SITIS Archives - Topic Details
Program:  SBIR
Topic Num:  N113-179 (Navy)
Title:  Automated Radio Frequency (RF) Spectrum Management for Wideband Electronic Warfare (EW) Systems
Research & Technical Areas:  Sensors

Acquisition Program:  PMS-450 Virginia Class (ACAT I)
  Objective:  Modern electronic warfare systems typically operate over very wide bandwidths of up to 40GHz. The goal of next generation WB EW systems is to ensure 100% POI with high dynamic range in order to detect and classify signals of interest (SOI) in dense target environments while reducing size, weight, power (SWaP) and cost. In order to effectively perform in this manner and over these bandwidths, innovative end-to-end spectral processing and analysis improvements are needed from the antenna to the receiver. Current IFM, notch filtering, analog channelization, high speed scanning and automatic gain control technologies as well as digital signal processing techniques can help overcome certain aspects of this problem, but have their own shortcomings with respect to the overall system SWaP, cost and performance. What is needed is an innovative WB (up to 40GHz) RF spectrum management architecture that can tolerate and dynamically adapt in response to large in-band interferers. This will improve the EW system’s ability to effectively detect and classify SOIs in dense, interference dominated RF environments, such as those encountered in the littorals. In other words, an architecture is needed which continually attempts to maximize S/(N+I) over wide bandwidths, but does not significantly increase system SWaP and cost.
  Description:  Modern electronic warfare systems typically operate over very wide bandwidths of up to 40GHz. The goal of next generation WB EW systems is to ensure 100% POI with high dynamic range in order to detect and classify signals of interest (SOI) in dense target environments while reducing size, weight, power (SWaP) and cost. In order to effectively perform in this manner and over these bandwidths, innovative end-to-end spectral processing and analysis improvements are needed from the antenna to the receiver. Current IFM, notch filtering, analog channelization, high speed scanning and automatic gain control technologies as well as digital signal processing techniques can help overcome certain aspects of this problem, but have their own shortcomings with respect to the overall system SWaP, cost and performance. What is needed is an innovative RF spectrum management architecture that can tolerate and dynamically adapt in response to large in-band interferers. This will improve the EW system’s ability to effectively detect and classify SOIs in dense, interference dominated RF environments, such as those encountered in the littorals. In other words, an architecture is needed which continually attempts to maximize S/(N+I) over wide bandwidths, but does not significantly increase system SWaP and cost.

  PHASE I: Develop an innovative and cost effective RF spectrum management architecture which provides 100% POI with a minimum of 70dB (80dB desired) of dynamic range over 18GHz (40GHz desired) and maximizes S/(N&I). Demonstrate the performance of the approach via simulation. Show how the architecture cost vs. performance scales as a function of instantaneous BW and total N+I power (assume both NB and WB interference).
  PHASE II: Implement a scaled prototype of the proposed architecture based on the concept developed in Phase I over a subset of the overall required instantaneous BW. The prototype must provide a means to measure S/(N+I) when connected to an RF input with a BW greater than or equal to the prototype. If possible, a demonstration on a representative system (e.g., radar band EW system) in a laboratory environment is preferred.

  PHASE III: The architecture will be transitioned to one or more Navy EW and airborne early warning programs, such as the AN/BLQ-10 or AN/SLQ-32. This improved architecture will be ideal for Virginia (VA) Block IV/V and Ohio Replacement Program (ORP) to realize the full potential of EW sensor improvements for these platforms. PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/

  DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: The technology developed here for EW sensors should be readily applicable to commercial and military communications systems, radar systems and Counter Radio Controlled IED detection systems.

  References:   1. D.C. Schleher, Electronic Warfare in the Information Age, Artech House, 2001. 2. D.L. Adamy, Introduction to Electronic Warfare Modeling and Simulation, SciTech Publishing, 2006. 3. A Sampling Based Approach to Wideband Interference cancellation, A.M. Haimovich, M.O. Berin, J.G. Teti Jr., IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems, 1998 4. AN/SLQ-32 Technical Manuals (all volumes) SE400 M3 MMO xxx/(U) SLQ 32A (V), Published by Direction of Commander, Naval Sea Systems Command, 1990. 2. PSK EMI Mitigation Requirements Document NSC-Q32-2002-070, Brandon Sisley, 2003.

Keywords:  electronic warfare, interference cancellation, wide band systems, narrowband interference, filtering, automatic gain control

Questions and Answers:
Q: Can you please provide us with a link/site to get the docs shown in Ref. 4?
A: Unfortunately, that document is not available for distribution. It was used as a reference for writing the topic, but will not be provided.
Q: NOTE: Ref. 4 is not available for public distribution at this time, and has been removed (8/9/11).
A: o

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