SITIS Archives - Topic Details
Program:  SBIR
Topic Num:  AF071-105 (AirForce)
Title:  Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Structures for Vanes and Exhaust Nozzle Components
Research & Technical Areas:  Air Platform, Materials/Processes

  Objective:  Reduce the cost and cycle time to manufacture CMC vanes and exhaust nozzle structures for gas turbine engine applications.
  Description:  Requirements for advanced propulsion systems call for significant increases in performance. CMCs offer a huge potential to increase the performance of gas turbine engines by enabling increased engine temperatures. However, today's cost of CMCs make wide implementation impractical. Advanced manufacturing techniques can reduce the cost and cycle time to implement advanced CMCs in gas turbine engines for vanes and exhaust nozzles. Particular areas of interest include simulation of CMC manufacturing processes to enable the application of lean manufacturing, weaving process, coating processes, machining, quality control, nondestructive inspection, and effects of defects. Proposals shall demonstrate a reasonable expectation that new manufacturing approaches will lead to lower cost and/or cycle time for producing CMC. The ability to achieve mechanical properties suitable for the particular gas turbine engine application shall also be demonstrated. The potential cost savings and cycle time reductions of the demonstrated processes shall be validated. Commercialization plans and qualification requirements shall be established to offer these new techniques to the aerospace industry for production, transition, and qualification in Phase III.

  PHASE I: Demonstrate the feasibility of innovative manufacturing methods that will result in substantial cost and cycle time reductions to produce CMCs for vanes and exhaust nozzle structures for gas turbine engine applications.
  
  PHASE II: It is encouragd that the small business will team with an engine/ engine parts manufacturer for Phase II, although Phase I interaction is highly encouraged. Fully develop manufacturing techniques developed in Phase I and demonstrate these techniques can enable the cost and/or cycle time reductions claimed. Demonstrate the manufacturing techniques in a pilot-scale manufacturing environment.

  DUAL USE COMMERCIALIZATION: Military application: Military aircraft engines Commercial application: Commercial aircraft engines, power generation turbines, and marine vehicles.

  References:  1. High Temperature Ceramic Matrix Composites, Walter Krenkel, Roger Naslain, and Hartmut Schneider (Editors), January 2002

Keywords:  ceramics, fiber weaving, ceramic matrix composites, lean manufacturing, machining

Questions and Answers:
Q: 1. What maximum temperature, pressure and heating rates are anticipated foe nozzles and vanes?

2. What are approximate dimensions of these components?

3. In what atmosphere do these components operate?
A: This topic is geared towards the F-135, F-136 engines. I would suggest talking to the OEMs - Rolls Royce, Pratt and Whitney, and GE.
Q: 1. What maximum temperature, pressure and heating rates are anticipated foe nozzles and vanes?

2. What are approximate dimensions of these components?

3. In what atmosphere do these components operate?
A: This topic is geared towards the F-135, F-136 engines. I would suggest talking to the OEMs - Rolls Royce, Pratt and Whitney, and GE.

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