SITIS Archives - Topic Details
Program:  SBIR
Topic Num:  AF071-313 (AirForce)
Title:  Windscreen Shielding Integrity Monitor
Research & Technical Areas:  Air Platform

  Objective:  Develop a system for in situ monitoring of the shielding integrity of windows and windscreens on electromagnetically hardened aircraft.
  Description:  Aircraft that are hardened against the effects of nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP), high power microwaves (HPM) or other high intensity radiofrequency (HIRF) environments have electrically conductive screens built into the windows that must be monitored in order to maintain the shielding integrity and battle readiness of the system. Current procedures using external antennas and sensors require the aircraft to be specially configured in order to make the measurement. This is time consuming, and often difficult to do at an operating base during bad weather. This effort is to design and demonstrate a system with sensors that can be built into the aircraft so that only the placement of an external antenna or transmission line is needed to make the measurement. This will allow the hardness of the airframe to be monitored more easily and will save both time and money.

  PHASE I: Perform an initial design and brassboard demonstration of a shielded window monitoring system. Develop an initial commercialization concept and plan.
  
  PHASE II: Design and build a prototype system. Demonstrate the accuracy of the system by comparing it to other measurement techniques currently being used. Develop a business and commercialization plan for a Phase III engineering development and marketing program.

  DUAL USE COMMERCIALIZATION: Military application: Military uses of this technology include hardness surveillance of shielded windows and doors on military aircraft and shielded door gaskets in communications facilities. Commercial application: Civilian sector applications include monitoring of the doors in shielded rooms and communications facilities.

  References:   1. C.E. Baum, “A Spiral-Transmission Line Technique for Detecting Slot Apertures in Shield Enclosures,” Measurement Note 37, Air Force Weapons Laboratory, Kirtland AFB NM, December 1987. 2. C.E. Baum, “Monitor for Integrity of Seams in a Shield Enclosure,” IEEE Trans. On EMC, Vol. 30, No. 3, Aug 1988, and Measurement Note 32, Air Force Weapons Laboratory, Kirtland AFB NM 87117. 3. C.E. Baum, “Monitor for Integrity of Doors in a Shielded Enclosure,” Measurement Note 36, Air Force Weapons Laboratory, Kirtland AFB NM, Nov 1987. 4. C.D. Taylor, F. Marcum, and W.D. Prather, “On Using a Sense Wire to Quantitate the Magnetic Flux Leakage Through an Aperture in an Electromagnetic Shield,” IEEE Trans. on Electromagnetic Compatibility, Vol. 31, No. 4, November 1989 and Measurement Note 38, AFWL, November 1989. 5. W.D. Prather and C.D. Taylor, "Verification of the EMP Hardening of Aircraft Windows and Doors," Hardness Surveillance Memo 2, Air Force Weapons Lab, Kirtland AFB NM, June 1987.

Keywords:  electromagnetics, directed energy, shielding effectiveness, shielding integrity, monitor

Questions and Answers:
Q: 1. Is this a wideband monitoring system?
2. What frequencies or bands are of interest?
A: 1. For this application; the system is set-upped to make frequency domain measurements.

2. For this application the system steps through 100 KHz to 100 MHz at logarithmically spaced increments. However; the band of frequencies of most interest are those between 1 MHz to 10 MHz. The sweep time is set for 120 seconds and the bandwidth for each frequency set for 100 Hz.
Q: 1. Is this a wideband monitoring system?
2. What frequencies or bands are of interest?
A: 1. For this application; the system is set-upped to make frequency domain measurements.

2. For this application the system steps through 100 KHz to 100 MHz at logarithmically spaced increments. However; the band of frequencies of most interest are those between 1 MHz to 10 MHz. The sweep time is set for 120 seconds and the bandwidth for each frequency set for 100 Hz.

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