SITIS Archives - Topic Details
Program:  SBIR
Topic Num:  N07-001 (Navy)
Title:  Ballistic Exhaust Grille
Research & Technical Areas:  Ground/Sea Vehicles, Materials/Processes

Acquisition Program:  DRPM Advanced Amphibious Assault (DRPM AAA) ACAT I
 RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN NATIONALS: This topic is “ITAR Restricted”. The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120-130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data. Foreign nationals may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign national who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal may be rejected.
  Objective:  Research, design and build a high flow rate ballistic exhaust grille that allows directional output control.
  Description:  The Marine Corps EFV is a 76,000 lb armored and tracked troop carrier designed to operate over harsh off-road terrain and in oceans and rivers. The current cooling outlet armor grilles are grilles affixed to the hull that are used to protect the heat exchangers from ballistic damage. The current design is limited due to competing requirements: 1) The design must maintain ballistic performance, 2) must allow for airflow, and 3) must also reduce vehicle infrared signature. Material selection has been difficult due to the extreme operating environment which ranges from -25F to 200F, hot dessert blowing sand to full salt water immersion. The EFV is looking to create a cooling outlet armor grille or simple design that allows for increased air flow and directional flow control capabilities while maintaining ballistic protection against 14.5mm API B32 at 0 degrees elevation and the 99th percentile 155mm fragment simulated using the 20mm FSP.

  PHASE I: The contractor shall conduct research into lightweight ballistic materials for use on the EFV, keeping in mind the environment in which those materials will be used. Based on their research, the contractor shall create a conceptual design including estimated weight, cost and performance characteristics (i.e. air flow, temperature extremes, estimated life, functionality, etc.)
  PHASE II: The contractor shall manufacture a prototype and conduct ballistic and airflow testing to validate their design meets EFV required performance levels.

  PHASE III: The contractor shall manufacture ballistic cooling exhaust grilles for use on the EFV. This technology is directly applicable to large military vehicles such as the Army’s FCS and facilities that require ballistic protection and must still maintain exhaust air flow. PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/

  DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: This technology may be used in the commercial sector to maintain airflow in harsh environments that may include high speed fragments and high pressure explosions.

  References:  1. EFV S/SS Specification Rev H. dated 21 June 21, 2006. 2. MIL-STD-810F Environmental Test Methods and Engineering Guidelines 3. MIL-STD-889B Dissimilar Metals 4. AR 70-75 Survivability of Army Personnel and Materials

Keywords:  Ballistic; Grille; Airflow; lightweight; exhaust; cooling; all-weather

Additional Information, Corrections, References, etc:
EFV Ballistic Exhaust Grille Photos.pdf
EFV Ballistic Exhaust Grille Photos.pdf
Ref #1: EFV SSS RevJ_thru_P00247.doc
Ref #1: EFV SSS RevJ_thru_P00247.doc

Questions and Answers:
Q: What is the maximum required operating temperature (air flow) for the exhaust grille?
A: The temperature and air flow listed on the drawing is what the grille should be designed to handle. The normal operating temperature and airflow is equal to the maximum, because the system is designed to operate at max output.
Q: What is the thickness of the louvres that are on the exhaust grille and what is the material that they are made of?
A: The current Louver design is proprietary and cannot be published. The current design should not influence any proposed designs. The design envelope is detailed in the drawing posted on the website.
Q: Please clarify:
1. Does the drawing intend to show what the grille is supposed to be attached to on the vehicle?

2. Does the part shown in the drawing represent flanges and attachment points that are currently on the vehicle?
A: 1. The drawing shows the housing the current louvers are attached to.

2. The attachment points on the housing currently fit into the existing design. If someone used the current housing, they would be guaranteed to fit into the existing design with no other vehicle retrofit required. Although, it is not required that you use the current housing, you should detail what the interface may look like in your proposal if you have a large departure from the existing housing.
Q: What is the maximum required operating temperature (air flow) for the exhaust grille?
A: The temperature and air flow listed on the drawing is what the grille should be designed to handle. The normal operating temperature and airflow is equal to the maximum, because the system is designed to operate at max output.
Q: 1. Is there a flow requirement (gallons per minute?) for water to drain from the grille?
2. Is the housing removable from the EFV or is it a fixed port/cavity?
A: 1. There is no specific water flow requirement. Flow is currently gravity fed, and not the limiting flow requirement for the exhaust grilles.

2. The housing as detailed in the drawing is removable from the EFV.
Q: Regarding to the protective coatings, will it be considered systematic on the EFV level (i.e. after the grille is made), or it must be considered in the manufacturing of the grille?
A: Depending on how intricate the proposed design is, it may be smart to coat the system during manufacturing. There is not a system level protective coating besides CARC paint.
Q: 1. Can you provide a sketch and/or photos of the area on the vehicle?
2. Can you provide baseline airflow requirements?
3. Are there preferred airflow directions for various operating conditions?
A: 1. A drawing on the current space claim for the ballistic exhaust grille as well as a couple of pictures to show their relative location on the vehicle is posted on SITIS.

2. Airflow requirements are detailed on the drawing.

3. There are no specific requirements for directional control in specific operating conditions. The hope is that we can have flexibility in the design to allow crew and troop preference while in the field.
Q: What is the thickness of the louvres that are on the exhaust grille and what is the material that they are made of?
A: The current Louver design is proprietary and cannot be published. The current design should not influence any proposed designs. The design envelope is detailed in the drawing posted on the website.
Q: Please clarify:
1. Does the drawing intend to show what the grille is supposed to be attached to on the vehicle?

2. Does the part shown in the drawing represent flanges and attachment points that are currently on the vehicle?
A: 1. The drawing shows the housing the current louvers are attached to.

2. The attachment points on the housing currently fit into the existing design. If someone used the current housing, they would be guaranteed to fit into the existing design with no other vehicle retrofit required. Although, it is not required that you use the current housing, you should detail what the interface may look like in your proposal if you have a large departure from the existing housing.
Q: 1. Is there a flow requirement (gallons per minute?) for water to drain from the grille?
2. Is the housing removable from the EFV or is it a fixed port/cavity?
A: 1. There is no specific water flow requirement. Flow is currently gravity fed, and not the limiting flow requirement for the exhaust grilles.

2. The housing as detailed in the drawing is removable from the EFV.
Q: Regarding to the protective coatings, will it be considered systematic on the EFV level (i.e. after the grille is made), or it must be considered in the manufacturing of the grille?
A: Depending on how intricate the proposed design is, it may be smart to coat the system during manufacturing. There is not a system level protective coating besides CARC paint.
Q: 1. Can you provide a sketch and/or photos of the area on the vehicle?
2. Can you provide baseline airflow requirements?
3. Are there preferred airflow directions for various operating conditions?
A: 1. A drawing on the current space claim for the ballistic exhaust grille as well as a couple of pictures to show their relative location on the vehicle is posted on SITIS.

2. Airflow requirements are detailed on the drawing.

3. There are no specific requirements for directional control in specific operating conditions. The hope is that we can have flexibility in the design to allow crew and troop preference while in the field.

Record: of