SITIS Archives - Topic Details
Program:  SBIR
Topic Num:  A11-034 (Army)
Title:  Long Range, Non-cooperative, Biometric Tagging, Tracking and Location
Research & Technical Areas:  Information Systems, Electronics

Acquisition Program:  PEO Intelligence, Electronic Warfare and Sensors
 The technology within this topic is restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulation (ITAR), which controls the export and import of defense-related material and services. Offerors must disclose any proposed use of foreign nationals, their country of origin, and what tasks each would accomplish in the statement of work in accordance with section 3.5.b.(7) of the solicitation.
  Objective:  Provide Long Range, non-cooperative, biometric detection, in all weather, on an existing UAV payload. Deliver the ability to tag, track, and locate high value targets in environments from urban to rural where user constant tracking is unlikely.
  Description:  Enabling technologies include Predictive methods to enhance TTL even when only sporadic data is received and enhanced facial recognition algorithms are required. The enhanced TTL algorithms build off basic research work that in now ready to transition into an SBIR program. That includes work based on Yu and Zhou for UAV tracking video applications. This is valuable to the warfighter since it will enable correct UAV position determination given a lack of highly accurate POS/NAV systems. This work will be supplemented with basic research work in sparse data prediction of tracking object locations, which in turn enables all weather, urban and cave operation for TTL missions. This overcomes a basic limitation in current TTL operations where inclement weather and objects of interest only appearing periodically from sheltered positions or crowds. The long range portion of the biometrics piece will enable stand-off, non-cooperative identification of high value targets. These three enabling technologies will give the warfighter a new, robust capability in the TTL area.

  PHASE I: Feasibility study and extension of research area in 1) long range biometrics 2) Sporadic data array algorithms and 3) Predictive Location algorithms. The study phase in Phase I will determine the extent of effort, approach, and metrics for Phase II.
  PHASE II: Develop the algorithms that enable the long range, non-cooperative application of biometric and sporadic position and prediction algorithms into a single operational software package for incorporation onto an Airborne UAV platform.

  PHASE III: The completion of this phase would result in a mature technology which would undergo an appropriate demonstration, such Tagging, Tracking and Locating. The system should prove the ability to track object of high value in any weather and when only appearing momentarily throughout the area of interest. This technology is applicable to the BCT Modernization effort. The transition point is into the Bio-NODE ATO-R that I2WD has for an FY 11 Start and into Homeland Defense operations as well as general high value site protection.

  References:  ) Yu and Zhou, “ UAV Tracking Video Applications”, IEEE SYmposium 2) Clark, Hollander, Kepner, Robinson “ Sparse Data Prediction of Tracking Object Locations” , University of Maryland College Park.

Keywords:  Biometrics, Algorithms, Standoff, Non-Cooperative

Questions and Answers:
Q: For this solicitation, do you have in mind large UAVs (e.g. Predator) or small UAVs (e.g. Raven)?
A: Small UAVs.
Q: Regarding the requirement that the system should function with an “existing payload”, should this be interpreted narrowly to allow only current default cameras for existing UAVs to be used, or would it be acceptable to swap-in similar off-the-shelf cameras within existing UAV payload constraints (e.g. weight, size, etc)?
A: Existing payloads means on the UAVs currently, not COTS items that have no current UAV application.

Q: The solicitation mentions enabling “correct UAV position determination”. Is this referring to determining the position of the tracked ground entity using a UAV, or determining the position of the UAV itself?
A: It is aimed at the idea that the UAV angle and the position of the UAV are required in determining the accurate position of the tracked ground entity, however if an approach is found that doesn't require that, then it is ultimately a requirement to track the ground entity.

Q: Could you clarify the meaning of the requirement to develop "sporadic data array algorithms"?

Do methods for predicting the likely image locations of occluded (sporadically visible) target objects constitute "sporadic data array algorithms"? If so, how does this differ from the requirement to develop "predictive location algorithms"?
A: Q: Could you clarify the meaning of the requirement to develop "sporadic data array algorithms"?

A: It means that we don't always have continued tracking of the entity and that the algorithms would have to 'create' the missing information based on data previously collected and future collected data.

Do methods for predicting the likely image locations of occluded (sporadically visible) target objects constitute "sporadic data array algorithms"? If so, how does this differ from the requirement to develop "predictive location algorithms"?

A: Yes that is the meaning, the predictive location algorithms is basically what is implied, except that it is a little more challenging in that we may have a longer time in acquisition points temporarily than normal.

Q: Are approaches which involved the collaboration of multiple UAVs within the scope of the requirements?
A: No..single UAV platforms are required.

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