that operates at extremely high speed to provide ultra-high power density. The resulting system will be compact, lightweight, efficient, robust, and reliable. Our team is ideal for this project because we have focused intense effort on the development of advanced high-speed turbomachines, alternators, motors, and power electronics for many challenging aerospace and terrestrial applications. During the Phase I project, we will optimize design trades, create a preliminary design, conduct fabrication trials, and estimate production costs. We will then fabricate and test a prototype system during Phase II.

DECISIVE ANALYTICS Corporation
1235 South Clark Street, Suite 400
Arlington, VA 22202
(703) 414-5016

PI: Jonathan Clausen
(703) 414-5020
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1177
University of Maryland
Lee Building,
College Park, MD 20742
(301) 405-6274

ID#: N13A-024-0078
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T024      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Situational Awareness as a Man-Machine Map Reduce Job
Abstract:   This effort is focused on the development of a system called Situational Awareness via Mixed-initiative Universal Recognition, Analysis, and Inference (SAMURAI). SAMURAI will provide a single cloud-enabled end-to-end workflow covering the full range of data analysis from data ingest to situational assessment and decision support. As part of this workflow SAMURAI will provide the ability for automated processing to provide rapid extraction of knowledge while allowing manual corrections and additions at multiple levels. These manual changes will then be utilized to improve the underlying statistical models utilized within the automated processes. The SAMURAI system will also provide a behavior/intent prediction capability that has been demonstrated to operate on millions of entities and billions of relationships. Moreover, the prediction algorithms will have the ability to be updated according to analyst feedback and use analyst-provided information not present in the raw data. The overall efficiency and accuracy of a large scale, mixed initiative analytical system will be heavily affected by when and how users provide feedback to the algorithms, the system incorporates this feedback, and users interact with each other. SAMURAI identifies when such interactions have the greatest benefit, and advises the user accordingly.

Deep Springs Technology
4750 W. Bancroft St., Suite 5,
Toledo, OH 43615
(419) 536-5741

PI: Oliver Strbik
(419) 536-5741
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1161
Brown University
47 George St.,
Providence, RI 02912
(401) 863-2862

ID#: N13A-012-0029
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T012      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Mechanical Property Characterization and Modeling for Structural Mo-Si-B Alloys for High Temperature Applications
Abstract:   The objective of the work described in this proposal is to aid in the advancement of Mo-Si-B alloys for use in high temperature applications such as hot gas stream components in turbine engines. Such alloys are being characterized for their monotonic tensile properties in tension and compression as well for their creep resistance. Likewise, multiphase Mo-Si-B alloys have been studied in terms of monotonic and cyclic crack growth and creep fatigue interactions. Less is known about their cyclic deformation response. Computer modeling has been applied to the Mo-Si- B alloy system. However, only 2D studies have been conducted on this material. The accuracy of prediction was found to be very good when the 2D microstructure based simulations were conducted. These studies can be extended to model the failure mechanisms with high level of accuracy because of capturing the stress profile in the material with very high level of accuracy, including the stress concentration location and magnitude and crack length for intergranular fracture. The present work will strive to develop 3D models of the alloy microstructure, and conduct analysis over a range of temperatures and strain rate; all of which are not yet available for this alloy in the existing studies.

Electric Drivetrain Technologies LLC.
78 N. Main St, PO 1700
Moab, UT 84532
(435) 259-5500

PI: George Holling
(435) 259-5500
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1185
University of Wisconsin
2557 Engineering Hall, 1415 Engineering Drive
Madison, WI 53706
(608) 263-7057

ID#: N13A-028-0019
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T028      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Hybrid, Ultra-High-Speed, High Efficiency, Power Dense, Electronically Controlled Energy Conversion Unit for Ship Systems, Unmanned Vehicles, and Robo
Abstract:   The Navy seeks to develop new, innovative motor/generator technologies that can effectively operate at speeds up to 1,000 kRPM at power densities of 40 kW/kg (excluding heat exchanger) with an overall system efficiency of 95% or better. Such a motor/generator will have a wide range of applications, i.e. it can be used as the core building block of a very lightweight electrical energy storage system for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) or to maintain power quality in micro-grids that experience high pulse loads such as airframes and Navy ships. We have identified that it is feasible in principle to build a 500 kW motor/generator operating above 750 kRPM using emerging technologies and materials. In our preliminary analysis we have identified several technologies and projected their respective performance. Technical risk factors and technical unknowns have been identified along with potential solutions. This framework will guide us in our Phase I analysis which is aimed to provide a more in depth analysis along with simulations and inputs from consultants to confirm the feasibility to build such a machine in Phase II with a reasonable promise of success. The research will be performed jointly with the University of Wisconsin and the University of Virginia.

EOS Photonics
30 Spinelli Place, A
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 945-9137

PI: Christian Pfluegl
(617) 945-9137
Contract #: N68335-13-C-0340
Harvard University
9 Oxford St,
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 495-5798

ID#: N13A-006-0020
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T006      Awarded: 8/15/2013
Title: Low-Cost High Power Surface Emitting Micro-Stripe Quantum Cascade Laser Arrays
Abstract:   We envision a coherently coupled QCL array architecture featuring 2nd order DFB gratings to vertically couple out light with excellent beam quality and high output power. This approach does not require cleaving of the devices or facet coatings and is therefore inherently more robust and manufacturable than facet emitters.

Freedom Photonics LLC
90 Arnold Place, Suite D
Santa Barbara, CA 93117
(805) 277-3031

PI: Paul Juodawlkis
(781) 981-7837
Contract #: N68335-13-C-0380
MIT Lincoln Laboratory
Advanced Technology Division, 244 Wood Street
Lexington, MA 02420
(781) 981-7837

ID#: N13A-005-0378
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T005      Awarded: 8/15/2013
Title: Ultra-Wideband, Low-Power Compound Semiconductor Electro-optic Modulator
Abstract:   Freedom Photonics is proposing to develop a novel modulator concept. The overall objective of this program is to develop a novel compound-semiconductor electro-optic modulator that simultaneously exhibits 100-GHz operation, optical/microwave velocity matching, Zo of 50 ohms, low optical (

Freedom Photonics LLC
90 Arnold Place, Suite D
Santa Barbara, CA 93117
(805) 277-3031

PI: Nadir Dagli
(805) 893-4847
Contract #: N68335-13-C-0381
UCSB
Dept. Electrical Engineering,
Santa Barbara, CA 93117
(805) 893-4847

ID#: N13A-005-0377
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T005      Awarded: 8/15/2013
Title: 100GBit/s Low Drive voltage Multi-Quantum Well Nanowire modulator
Abstract:   In this Phase I Small Business Innovative Research project we will be developing extremely efficient (

GrammaTech, Inc
531 Esty Street,
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 273-7340

PI: Michael McDougall
(607) 273-7340
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1175
University of Pennsylvania
Office of Research Services, P221 Franklin Bldg/6205; 3451
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 573-6707

ID#: N13A-014-0013
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T014      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Progressive Model Generation for Adaptive Resilient System Software
Abstract:   Software continues to be a weak link in our critical systems. A prudent operator should employ a defense-in-depth strategy whereby ‘safe’ systems are still monitored to detect breaches and respond to them. Unfortunately, such monitoring is challenging in practice, since there is no universal pattern that characterizes misbehaving software. We will capture an application’s intended behavior as it is coded in an IDE. The behavior will be stored as a model, and will be captured using a combination of automatic program analysis and manual tuning. We leverage modeling languages developed at the University of Pennsylvania for the purpose of runtime verification. These languages provide two levels of information: an abstract description of a system’s high-level behavior, and a mapping from high-level behavior to the source-level variables and procedures that actually implement the system. These models will supply a runtime monitor with the information needed to both determine when behavior is abnormal and determine what low-level events need to be tracked to observe the critical behavior.

