SITIS Archives - Topic Details
Program:  SBIR
Topic Num:  AF071-218 (AirForce)
Title:  Network-Centric Warfare Radio-Frequency (RF) Real-Time Hardware-In-the-Loop (HITL) Synthetic Battlespace Research Capabilities/Technologies
Research & Technical Areas:  Sensors, Battlespace

  STATEMENT OF INTENT: Develop enabling real-time hardware
  Objective:  Develop enabling real-time hardware-in-the-loop synthetic battlespace simulator technologies to transition network-centric warfare capability-based radio frequency sensor/electronic combat solutions
  Description:  Current RF sensor/electronic combat research methodologies were evolved for platform-centric warfare where the open-air test ranges are utilized to mature, demonstrate, and transition technologies/capabilities to the warfighter. This approach is time-consuming, requiring extensive/costly flight testing. Future combat operations will utilize capabilities-based system of systems (SoS) concepts that enhance combat operations through network-centric warfare. Open-air ranges cannot generate the SoS environments required to develop/transition network-centric warfare RF sensor/electronic combat technologies/capabilities. Real-time HITL synthetic battlespace simulation provides a cost-effective, collaborative research methodology for evolving network-centric warfare RF sensor/electronic combat technologies/capabilities. Approaches are sought that lead to the creation of innovative, dual-use real-time HITL simulator technologies, tools, and methodologies that enable the rapid development/transition of capability-based sensor/electronic combat solutions for network-centric warfare. This research area addresses simulator technologies that could be utilized for evolving advanced RF digital receiver/processor capabilities for specific emitter identification and single/multiship geo-location. The goal of this research is to evolve affordable dual-use real-time HITL simulator technologies, tools, and methodologies that reduce the cost and time required for developing and transitioning network-centric warfare RF sensor/electronic combat capabilities. The dual-use simulator technology base established by this research can be applied to developing advanced networked RF sensors for both commercial and military aircraft.

  PHASE I: Identify real-time simulator technologies for transitioning network-centric warfare RF sensor/electronic combat solutions. Phase I research will define challenges and the Phase II development/demonstration approach. Phase I risk reduction experiments will show the Phase II approach’s feasibility.
  
  PHASE II: The Phase II effort will implement and demonstrate the critical real-time HITL simulator technologies, tools, and methodologies that enable the rapid maturation and transition of network-centric warfare capability-based RF sensor/electronic combat solutions.

  DUAL USE COMMERCIALIZATION: Military application: Real-time HITL synthetic battlespace simulator technologies can be implemented in government laboratories and test ranges for military network-centric warfare research. Commercial application: Real-time HITL synthetic battlespace simulator technologies are dual-use technologies that have commercial applications for markets such as the networked RF sensor industries.

  References:  1. “Network Centric Warfare,” Department of Defense Report to Congress, July 2001. 2. Air Force Link, “Air Force Releases New Mission Statement” 12/8/2005 - WASHINGTON (AFPN) http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123013440

Keywords:  battlespace, network-centric warfare

Questions and Answers:
Q: 1. Are there objective/threshold requirements for the number of network ports?

2. Is MIMO simulation a requirment?
A: 1. There are no objective/threshold requirements for the number of network ports.

2. In order to answer the question we need the term “MIMO simulation” defined.
Q: In follow up to Q2: MIMO stands for Multiple-Inpu Multiple-Output and refers to RF systems communication systems that transmit and receive on multiple antennas; RF simulation for such systems involves implementaion of spatial propagation models to accurately simulate spatial diversity and Angle of Departure/Arrival at multiple transmit/receiver ports. Would a capability of simulating RF propagation and/or synthetic RF sources with spatially accurate characteristics be desired for the application of this topic?
A: MIMO simulation is not a requirement. This research area addresses simulator technologies that could be utilized for evolving advanced RF digital receiver/processor capabilities for specific emitter identification and single/multi-ship geo-location. A capability of simulating RF propagation and/or synthetic RF sources with spatially accurate characteristics could potentially address the geo-location real-time simulation challenge.
Q: 1. Are there objective/threshold requirements for the number of network ports?

2. Is MIMO simulation a requirment?
A: 1. There are no objective/threshold requirements for the number of network ports.

2. In order to answer the question we need the term “MIMO simulation” defined.
Q: In follow up to Q2: MIMO stands for Multiple-Inpu Multiple-Output and refers to RF systems communication systems that transmit and receive on multiple antennas; RF simulation for such systems involves implementaion of spatial propagation models to accurately simulate spatial diversity and Angle of Departure/Arrival at multiple transmit/receiver ports. Would a capability of simulating RF propagation and/or synthetic RF sources with spatially accurate characteristics be desired for the application of this topic?
A: MIMO simulation is not a requirement. This research area addresses simulator technologies that could be utilized for evolving advanced RF digital receiver/processor capabilities for specific emitter identification and single/multi-ship geo-location. A capability of simulating RF propagation and/or synthetic RF sources with spatially accurate characteristics could potentially address the geo-location real-time simulation challenge.

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