SITIS Archives - Topic Details
Program:  SBIR
Topic Num:  AF071-028 (AirForce)
Title:  CSAR-X Digital Visionic System
Research & Technical Areas:  Human Systems

 The technology within this topic is restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulation (ITAR), which controls the export and import of defense-related material and services. Offerors must disclose any proposed use of foreign nationals, their country of origin, and what tasks each would accomplish in the statement of work in accordance with section 3.5.b.(7) of the solicitation.
  STATEMENT OF INTENT: Improve Combat Search and Rescue Aircrew Personnel
  Objective:  To develop a digital visionic system to aide combat search and rescue aircrew personnel.
  Description:  The Digital Visionic System (DVS) initiative is a helmet-mounted device primarily for night ground operations or in helicopters with open doors (combat search and rescue missions). Current night-vision goggles operate only in the 625-930 nanometer spectral band, which encompasses part of the visible and near infrared electromagnetic spectrum. However, additional night sky energy is available in longer wave-lengths that night vision goggles cannot see. The two bands with the most interest are the short-wave infrared spectral band (1.1 – 3.5 microns) and the long-wave infrared spectral band (7-15 microns). The shortwave infrared band has a unique ability to see through atmospheric obscurants (e.g. fog), improved detection of camouflage, and detection of out-of-band lasers whereas terrestrial temperatures (people, cars, animals) emit energy in the long-wave infrared band. The higher an object’s temperature, the brighter it appears. However, longer wavelengths are typically absorbed by aircraft canopies/windscreens and therefore to be effective, need to operate where these “windows” are not present. The DVS will be a binocular configuration and feature the following sensors: near-infrared, short-wave infrared, and long-wave infrared. The DVS shall be battery powered and be capable of displaying symbology/imagery from an external source. The weight and size of the configuration shall be minimized to promote user comfort and acceptance. Examples of possible tradeoff considerations are helmet versus body-mounted batteries and wired versus wireless connections for external source connectivity.

  PHASE I: A design of the optimized DVS approach shall be presented. Tradeoff analyses of selected component technologies and human factors issues shall be detailed. Producibility of the selected approach and supportability by life support personnel will be considered
  
  PHASE II: This phase will result in the fabrication of a prototype DVS using the optimized approach as determined by the Phase I effort. The Phase II prototype DVS hardware will be robust enough to undergo laboratory and operational testing. A final report will document the entire DVS program.

  DUAL USE COMMERCIALIZATION: Military application: Applications are primarily for ground personnel who currently use night vision devices and combat search and rescue missions where there are open doors to view through. Commercial application: The applications of a DVS are many and include such areas as surveillance and law enforcement. Additionally, homeland security applications are relevant (border patrol, etc.)

  References:  1. Pinkus, A.R., Task, H.L., Dixon, S.A., Barbato, M.H., Hausmann, M.A., (2003) Twenty-Plus Years of Night Vision Technology: Publications And Patents From The Crew System Interface Division Of The Air Force Research Laboratory At Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, AFRL-HE-WP-TR-2003-0048.

Keywords:  Night-vision goggle, image intensifier tube, short-wave infrared, long-wave infrared, ANVIS HUD

Additional Information, Corrections, References, etc:
Ref #1: available at: http://www.hec.afrl.af.mil/Publications/night/index.html
Ref #1: available at: http://www.hec.afrl.af.mil/Publications/night/index.html

Questions and Answers:
Q: 1. Do you have target languages and domains for speech translation?

2. Is the goal of the SBIR to have other languages translated into English or is it to be Bi-Directional?

3. What level of translation depth do you need. Do you need language modeling in the target language or do you want a surface translation of the words with accurate syntax as a secondary goal?

4. Do you have sample corpora we can study to develop our proposal?

5. At the end of phase I, do you expect a working proto-type system/tool that translates speech from one language to another?
A: I believe there is a mix-up as to the topic the contractor is really interested in.
Q: 1. Do you have target languages and domains for speech translation?

2. Is the goal of the SBIR to have other languages translated into English or is it to be Bi-Directional?

3. What level of translation depth do you need. Do you need language modeling in the target language or do you want a surface translation of the words with accurate syntax as a secondary goal?

4. Do you have sample corpora we can study to develop our proposal?

5. At the end of phase I, do you expect a working proto-type system/tool that translates speech from one language to another?
A: I believe there is a mix-up as to the topic the contractor is really interested in.

Record: of