Imaging Systems Technology
4750 W. Bancroft,
Toledo, OH 43615
(419) 536-5741

PI: Carol Wedding
(419) 536-5741
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1181
Georgia Institute of Technology
771 Ferst Dr., Love Bldg., Room 368
Atlanta, GA 30332
(678) 612-6288

ID#: N13A-012-0014
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T012      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Mechanical Property Characterization and Modeling for Structural Mo-Si-B Alloys for High Temperature Applications
Abstract:   Under this STTR, Imaging Systems Technology (IST) in cooperation with Georgia Institute Technology (GIT) will develop and mature models to predict mechanical properties of refractory alloys with an eye toward tailoring these alloys for specific applications. In particular, this research will focus on addressing core aspects of Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) as it applies to novel Molybdenum-Silicon-Boron Composites (Mo-Si-B) and its associated processing method. Specifically the research will focus on Molybdenum-Silicon-Boron Composites (Mo-Si- B) fabricated through a novel powder processing based on the Georgia Tech Reaction Sintered (GTRS). Model development will focus on Mo-Si-B composite systems fabricated using ultrasonic spray drying of the constituent components.

Intraband LLC
200 N. Prospect Ave.,
Madison, WI 53726
(608) 216-6920

PI: Dan Botez
(608) 265-4643
Contract #: N68335-13-C-0341
University of Wisconsin-Madison
21 N. Park St, Suite 6401
Madison, WI 53715
(608) 262-3822

ID#: N13A-006-0040
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T006      Awarded: 8/15/2013
Title: Surface-Emitting, Monolithic Beam-Combined Mid-Wave IR Quantum Cascade Lasers
Abstract:   The technical objectives of this proposal are: (1) design a grating-coupled surface-emitting (GCSE) active-photonic- crystal (APC) 4.6 micron-emitting quantum-cascade laser (QCL) to deliver 15 W diffraction-limited CW power in the main lobe of the far-field beam pattern; (2) design a GCSE-APC QCL structure with monolithic aperture-filling optical elements for obtaining close to 90 % of the surface-emitted power into the main lobe of the far-field beam pattern; and (3) design a GCSE-APC QCL structure employing second-order gratings with chirped period for increasing the light- outcoupling efficiency and the device wallplug efficiency. Step-taper-active (STA) QCLs will be used in the design since they suppress carrier leakage out of the QCL active regions, resulting in electro-optic characteristics much less temperature sensitive than for conventional QCLs; thus, allowing for significant increases in CW power and wallplug efficiency. The design will be for APC devices of built-in index step an order of magnitude higher than for conventional APC-QCL as to achieve stable-beam operation in CW operation to high coherent powers with high wallplug efficiency. For 4.6 micron-emitting devices the design will be for usable CW powers as high as 20 W, delivered in diffraction- limited beams.

KaZaK Technologies, Inc
P.0. Box 198, 44 Indian Point Road
Georgetown, ME 04548
(207) 371-2568

PI: Michael McAleenan
(207) 371-2568
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1203
University of Maine, Orono
5711 Boardman Hall, Rm 212, University of Maine
Orono, ME 04469
(207) 581-2131

ID#: N13A-022-0346
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T022      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Development of Next-Generation Composite Flywheel Design for Shock and Vibration Tolerant, High Density Rotating Energy Storage
Abstract:   KaZaK Technologies and our program subcontractors and technical associates our proposing several concepts to significantly increase rim rotational velocity and increase storage energy density/ unit as identified by the Navy as a pre- requisite for shipboard integration of flywheel energy stowage systems. These systems have the potential to reduce drain on ship electrical systems and to provide access to an almost instantaneous supply of electrical energy. Incorporating such storage systems into next generation integrated power systems has potential to meet peak high power electrical demands and support shipboard integration of next generation high electric power technologies without compromising ship electrical systems, thermal signature and RCS. During Phase I, our team will develop rim designs and predict performance via finite element analysis, test coupon fabrication and testing emphasizing material and geometric optimization for low cost, high quality manufacturing automation. If awarded a Phase II, our team will work to apply Phase I materials, configurations and automated manufacturing technology to the fabrication of hardware for prototypes sea trials.

LUMANY, LLC
Newport Park Centre, 5001 Birch Street
Costa Mesa, CA 92626
(949) 294-4500

PI: Paul Rudy
(408) 921-6948
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1183
Clemson University
Holcombe Dept of Electr Engin, 215 Riggs Hall
Clemson, SC 29634
(864) 986-1106

ID#: N13A-023-0367
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T023      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Solid-State Fundamental Mode Green Laser for Ocean Mine Detection
Abstract:   To address the Navy’s need for a solid state fundamental mode green laser for ocean mine detection, Lumany is proposing a compact, high efficiency, diode pumped solid state, q-switched laser based on novel laser diode pumps and a unique solid state crystal with excellent energy storage properties for high peak power, short pulsed green lasing output at 520nm from the fundamental mode. This proposed approach meets the program requirements by eliminating the need for second harmonic generation to achieve green laser emission, which is expensive, inefficient, bulky, and temperature sensitive. Lumany’s proposal leverages several prior related achievements, specifically in Lumany’s commercialization of the world’s first CW diode pumped solid state laser delivering visible light output from the fundamental mode. In addition to Lumany’s expertise in visible solid state laser technology, the proposing team includes Clemson University’s Professor Eric Johnson, the PalmettoNet Endowed Chair in Optoelectronics and his group at Clemson’s Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies. Additionally, the proposing team includes Soraa Laser Diode, the only commercial GaN laser diode manufacturer in the United States, founded by Professors Shuji Nakamura and Steve DenBaars of University of California, Santa Barbara.

Lynntech, Inc.
2501 Earl Rudder Freeway South,
College Station, TX 77845
(979) 764-2218

PI: Victor Palmer
(979) 764-2200
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1187
Carnegie Mellon University
5000 Forbes Avenue,
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 268-5837

ID#: N13A-016-0047
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T016      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: ADP: Autonomous Deep Perception
Abstract:   Autonomous systems acquire massive amounts of sensor and communications data over the course of their potentially lengthy missions. Ideally, such systems would incorporate current and historical data into their decision making processes to generalize from experience and avoid repetitive errors. However, the sheer quantity of data gathered can make storage and processing of an unfiltered data stream practically difficult. As a result, many current autonomous systems utilize only recent sensor data. In contrast, biological systems quickly summarize highly complex sensory information streams into a lifetime of well-organized memories, which can be quickly accessed to affect current reasoning tasks. Lynntech’s Autonomous Deep Perception (ADP) system will use deep belief neural networks, coupled with life-long learning methods, with the goal of allowing autonomous systems to quickly generate and archive small, salient, and highly-accessible representations of sensor information. Using this transformed, highly relevant view of the incoming data, autonomous systems can identify and focus on mission-relevant input, as well as quickly scan through historical, compactly-represented data archives to apply past experience to current decisions in real time.

M4 Engineering, Inc.
4020 Long Beach Blvd,
Long Beach, CA 90807
(562) 981-7797

PI: Kevin Roughen
(562) 981-7797
Contract #: N68335-13-C-0371
UCLA
48-121 Engineering IV, 420 Westwood Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095
(310) 206-5453

ID#: N13A-002-0186
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T002      Awarded: 8/15/2013
Title: Integrally Bladed Rotor (IBR) Blend Optimization Tool
Abstract:   M4 Engineering and UCLA propose to develop software for rapidly and accurately assessing the impact of blend repairs on bladed disk structures. Reduced order modeling techniques will be employed to efficiently simulate modal responses and parametric models of blend repairs will be generated. This approach will be coupled with an optimization scheme for determining optimal blend geometry with minimal user interaction. The techniques developed in this effort will be an excellent complement to existing tools for simulating IBR response.

Materials Research & Design
300 E. Swedesford Rd,
Wayne, PA 19087
(610) 964-6131

PI: Craig Iwano
(610) 964-9000
Contract #: N68335-13-C-0348
Southern Research Institute
757 Tom Martin Drive,
Birmingham, AL 35255
(205) 581-2439

ID#: N13A-008-0103
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T008      Awarded: 8/15/2013
Title: Innovative Interlaminar Mode I and Mode II Fracture Toughness Test Methods for Ceramic Matrix Composites
Abstract:   It is critical to the safe use of ceramic matrix composite components that information on the fracture toughness of these materials be available, in order to allow an assessment of the likelihood for crack growth. Although Military Standards and American Society for Testing and Materials both serve as resources for room and elevated temperature test methods, there are no standards to obtain the interlaminar fracture toughness in CMCs. This proposal seeks to develop a reliable process for measuring the Mode I and Mode II fracture toughness at any temperature for CMC materials. The process includes the selection of the best test method, the specification of the test procedures, the design of the test specimen, and the determination of the fracture toughness from the measured data.

