SITIS Archives - Topic Details
Program:  SBIR
Topic Num:  CBD07-111 (CBD)
Title:  Nanotechnology Supported Aerosolized Collection Methods for Chem-Bio Threats
Research & Technical Areas:  Chemical/Bio Defense

Acquisition Program:  
  Objective:  The objective is to design and build a portable aerosol sampler that can collect and archive encounters with chemical and biological threat agents. Remote and distributed placement of these samplers of contaminants is ultimately desired.
  Description:  There is a need for the development of short response time (~ <5 seconds) for innovative nano-fiber collection technologies that serve to maintain biological sample integrity/ viability and be flexible for bacteria, viruses and toxins. The development and application of such a new type technology is encouraged to include the use of novel nanotechnology based aerosol collection and have the potential for dual use applications. Aerosol particles should be captured on an electrospun nanofilter strip or material that could be either stored on the filter or released into a small volume of water for further biochemical or microbiological analysis. Potential components of the technology involve use of a nano-filter, created from the soft ionization spinning techniques of nanofibers. The potential aerosol collector will consume less energy, concentrate samples, and provide higher viability and structural integrity of collected bacteria, viruses, and toxins. Finally, the sample collector should be field portable and adhere to the performance specifications needed to meet soldier deployable collection systems. Any system developed must address the flow rate thru the system, concentration and capacity of the filter. In addition, the system should be durable to environmental elements, such as extreme temperatures, salinity fluctuations, and pH variations, and as light weight as possible for soldier’s to carry, use, and place throughout the battlefield environment.

  PHASE I: Complete a conceptual design and demonstrate feasibility of a nanotechnology-based aerosol sampler and has a collection and an archiving capability. The concept design should include: the ability to maintain biological sample integrity/ viability for bacteria, viruses and toxins. As part of the feasibility demonstration, it would be desirable to include tests of the aerosol sampler and its archiving capability.
  PHASE II: Develop and demonstrate a prototype system. Test under a range of controlled material/threat agent concentrations released in the air under various environmental conditions. Apply different analytical procedures for “harvesting” the target stimulant to threat agent. Time, date, and potentially global position (GPS) stamping should provide the needed information for monitoring the archiving capability and dispersal rates.

  PHASE III

  DUAL USE COMMERCIALIZATION: Such a device has broad use applications from monitoring environmental air quality for soldier health that would expand to industrial hygiene applications. Additionally, drones may be adapted to distribute and remotely monitor the samplers.

  References:  1. Fenn, J.B., Mann, M., Chin Kai Meng. 1989. Electrospray ionization for mass spectrometry of large biomolecules. Science, vol. 246, no. 4926,64-71. 2. Tepper G., J. Fenn, R. Kessick, D. Pestov and J. Anderson. 2006 A New Sampler based on Electrically Charged Liquid Nanodroplets. Submitted to IEEE. 3. Morozov, V.N. (2004) Protein microarrays: principles and limitations. In: Protein Microarrays. Ed. M. Schena. Jones and Bartlett Publishers, Chapter 5, pp. 71-105. 4. Morozov, V.N., Morozova, T.Ya. (2005) Active bead-linked immunoassay on protein microarrays. Anal. Chim. Acta, in press.

Keywords:  Aerosol, nano-filter strips, threat agents

Additional Information, Corrections, References, etc:
Ref #1: May be obtained through interlibrary loan/document delivery services.
Ref #1: May be obtained through interlibrary loan/document delivery services.
Ref #2: Available online to IEEE members.
Ref #2: Available online to IEEE members.
Ref #3: ISBN: 0-7637-3127-7 May be obtained through interlibrary loan/document delivery services.
Ref #3: ISBN: 0-7637-3127-7 May be obtained through interlibrary loan/document delivery services.

Questions and Answers:
Q: 1. On the device deployed on a soldier to be carried in battle, are you interested in an analytical readout or alarm that signals in more or less real time that a hazard has been encountered? Hazard ID'd to soldier? Radio'd to command?

2. What level of hazard identity and communication are you looking for on the carried device?

3. Do you envision a secondary unit for local detailed analysis in the field or at a command center?
A: 1. The interest is in an alarm type detector that signals in more or less real time and can archive the encounter. The device would at the same time have a gps time date stamp and potentially have some sort of signal to other nodes or command points.

2. The detectors sensitivity and hazard identity would need to be tested. It would be nice to have wireless communication and transferable data communication to radio and satillite type communications.

3. It is highly desirable to not have a secondary unit for local detailed analysis, but if needed yes, within the field and at command centers.
Q: “Potential components of the technology involve use of a nano-filter, created from the soft ionization spinning techniques of nanofibers.” Can other nanofilter strips/techniques have scope for proof of concept and later can be developed by soft ionization spinning techniques?
A: Yes, other nanofilter strips/techniques can be incorporated into the proof of concept and later be developed by soft ionization spinning techniques.
Q: Is there a special reason, to start with, for using the soft ionization nanofiber spinning technology to fabricate the nano-filters?
A: There is no special reason to start with soft ionization nanofiber spinning technology to fabricate the nano-filters other than some filters produced using this method have been shown to be efficient collectors.
Q: 1. On the device deployed on a soldier to be carried in battle, are you interested in an analytical readout or alarm that signals in more or less real time that a hazard has been encountered? Hazard ID'd to soldier? Radio'd to command?

2. What level of hazard identity and communication are you looking for on the carried device?

3. Do you envision a secondary unit for local detailed analysis in the field or at a command center?
A: 1. The interest is in an alarm type detector that signals in more or less real time and can archive the encounter. The device would at the same time have a gps time date stamp and potentially have some sort of signal to other nodes or command points.

2. The detectors sensitivity and hazard identity would need to be tested. It would be nice to have wireless communication and transferable data communication to radio and satillite type communications.

3. It is highly desirable to not have a secondary unit for local detailed analysis, but if needed yes, within the field and at command centers.
Q: “Potential components of the technology involve use of a nano-filter, created from the soft ionization spinning techniques of nanofibers.” Can other nanofilter strips/techniques have scope for proof of concept and later can be developed by soft ionization spinning techniques?
A: Yes, other nanofilter strips/techniques can be incorporated into the proof of concept and later be developed by soft ionization spinning techniques.
Q: Is there a special reason, to start with, for using the soft ionization nanofiber spinning technology to fabricate the nano-filters?
A: There is no special reason to start with soft ionization nanofiber spinning technology to fabricate the nano-filters other than some filters produced using this method have been shown to be efficient collectors.

Record: of