MC10 Inc.
19 Camp Street,
Cambridge, MA 02140
(571) 205-1149

PI: Barry Ives
(571) 205-1149
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1206
University of Illinois Urbana-Champ
Beckman Institute, Room 3355, 405 N. Mathews Ave.
Urbana, IL 61801
(217) 369-7398

ID#: N13A-021-0327
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T021      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Body-worn sensors for monitoring warrior physical and mental state
Abstract:   Wearable human state monitors must be mechanically invisible to greatest degree possible, to maximize comfort, wearability, hygiene and signal quality. These device attributes are aligned with the goal of closely coupling devices to the body for best-quality signal capture and continuous health monitoring by seamlessly integrating with the body, under clothing and gear. They must be robust to dynamic motion in moist environments and under constant mechanical stresses. MC10 & UIUC jointly propose Mechanically-iNvisible electronic Tattoo (Mentat), an ultra-lightweight evolution of MC10’s existing conformal (flexible & stretchable), adhesive commercial platform for wearable electronics. Mentat will miniaturize and reduce the profile of conventional wearable electronics, resulting in electronics systems that look like tattoos in weight and thickness. Software apps will run on remote smart devices to integrate and evaluate wearer status in context of personal parameters and health history. In Phase II we will conduct military-grade environmental testing of electronics hardware to establish system robustness. We will assess realistic proxy metrics for comfort & wearability while electronic tattoos operate under sustained PPE/gear loads during field activity, or unloaded but needing to operate wet. Mentat will provide leap-ahead beyond current state-of-art technology in ultra-low-power electronics, wireless communications & management for energy efficiency.

Mide Technology Corporation
200 Boston Avenue Suite 1000,
Medford, MA 02155
(789) 306-0609

PI: C. van
(781) 306-0609
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1193
Massachusetts Institute of Technolo
77 Massachusetts Avenue,
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 258-8799

ID#: N13A-029-0340
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T029      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Light-Weight Atmospheric Diving Suit
Abstract:   The Navy is seeking a new light-weight Atmospheric Diving Suit (ADS) design. This suit must be less than 400 lbs; at this weight a diver will be able to self-propel using his legs and fins. The system must ensure the divers safety at a working depth of 1000 ft of sea-water; protecting the body from the high external pressure at depth, while providing a sustainable 1 ATM internal pressure. Midé in partnership with MIT propose to create a next generation ADS built from three innovative approaches. Firstly, Midé will carefully design a composite outer shell for the ADS. A composite design will reduce the overall weight considerably over current aluminum designs. Secondly, the team will use lessons learned from MIT’s Bio-Suit Mechanical Counter Pressure Space Suit Design. Most notably the concept of “Lines of Non- Extension” (LoNE). The LoNE are lines along the body that do not move during articulation. By creating sub structure along LoNE lines the team can reduce joint complexity to two dimensions, while still allowing full range of motion. Thirdly, Midé will use super-elastic shape memory alloys to enhance the LoNE joint design, allowing the joints added flex while still providing structural rigidity.

MiMoCloud
11531 Swains Lock Terrace,
Potomac, MD 20854
(301) 651-7259

PI: Tejbir Phool
(301) 651-7259
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1184
University of California Santa Barb
552 University Rd,
Santa Barba, CA 93106
(805) 893-3586

ID#: N13A-025-0190
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T025      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Gallium Nitride (GaN)-based High Efficiency Switch/Transistor for L-Band RF Power Amplifier Applications
Abstract:   This research seeks to develop a method of developing solid-state power amplifiers that operate at 300 Volts, achieve 100 Watt output and greater than 90% efficiency at 1 GHz with 10% bandwidths. We will seek to demonstrate switch- mode amplifiers that use a novel gate design with Gallium Nitride forming the basis for solid state power amplification.

Modus Operandi, Inc.
709 South Harbor City Blvd., Suite 400,
Melbourne, FL 32901
(321) 473-1444

PI: Teresa Nieten
(321) 473-1426
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1178
Institute for Human & Machine
40 S. Alcaniz St,
Pensacola, FL 32502
(850) 202-4473

ID#: N13A-024-0140
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T024      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Intelligence and Intuition for Enhanced Decision Making (I2EDM)
Abstract:   The focus of our Intelligence and Intuition for Enhanced Decision Making (I2EDM) Phase 1 research is to provide efficient and timely automated production and dissemination of information products in support of doctrinal Decision Points for the Company and below in austere environments. Operating in the Cloud, I2EDM will continuously fuse tactical information with human intuition and experience to push data relevant to the decision support matrix to the Commander in the field.The Modus Operandi Team's solution will define, prototype, and develop a fusion approach that goes beyond JDL level 0 (Subobject assessment) and 1 (Object assessment) fusion to approach level 2 (Situation assessment) and level 3 (Impact assessment) fusion.The intelligence data will continue to be updated in the cloud as new intelligence arrives, even when the end users are offline. As processing is completed, the distributed data will then be recombined, or reduced, into the normalized fused results, and made available to the decision makers or analysts for further refinement.The analyst will then have the opportunity to adjust certainty assessments and constraining assumptions, add missing information, remove irrelevant or inaccurate data, and otherwise influence the direction of machine processing prior to the predictive analysis step.

Mohawk Innovative Technology, Inc.
1037 Watervliet-Shaker Road,
Albany, NY 12205
(518) 862-4290

PI: James Walton
(518) 862-4290
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1204
University of Texas
101 E. @7th St. Suite 5.300, Mail Stop A9000
Austin, TX 78712
(512) 471-6224

ID#: N13A-022-0365
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T022      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Development of Next-Generation Composite Flywheel Design for Shock and Vibration Tolerant, High Density Rotating Energy Storage
Abstract:   The overall objective of the Phase I and Phase II proposed effort is to design and demonstrate the ability to develop a high-speed shock tolerant composite flywheel energy storage system (FESS) using a low cost manufacturing process. The Phase I tradeoff design studies will assess the FESS size, operating speeds and material requirements needed to achieve the energy density levels and charge/discharge rates. Tests of composite material coupons fabricated with the low cost composite material manufacturing process will be completed. Transient shock analysis will also be performed to establish the shock tolerant FESS design configuration and corresponding bearing support system. Under Phase II, the composite flywheel manufacturing approach will be validated through high speed testing. The overall goal is to verify the power and energy density gains and reduced footprint possible through effectively integrating the generator, bearing and flywheel components. To achieve the desired power and energy densities in a composite flywheel operating at speeds to 100,000 rpm in a shock and vibration environment will require robust, well damped and low loss bearings. UT-CEM as subcontractor will establish the composite flywheel structure and manufacturing layup, while MiTi will be responsible for system integration and overall fabrication.

MP Technologies, LLC
1801 Maple Avenue,
Evanston, IL 60201
(847) 491-7208

PI: Yanbo Bai
(847) 491-7208
Contract #: N68335-13-C-0342
Northwestern University
Center for Quantum Devices, 2220 Campus Drive
Evanston, IL 60208
(847) 491-7205

ID#: N13A-006-0175
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T006      Awarded: 8/15/2013
Title: Ring-Cavity Surface-Emitting Quantum Cascade Lasers for High Power Applications at 4.5 um
Abstract:   Surface emitting semiconductor lasers eliminate the necessity for facet cleaving and allow for wafer scale testing, which increase the manufacturing yield and reduces the cost. However, in the mid-infrared, surface emitting semiconductor lasers are significantly underdeveloped compared to edge emitting devices. The proposed research will investigate the feasibility of using ring-cavity surface-emitting quantum cascade lasers for power scaling at a wavelength of 4.5 ?m. This approach allows for two-dimensional integration of multiple emitters on a single chip. A single mode emitting spectrum, excellent beam quality, and high power can be simultaneously achieved with this technology.

MZA Associates Corporation
2021 Girard Blvd. SE, Suite 150
Albuquerque, NM 87106
(505) 245-9970

PI: Matthew Whiteley
(937) 684-4100
Contract #: N68335-13-C-0378
University of Notre Dame
110 Hessert Laboratory, University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame, IN 46556
(574) 631-7680

ID#: N13A-001-0076
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T001      Awarded: 8/15/2013
Title: Naval Platform Aero-Optic Turbulence and Mitigation Methodology
Abstract:   MZA partnered with the University of Notre Dame proposes to conduct high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations providing volumetric time-resolved aero-optical disturbance modeling for rotary-wing aircraft flow dominated by wing-tip vortices. We will develop detailed wave-optics models of a baseline Navy helicopter beam director including engineering-level simulations of the beam control sensors and optics, illuminator propagation, active and passive sensor imaging, and high-energy laser transmission for target engagements. The aero-optic CFD solutions will be integrated with the wave-optics simulation, line-of-sight jitter modeling, and synthetic target rendering to provide a comprehensive system simulation. Parametric system sensitivity analysis will be performed using this simulation. We will conduct high-speed and high-resolution wavefront sensor measurements for a model-scale rotor flow. These measurements will be compared to the CFD modeling of the rotary wing flow, establishing spatial and temporal properties of the flow at different viewing angles. These validated disturbances will be used to quantify the aero-optical mitigation which can be achieved by use of predictive adaptive optics techniques applied as an upgrade to the baseline Navy helicopter system. Dr. Matthew Whiteley will be Principal Investigator for MZA and Dr. Mark Rennie will be the Principal Scientist for Notre Dame.

Nanohmics, Inc
6201 East Oltorf St., Suite 400
Austin, TX 78741
(512) 389-9990

PI: Steve Savoy
(512) 389-9990
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1188
University of Texas Austin
Office of Accounting, PO Box 7159
Austin, TX 78713
(512) 471-7371

ID#: N13A-017-0281
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T017      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Metamaterial Enhanced Thermophotovoltaics
Abstract:   Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion produces electrical power from heat energy using, in its most basic form, a thermal emitter and a photovoltaic converter. Since these systems typically have no or few moving parts, they provide a long term maintenance-free power generation. Key factors affecting performance include matching the emitter spectrum more precisely to the conversion characteristics and designing mechanical conversion systems that concentrate the radiant energy to maximize photovoltaic conversion and limit the conversion cost ($/W) by minimizing the required photovoltaic footprint. Nanohmics Inc., an early stage technology development company (Austin, TX) and Professor Gennady Shvets at The University of Texas at Austin propose to develop a complete system for energy recovery that incorporates a novel film to cover a hot power source.

Nanohmics, Inc
6201 East Oltorf St., Suite 400
Austin, TX 78741
(512) 389-9990

PI: Byron Zollars
(512) 389-9990
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1169
University of Texas Austin
Department of Physics, RLM 5.204
Austin, TX 78712
(512) 471-7371

ID#: N13A-027-0104
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T027      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Wide Spectral Band Laser Threat Sensor
Abstract:   US troops and equipment are increasingly at risk for irradiation by lasers, whether it be from enemy targeting and ranging systems, designators, or high-energy lasers as weapons themselves. Countering the threat requires detection of the incident laser radiation, the direction from which it is originating, and characterization of its wavelength and temporal profile. Nanohmics Inc., in partnership with Professor Gennady Shvets of the University of Texas at Austin, proposes to build, test, and demonstrate a high-performance wide spectral band, high dynamic range laser threat detector and characterization module with an instantaneous field-of-view that exceeds one hemisphere of solid angle. Based on Nanohmics' existing, proven, and patent-pending Argus visible/near-infrared threat sensor (Argus), the innovative Argus-EC (Extended Capability) architecture combines a sophisticated embedded processor with low-cost, novel, and lightweight optical system. The Argus-EC detectors are capable of accurately determining the angle-of- arrival of incident laser radiation, while characterizing the wavelength, spectral width, pulse format, and irradiance of the laser source. If vehicle position and attitude are supplied, Argus-EC can geolocate the laser source, and provide updated threat position information in real time.

Novateur Research Solutions LLC
20452 Scioto Terrace,
Ashburn, VA 20147
(703) 509-0069

PI: David Tolliver
(412) 983-3558
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1211
The Ohio State University
200K Lazenby Hall, 1827 Neil Ave
Columbus, OH 43210
(614) 292-1424

ID#: N13A-016-0328
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T016      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: On-Board Data Handling for Longer Duration Autonomous Systems on Expeditionary Missions
Abstract:   This STTR Phase I project will demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of novel biologically-inspired computational memory models for on-board exploitation of long-duration sensor data streams to enable autonomous missions in unknown environments. The key innovation in this effort is a computationally and space-efficient computational memory model that is able to: i) handle long-duration data streams; ii) identify informative features in data streams; iii) learn from unlabeled sensor observations; iv) adapt to new scenarios; v) store learned experience in short term and long term memories and their semantic associations; and v) perform prediction and inference using the observations and the learned models. The proposed model provides a framework for modeling and solving a large variety of autonomous learning and prediction problems that arise in UAV and UGV missions. The Phase I effort will include; development of proposed models, solution of UAV and UGV problems using the models, performance optimization for SWaP constrained onboard processing, quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the proposed technologies, and demonstration of proof of concept using real-world data from multiple use-cases. The project will benefit from the Ohio State University’s expertise in computational memory modeling and Novateur Research Solution’s experience in sensor exploitation and onboard processing.

Numerica Corporation
4850 Hahns Peak Drive, Suite 200
Loveland, CO 80538
(970) 461-2000

PI: Philip Toit
(970) 461-2000
Contract #: N68335-13-C-0376
Johns Hopkins University
3400 N. Charles St., Suite W-400, Wyman Park Center
Baltimore, MD 21218
(410) 516-8668

ID#: N13A-003-0041
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T003      Awarded: 8/15/2013
Title: Maneuver Prediction and Avoidance Logic For Unmanned Aircraft System Encounters with Non-Cooperative Air Traffic
Abstract:   For Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) to operate seamlessly in both the U.S. National Airspace System (NAS) and abroad, it will be crucial that they possess a sense-and-avoid (SAA) capability that can ensure safe operations among maneuvering, non-cooperative aircraft. Numerica Corporation, in partnership with Johns Hopkins University, proposes to develop a set of algorithms to model the uncertainties associated with maneuvering aircraft, update these representations in real-time using encounter-specific information, and then use them to estimate conflict risk and plan avoidance maneuvers. An important feature of the proposed approach is the development of an avoidance-based measure of conflict risk that is based on the coupling between possible maneuvers of an uncertain intruder and resulting avoidance responses of theownship. This would extend the typical "blunder scenario" measure of risk for the purpose of: (i) reducing the occurrence of unnecessary maneuvers triggered by the SAA system, (ii) understanding the relationship between advanced sensor capabilities and improved safety, and (iii) informing hardware requirements for an SAA system operating in Visual Flight Rules (VFR) type environments.

Ocean Acoustical Services and Instrumentation Syst
5 Militia Drive,
Lexington, MA 02421
(781) 862-8339

PI: Anthony Eller
(781) 862-8339
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1166
Penn. State University
201 Old Main,
University Park, PA 16802
(814) 865-1724

ID#: N13A-026-0030
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T026      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Improving the Physics of Applied Reverberation Models
Abstract:   The proposed work will address the core physics underlying acoustic reverberation as related to properties of the ocean environment and properties of the acoustic sources, receivers and waveforms that make up ocean-going acoustic systems of interest to the U.S. Navy. Present day active acoustic system performance models, which contain reverberation models as an essential component, are over twenty years old. At the same time, new applications for models come with new requirements as to their faithfulness to physics and execution speed. Several deficiencies are identified in current applied models, based on their deteriorating ability to meet the new demands. Many of these deficiencies can be addressed by on-going developments in related basic research programs. The proposed work matches the modeling gaps to research progress and outlines an approach for implementing new or modified algorithms and incorporating them into existing models in order to remedy the known deficiencies.

Oceanit Laboratories, Inc.
Oceanit Center, 828 Fort Street Mall, Suite 600
Honolulu, HI 96813
(808) 531-3017

PI: Fred Cowell
(808) 531-3017
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1174
Johns Hopkins
Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road
Laurel, MD 20723
(240) 228-5089

ID#: N13A-027-0189
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T027      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Wide Spectral Band Laser Threat Sensor
Abstract:   We propose a solution to the Navy’s laser weapons warning problem. The proposed solution employs a combined approach of extending the wavelength spectrum and dynamic range of current State of the Art laser warning systems. The proposed wide optical bandwidth will be achieved by adapting previously developed methods. The system will exploit on going design work created for visible multi-threat optical systems and leverage advances in FPA technologies. The optical bandwidth will require multiple diffraction gratings integrated with reflective wide FOV optics. FPA enhancements will address anticipated dynamic range requirements

Optimal Solutions Software LLC
PO Box 2427,
Idaho Falls, ID 83403
(208) 569-4942

PI: Mark Landon
(208) 521-4660
Contract #: N68335-13-C-0373
University of Michigan
Wolverine Tower, 3003 South State Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
(734) 764-8566

ID#: N13A-002-0207
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T002      Awarded: 8/15/2013
Title: Modeling of Integrally Bladed Rotor (IBR) Blends
Abstract:   The overall goal of this Phase I project is to show the feasibility of using state-of-the-art parameterization tools for shape changes (i.e., volumetric deformation/morphing provided by Sculptor) coupled with a fast FEA tool (i.e., the MAX method) to quickly calculate the dynamic response of the many different shapes necessary for sample-based stochastic vibration analysis of IBRs with blends. The PI’s MAX method is the basis for a robust and computationally effective technology for dynamic analysis. The MAX method allows for quick FEA analysis of different blend shapes for statistical investigations. Current state-of-the-art FEA analysis of industrial models, with several thousands of separate calculations (samples) for stochastic investigations, requires prohibitively long computation time for any realistic results. For example, it is not unusual for a single dynamic analysis of a single IBR to require over 10 days of CPU time. In contrast, the MAX method is expected to require only a few seconds of CPU time. The combination of the MAX method and the mesh morphing technology provided by Sculptor will enable the analysis of blends with arbitrary shape.

OptoNet
828 Davis Street, Suite 206,
Evanston, IL 60201
(847) 722-6980

PI: Yingyan Huang
(847) 722-6980
Contract #: N68335-13-C-0379
Northwestern University
633 Clark St,
Evanston, IL 60208
(847) 491-2103

ID#: N13A-005-0285
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T005      Awarded: 8/15/2013
Title: Ultra-Low-RF-Power Ultra-Wide-RF-Bandwidth High-Optical-Power Low-Loss Wide-Temperature Semiconductor Electro- Optic Modulators based on Silicon-Photon
Abstract:   The proposed project will undertake the research, design, and development of key concepts and technologies for a very- low-voltage high-speed semiconductor electro-optic modulator. Low-voltage high-speed optical intensity modulators with voltage 100GHz, and low optical loss <65%.

OPTRA, Inc
461 Boston Street,
Topsfield, MA 01983
(978) 887-6600

PI: Craig Schwarze
(978) 887-6600
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1170
Tufts University
20 Professors Row,
Medford, MA 02155
(617) 627-5187

ID#: N13A-027-0158
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T027      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: High Dynamic Range CMOS Laser Threat Sensor
Abstract:   The proliferation of laser based weapons systems has led to the need for laser threat sensor systems that operate over wide spectral range from the visible to infrared and provide sufficient dynamic range to measure the irradiance levels seen in practice. OPTRA, Inc. proposes a solution based on the complementary combination of CMOS readout integrated circuitry and diffractive optics to provide the full set of threat characterization metrics. In the Phase I R&D effort, OPTRA, Inc. will develop optical and electronics models, perform tradeoff analyses, predict system performance, and develop a SWaP estimate.

Pacific Science & Engineering Group, Inc.
9180 Brown Deer Road,
San Diego, CA 92121
(858) 535-1661

PI: Harvey Smallman
(858) 535-1661
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1192
Georgia Tech Research Corporation
505 Tenth Street NW,
Atlanta, GA 30332
(404) 385-7686

ID#: N13A-020-0226
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T020      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Proactive Contextual Decision Support for Decision Making Under Uncertainty
Abstract:   Decision making is driven by context. Context can be hard to operationalize and harness to the design of decision support systems. Modern military task displays often omit important context which can lead to singificant errors. This problem is exemplified in undersea warfare and specifically contact management for safe littoral navigation. In littoral navigation, workload may be high and team members operating in discrete roles may proceed without awareness of important general context. This proposal addresses these issues by pairing PSEês expertise in designing scientifically principled interfaces to support challenging cognitive and collaborative tasks with Georgia Techês expertise in the cognitive science of the role of context in decision making. This proposal uses contact management and navigation in the littoral environment as an illustrative test case for the creation of PDS elements that integrate context into decision tools. Critically, rather than indiscriminate the unprincipled addition of context to current decision tools, we will utilize current decision science research to incorporate context into decision systems in a scientifically principled, intelligent, and effective way. Our proposal outlines the steps needed to combine current research with practice to create concept PDS elements supporting modern operational decision-making through the effective and appropriate integration of context.

Patagonia Flow Dynamics LLC
895 Maplewood Dr. NE,
Coralville, IA 52241
(319) 541-7944

PI: Pablo Carrica
(319) 541-7944
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1213
The University of Iowa
300 S Riverside Dr,
Iowa City, IA 52246
(319) 335-5597

ID#: N13A-009-0043
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T009      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: High Efficiency Computation of High Reynolds Number Flows for Moving Objects
Abstract:   The objective of this proposal is to demonstrate a new method that will make possible the treatment of large-scale problems with current computational resources. The idea behind the proposed technique is the use of analytical rotated overset grids to define the geometry. Instead of exactly fitting the bodies, an immersed boundary technique will be used, allowing the use of cylindrical, Cartesian, spherical, elliptic or other analytical orthogonal grids to cover the whole computational domain. Since the geometry of these grid topologies have explicit analytical equations, the donor search and optimization algorithms needed for the overset domain connectivity become extremely efficient. The proposed approach then can combine highly scalable algorithms for the solution of the CFD problem in orthogonal grids along with the advantages of overset grids. Phase II of this proposal will result in a highly scalable and accurate CFD code for moving/deformable objects such as a towed array and the towing vehicle.

Physical Sciences Inc.
20 New England Business Center,
Andover, MA 01810
(978) 689-0003

PI: Hartmut Legner
(978) 689-0003
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1202
West Virginia University
Manager Sponsored Programs, WVU Office of Sponsored Progra
Morgantown, WV 26506
(304) 293-3998

ID#: N13A-015-0275
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T015      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Ship Wake Velocity Mapping Using InstantEye MAV
Abstract:   Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) and their academic partner, West Virginia University (WVU), are pleased to propose a uniquely innovative approach to measuring the three-dimensional air wake velocity field behind ship structures and towers. The velocity data is needed to support the validation of CFD models that will ultimately be used to provide sufficient safety margins for ship aircraft operations under extreme weather and sea-state conditions. PSI will employ its proven Instant Eye micro-air vehicle (MAV) in order to measure the entire 3D air wake velocity field as well as specific air wake flow features, such as downwash behind the stern and concentrated vortical regions stemming from the flow past the blunt-ship structures. The proposed approach will integrate a five-hole pitot probe with appropriate pressure transducers onto the Instant Eye MAV and use it to map the velocity field. Phase I measurements will be conducted behind a moving truck, a stationary truck in a large wind tunnel with existing experimental data and CFD and behind an operational Navy ship. These three measurement campaigns will establish the feasibility of the Instant Eye integrated measurement system and pave the way for the prototype development in Phase II.

Physical Sciences Inc.
20 New England Business Center,
Andover, MA 01810
(978) 689-0003

PI: Bernard Casse
(978) 689-0003
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1190
Sandia National Laboratories, NM
P.O. Box 5800,
Albuquerque, NM 87185
(505) 284-5701

ID#: N13A-017-0119
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T017      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: High-Temperature Metamaterial Emitter For Thermophotovoltaics
Abstract:   Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), in collaboration with Sandia National Laboratories, proposes to develop a high energy density (HED) power source based on the principles of thermophotovoltaics (TPV). The core technology of the HED power source is a novel high-temperature, spectrally-selective metamaterial emitter with a tailored emission spectrum matched to the external quantum efficiency spectrum of a low-bandgap PV cell. The focus of the Phase I effort is to engineer the metamaterial emitter and demonstrate coupling to Sandia’s existing PV cells, with expected TPV efficiency of at least 20% and output power density of 1.5 W/cm2. In Phase II, a full-fledged HED power source, with anticipated TPV efficiency of ~30% and power density of 2.5 W/cm2, incorporating both an enhanced metamaterial emitter and a new state-of-the-art PV cell will be demonstrated.

PowerTHRU Corporation
11825 Mayfield Street,
Livonia, MI 48150
(734) 853-5477

PI: Jim Diroff
(734) 853-5477
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1205
Michigan State University
Composite Materials and Struct, 2100 Engineering Building
East Lansing, MI 48824
(517) 353-5466

ID#: N13A-022-0134
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T022      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Development of Next-Generation Composite Flywheel Design for Shock and Vibration Tolerant, High Density Rotating Energy Storage
Abstract:   PowerTHRU Corporation proposes to meet or exceed the requirements of this STTR by utilizing its extensive experience in carbon fiber based high speed flywheel systems, to design and build a 100K RPM flywheel system. Unlike steel flywheel technologies that are limited by the speed in which they can safely rotate, PowerTHRU has already demonstrated that 50,000 RPM carbon fiber flywheels can be designed and operated safely in the commercial and military markets by distributing over 950 active systems from 2004 - 2012. PowerTHRU shall rely on that field level experience to achieve 100K RPM with an increased mass. THE BENEFIT to this improved design will offer an immediate opportunity in the commercial UPS industry to bridge the power outage time between loss of grid power and generator start-up, in a safe and efficient manner. THE BENEFIT of the carbon fiber system is that even in the case of an ultimate system failure, it would be a benign event that poses no risk to any personnel or equipment in the area, which allows the system to be used not only in the commercial UPS industry, but also in any military or commercial application that requires pulse power.

Q Peak, Inc.
135 South Road,
Bedford, MA 01730
(978) 689-0003

PI: Kevin Wall
(781) 275-9535
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1164
Univ of California, Santa Barbara
UC Santa Barbara, 552 University Road
Santa Barbara, CA 93106
(805) 893-8000

ID#: N13A-023-0268
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T023      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Solid-State Green Laser
Abstract:   Green laser sources are important in advanced naval mine detection as this wavelength has good penetration though seawater. Mine detection programs such as the Coastal Battlefield Reconnaissance and Analysis (COBRA) system and the Airborne Laser Mine Detection System (ALMDS) currently use frequency-doubled 1-µm lasers as the laser source. The generation of green laser light via frequency doubling of a 1-µm laser has typical conversion efficiencies that are ~50% for the process. For unmanned vehicles or manned platforms with limited space and power, the loss in efficiency due to frequency doubling impacts size, weight, and power. It is highly desirable to develop a solid-state laser whose primary wavelength is in the green and does not require frequency doubling. Laser sources for naval mine detection require 1 - 5 ns pulses, pulse energies of greater than 100 mJ, and average powers of ~ 50W. In this STTR program, we propose to study the feasibility of constructing a diode-pumped solid-state laser source that meets these requirements.

RDRTec Inc.
3737 Atwell St., Suite 208
Dallas, TX 75209
(214) 353-8755

PI: Sidney Theis
(214) 353-8755
Contract #: N68335-13-C-0375
MIT Lincoln Laboratory
244 Wood Street,
Lexington, MA 02420
(781) 981-5018

ID#: N13A-003-0188
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T003      Awarded: 8/15/2013
Title: Maneuver Prediction and Avoidance Logic For Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Encounters with Non-Cooperative Air Traffic
Abstract:   RDRTec Inc. and Lincoln Laboratory propose to establish the feasibility and develop the plan for an extensible analytic framework and methodology to address unanticipated maneuver encounter modeling, collision risk estimation, and ownship maneuver logic. With the widespread introduction of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), the nature of the airspace will change significantly over the next 10-20 years as they are fully integrated into both segregated and non- segregated airspace. New procedures and technologies will be required to ensure safe airspace operations via conflict avoidance while accommodating increasing traffic demands. Conflict avoidance has two main functions; Collision Avoidance (CA) and self-separation. Self-Separation (SS) can be thought of as strategic planning between aircraft by either the Air Traffic Control (ATC) or a future Sense And Avoid (SAA) system to maintain a “well clear” separation so that collision avoidance maneuvers are not required. Collision avoidance is a time critical action that must be taken by each pilot or the SAA system to avoid a collision if the aircraft have failed to maintain a well clear separation.

Robotic Research LLC
555 Quince Orchard Road, Suite 300
Gaithersburg, MD 20878
(240) 631-0008

PI: Alberto Lacaze
(240) 631-0008
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1186
Southwest Research Institute
6220 Culebra Rd.,
San Antonio, TX 78238
(210) 684-5111

ID#: N13A-016-0331
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T016      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: LEARNING-BASED APPROACH FOR RELEVANT DATA EXTRACTION (LARDE)
Abstract:   Autonomous systems continue to be outfitted with larger amounts of sensors that are capable of collecting extremely large amounts of data over the course of a mission. Even autonomous systems with high storage capacities can run into storage limitations when burdened with large amounts of sensor data over long mission durations. This proposal will develop a Learning-based Approach for Relevant Data Abstraction (LARDA) from a set of sensors that produce a large volume of raw data on-board an autonomous system. LARDA will generate a data abstraction and handling framework that is generic enough to be useful for a variety of current and future autonomous systems, but specific enough to directly support missions fielded with autonomous systems in the near-term. The core algorithms of this framework will comprise both supervised and unsupervised machine learning techniques to extract, cluster, and label relevant features from sensor data that can support planning and decision-making for future autonomous missions.

Santec Systems, Inc.
2924 Malmo Drive,
Arlington Heights, IL 60004
(847) 215-8884

PI: Jaswinder Sandhu
(847) 215-8884
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1214
Southern Illinois University
1220 Lincoln Dr,
Carbondale, IL 62901
(618) 453-2121

ID#: N13A-011-0171
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T011      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Bondline and Kissing Bond Assessment using Acoustography
Abstract:   This research work aims to demonstrate the feasibility of applying a novel Acoustography technique for the semi- quantitative evaluation of bond shear strength and assessment of adhesive bond quality in airframe sandwich structures. The proposed approach will utilize thermal and mechanical excitation methods to separate the weak/kissing bonds in the adhesively bonded test coupons. Finite element analysis (FEA) will be conducted to design optimal thermal and mechanical excitation sources and to properly model the effects of disbonds in sandwich interface. Coupons consisting of composite epoxy panels bonded to a Ti-alloy, fabricated with predefined phantom disbond defects, shall be the primary focus of this study. A correlation between acoustography results for predicted bond quality in a range of appropriately flawed test specimens (initially fabricated and aged conditions) and the results of shear testing of the flawed specimens will be drawn. In addition, microstructure evaluation of the bonded samples will also be carried out. The proposed method will be portable, easy to use, and will possess the ability to conduct close-to-the-edge and round curvature inspection. In addition, this method will be more reliable for detecting weak/kissing bonds so as to enhance the reliability and reduce the costs during manufacturing and in-service operations.

Securboration Inc
1050 W NASA Blvd, Suite 155
Melbourne, FL 32901
(919) 244-3946

PI: Lee Krause
(321) 591-9836
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1176
Vanderbilt University
5332 Stevenson Center,
Nashville, TN 37235
(615) 332-2762

ID#: N13A-014-0224
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T014      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Progressive Model Generation for Adaptive Resilient System Software
Abstract:   Complex software systems are typically developed by disparate engineering teams working concurrently. At the same time, software requirements are frequently dynamic, evolving even during active development cycles. Discrepancies between how software is defined and how it is implemented at the modular level can cascade into critical system errors when modules are integrated. More troubling is that integration of modules containing poorly specified or poorly tested code can imperceptibly weaken the system from a security perspective, enabling an attacker to exploit undefined program states to exert undue control over the underlying system. The objective of the proposed work is the creation of the Robust Software Modeling Tool (RSMT), which enables software design to be precisely defined incrementally from the ground up by developers and later verified against assumptions that are made top-down by management. This greatly reduces the risk of integrating third party modules into an existing software system. RSMT is an incremental modeling tool that will be implemented as an Eclipse plugin targeting the Java language. It could, however, be extended to apply to virtually any compiled language.

Simmetrix, Inc.
10 Halfmoon Executive Park Drive,
Clifton Park, NY 12065
(518) 348-1639

PI: Ottmar Klaas
(518) 348-1639
Contract #: N68335-13-C-0372
Duke University
220 W. Main St, Ste. 710,
Durham, NC 22705
(919) 684-3030

ID#: N13A-002-0312
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T002      Awarded: 8/15/2013
Title: Modeling of Integrally Bladed Rotor (IBR) Blends
Abstract:   Integrally bladed rotors (IBR), also called blisks, are becoming increasingly common in the compressor and fan sections of modern turbine engines. The integration of the blades and disks into a single part has the advantages of reduced part count, reduced weight, increased reliability, and increased performance. However, a drawback of this technology is that individual blades cannot be easily replaced and thus blending is typically used to resolve minor damage to blades. Blending involves removing material around the damaged area to reduce the stress concentrations that could lead to cracking and subsequent failure. But this process also changes the mechanical, dynamic, and aerodynamic properties of the blisk.This project will combine the expertise of Simmetrix, Duke University and GE to create a system to model the effects of introducing blends into a blisk, giving the ability to accurately predict the structural and aerodynamic effects of such a repair. By being able to model these effects, the blend shape and size can be optimized minimizing the impacts on the performance and reliability of the engine.

Soar Technology, Inc.
3600 Green Court, Suite 600
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
(734) 887-7603

PI: Sven Brueckner
(734) 887-7642
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1179
CUBRC
4455 Genessee Street,
Buffalo, NY 14225
(716) 204-5123

ID#: N13A-024-0113
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T024      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Situational Awareness as a Man-Machine Map Reduce Job
Abstract:   Improving situational awareness and accuracy of decisions in complex missions relying on streaming open-source data requires scalable information extraction and fusion in collaboration between Man and Machine reasoning. SoarTech, with its proven track-record of basic and applied research and transition into actual deployment, will bring forward advanced imagery and text processing technology integrated in a Hadoop-based distribution framework from its academic partners CUBRC and Dr. Corso from the University of Buffalo. The resulting stream of entity and behavior recognition events from large-scale unstructured and uncalibrated raw data from many sources is fused with a continuously adapting agent simulation and extended into probabilistic predictions of alternative futures. Human intelligence and knowledge is effectively integrated throughout the recognition-fusion-prediction process through a task-aware collaboration environment. As equal participants in the ongoing information-fusion process, decision- makers gain a deeper understanding of the current scenario and the impact of decision alternatives, and thus arrive at better decisions.Our proposed objectives for Phase-I include the demonstration of the feasibility of recognition of HADR-mission-relevant entities and behaviors and the feasibility of such recognition and the subsequent fusion/prediction at scale. We also propose to develop initial use-cases, identify target transition partners, and draft key component and system architecture designs.

Southwest Sciences, Inc.
1570 Pacheco Street, Suite E-11,
Santa Fe, NM 87505
(505) 984-1322

PI: David Hovde
(513) 272-1323
Contract #:
University of California
Sponsored Projects Office, 2150 Shattuck Ave, Suite 313
Berkeley, CA 94704
(510) 643-3891

ID#: N13A-019-0319
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T019      Selected for Award
Title: All-Optical Triaxial Magnetometer
Abstract:   Sensitive triaxial magnetometers are needed for shallow water surveillance and other applications. This Phase I STTR project will investigate a novel, all-optical vector magnetometer. Its advantages include stable calibration that results from probing quantum properties, and low cross-talk as a result of the all-optical design. This will greatly simplify calibrations, because multiple sensors can be located next to one another without compromising accuracy. The Phase I research will demonstrate the all-optical measurement principle, show that two different ways of measuring vector components can be combined to provide a more precise estimate of the magnetic field, and determine the size, weight, power and performance likely to be achieved by an instrument that employs the measurement principle. The Phase I option will investigate designs for the magnetometer and its electronics. Successful completion of the Phase I and Option will permit a prototype magnetometer to be built and tested in Phase II.

Spectral Sciences, Inc.
4 Fourth Avenue,
Burlington, MA 01803
(781) 273-4770

PI: Frank Clark
(781) 273-4770
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1209
University of Louisville
580 S Preston St,
Louisville, KY 40202
(502) 852-5990

ID#: N13A-011-0107
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T011      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: A Rapid Optical Approach to Quantitative Composite Bond Quality Assessment
Abstract:   Composite materials are widely used in aircraft to reduce weight and cost, improve structural performance, and boost fuel efficiency. However, composites are susceptible to adhesive bond quality issues, including kissing bonds which may occur because of initial fabrication or service related issues. Detection of such weakened bonds requires an easily used detection approach to routinely monitor composite health of military aircraft. We propose a solution based on three innovations, including this combination: a flexible movable mechanical bulk wave exciter that may be operated in impulse or chirped mode, and a compact lightweight rapid zooming optical imaging approach that can monitor any area from the complete airframe to a specific joint. We identify regions exhibiting suspicious bond quality by detecting the areas of resonance change or reduced damping, as a weakened bond reveals itself in response to mechanical excitation. This technique, called the Fast Imaging Non-Destructive Inspection Technique (FINDIT), can directly and nondestructively test the mechanical properties of composite material. FINDIT quantitatively measures the associated surface tilt-tip surface changes, and may be automated, removing subjective judgment factors. We envision commercial aircraft application in production and normal hangar maintenance, automotive safety, and other areas of composite application such as boats.

Stottler Henke Associates, Inc.
1670 South Amphlett Blvd., Suite 310
San Mateo, CA 94402
(650) 931-2700

PI: Eric Domeshek
(617) 902-2223
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1194
Carnegie Mellon University (CMU)
5000 Forbes Avenue,
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 268-9527

ID#: N13A-020-0151
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T020      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Pro-Active Decision Support (PADS)
Abstract:   Warfighters face overwhelmingly complex and uncertain situations in which they must make life-and- death decisions. Today’s information systems often overwhelm decision makers still further. Attention to results of cognitive science can contribute to the design of a new generation of systems that are far more helpful: based on knowledge of user roles, tasks, and context, systems can help proactively flag decision points; select relevant information and project trends; present information emphasizing relationships to thresholds and deviations from expectations; suggest courses of action based on past experience; and expedite coordination with other parties.We propose to identify decision-making needs in the context of Maritime Operations Centers (MOCs) and align those needs with cognitive science findings on Situation Awareness (SA) and Dynamic Decision Making (DDM). From this combination, we will develop a set of design guidelines. Using those guidelines, we will design and prototype a general and extensible framework for Pro- Active Decision Support (PADS). During Phase I, we will generate use cases associated with MOC staff, identify relevant cognitive science findings, systematize those findings into a set of guidelines, design the general PADS framework, develop a limited proof-of-concept prototype, and elaborate a plan for Phase II technology development and transition.

Technical Data Analysis, Inc.
3190 Fairview Park Drive, Suite 650
Falls Church, VA 22042
(703) 226-4061

PI: Nagaraja Iyyer
(703) 226-4070
Contract #: N68335-13-C-0344
Cornell University
373 Pine Tree Road,
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 255-2945

ID#: N13A-007-0017
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T007      Awarded: 8/15/2013
Title: Multi-scale Peridynamics Theory for Corrosion Fatigue Damage Prediction
Abstract:   TDA and its University partner, Cornell University, first address the stress assisted corrosion crack growth from concurrent multi-scale modeling through atomistic simulations in order to formulate and calibrate mesoscale Peridynamics model. Initially, the multi-scale CADD simulations will utilize reactive force field potentials for the 7075- T6Al in water to simulate stress corrosion cracking and then extend to study the near threshold crack growth behavior in water. Future efforts will utilize appropriate force field potentials for 7075-T6Al under various NaCl concentrations and also refine crack tip simulations using linearly scaled density functional theory inputs. Peridynamic kernel formulations will be investigated for improvement and calibration using the CADD simulations input and also address issues arising from skin effect near the interface and from horizon length to deal with corrosion. Both model predictions will be verified and validated against a variety of laboratory data. Stress-free model predictions will be compared and contrasted with molecular automata methodologies. Utilizing all work efforts, we will also develop appropriate computational strategies in a hybrid framework.

Technosoft Inc.
11180 Reed Hartman Highway,
Cincinnati, OH 45242
(513) 985-9877

PI: Stephen Hill
(513) 985-9877
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1199
Penn State Unv,Applied Research
PO Box 30,
University Park, PA 16804
(814) 867-1552

ID#: N13A-009-0267
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T009      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: High Efficiency Computation of High Reynolds Number Flows
Abstract:   Although advancements in CFD technology and high performance computing have proven to be effective and reasonably accurate in assessing the hydrodynamic performance of naval vessels, the effort required to develop associated analysis models remains a challenging and time consuming task. Decomposing and manipulating the design geometry for mesh construction, while capturing near-field and far-field effects and interactions among moving components, are manual processes and place the heaviest demands on time in the analysis process. An integrated modeling and hydrodynamics analysis framework is proposed. It incorporates a feature-based modeling environment facilitating rapid layout and configuration of vessels automating the creation and parameterization of structured, unstructured, and overset grids. CFD solvers are seamlessly integrated and directly linked with algorithms for mesh refinement and adaptivity. Updating grids in critical flow regions (streamlines, wakes, boundary layers) and management of overset grids around moving components are supported. Distributed-object computing algorithms to process, manage, and enable interoperability among large scale analysis geometry and mesh models are supported. The framework integrates design and analysis processes, seamlessly linking solvers with the modeling and meshing process, enabling rapid development of computationally efficient and accurate hydrodynamic simulations for performance assessment of vessels at the earliest stage of the engineering process.

Twinleaf
848 Alexander Road,
Princeton, NJ 08540
(609) 759-0859

PI: Thomas Kornack
(609) 759-0859
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1162
Princeton University
87 Prospect Avenue, 2nd Floor, PO Box 36
Princeton, NJ 08544
(609) 258-2565

ID#: N13A-019-0026
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T019      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: A Universal, Low-Cost Atomic Magnetometer
Abstract:   We propose to develop a universal atomic magnetometer magnetometer capable of operation as either a three-axis vector atomic magnetometer or a scalar (total field) atomic magnetometer. We furthermore operate the magnetometer in a regime that is inherently free of sources of drift in the lasers or cell to achieve unprecedented low drift at low frequency. The magnetometer is being developed for volume manufacture and is capable of competing with with fluxgate magnetometers on both performance and price.

Vescent Photonics
4865 E. 41st Ave,
Denver, CO 80216
(303) 296-6766

PI: Michael Anderson
(303) 296-6766
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1196
University of Colorado
JILA University of Colorado, 440 UCB
Boulder, CO 80309
(303) 492-7558

ID#: N13A-018-0342
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T018      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Compact, cold-atom clock for Navy field use
Abstract:   Vescent Photonics proposes to develop a compact laser system and integrate it with a cold-atom micro primary standard developed under the DARPA IMPACT program. In phase I we will investigate performance enhancements resulting from immobilizing the cold-atom sample with an optical lattice formed from an optical field whose wavelength is chosen to minimize the differential light shifts between the states of the clock transition in rubidium vapor. The optical lattice can potentially increase the Ramsey interrogation time, reduce collisional broadening, and improve the readout of the hyperfine populations as well as reduce systematic error resulting from motion of the atoms in the microwave interrogation region. A successful Phase I effort will result in a clock design that improves upon stability, accuracy, and size, weight, and power as compared to commercially available primary standards based on cesium. In Phase II a complete laser system will be developed and integrated with a physics package. The Allan variance of the resulting clock will be tested over long times.

VISHWA ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION LLC
32 Orvis Road, 27-4176489
Arlington, MA 02474
(321) 276-0380

PI: Bhargav Gajjar
(321) 276-0380
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1212
Massachusetts Institute of Tech
77 Massachusetts ave,
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 452-3262

ID#: N13A-010-0257
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T010      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: Prehensor for one atmosphere diving suit
Abstract:   Current atmospheric diving suits and remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) have end effectors with simply 1 DOF. This rudimentary manipulation results in excessive time spent working a problem underwater, development of task specific tools that can be operated by the pliers or acceptance that a specific job simply can't be accomplished. Vishwa Robotics proposes a teleoperated, anthropomorphic end effector that mimics the dexterity of a human hand that would provide significant benefit to the underwater industry by expanding the range of operations a diver in an atmospheric suit, or a pilot of an ROV can accomplish.

Vivonics, Inc.
303 Bear Hill Road,
Waltham, MA 02451
(781) 373-1930

PI: Anna Galea
(781) 373-1930
Contract #: N00014-13-P-1207
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
110 8th Street,
Troy, NY 12180
(518) 276-6176

ID#: N13A-021-0053
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T021      Awarded: 7/1/2013
Title: MICRO system - Miniature Integrated Circuits Reporting Overall status
Abstract:   Continuous physiological monitoring can provide invaluable insight into the status of the person monitored. The right sensors can provide important information related to both the physical and mental state of the subject. Although sensing modalities and the information that can be gleaned from them is a fairly well advanced science, the sensors themselves lag behind in terms of being sufficiently unobtrusive and wearable. A near-term solution is possible by combining known engineering solutions in a novel way. By building on well understood technologies, our team is poised to prepare rugged miniature sensors that are embedded in a flexible adhesive patch and worn directly on the skin. Our system is called “Miniature Integrated Circuits Reporting Overall status” (MICRO). The MICRO system includes sensors for a broad range of physiologic signals. MICRO comprises discrete components on a flexible, stretchable substrate. Each component is less than 2 mm across and fits within the spongy adhesive substrate. MICRO includes power scavenging capabilities which augment an on-board battery, providing extended operating time. To eliminate wired connections and enable transmission of the data to any desired distance, the antenna is formed directly on to the flexible substrate and is itself flexible in multiple directions simultaneously.

Weidlinger Associates, Inc.
40 Wall Street, 18th Floor
New York, NY 10005
(202) 649-2444

PI: Marcus Rutner
(212) 367-2951
Contract #: N68335-13-C-0346
Southern Research Institute
2000 Ninth Avenue South,
Birmingham, AL 35205
(205) 581-2378

ID#: N13A-008-0258
Agency: NAVY
Topic#: N13A-T008      Awarded: 8/15/2013
Title: Interlaminar Mode I and Mode II Fracture Toughnesses in Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs)
Abstract:   Susceptibility to delamination is one of the major weaknesses of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Knowledge of the resistance of composite to interlaminar fracture is essential for life cycle prediction analyses of structural components. The current test method for Mode I-interlaminar fracture toughness, the double cantilevered beam (DCB), is not satisfactory for thin CMC specimens because the compliance of the cantilever arms yields a spurious energy release rate. For Mode II-interlaminar fracture toughness testing, the end notched flexure (ENF) test is the most popular, but this test is not a standardized test method as yet. CMC components are in heavy demand for parts subjected to high heat. However, elevated temperature creates more severe conditions for interlaminar fracture toughness testing. A need exists, therefore, for reliable Mode I- and Mode II-interlaminar fracture toughness test methods which are applicable to a wide range of CMC materials, allowing for quantification of Mode I and Mode II-fracture toughness and accounting for the effects due to complexity of ply architecture at room temperature and elevated temperature up to 1316C (2400F). We propose several alternative methods, and a means to evaluate them using finite element analysis and actual testing. We will refine and downselect the methods to standardize an efficient, accurate testing approach.